Sundara Karma – Live at Brixton O2 Academy

Reading four-piece Sundara Karma played their biggest ever headline show on 5th October to a delirious crowd at Brixton O2 Academy. Comprised of vocalist/guitarist Oscar Pollock, drummer Haydn Evans, bassist Dom Cordell, and guitarist Ally Baty, the indie pop/rock band has been making music since the tender age of fourteen.

With support from Willie J. Healey and The Magic Gang, the quartet kicked off their gig with gothic number ‘Another Word for Beautiful’, before launching into the more upbeat crowd pleasers ‘A Young Understanding’ and ‘Loveblood’.

The evening saw the band play the entire ‘Youth Is Only Ever Fun In Retrospect’ album, intertwined with a few old favourites such as ‘Flame’, ‘Run Away’ and ‘In the Night’; much to the delight of their captivated fans, who sang along with Pollock word for word on almost every track. The androgynous frontman even jumped into the crowd during ‘Vivienne’.

“Is heaven such a fine thing?” Pollock sang on ‘Olympia’, bathed in the blue luminescence of the stage, which shifted to red as the gig progressed, three white orbs glowing behind him. 

Ending their set with ‘Explore’, Drummer Haydn Evans cast his sticks into the crowd before the band exited the stage to a fittingly roaring applause.

Sundara Karma’s lyrics might be about the trials and tribulations of youth, but their evolved sound offsets their young years. Filled with entrancing guitar riffs and soaring vocals, a live show with them is not to be missed.

Words Aimee Phillips

FAULT Magazine Travel Essential #21 – LUSH Toothy Tabs

 

This travel season, FAULT Travel have been over the world trying to find the best destinations for summer 2017 but unfortunately, all the hours in the air haven’t done wonders for our beauty regimes. To combat this, we’ve selected the best products which helped us keep our beauty regiment on track whilst on the move.

Today, we’re turning to oral hygiene and we’ve found the best toothpaste for you to pack into your in-flight luggage. We say “toothpaste” but in fact, it isn’t a paste at all; it’s a tablet.

 

Regardless what class you fly, you’ll never get a phenomenal night’s sleep while travelling and uncomfortable sleep will usually lead to an uncomfortable awakening. Packing toothpaste whether in your carry-on or checked luggage is always a pain, you either risk it bursting in your luggage and if you’re not planning to check your luggage – you’re going to have to specifically find a tiny tube which is under the liquid allowance of the airport you’re flying out from. However, Lush have created the answer to all our woes with their latest line of Toothy tabs!

With a 22 hour flight on the horizon, our travel team packed their sample bottles in their carry-ons and were off down under.

Waking up from a very uncomfortable night’s sleep in a middle seat, it was time for an in-flight refresh. I took the ‘Boom’ and ‘Oral Pleasure’ tabs with me. According to the package, one tab is enough however for the sake of the review I wanted to try more of a variety. The tablets are really small but they sure pack a punch. Chewing on the ‘Boom!’ tab, which is infused with powdered charcoal, gunpowder tea, pepper oil and ground chilli, it made for a strangely pleasant brushing sensation to experience first thing. The spicy cola felt like a black of freshness inside my mouth and the packaging did not lie, one tab was truly enough to leave me feeling refreshed and awake for the rest of my journey.

After checking in, it was time to try out the humorously named ‘Oral Pleasure’ tabs. I found the taste was more sweet and far more subtle than the ‘Boom’ tabs. If you’re not one for the big burst of spice, then this flavour would be more up your street. The sweeter taste of passion fruit and electric daisies made for a soothing brush which was great for a just before bed. Both tabs dissolved after a few bites and despite it seeming like a new fangled idea – the act of brushing isn’t too dissimilar to using conventional toothpaste. 

