Tory Lanez Menswear Cover for FAULT Magazine 28

Tory Lanez X FAULT Magazine

 

Photography: Miles Holder

Stylist: Rachel Gold

Grooming: Shamirah Sairally

 

Words: Trina John-Charles

We bundle out of the photo shoot and into a waiting car. Tory Lanez is clearly rattled by a previous incident and I believe everything he is threatening to do if the car doesn’t move promptly. Although quite intimidating when the switch has been flipped, he remains polite and quite chatty with me – revealing some amazing tidbits off mic, but sadly, we are not that type of publication. As we weave in and out of the busy central London traffic, Tory rolls the biggest blunt I have ever seen and our 20-minute conversation about the new album ‘Memories Don’t Die’, the cultural appropriation police and derogatory terms in music, begins…

 

FAULT: On the song ‘Happiness’ you talk about losing your mother. How difficult was it making a song like that?

Tory Lanez : I had to record that song like, four different times. I just kept crying every time I tried to record it. I knew it would resonate with people, because of the way it resonated with me.

 

FAULT: People always talk about stark similarities between the street culture in London and the street culture in Toronto. Having been here many times, have you noticed this yourself?

Tory Lanez : Definitely. Like, they way we talk… the way we say, ’mandem’, or when we talk about somebody we’ll say, ‘a man did this’. I think it’s the way we are all brought up. It has a bit of a Caribbean edge to it. I think that’s where the similarities come in.

FAULT: Are you planning on working with any other London, or British based artists?

Tory Lanez : Of course, I want to work with a lot of people from here. I want to do a whole project thats just with people from here. I definitely want to work with Nines, Stefflondon, J Hus, Dave, Stormzy… of course Skepta.

 

FAULT: Keeping the British theme, there is a Zayn Malik sample on the new album. It is done in a great way and it isn’t the most obvious choice. Why did you choose that particular sample?

Tory Lanez : I didn’t. I didn’t even know it was a Zayn sample until after I was trying to clear it. That’s when I found out it was a One Direction sample. The producer, Christian Lou, brought that beat to me.

 

FAULT: …And Sting’s influence on the album?

Tory Lanez : Sting specifically asked us to use his song instead of ours. We had like an interpretation that sounded like his song and Sting said, ‘no, I want them to use the real one, the real song’… so that’s what happened with that. Sting loves it… It’s dope that he allowed us to use his song and was like, ‘use the real song, I don’t want you to use something like it, I want you to use the real thing’. 

 

FAULT: When you talk about being younger and people trying to bully you, it’s almost like you developed a very defensive ‘fuck all of you’ kind of attitude. Is it fair to say you still have that now towards negative people?

Tory Lanez : Yeah. I’m always like that. I grew up like, you fend for yours and if somebody tries to take yours, you show them why they should have never tried it. So for me, I’m the type of person… I just don’t take no bullshit – with anything.

 

FAULT: You have already addressed the issue you had with an upmarket clothing store assistant being rude and dismissive towards you, because of your appearance and in retaliation you spent $35k (of record label money) with a different assistant to prove a point. There was a lot of chatter online about this not being the best way to handle the situation. It is great this conversation is being had because this is something that has been happening for years. In retrospect and if it was your own money and not the record label’s, would you have dealt with the situation in the same way?

Tory Lanez : Some of it was my own money… and yeah, I would have still dealt with it the same way. I didn’t do anything wrong. All I was doing was shopping for clothes. That store being the only store that sells high end designer fabrics, I still had to buy what I was going there to buy, I just didn’t give the commission to the person who was looking down on me.

Do you know what’s crazy… what the actual fucked up part is? The black mentality… and this is so harshly and blatantly true… the black mentality, because we have been oppressed for years, when we do feel like we are no longer second class and we have made something of ourselves, we have gotten our money and we have acquired whatever it is that we have acquired, when we go into stores, there are certain things we don’t want to happen. You don’t want to go into a store and ask for something and they bring you something less expensive. You don’t ever want them to act like you cant afford it… and because, as black people we feel so under privileged our whole lives, the fact that we are in a situation of more privilege, we tend to take more of an advantage of it, to prove to whoever the authority is, that we can do it to. It’s really stupid, but the pride and the underprivilege leads you to it.

 

FAULT: Very loosely leading on from that, Skepta recently in an interview that the term ‘white bitch’ is racist and should not be used. Some people agreed, some disagreed. I just wanted to know your thoughts on that, as you use the term on the album. 

