LFW February ’15, Day 3: The FAULT AW15 Daily Edit

 

The FAULT Magazine Editors have been busy catching the shows this season at London Fashion Week. We present here, our exclusive daily edit of the must-see London shows. Be sure to stay tuned to FAULT Online for exclusive backstage photography, daily updates and our daily show edit. To see the new season collections, with us, as they happen check out our official Instagram

 

Vivienne Westwood 

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The Vivienne Westwood show had a wearability that reflected not only the streetwear influence that has always permeated her label, but also referenced sportswear. Light fabrics, jumpsuits and shorts, gym socks, racing stripes; through day and evening looks there was an ease to the silhouette and cut of this collection. The models walked with ease (not always the case with Westwood past, cc: Naomi ’93) and though always heavily layered, this season’s looks consisted of separates that would actually make sense beyond the eccentric intricacy of Westwood’s famous assemblages. Prints were as strong as ever, and especially sharp- thick geometric prints veered between sleek athletic modernity, and of Mother Nature; exotic animal prints, kaleidoscopic nature patterns and at one stage, peacock feathers. The show notes voiced Westwood’s support for the Green Party, reiterating her stance against our current consumption, and this aesthetic nod to the environment was a charming and surprisingly restrained way of expressing her ever-present political chagrin.

 

Will Ballentyne Reid

Preen by Thornton Bregazzi

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Dark romance was the theme for this year’s collection by Justin Thornton and Thea Bregazzi for Preen with the designer duo setting out to give the 70s hippie chic an urban update.

 

Lose, boxy shapes were dominant in this AW season with an element of attempted juxtaposition throughout. The success of contrasting silhouettes and shapes usually relies on matriculate tailoring, something that was slightly lacking in the season’s Preen show for me. However, the recurring pop colour through many of the collections pieces made the collection feel colourful despite the dark base of most pieces. Personal favourites were the blue floral dresses at the end of the show as they posed an interesting contrast to the rest of the collection and felt distinctly summery despite being part of an AW collection.

 

Overall the collection felt a little too full of ideas – Thornton and Bregazzi in the past have proven to be not only full of ideas but also to be able to throw a lot of different ideas into a collection. However, this season it felt as though the pair had trouble changeling their ideas into clear and coherent silhouettes and colour pallets.

Charlie Natter


Mulberry

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With a brand spanking new creative director in place the expectations for Mulberry’s AW15 collection were certainly set high. With Johnny Coca arriving at the English fashion house in July the Mulberry design team took inspiration from English manor houses of the Georgian era. Mouldings, stuccos and architectural decorations acted as the basis for prints and embroideries with a recurring theme of neo-classical filigree motif used throughout the collection.

Once again the house emphasised their love of artisan craft as they have in the last year, showcasing their artisan works at festivals such as Wilderness. The intricate details and sharpness we saw this season further showed Mulberry’s approach to their collection through artisan craft.

Mulberry also took the opportunity to showcase their newest bag: The Roxette. Seen in an aray of colours and different kinds of leathers, the bag certainly has the appeal of sturdy yet delicate kind of companion that Mulberry has done so well in the past. This season was a big departure from what we saw last season and it will be interesting to see how the brand takes shape under its new creative leadership.

Charlie Natter

 

David Koma

Shot exclusively for FAULT Magazine by Nigel Pacquette

Shot exclusively for FAULT Magazine by Nigel Pacquette

Known for his bold, geometric designs and architectural shapes paired with body con shapes, David Koma has well and truly perfected through the seasons. With 60’s style shifts, leather separates and cut-out, form fitting jumpsuits, the David Koma woman looked badass. Gothic Barbie seems to be a strong new direction for him, with delicate flared sleeves, saucy top to bottom zippers and sheer panel details, oh and the ultimate bed hair. I really want to be a David Koma girl #justsaying

Jenny Slungaard

Issa

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Jamie O’Hare’s debut collection for Issa was a fairly rock n roll inspired affair, all cutout panels, jacquard animal prints, draped fabric and fringing, man there was a lot of fringing! Whilst being fairly reminiscent of designs put out by Cavalli, Ford and McCartney, the collection was still polished and totally commercial. Gorgeous prints, a heavy use of black and white with pops of red, blue and yellow and draped fabrics, the collection retained the signature Issa look but a sexier new direction with O’Hare at the helm. With subtle cutouts, sheer yet strategically placed panels, and that generous fringing all protecting your modesty, it’s just the kind of outfit your mum would approve of.