While we primarily planned to focus this review of the uses while in transit, we actually found the tabs very useful throughout the trip and even at home. Throughout summer I packed the tabs on my way to festivals, overnight hikes and even packed them in my “keep fresh” kit for Fashion week. I can recount times previously at all of these where my toothpaste has managed to leak and stain my handbags and other luggage but with these, I was safe from such threats.

In short, we loved the toothy tabs for at home and away! With the added bonus of the toothy tabs being vegan and using natural ingredients, we couldn’t recommend them enough. For more information head over to Lush.com

 

Picture Credit: Lush.com

 

Could The Apple Watch Be The Fashion Editor’s Dream Accessory?

Apple Watch - pre subbing

 

 

Fashion week while glamorous, is never an easy time of year. Traversing from show to show, organising invites among your writers and photographers can be the most hellish time for Fashion Editors. Let your phone run out of battery and you’re dead in the water. This SS16LC:M, FAULT looks to the technology industry to find out what gadgets could truly help us get through it all. This week we look at the much talked about Apple Watch and how, if at all, it helped us get through another tough season of shows.

Wearable tech hasn’t quite been as revolutionary as we once hoped. As we saw with the GoogleGlass, there’s a fine line between useful and gimmicky. On some occasions you’ll find that many of these newfangled devices aren’t being made with their consumer in mind. We’re happy to report that this is not the case with the Apple Watch. While reviews have differed for the device since it’s inception, could it be that the Apple Watch’s home is in fact within the fashion industry…

Design

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Starting with the basics, the strap is interchangeable! Apple naturally offers some great options, our FAULT Faves being their Noir Leather Strap and Link Bracelet. These classic options definitely outclass the sport bands for any style conscious user? we can not recommend wearing any watch to a formal event with a nonmetallic or leather watch strap.

If the Apple made watches don’t float your boat, there are also many 3rd party options for all tastes. In tune with the Apple design ethos, the rounded off rectangular watch face is a very unique and recognisable body design which is also reminiscent of the iPhone 3g. It’s sleek no doubt and I’ve yet to see the rule book on what shape a watch face should take.

Personally, we like it. Not to mention that depending on how you configure the home screen settings, at a glance it can tell you all the urgent and vital information that you may need to know. Being able to see the next show you’re attending without having to trawl through your invites is a big plus for Fashion Editors.

Functionality 

Apple Watch - pre subbing

For us, this was most handy with organising our own individual show schedules. The Apple Watch was able to sync directly with our google calendar which saved us from having to input the data more than once. Being able to follow our schedules, direct from a watch was one of the most lifesaving features throughout LC:M.

To be clear, we aren’t “technophobic” cavemen, before the Apple Watch we weren’t using paper calendars and smoke signals to navigate shows and we do know that almost all smartphones can now perform some kind of calendar sync but sample bag in one hand, a copy of FAULT in the other, juggling an iPad and a champagne flute does not a fashionista make. With a flick of the wrist, one is able to check all the times of their upcoming events including said show’s location with ease.

Connectivity

Apple Watch - pre subbing

Staying connected during fashion week when you’ve commissioned a team of 10+ writers and photographers is not easy. Someone will get lost, someone will turn up at the wrong location and you’ll receive mountains of emails to your inbox all with “URGENT” in the subject line (despite many instances the issue being unqualified for such dramatics mind you…!) However communication is key and a blistering January is not the best of times to be emailing through sodden fingers. The Apple Watch syncs with your iPhone to allow you to read and reply to emails, texts and even answer calls. On the Apple Watch you’re able to quickly read an email without having to rudely brandish your phone or tablet in the middle of a presentation. We’re all sick of phones on the catwalk floor the Apple Watch makes for a better alternative.

Answering calls and writing emails are  one of the features while nice to have, in practise just looks a bit odd. Both functions are done via voice recognition which is surprisingly accurate compared to the other devices on the market. That being said, it just isn’t a good look. Communicating like a ‘Mighty Morphing Power Ranger’ was cute in the 90’s but in 2016 it’s either mightily ahead of it’s time or a decade late for it. Useful, somewhat? necessity? Not so much.