Tory Lanez : Is black bitch the same, or no?

FAULT: Well, Skepta argued that nobody would ever say ‘black bitch’, because there would be such uproar…

Tory Lanez : I’d say black bitch, or white bitch …and feel absolutely no way about it, what do you mean? When I say ‘black bitch’ I don’t mean, black bitch. I am not calling a woman a bitch. I’m not saying, ‘Yo, you black bitch’. When I am with women, or when I am with girls, they will say, ‘I’m with my bitches’… A bitch is a female dog. My friend is my dog. If I say, ‘this is my dog’ I mean this is my dog, he’s my friend, he’s my companion. If I say, ‘I’m with my bitches’, they are my dogs too, just the female type. It doesn’t matter if they are white or black. What people should really be mad at, is the fact that I’m saying bitches. If you are mad at me calling you a bitch, then be mad at me calling you a bitch, but don’t say white bitch is more racist than black bitch, or that I would never say black bitch so why is it ok to say white bitch. If you are going to have a problem with that, just have a problem with the word bitch, don’t have a problem with the colour. If a girl is a whore and she is white, she is a white whore. If a girl is black and she’s a whore, she’s a black whore. I hate for it to sound so blatant and so rude, but you have to get mad at the word, not the colour it’s associated with. You cant get mad at someone calling you a black bitch, be mad at the word bitch… you’re black, that can’t change, be mad at the word that is derogatory.

 

FAULT: Finally, what is your FAULT?

Tory Lanez : My only FAULT is that I was cursed with like these devilish, devilish good looks. It is not the worse curse to have, but that’s my fault, Sorry. Sorry to all those I may have offended with them [laughs].

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 28 – THE STRUCTURAL ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

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Vance Joy for FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Vance Joy x FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Vance Joy FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Words and Photography: Miles Holder
Fashion: Rachel Gold

Vance Joy first caught our eye back in 2013 with the release of his debut album EP God Loves You When You’re Dancing which featured his runaway hit ‘Riptide’. In February 2018 Vance Joy returned with his second album record Nation of Two which featured hits ‘Saturday Sun’ and ‘I’m With You’. About to embark on his worldwide tour, we caught up with Vance to find out more!

FAULT: You’re about to embark on your Nation Of Two world tour, excited?

Vance Joy: We did a short European tour last month, and it was so much fun to see the fans and reconnect with them in person. It’d been three and a half years since we’d last played in Europe, so it’ll be great to relaunch with the big shows and play some new material. IT should be a lot of fun, and everyone is really excited.

Do you find that your songs suddenly take on new meaning when you get to play them live to your fans?

Vance Joy: I’m always surprised to find that so many people know the lyrics to a bunch of songs and it’s such a warm and enthusiastic vibe when I’m playing, and it’s super encouraging. You don’t know what songs people will know and recently on tour we played some of the deep album tracks, and it was great to see people enjoying them. As we tour, I’m getting more comfortable with the songs and finding new ways to sing them and wear them in a bit. ‘We’re Going Home’, and ‘Saturday Sun’ are tracks in particular which are starting to feel good to perform on stage.

Vance Joy FAULT Magazine Issue 28

 

Is there a date in particular or festival in particular that you’re especially excited for?

Vance Joy: I’m looking forward to going to LA for a rehearsal for a few days, so I’m looking forward to the band and me having a relaxing time out there. We’ll do a couple of shows and then head to Coachella which is a big one that everyone will know. There are also dates in huge venues which will also be a new challenge and experience for us, but it’s exciting to play to bigger rooms and larger audiences. I’m looking forward to seeing how it all goes!

Nation Of Two released a couple of months ago now; do you ever find yourself wanting to make changes or fixes to it or do you feel like the project was exactly what it needed to be at the time and it should remain that way?

Vance Joy: I’m quite relaxed when it comes to that stuff; I think you need a deadline and know when to say goodbye. I feel like when you have a song that you feel strongly about but there’s pushback, and people say, “I don’t think you quite nailed it on this song”, then I listen. I listen to all of those perspectives and then eventually you’ve got to release it and say “that’s it”. I sometimes think instead of looking too closely and getting too stuck on the minutia you can get distracted. Certainly, after two months you might hear it on the radio and say “oh, I’m seeing it differently now” but I think you can get distracted and go off course with perfection and I don’t think there’s such a thing.

Vance Joy FAULT Magazine Issue 28

What is your favourite tour story?