Jenny Slungaard

Matthew Williamson

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There were more than just stars on the front row at Matthew Williamson as he showcased the aw15 collection inspired by the signs of the zodiac. A fuchsia satin blouse and electric blue satin dress were embroidered with gold zodiac symbols and a heavily embroidered blue evening gown featured mystical swirls amongst the glittering beadwork.

It wouldn’t be a Matthew Williamson show without some bright, feminine prints and we weren’t left wanting. Next season’s offering includes a purple leopard print jumpsuit, maroon pegged trousers with wispy botanical flowers in marigold and sky blue and the same floral design in varying shades of red on an evening coat with fur trimmed sleeves and a floor-length evening dress with thigh high split.

Also taking inspiration from 70’s bohemian silhouettes, maxi length skirts and dresses billowed around the models’ legs and button-through styles added to the sex appeal.

We think the vibrant colours, dashes of regal gold and roaring leopard print will most appeal to Leos next season!

Olivia Pinnock

 

Temperley

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Make way for the African Queen of Temperley London next season! Glamorous, flowing evening looks came in burnt orange, bronze, yellow, white and black in distinct African prints. Animal print-like chevrons and thick rows of triangles, diamonds and circles were seen on contemporary culottes and long, flower trumpet shape skirts and an armadillo skin gold jacket all made for a refreshingly luxurious take on the theme.

Long, skinny evening scarves matched each outfit in print and fabric and provided a seamless link between the African-inspired styles and the 1930s concept that ran throughout as well. This came in the form of dainty, flat slipper shoes, double-breasted black jumpsuits, spaghetti strap, sequined evening dresses and velvet art-deco shapes on chiffon dresses.

Tunics and suit jackets were smart daytime pieces but, as usual, Temperley’s evening looks are some of the most covetable around.

Olivia Pinnock

 

Topshop Unique

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This season Topshop Unique had a distinct feeling of ‘posh’ about its collection. Creative director Kate Phelan showed us what she thinks the well-bred (and the not so well-bred) countryside-moved-to-London Chelsea girls of 2015 should be wearing: clean, sophisticated, tailored dresses, pants and skirts teamed with big knits, fur and feathers and pieces of leather. The thistle and dandelion prints that weaved their way throughout the show were unusual and interesting while still echoing the privileged upbringing of the Topshop Unique girl.

The collection felt slightly safer than previous seasons as well as a lot more grown up. More importantly Phelan’s latest collection had that essence of cool that only English party girls seem to possess; the ability to just get out of bed, run their fingers through their hair, touch up their mascara and throw on the first thing they see, seemingly without a care in the world. Cara and Kate are the prime examples of this quintessentially and apparent laisse-faire attitude that you cannot buy, one is simply born with it. Now for AW 15 you can attempt to at least look the part, even if this means spending a good amount of time looking like you just woke up like this.

Charlie Natter

 

Phoebe English

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Dust sheets in the corners and wires around the walls, the BFC presentation space became the perfect showcase for the Autumn/Winter collection of designer Phoebe English. Serious and smoky; this season the Phoebe English girl is not to be messed with.

The looks were monochromatic and intricate with layers of shrimp netting, tulle and PVC that created a killer collaboration of textiles. Oversized hoodies and shiny worker boots were made feminine with black hair gems and sequin trimmings.

Collars up and hair pinned the Phoebe English Autumn/Winter 15 collection is all about the details in the construction. The most iconic of the designs were the mesh trousers that amplified the vast amount of construction and creation thatPhoebe English never fails to bring to her work.

Translucent netting created looks that were like real life fashion x-rays. A collection infused with a dark confidence, Phoebe English confirmed once again that her widely recognised talent is always moving in the right direction.

Jael Fowakes

 

Pringle of Scotland

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A brand with over 200 years of heritage that is rooted within every collection, this season Pringle Of Scotland provided a collection that was contemporary and minimal. Whilst not breaking boundaries this collection may break the bank, we predict that sales of this collection will be high. The usual autumnal colour palette of navy’s, greys, burgundy’s and nudes was used to create a collection providing stylish basics and classy staples that have the ability to add finesse to every woman’s wardrobe.

Embossed leather, suede, lace and mohair were amongst the textures intertwined to create pieces that showcased the high design capability of the brand. An interjection of leopard print and sheer knitted skirts added an underlying sense glamour and allure to an otherwise casual chic show, showcasing the brands ability over the years to provide pieces for every one of their loyal customers.