Credit to Apple as there weren’t many alternatives in this department. The watch face is but a mere 42x35mm, fitting a keypad would not have been appropriate and neither would a larger watch face so we have to commend Apple on not breaking their tradition of unrivaled design.

Necessity

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I guess this is the question that you all are asking when reading this review. “Do I need the Apple Watch?”. To be frank, not really. You need the apple watch as much as you need bottled water, organic vegetables and designer clothing. Necessity it is not. Useful to have, it is.

We would argue that Apple didn’t create nor anticipate that the Apple Watch would be on the wrists of everybody everywhere. In it’s own right, the Apple Watch is innovative, creative but more importantly, useful. In the brief 2 weeks that we became accustomed to the device, we fell in love with the ease of checking emails, texts and keeping up with our calendars.

Not to mention, we’re recommending this product only based on its usefulness during fashion week. When we factor in the fact that it also has a great number of fitness apps – it is an extremely helpful product. Revolutionary as it may not be – as a product for the modern professional working within the fashion industry and outside, we’d definitely suggesting you give it a chance. Great things do indeed come in small packages and the AppleWatch is proof of that.

FAULT reviews Buttercup Bill

 

The first film from Sadie Frost and Emma Comley’s production company Blonde to Black Pictures, ‘Buttercup Bill’ is a chilling story of love, sex, mind games and dark desires.

BCB_9 low resDirected by, and starring, Remy Bennett – granddaughter of Tony Bennett – it follows long lost friends Pernilla (Bennett) and Patrick (Evan Louison) who reunite following the suicide of another childhood friend.

Despite the years that have gone past, there’s an undeniable chemistry between the two that starts with childish play fighting and escalates into games of sexual jealousy, using those around them as pawns. From the moment Pernilla arrives in the sweaty, free-spirited town in America’s Deep South where Patrick has been keeping his distance questions are raised and tensions get higher and higher. Why do these two soul mates resist their urge to be together? And could the death of their play mate have something to do with it?

Remy Bennett Buttercup Bill

Patrick and Pernilla Buttercup Bill

Having premiered at New Orleans Film Festival, Raindance and MARFA, it has now been released in the UK. With female directors and producers it’s a triumph for women in film as well as a gripping and brilliantly made story that puts a dark twist on the romantic notion of childhood sweethearts.

‘Buttercup Bill’ opens in cinemas today.

Alexander McQueen fever is officially in the air.

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‘Inferno: Alexander McQueen’ by Kent Baker and Melanie Rickey

Five years after his untimely death, London is celebrating this genius London talent with two major exhibitions (‘Savage Beauty’ at the V & A and Nick Waplington’s ‘Woking Progress’ at the Tate Britain), alongside the stunning picture book ‘Inferno’ by Kent Baker and words by Melanie Rickey.

Focussing on one show- the breakout AW 1996 ‘Dante’, described as groundbreaking couture meets club culture, which took place at a Crypt in the midst of Jack the Ripper’s killing ground on a freezing March evening, in East London.

The venue in itself set the scene for mystery and intrigue, and the off the beaten track show was bound to be controversial with the fashpack who were keen to see what was next from the inventive young designer.

Coffee table book ‘Inferno’ is an insider’s view of that night. It showcases exclusive, intimate behind the scenes photographs, as viewed from the lens of fashion photographer Kent Baker; After meeting Lee through mutual friends, he casually asked if he could take document the evening, not imagining he would say yes!

The infamous show, set in the apparently haunted venue of Christ Church in Spitalfields, complete with skeleton on the front row, has never been re-created, but you can now see for yourself the buzz and excitement of the show preparation, unseen portraits, model shots, hissy fits and the master at work.

