8 Reasons You Feel Tired All Day

Photo: Antoni Shkraba

Everyone feels physical fatigue at some point in their life—whether it is due to a late night out, staying up watching your favorite TV show, or putting in some extra hours at work.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly 15.3 percent of women and 10.1 percent of men in the US frequently feel tired or exhausted. Tiredness often leads to a wide array of problems. For instance, around 1 in 25 adults report falling asleep at the wheel each month. Almost 72,000 crashes and 44,000 injuries are reported every year due to drowsy driving.

Usually, you will be able to figure out what’s causing fatigue or worsening it. But what if you can’t figure pinpoint the cause of your tiredness. We have researched the possible explanations for why you could be feeling tired constantly.

1.    Cut Back on Caffeine

Everyone knows that coffee keeps you awake. However, consuming too much caffeine will seriously disrupt your sleeping and waking up hours. Caffeine stays in your body for five to six hours. 

Meaning consuming caffeine in the afternoon or evening will interfere with your brain as you try to sleep. A rule of thumb is to have your last cup of caffeine at 3 pm if you can’t switch to healthier options like green tea.

2. There’s a Bigger Issue

Sometimes, there happens to be a bigger issue linked to fatigue that might be best addressed through a doctor’s visit. Sleep disorders are sometimes the underlying cause of tiredness. If you still feel drained after a few weeks of making lifestyle modifications, you will likely need to see a sleep specialist. 

A sleep disorder like sleep apnea could very well be the reason behind your tiredness. Sleep apnea is a condition where your breathing pauses while you sleep. Hence, your brain and body don’t receive enough oxygen at night, leading to daytime fatigue. Sleep apnea is a serious condition that can lead to high blood pressure, poor concentration, a stroke, or heart attack.

3. You’re in a Slump

Sometimes people feel sad to the point that they feel unmotivated to do anything. In other words, they are depressed and in a slump. Your best bet is to talk to your doctor and consider the various treatment options.

Your healthcare provider will be able to prescribe antidepressants or other practices. 

You might also want to consider mental health counseling. Cognitive-behavioral therapy can also help correct negative thoughts and patterns that lead to a negative mood and depression.

4. You Sleep Too Much or Too Little

A lack of sleep is obviously the primary reason behind your tiredness. Yet, nearly one in three US adults are not getting enough sleep consistently.

Most adults require seven hours of sleep or more for optimal health. By getting less, or more than the recommended hours of sleep every night, you are putting yourself at the risk of fatigue, impaired performance, and a greater risk of accidents, including obesity, depression, heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, and increased risk of death.

Practicing better sleep habits like maintaining a consistent sleep routine, avoiding naps, limiting time awake in bed to five to ten minutes, ensuring your bedroom is dark and quiet and avoiding tobacco and alcohol before bed.

If your sleep doesn’t improve, it might be a good idea to contact your healthcare provider to discuss whether you have a sleep-related medical issue, like insomnia, restless legs syndrome, or obstructive sleep apnea.

5. Being Too Active

Too much exercise during the day is a natural contributor to the feeling of physical exhaustion. The feeling of tiredness that affects your body and mind happens when you don’t completely recover from the workout.

Try to cut back on the hours spent exercising and ensure you are fully hydrated. Fuelling up before a workout session is also essential to avoid fatigue and exhaustion. Consume enough carbohydrates, proteins, and fats for energy.

6. Your Body is Reacting to Something

There are several tablets and pills that can make you feel drained, like antihistamines. Often, people don’t link the two, even if it is clearly mentioned in the side effects. If you are on medication, this might be what’s making you feel tired. Or perhaps, it is a combination of tablets that don’t work well when taken together. Chat with your doctor to figure out the exact reason.

Furthermore, other factors like a specific scent/smell, skincare products, prescription glasses that aren’t properly adjusted can also cause fatigue. If the latter is something you think might be the reason, switch out your current glasses to affordable progressive glasses. It will help fix vision problems and reduce associated fatigue.

7. Being Indoors

If you spend most of the day indoors, working in the office, or staying at home all day before going to bed, you probably lack fresh air and sunshine. Fresh air is essential to get your daily dose of oxygen and sunlight for vitamin D. Together; these elements will boost your immune system, making you less likely to fall sick.

Try to get outdoors during lunchtime or consider going for evening walks. During summers, open the windows and doors to let fresh air and sunshine reach your house.

8. You Need New Bedding

Feeling too hot or too cold in bed will affect your sleep quality, leaving you feeling drained the upcoming morning. Increased temperatures make it hard for your body to drift off, meaning more tossing and turning than usual. However, sleep with the windows open, and light and noise keep you up.

Your ideal solution is to invest in good bedding —mattress, pillows, and sheets. A light cotton sheet is ideal during summers, whereas warm materials are perfect for winters. Additionally, buying the right pillow and mattress to support your neck and spine and prevent back pain is equally important.

Finding a Way Out of Tiredness

There are several reasons you could be feeling so tired all the time — from early mornings to late nights and more severe health conditions, such as insomnia. Tiredness makes it hard to live your life to the full in the long run. A few lifestyle changes can help. But if it doesn’t, ensure you consult a healthcare provider at the earliest.