This artisanal collection was modest and clean, and a representation of PringleOf Scotlands place within the industry. Would we wear the collection? Hell yes.

Jael Fowakes

 

Jonathan Saunders

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Jonathan Saunders’ newest collection can probably best be describes as bright and beautiful. His technicolour AW15 collection once more shows of the Scottish designer’s love of colour and might also be a reflection of his current mood having recently secured a nice backing of a private investor to further expand his ready-to-wear line. Other designers might have struggled mixing and matching colours the way Saunders did, but you can tell that he has had a lot of practice in experimenting and playing with strong colours.

Graphic shapes and patterns mixed with precise tailoring gave the pieces a certain raffinesse while leaving us with a distinct feeling of the fun and funky 60’s. Teamed with knee-high laced boots the Saunders’ woman is both confident and outgoing, as she certainly wouldn’t go unnoticed. I loved the accessories, the nude lace-up boots in particular, that accentuated the pieces throughout and. Overall the collection certainly reflecting Saunders’ theme for this season: Joy and optimism.

Charlie Natter

FASHION MONTH IS FINALLY OVER: Here’s the trends you will need to know

By Sara Darling

Fashion is going raving with a nod to neon.

Pack your glow sticks for SS15, as this summer’s neon trend is not going anywhere! If you missed the boat this summer (or indeed the eighties!) several designers were re-living their youth with flashes on neon suitable for Goa-n beach parties or hot long nights in the city. Fyodor Golan provided highlighter-marker stripes and ostrich feathers, whilst Christopher Raeburn and Ashish worked up multi-coloured frenzy; Lucas Nascimento proved that doubling up is not such a bad thing, with a double dose of orange- having the same mind set is Emilia Wickstead! For accessories, Sophia Webster mashed up clashing prints and rainbow textures, while Markus Lupfer journeyed to California for his super brights ‘surf dudes’ collection. Let’s hope next summer is a hot one! Neon goes so well with a suntan!

Emilia Wickstead SS15, backstage (Daniel Sims, British Fashion Council) 3

The 70s glamour puss

The 70s have dominated the men’s catwalks for the past two seasons, but now the womenswear designers are claiming the decade with my fave picks showcasing flattering flares, bold prints and glam rock platforms. Check out designers including Tom Ford who’s rock chick collection is perfect for Kate Moss or Mossy wannabes! House of Holland featured 70s loud prints on shirts, dresses and skirts in a mixture of that classic vintage curtain palette of yellow, green, red and orange. Matthew Williamson’s catwalk show at the BFC show space was stacked with 70s references: halter necks, jumpsuits and maxi dresses- perfect to embrace your inner hippy.

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Denim like you’ve never seen it before

Burberry Prorsum is always a popular London show. It sets trends that become instant classics, and SS15 is no different. Creative Director Christopher Bailey wowed us all with his new denim trench coat, alongside cropped denim jackets and denim with feathers- some more practical than others!

Marques’ Almeida took inspiration from the 90s and the drama of songstress PJ Harvey by incorporating black metallic denim in part of the collection, for a grungy feel for summer. Perfect for sitting under a tree and writing poetry! Joseph on the other hand did oversized double denim. In the disused industrial show space, the loose shirts, frayed edges chunky jumpers and leather were layered up to accentuate the moody mood.

Meanwhile in Paris, Kenzo did supersize denim, with wide legged pants, midi length skirts and ¾ sleeve jackets. Perfect as separates as it becomes a little last season pyjama-party as a full look. Even Milan, the capital of sophistication, mixed denim with drummer-boy jackets and silk kimono jackets at Gucci.Post-Burberry-Prorsum-Womenswear-Spring-Summer-2015-Collection-Look-17JOSEPH_ss15

 

Flower Power

With flowers never going out of fashion, somewhere across the globe designers nodded to the 60s, 70s and nineties at the shows this year, but the floral print was definitely given a 21st century makeover.

It is never a surprise when the humble flower is on trend for the spring/summer season. After all what summarises the spring more than a blooming bulb? However, this time the floral trend is a little different, with 3D floral embellishments leading the way for SS15. Erdem featured 3D floral patterns, and House of Holland featured tops and dresses with 3D floral embellishment designs.