With words by fashion journalist Melanie Rickey, Lee’s peers, his ex, the creative teams, and models that walked for him, all tell their version of what it was like to know and work with the legend on the show. High energy, raw, dramatic, are all phrases that crop up time and time again, alongside tales of the freaky vibe, dark spirits and electricity, which make the anecdotes worth their weight in gold.

Known for always pushing the boundaries in fashion and production, this show was bound to be remembered- as a performance as well as the designs. With Lee once stating “You’ve got to know the rules to break them. That’s what I’m here for”

This is a book for everyone that agrees with that, and can appreciate couture, and a dark, thoughtful visionary. Long live that sentiment. Even now you’re gone.

By Sara Darling

Inferno: Alexander McQueen by Kent Baker and Melanie Rickey is published by Laurence King Publishing in March, available from www.laurenceking.com

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Stylish Rotterdam- Exhibitions for Autumn

Rotterdam never fails to disappoint in the style stakes. With modern architecture and its canal setting, it’s a great place for a weekend break. My second visit to the city felt like visiting a favourite cousin- the lush green parks, clean streets and hospitable locals making it more of a pleasure than a work chore!

 

My home for the weekend was the newest pad in town, and I was excited to sample a room on the penthouse floor of the latest addition to the city’s five star offerings, The Mainport Hotel. Aptly situated near the port, it commands spectacular views of the city and sunset. Viewed all the better in the luxury spa complete with swimming pool, Turkish bath, sauna, treatment rooms and gym on the 9th floor. Perfectly situated for a stunning view and opening hours from 6.30am – 11pm, there is no excuse not to wind down here!

 

With great sights promised on my weekend agenda, it is only right to mention that this hotel is a preferred partner of the current James Bond exhibition at the Kunsthal Museum. “Designing 007: 50 years of Bond Style” is the definitive showcase for Bond fans. Celebrating the iconic world of the world’s best-loved action man (in all his guises). The style and sex appeal of 50 years worth of films is fully explored in a blockbuster of a show. With more than 500 gadgets, costumes, classic vehicles, props and film clips, carefully curated by London’s Barbican Centre, and presented in an out of this world multimedia experience of the world’s favourite secret agent. (Whichever actor is your preference!) Back at the hotel, a speedboat ride, Bollinger (Bond’s preferred champagne) and his shaken not stirred Martini are on offer. But I would recommend the boat ride pre martini- it really is quite speedy!

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With two major style exhibitions on offer this autumn, I was very much looking forward to the `The Future of Fashion is Now´ which opened last week until 18th January 2015, at Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen. This promised to be a completely different experience – fusing art, design, photography, technology and fashion. Not specifically targeted to fashion fans, or art historians, this is a must see exhibition about the future of what we wear and how we wear it.

 

Showcasing more than fifty contemporary international designers, artists and creators including renowned names like Viktor&Rolf, Hussein Chalayan and Nick Knight to emerging talents such as Ana Rajacevic and Rejina Py; the gallery has been transformed into a present-day playground for the next generation of designers, who showcased their innovation interpretation of the concept of ‘fashion’.fof2

 

The exhibition has been in the making for quite some time and six cutting edge designers were carefully chosen by an international judging panel and awarded the coveted title of The Future of Fashion. These included Iris van Herpen (Netherlands), Lucîa Cuba (Peru), Craig Green (UK), and OLEK (Poland/USA) who showcased their exclusive site-specific work at the exhibition; It is worth checking the online platform at www.futureoffashion.nl for an insight into the creative process.

 

With fashion being such a commercial enterprise in the 21st century, it is interesting to see how the next generation of designers is given a free range to develop their exciting visions and take on the notion of fashion of the future. The show takes us on a journey where they re-define the concept of the traditional fashion calendar. Six monthly seasons and trends have been boycotted and the focus is on well and truly on fashion being fun, exciting, innovative and perhaps not even wearable- fusing fashion with wearable art. The technically advanced designs offer an insight of what fashion might look in the future.