Vance Joy: I was fortunate and got to play the AFL Grand Final, and I was playing with another band called Living Head, and the main headliner was Sting. After we played, we were chilling out in the green room, and I felt someone hug me from behind, and I turned around, and it was Sting! It was surreal, I just shook his hand and said: “lovely to meet you!”

What is your writing discipline, do you sit down at a writing station and try to get through it or do you just let them come to you naturally?

Vance Joy: I think there’s a bit of both and always a push and pull. If you haven’t written a song in a while, you can get frustrated. Sometimes you just have to pick up your guitar, and a song comes, and other days it feels like you’re trying to force it out. I think ultimately the excellent stuff songs happen mysteriously and catch you off guard. Some days you can write and take the chance that magic will happen again but sometimes you have to approach it with a bit more discipline. The best stuff happens when you’re not trying to force it too much.

What is your FAULT?

Vance Joy: I can be impatient, and when I’m in a bad mood, the atmosphere can be quiet and cold. I might not say anything, but people can tell! I’m learning to try and remove myself at times when I’m annoyed (or hungry) but it doesn’t happen too often, but I’m trying to notice when it does.

Vance Joy FAULT Magazine Issue 28

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 28 – THE STRUCTURAL ISSUE –  IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

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Sophie Cookson – Queen of Kings – kills it in FAULT Issue 26 – The Millennial Issue

Sophie Cookson exclusive for FAULT Issue 26 – Click to order your copy now

When she first hit our screens with a starring role in Kingsman: Secret Service in 2014, it was hard to believe that it was Sophie Cookson’s first big-time project since leaving drama school. An alumna of the National Youth Music Theatre and Oxford School of Drama, her career has taken an impressive and rapid trajectory – from being named as one of Screen International’s Stars of Tomorrow in 2014 to securing roles in blockbuster titles and starring alongside industry greats.

Now, reprising her role as the ass-kicking Roxy in Kingsman: The Golden Circle, fans of the franchise can look forward to seeing Sophie and her fellow Kingsman spies face a deluge of dangers, with their headquarters in ruins while the world is held hostage by a nefarious new nemesis…

Things are obviously going to be a bit different in Kingsman: The Golden Circle. How do you think Roxy has developed as a character by this point? Will we learn more about her?

You’ll have to wait and see! She’s definitely now an established working cog in Kingsman with a great suit… apart from that, I can’t tell you much more!

 …

Sophie wears looks by Ralph Lauren, DSQUARED2, and Zeynep Kartel in our shoot

 

As most people will be aware, the Kingsman series has comic book origins – is that a genre that interests you, or are there others you’re more into?

I have to say, I’ve never been a comic book fanatic – but, through Kingsman and the fact that the movie industry does seem focused on that genre at the moment, I’ve learnt a lot about it in the last few years.

For me if it’s a great script and concept then I’m interested, regardless of genre. Having said that, I do love a good psychological thriller; something intriguing, with dark undertones. Right now I’m loving The Handmaid’s Tale – it’s so brilliantly harrowing and moving.

 

Photography: Roberto Aguilar
Styling: Rachel Gold @Red Represents and BTS Talent
Hair: Diego Miranda Hair @BTS Talent using Dyson supersonic & Sebastian professional
Make up: Emily Dhanjal @BTS Talent using Rodial skincare & MAC cosmetics
Nails: Nickie Rhodes-Hill @BTS Talent using Barry M
Photographer’s assistant: Khalil Musa
Interview: Jennifer Sara Parkes
Production Manager: Adina Ilie

 

You’re also starring in Gypsy on Netflix– what’s your character, Sidney, like in the show?  

Sid is super complicated, which is what drew me to her. She talks about owning your circumstances and living this authentic ‘I don’t care what anyone else thinks’ life – yet, at the same time, she lies and has this deep- rooted vulnerability. She can lie and manipulate, but also has this amazing zest for life and ability to draw people out of themselves. I was so excited to play someone who straddles the good and bad side of human nature. It’s still rare to see such three-dimensional women on screen.

Gypsy is, refreshingly, quite a female-led series – did you find it to be a different vibe on set, with women in so many of the production and on-screen roles we often see going to men?

There are sensitive issues we deal with in the show, and I was definitely happy to have all my intimate scenes with Naomi directed by women. There’s an implicit level of safety and understanding that is perhaps more automatic than when you’re working with a director of the opposite sex. It’s the first time I’ve done a scene of that nature surrounded by so many women – it felt empowering.

And, lastly, what is your FAULT?