Paul & Joe gave us pretty florals AND stripes (two trends in one!) and Sarah Burton at McQueen showed us a collection inspired by traditional kimonos, complete with leather, buckles and graphic floral motifs. One can only hope the very enviable lace up gladiator sandals will go into production too.

On the other end of the spectrum, Viktor and Rolf showed very wearable loose floral separates, and in Milan, Marni went bold with daffodils, daisies, lilies and chrysanthemums playing a big part in the the garden party collection. Achew!! Now where did I put my hayfever tabs?

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Technology Students

With designers out smarting themselves in the field of fabric development, it is great to see how engineering is fused with fashion to make some anti- sports, sportswear designs. Richard Nicoll used mesh and fibres and H by Hakaan Yildrim worked cylindrical shapes and hexagonal motif on skirts and outerwear. Marios Schwab’s collection was an architectural adventure into fitness and travel, and Preen by Thornton Bregazzi led the body con trend in scuba style fabrics and made dresses look sporty and sexy! The Whistles collection was inspired by grown up street wear, as was the new kid on the block, Nasir Mazhar who knows how to make a crop top. Alexander Wang re-interpreted sportswear with bodycon dresses, high-heeled pumps and sporty accessories- which you don’t need to wear at the gym.

Even the humble parka was brought back to life at the New York shows, with a makeover by J. Crew and Marc by Marc Jacobs, and Hugo Boss offered us a safe and completely wearable take on the polo shirt.

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Gingham girls

Stripes and checks make for a Little House on the Prairie trend with New York leading the way. Diane von Furstenberg showcased flirty dresses perfect for the French Riviera, and bound to put a spring in your pedicured step! Oscar de la Renta is as glam as you can expect, and his checks took a large, pastel turn. Shorts suits coupled with loose oversized jackets are perfect for layering and pretty enough to see you through any weather and Lela Rose showed us that checks don’t have to look like your granny’s tablecloth in her version of the spring summer two piece! And if you need any extra assurance, check out Altuzarra- perfect for the sexy girl. The gingham silhouettes unbuttoned just enough to tantalize and a silhouette designed to flatter. Whilst the Italian powerhouse Mui Mui took us on a trip to a John Walters film with 50s inspired pencil skirts and housecoats.

In London, we did it slightly differently and Ryan Lo presented a knitted version in a sugarcoated pastel palette and Lulu Lui gave us vertical stripes – if you have the legs for it! Or spend the next five months getting those legs into check!

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By Sara Darling

 

 

 

LFW Feb ’14: Day 3 AW14

FAULT‘s fashion team hit the catwalk shows and backstage at London Fashion Week (Feb ’14) to bring you our favourite pieces from the Autumn / Winter 2014 shows. Stay connected – on TwitterFacebook or right here on FAULT Online – for our round-up of the designers and trends that we have our eye on.

 

Preen by Thornton Bregazzi

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This season’s Preen collection was a real smorgasbord of references; Star Wars detailing, metallic fabrics, Victorian silhouettes and prints that recalled the kaleidoscopic graphics of Eley Kishimoto. The look was strong; neon in palette and merging these influences with every look, creating a runway woman who appeared clearly creative and clever with it. Styling the show can have been no mean feat, but experimental proportions balanced each other beautifully, retaining an easiness and effortless luxury. The lightness of the lace and metallics allowed for a loose shape and complex layering of print and colour. Some of the totally neon orange looks could have seemed too much but, amidst the coolly intellectual collage of the other looks, they were bold and high-impact.

 

Temperley

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For AW14, Temperley London looked abroad, using ethnic prints and an Oriental-influenced palette of china blue and pale white, with bursts of tribal print and folk embroidery. This felt like a bit of a revival of the boho-chic that was so popular when Temperley first burst onto the scene in the early 2000s, but there was a sharpness of silhouette and cut that launched the collection right up to date. Cut at the waist, with strong prints and beautifully intricate detailing, these looks were bold and unusually utilitarian, whilst maintaining the glamour and femininity that the label is so renowned for. The collection unfolded nicely, with heavier evening looks dispersed throughout so that it managed to end not in predictably darker night shades but in light peach and blush pink, with a final look in palest ivory. Temperley knows her strengths, and she has mastered the art of playing to them without endlessly repeating herself.