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Pushing boundaries is what the Netherlands is good at, and it seems only right that this exhibition was launched in Rotterdam, a very forward thinking city in more ways than one.

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Once you have had your fill of fashion, it is definitely worth a visit to another Rotterdam highlight- the recently opened Markthal Rotterdam. The much talked about food walhalla, is one of the cities most welcome and tasty additions, offering a wide range of fresh, modern delicacies in beautiful surroundings in a glass horse-shoe shaped arch in the heart of the city. Open every day of the week until 8pm, you can be sure to want a second visit- before or after hitting the local shops- including the newly launched and biggest H & M store in Europe!

 

So if it’s art, fashion, culture, food or shopping, you are after, you can soak it all up in a weekend in Rotterdam, and with flights from City Airport, London, taking just 40 minutes, I know I will be back.

 

For more information check out the extremely helpful tourist board

www.holland.com

 

Accommodation

Mainport Hotel

www.mainporthotel.com

 

Museums

Designing 007: Fifty Years of Bond Style, until 8th February 2015.

www.kunsthal.nl

 

The Future of Fashion is Now, until 18th January 2015.

www.boijmans.nl

 

By Sara Darling

HORST: Photographer of Style

For fashionistas in the know, Horst P Horst will not be an alien name to them. A German photographer with a classic background, he set the rules of fashion photography across his sixty years in the business and is a huge influence on fashion photography today.

With a retrospective to celebrate his decadent career, “HORST: Photographer of Style”, is a must see for fashion lovers- and is on now until 4th January in London’s  V & A.

Showcasing a vast catalogue of over 250 images from his six decades of style, his love for beautiful women and encapsulating them in print is evident. With his models dripping in pre-war haute couture, and post war ready to wear, it is not only an insight into one of the photography greats, but a lesson in fashion history, as all pieces used are credited and dated from the designer’s collections. Opulent and cinematic, high-society models and celebrities are captured in timeless, classic settings and are a true inspiration for fashion shoots of today.

Totally passionate about the shoot process, this ‘magician of light’ racked up 94 Vogue covers (including French, British and American) which are on loan from the Conde Nast archive, alongside iconic images of some of the most talked about Hollywood stars- including Marlene Dietrich, Rita Hayworth, Vivien Leigh, Ginger Rogers and Bette Davis, to name a few. He also launched the careers of Lisa Fonssagrives (who went on to marry Irvine Penn) and was the first to shoot designer Elsa Schiaparelli.

Taking inspiration from his post war travels, his later work consists of portraits, nudes, nature and still life, which can be viewed alongside a collection of lavish interiors shots- which became his passion until his death in 1999.

With so much to see, it might make your normal life seem boring, but don’t let that put you off!

HORST: Photographer of Style is at the V & A.

By Sara Darling

Vogue cover

Vogue cover

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Horst_videoBuro_Cover horst_round

LFW Feb ’14: Day 4 AW14

FAULT‘s fashion team hit the catwalk shows and backstage at London Fashion Week (Feb ’14) to bring you our favourite pieces from the Autumn / Winter 2014 shows. Stay connected – on TwitterFacebook or right here on FAULT Online – for our round-up of the designers and trends that we have our eye on.

 

 Roksanda Ilincic

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Is it safe to assume that come AW14 the colour Royal blue is going to be EVERYWHERE? Here it cropped up again in Roksanda Ilincic’s new collection. The pieces looked strongly influenced by modern art with staggered hemlines, interesting, angular draping, with strong use of colour and blocks of colour with sheer panels plus angular pattern repeating throughout. Stripes made a subtle appearance and could be seen on the edges of hems, around collars and and on the larger patterns of the clothing. Thick woolen, luxurious-looking pieces made way to a confetti dress made up of shards of colour, this then continued more subtly onto the other pieces that followed in the collection. Cute flat shoes and ankle socks reigned supreme, as did gorgeous chunky gold belts leaving us with a vision of the thinking woman’s wardrobe.