I can be incredibly stubborn – I like to see it as determination, but it can definitely swing the other way!

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 26 – THE MILLENNIAL ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

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EXCLUSIVE FASHION EDITORIAL FOR FAULT ONLINE – CATHERINE HARBOUR’S FAULT

I.D Sarrieri Bathing Suit: I.D Sarrieri Cuff: Kara Ross www.kararossny.com

I.D Sarrieri
Bathing Suit: I.D Sarrieri
Cuff: Kara Ross www.kararossny.com

Bathing Suit: Stylists own Cuff:  Kara by Kara Ross

Bathing Suit: Stylists own
Cuff: Kara by Kara Ross

Bathing Suit: I.D Sarrieri  Bracelet: Stylist Own

Bathing Suit: I.D Sarrieri
Bracelet: Stylist Own

Jewelled Bathing Suit: River Island Bee Bracelet: Strange of London

Jewelled Bathing Suit: River Island
Bee Bracelet: Strange of London

Jewelled Bathing Suit : River Island Bee Bracelet Strange: London

Jewelled Bathing Suit : River Island
Bee Bracelet Strange: London

White Bathing Suit: Stylist Own

White Bathing Suit: Stylist Own

 

Photographer:  Catherine Harbour @LHA Represents
Stylist Rachel Gold @ Mandy Coakley
Hair Enzo Volpe @ Mandy Coakley using fudge hair care
Make up Katie Pettigrew @LHA Represents using Mac cosmetics
Black bob hair – Margaux @models 1
Long hair – Danii Newman@ storm models
Photographers assistant Olivia Ezechukwu

‘Lights, Camera, Fashion’ – Roberto Aguilar for FAULT Online

scarf -Hermes, glasses -Tom Browne, dress-Karl Lagerfeld

scarf -Hermes, glasses -Tom Browne, dress-Karl Lagerfeld

Dress -Helmut Lang @ Harvey Nichols

Dress -Helmut Lang @ Harvey Nichols

Dress -Preen, Trainers  Guiseppi Zanotti

Dress -Preen, Trainers -Guiseppi Zanotti

Dress -KARL, socks -stylists own, shoes -Moncler

Dress -KARL, socks -stylists own, shoes -Moncler

Dress -KARL

Dress -KARL

Tuxedo -Rag & Bone @ Matches Fashion, briefs -Elle McPherson, glasses -Dita, baseball cap -KARL

Tuxedo -Rag & Bone @ Matches Fashion, briefs -Elle McPherson, glasses -Dita, baseball cap -KARL

Tuxedo -Rag & Bone @ Matches Fashion, briefs -Elle McPherson, glasses -Dita, baseball cap -KARL

Tuxedo -Rag & Bone @ Matches Fashion, briefs -Elle McPherson, glasses -Dita, baseball cap -KARL

Tuxedo -Rag & Bone @ Matches Fashion, briefs -Elle McPherson, glasses -Dita, baseball cap -KARL

Tuxedo -Rag & Bone @ Matches Fashion, briefs -Elle McPherson, glasses -Dita, baseball cap -KARL

Tuxedo -Rag & Bone @ Matches Fashion, briefs -Elle McPherson, glasses -Dita, baseball cap -KARL

Tuxedo -Rag & Bone @ Matches Fashion, briefs -Elle McPherson, glasses -Dita, baseball cap -KARL

Dress -Acne, Boots -as before

Dress -Acne, Boots -as before

Dress -Meadam Kirchoff @ Harvey Nichols, boots -One Hunred

Dress -Meadam Kirchoff @ Harvey Nichols, boots -One Hunred

Dress -Stella McCartney @ Matches Fashion, shoes -Guiseppi Zanotti, hat -Roberto Cavalli

Dress -Stella McCartney @ Matches Fashion, shoes -Guiseppi Zanotti, hat -Roberto Cavalli

Vest -DKNY, skirt -Roberto Cavalli

Vest -DKNY, skirt -Roberto Cavalli, boots- Roberto Clegerie

Cape -L'Agence

Cape -L’Agence

Cape -L'Agence

Cape -L’Agence

Photography: Roberto Aguilar
Fashion Stylist: Rachel Gold @LHA Represents
Model: Ollie Henderson @ FM Model Management
MUA: Lan Nguyen-Grealis using MAC Cosmetics
Hair: Johnny Harte using Tigi
Nails: Pebbles Aitkens using Dior
Special Thanks  to Bedhead Studio