 

Topshop Unique

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The Topshop Unique show always offers a wide range of influences and looks, and AW14 was no different. The majority of the collection was rendered in a cool palette of concrete grey, electric blue and stony black. The look was loose, effortless and- as is always the case- achingly cool. Jackets and coats were worn with sleeves slipping off the shoulder whilst skirts were, for the most part, short or sheer. Everything from jumpers to jackets to fur tabards were belted in at the waist and trousers were slouchy and rolled at the cuffs. The collection may have benefited from a more strict adherence to the original colour palette but a mid-section in camel and taupe detracted nothing from the strength of the shapes and silhouettes on offer.

 

Vivienne Westwood Red Label       

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Vivienne Westwood has become a true hallmark of British heritage and quality and her AW14 collection was a statement of this. Restrained in silhouette and styling with minimal, everyday makeup and a relatively paired-back palette of muted grey, blue and beige, the collection was given punch with pops of tartan and scarlet. Westwood appropriated her own archive, with references to past collections in the mini skirts, double-breasted suits, crinoline shapes and sweetheart lapels. This was a refined luxury; a statement of power and purpose with Westwood’s habitual attention to detail and a focus on flattering the woman above all else. Amidst the theatrics of other shows this season, this show had refreshingly little to prove. Westwood is an effortless master of her craft.

 

Mary Kantrazoukantrazou

Mary Katrantzou’s AW14 collection was a beautiful tribute to symbols; from heraldic emblems to Art Deco patterns, love-hearts and men’s-room signs. Layered intricately over simple column shapes, with fabric in muted but rich colours draped and pleated with a careful simplicity. Katrantzou’s star has itself been long-rising in the fashion industry and with this collection, she managed to affirm her design aesthetic once again whilst side-stepping the digital print technique that threatened to define her brand. The clothes in this show possessed what has always been essential to her work- a staggering craftsmanship that she fuses with her thoroughly modern vision. She simply knows what the woman of today wants to wear and, season upon season, she delivers it with an unexpected twist. The symbols and signs so deeply interwoven into this show will no doubt filter out in accessories and prints over the coming months, whilst the clothes had a classic shape and subtlety that will do well on the red carpet. Yet another triumph for Katrantzou.

 

Jonathon Saunders

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Jonathan Saunders’ AW14 collection was a tour de force of jarring print, colour and texture. It kind of felt like it shouldn’t have worked but somehow he nailed it. The sheer maximalist intent of the collection brought a raw energy to the runway, with oversized detailing in collars and sleeves allowing for an awkwardness of proportions that played into the extremity of each look. Loose shapes and clean cuts balanced out the volume of print and colour, whilst the styling played off fuchsia and raspberry shades with cool camel and grey. By experimenting with textures early into the collection, the incorporation of a wide range of textiles- from furs and wet-look fabric, to textured wool and quilted silk- did not feel uneven or excessive.  In short, this collection was complex but clean, with a beautiful attention to detail and fresh experiments with textile and pattern. Saunders continues to refine his aesthetic, building upon his label signatures but not conforming to them.

 

Ashish

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Ashish’s shows are always full of energy and his AW14 collection proved to be no different. In what can always be expected to be an electrifying, flamboyant affair, he didn’t let us down. A pink disney-girl dress complete with sparkling tiara opened the show – setting the bar for the colour theme throughout. The glittering show was a love affair with pink, baby blues, gold, black and holographic silver. Blinged-up, form-fitting tracksuits made their appearance, alongside ‘princess-style’, full-skirted gowns, ruffled and ragged denim looks, plus jazzy sparkled jogging bottoms and bomber jackets. Ashish is an expert at taking the ordinary and making it extraordinary and in a sea of minimalism, seeing a designer staying true to their aesthetic when it may not be the ‘in’ style is to be applauded. Ashish’s girls are party girls who are in love with life – what’s not to love about that?

 

Nicole Farhi

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Nicole Farhi staged her A/W presentation on a Sunday morning at  29 Portland Place, a beautiful property with pastel-coloured walls and high windows. In this way, it provided the perfect setting for Farhi’s light, laid back collection. Models walked on loop, striding through the crowd in silk palazzo pants, pale pastel-coloured furs (sky blue and mint green), and minimalist separates cleanly-cut and loose-fitting. This was a relaxed luxury and it looked incredible; sophisticated and polished yet effortless and modern. Farhi has long specialised in this type of fashion- clothes that travel from home to boardroom to cocktail party- but this collection had a streak of experimentation. From coats and jackets in woven fur, to the quirkily beautiful colour palette, these clothes were eye-catching without being try-hard. And with the recent success of labels like Céline, Raf Simons and Marni, that seems to be the fashion gold for the designers and buyers of today.