Words by Rachel Holland

 

OSMAN

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The Osman A/W14 collection was a beautiful collision of the Middle Eastern- Moorish prints, Byzantine blue, dusty Moroccan pink- with the surrealism of Europe in the 1920s. These influences played off each other beautifully, with sleek, minimalist silhouettes allowing for intricately ornamental embellishment, surreal embroidery, and exotic details such as sashes. The palette was bold without being too much, with shades that felt well-researched and prints that seemed authentic. It felt that this collection really took a journey and paid tribute to the nuances and intricacies of another culture. Yousefzada laid out a new shape, with asymmetrical hemlines and skinny cropped trousers that seemed a nod to Raf Simons at Dior. The surreal details – bold eyes and manicured hands – did not impose, instead adding a lightness and playful quality to what was otherwise a very heavy, luxe look.  From full evening dresses to separates and accessories, this is a collection that will translate well both in print and on the shop floor. On the runway, the richness of colour and print made a striking impact, but the finer details of the texture and elegant tailoring really took this collection to another level.

Words by Will Ballantyne-Reid

 

Marios Schwab

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In what felt like a much more commercial collection for Schwab, which felt less focused on the red carpet and more about bringing the label into the closets of modern women, an edge of cool could be seen throughout. With a play on hemlines, structure and with most of the hemlines super-short, this was a focused collection from someone who knows their target audience well. Leather jackets, bomber jackets and capes were slung over pretty dresses or leather trousers. Sheer layers with elegant shapes and even trains featured in the catwalk show, there’s something in this collection that would appeal to everyone and that, lies in it’s success.

Words by Rachel Holland

 

Erdem

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Erdem’s collection took on elements of the 1960’s with references of fine couture and heritage techniques woven into delicate fabric, with the designers signature flowers and blooms. With many of the pieces having a purposely unfinished feel. The attention to detail, as always expected with this label, was exquisite. Gold, black and cream brocade sat alongside wet-look coats and jackets for an interesting contrast. Some coats and dresses were unexpectedly slashed at the elbows, sheer panels popped up at the neck and the focus on embroidery and embellishment could be seen in each piece. Far from being stuffy, this is a modern Erdem glimpsing at the past while striding forcefully into the future.

Words by Rachel Holland

 

David Koma

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David Koma’s show was a slick affair, with each piece being well thought out, edited back and refined so that the brand’s message was completely clear. That the Koma woman means business. Open-toed boots or shoes clad every model, the boots of note being the knee-highs – giving the outfits a feeling of restriction yet freedom. The first looks that entered the catwalk were a rich purple in a complete body colour-block – a bold statement. This led to grey to white to black and finally to pops of royal blue. Caging detail and harnessing revealed hints of flesh, looking decidedly stern, yet, the full skirts were more of a feminine, pretty detail. Leather and ‘angular lace’ however were far from pretty, creating a bold, strong statement that despite the dominatrix overtones, look surprisingly wearable.

Words by Rachel Holland

 

Burberry Prorsum

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Burberry was a painterly affair this season with botanical prints on bags, scarves and jackets with more than a passing nod to the artists muse or the 70’s bohemian, which is an unusual spin for AW14 but one that we can thankfully embrace. The longer skirt lengths, the cinched waist and the easy, draped shawls, blankets and sheepskin coats made for a high-class aristocratic mood, but one where the heroine runs away with a penniless poet, painter or musician. The monogrammed scarves, the caped trench and the hand painted bags will no doubt sell out fast as the must-have buys for the new season. The pretty delicate dresses and the wearable, statement coats will undoubtably be do well amongst the labels core fans. The Burberry powerhouse is showing no signs of slowing down, so it was fun to see Bailey having a lighter mood this season and looking to the bohemian for his inspiration, we applaud it.

Words by Rachel Holland

 

Peter Pilotto

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This was a pleasant surprise from Peter Pilotto this season after previous seasons displaying a more restricted and refined aesthetic. There was colour and print and lots of it, having varying levels of success in some pieces more than others. Literally every piece was unexpected and just when you thought that you had the collection ‘fixed’ in your head, a new equally dazzling look would emerge down the catwalk. An alpine print was used to great effect in both a dress and a padded suit, the sporty, patterned coats felt extremely ‘now’, whilst the colourful patterned detail picked up where Mary Kantranzou has left off and took us in a new direction. I loved the slouchy layering of contrasting patterned knits, more so than the earlier pieces, I can imagine the effortless comfort of wearing these looks and yet looking totally wild and eclectic at the same time. Despite reading conflicting reviews elsewehere, this collection gets a big thumbs up from me.

Words by Rachel Holland

 

GILES

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Giles is the designer who we can rely on to represent the cool British girls. This season he focused on playfulness and anarchy. The show was set in a dark car park in the East End of London to set the mood, with strobing lighting to add to the overall rebellious ‘Giles’ vibe. Punky looking girls strode the catwalk, with Brit model, Cara, snapping selfies of herself and the front row, creating an iconic catwalk moment. The theme was rebellion, the clothes either tropical bright, lime tartan or monochrome. Hummingbirds were the motif of the collection, trickling out towards the end as bugs crawling the edges of cocktail dresses. It did, as a whole feel a bit haphazard, however there were coveteable pieces in there, namely the capes, the long straight dresses, the leather items and the shorter dresses. The accessories will be perfect for wearability alone – long, leather gloves, huge scarves and punked-up boots will add an instant update to any winter wardrobe. Giles’ previous seasons are hard to follow, however we have no doubt that the best is yet to come.

Words by Rachel Holland

 

TOM FORD

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Showing a wicked sense of humour, Tom Ford took a cultural reference and spun it on it’s head with his upgraded version of the ‘Tom Ford 61’. A knockoff top that’s been doing the rounds in sub-culture – Ford’s now turned into a glittery party dress. The rest of the collection felt 60’s and a bit rock n roll with a sombre mood. Monochrome featured heavily throughout the collection, with splashes of bold red, copper and leopard print. There was a big play on textures with sequins, leather, velvet and wool. Of note were the long velvet dresses, so casual and wearable, yet so high-end at the same time. They could easily be dressed up for the red carpet with some striking jewels or down with a pair of rugged biker boots.

Ford proves season after season that’s he’s a master of the catwalk. With a huge celebrity turnout, plus using big name models such as Karen Elson, Liberty Ross, Stella Tennant and Georgia Jagger during his show, his pulling power is clear to see. And that’s the reason why we keep coming back, because we just can’t get enough Tom Ford in our lives.

Words by Rachel Holland

 

KTZ

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In the last year, KTZ has reached a whole new level of iconic brand identity. With the likes of Rihanna and A$AP ROCKY on board, the label has swiftly made an imprint upon the mainstream with its monochrome palette, bold prints and edgy proportions. In this vein, it can be easy to assume you’ll know what a KTZ show will look like before it comes down the runway. However the label somehow continues to challenge its own aesthetic, finding a new innovation whilst satisfying its cult following. This season the look was a sort of Medieval-Bionic-hybrid, with tabards and tunics in the form of oversized and embellished shirts and dresses, worn with leggings and trousers in beautifully manipulated silk and leather. Ribbed leather leggings had the look of machine parts, whilst jackets and tunic had a heavy luxury, weighted with geometric jewel patterns and studs. For their menswear presentation this season, the label sent models down the runway with snow-shrouded faces and this Arctic influence carried over; from the puffa jackets to the Doctor Zhivago hoods in pale silk lace. To put it simply, this was yet another triumph for a label that is already taking the world by storm. Who knows where they will be by next season?

Words by Will Ballantyne-Reid