 

Words by Will Ballantyne-Reid

London Fashion Week Highlights – Day 3

Words: Katlin Siil

The third day of London Fashion Week was bursting with creative energy and talent as British fashion giants (Mulberry, Temperley) took to the stage alongside our bright young stars (Jonathan Saunders, Preen by Thornton Bregazzi). We also witnessed a catwalk debut (Whistles), and two trends were very noticeable: constructed punk and cleverly manipulated PVC and putting dresses over trousers and skirt suits.

Preen by Thornton Bregazzi

Preen by Thornton Bregazzi

The morning star was Preen by Thornton Bregazzi with their sci-fi punk collection. There were typical punk features such as black leather, PVC and an overdose of metallic zips, but these were balanced with pretty floral prints, making the collection, against all odds, perhaps one of the softest we have seen from the duo.

 

Margaret Howell

Margaret Howell

Margaret Howell referenced the French resistance during World War II and despite the somewhat morbid subject matter it was a typically Howell-like collection of understated chic in muted hues and relaxed silhouettes. Perfectly appropriate for the English winter, it boasted soft cashmere, tweeds and comfy cottons. So very nonchalant, we will always love Howell for her own unique style and signature.

Mulberry

Mulberry

Emma Hill at Mulberry took her inspiration from swinging London. The a-line skirts (the favorite shape for the season, it seems) were short, the jackets were boxy and the puff-sleeved dresses had an almost coquette quality to them. There was, of course, lots of leather – expect skirt-suits in brown and olive green leather and detailed lady-like bags to take centre stage come fall. Not to mention the ever so adorable pups!

 

Temperley

Temperley

Temperley presented another sophisticated collection showcasing her tremendous talent for crafty detailing. The masterful contradiction in the feather-light Grecian dresses with their heavy beadwork was breathtaking, while the feminine skirts, blouses and day dresses (a tribute to silver screen siren and Hitchcock girl Tippy Hedren) will make the Duchess of Cambridge very happy. A celebrity favorite, Temperley front row was once again a star-studded affair with the likes of Olivia Palermo and Kate Nash making an appearance.

Topshop Unique

Topshop Unique

Topshop Unique – a show that seems to be the highlight of the LFW calendar, attracting even Queen Bee Anna Wintour – opened with Cara Delevingne and showcased even more leather and PVC. It was both edgy and feminine with soft cashmeres, pastels and fur stoles. The glittery finale series added a flirty playful touch.

Mary Katrantzou

Mary Katrantzou

Mary Katrantzou abandoned her usual bright colour pallet for a monochrome one. The results were splendid – it was probably the strongest, most refreshing collection we have seen from her. The oriental shapes were the perfect canvas for the digital prints of pastoral scenery complete with rivers and bridges – a delicate, almost nostalgic combination, perhaps the most stunning collection at LFW this season so far, dare we say.

Jonathan Saunders

Jonathan Saunders

Jonathan Saunders surprised us with a less ‘Saunders’ collection than usual – missing were the repetitive patterns we have grown to love, as well as the cute matching ensembles and knit-sets. But we (almost) forgive him as he presented a strong collection of PVC and punk in a soft, feminine way. Combined with tweeds and silks, it was more retro than punk. A-lined skirts once again made an appearance, as did the very ‘Saunders’ colour pops in baby blue, orange and pink.

Matthew Williamson

Matthew Williamson

Matthew Williamson’s collections are going from strength to strength. The former go-to designer for Ibiza party girls (Jade Jagger and Kate Moss, but party girls nonetheless) is finally all grown up, dressing her woman in city-sleek combos only tastefully reminiscent of the former hippy days. The mandatory Williamson prints will always be in the mix (and thank God!), but they are now bolder, the fabrics less sheer, the structures more sophisticated and the silhouette more practical. But underneath it all, we can still see that same girl who danced the night away on a sunny beach in Spain. Only now, she is simultaneously running an empire.

Paul Smith

Paul Smith

Paul Smith also thought outside the box this season. His collection had fewer distracting details and patterns and less fuss than we are used to seeing from him. We salute Smith for incorporating the new wider and shorter trouser shape in such beautiful way, introducing bold colours and colour combinations (who wouldn’t love those azure blues and fuchsia pinks) and generally adapting to a more modern, simpler and sophisticated fashion vernacular.