British Summer Time Announce New Wave of Acts

 

BST_colAdding to their already stellar line-up, British Summer Time just keep the good news coming. As of today, on Friday 1st of July, Massive Attack will be taking the main stage in Hyde Park alongside Patti Smith, TV on The Radio, Warpaint and Ghostpoet. Tickets for this day will be going on sale at 9am on the 11th of March.

LONDON, ENGLAND - JULY 13:  A general view of The Rolling Stones performing on stage during a headline performance as part of Barclaycard Present British Summer Time Hyde Park on July 13, 2013 in London, England.  (Photo by Dave J Hogan/Getty Images)

LONDON, ENGLAND – JULY 13: A general view of The Rolling Stones performing on stage during a headline performance as part of Barclaycard Present British Summer Time Hyde Park on July 13, 2013 in London, England. (Photo by Dave J Hogan/Getty Images)

This 2016, Barclaycard presents British Summer Time Hyde Park hits its fourth year, firmly established as the essential London summer event. Already announced for July 9th as headliners are Take That, bringing their full live experience to Hyde Park for the very first time. And on July 8th, Mumford & Sons will headline with special guests Alabama Shakes and Wolf Alice

On the 2nd of July, Jamie XX and Blood Orange will join a Grammy winning Kendrick Lamar alongside BRIT Award winner and platinum selling Florence And The Machine on the main stage of BST. This will be Kendrick Lamar’s only UK festival appearance. You can check out the announcement video below.

 

Teasing even further, amongst the new additions you’ll find BRIT Award-winning trip-folk star Cat Power, whose spellbinding mix of folk, country and blues you won’t want to miss, as Hyde Park will be the only place to catch Cat this summer in London.

She’ll be joined on the main stage by Norwegian DJ and producer Todd Terje and The Olsens. Rolling Stone magazine has placed Todd amongst their “25 DJs That Rule The Earth” , scoring an impressive no.17 slot. He’s bound to get crowds grooving in Hyde Park, especially since his live band The Olsens will be joining him. Expect a musical whirlwind that will bring to life hits from Todd’s debut album It’s About Time.

Also, Kamasi Washington, a genius of the tenor sax, is set to bring jazz funk fun to the afternoon. He’s definitely a force to be reckoned with, playing alongside household names such as Snoop Dogg, Chaka Khan and Flying Lotus.

Crowd

This year’s line-up has gotten everyone at FAULT HQ bouncing off the walls. We can’t help but wonder if Alex Turner is going to make another cameo appearance and dance like nobody is watching despite everyone will be watching – definitely a highlight to The Stroke’s first UK gig in years.

Avoid disappointment and grab yourself early tickets, as this year’s festival promises to be another memorable experience.

 

Ticket Prices:

£59.50                          General Admission     

£69.50                          Priority Entry           

£89.50                          Premium View                                                           

£129.50                        Barclaycard VIP Summer Garden                               

£199.50                        The Terrace

 

You can find more info on the event on their website, Facebook and Twitter accounts.

FAULT Future: Freddie Dickson

 

We recently spent the afternoon with Freddie Dickson, the young voice setting music blogs ablaze with his dark ‘Doom Pop’ sound. Courting comparisons to Lana del Rey and the legendary Nick Cave, Dickson has just today released the video for his new single ‘Speculate‘,  which has already been played on Annie Mac’s show on Radio 1 and Jo Good’s on XFM.

It’s taken from an EP, of the same name, out April 13th on Columbia. Dickson has also announced an intimate headline show at The Waiting Room in Stoke Newington on 1st April, before heading out on the Communion New Faces tour on the 20th.
Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

What are your influences and how have you arrived at this current ‘Doom Pop’ sound?

In the early days it was Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Van Morrison, and all those guys I had grown up on. Then as I got older I became more into production- The XX, Lana del Rey, Florence + the Machine, Plan B. I wanted an all-encompassing style for my music.

When did you start writing?

I didn’t start singing until I was 18 at an open mic, but I had been writing since I was 15/16. It just got to a point where I realised I didn’t want anyone else to be singing my songs.

When you did start performing, was it something that came easily to you?

No, I was so shy! But I just drilled my way through endless open mics. I guess I ‘Ed Sheeran’d’ my way through it! (laughs)

Were people quick to take notice?

No, not until I changed my sound. To begin with, I was just too stuck in the past. I was trying to be Bob Dylan, and no-one should try that! I got bored myself, and I did a gig in East London when I was 21 and a friend was just like “that was really bad.” And I knew it.

But I went away, and got Logic on my laptop, and started developing the sound I have now. The artists I want to be like are the ones who constantly change- Plan B, Kanye, Bowie. I get bored so easily (laughs)

Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

It’s interesting, watching sessions and live performances that you’ve done, to see how you take that production-based sound and transfer it into the realm of the live experience. How do you find the music changes when you perform it live?
I think the live experience has to be so different from the record – if you just try to mimic the recorded version, there’s nothing worse. It’s almost like you have to do a cover of your own song, and put some twist on it.

The visuals seem very important to your music- is that something you’re closely involved with?
Yeah I think it’s so important. All the artists I like – Nick Cave, Patti Smith – they created all this powerful imagery. It would be weird, given how dark my sound is, if I was styled with bright neon clothing, right? (laughs) I think it all has to fit together; how you’re photographed, how you look, the live performance.

Part of that process is collaboration, which seems to underpin so much of today’s music industry. Is that something that comes easily to you?
When I was first signed I had so many co-writing sessions set up for me, and none of them really worked. But  I eventually hit it off with someone and now I have this great team of musicians and producers who help me reach the exact thing I want. I’m not an accomplished musician, and I don’t even try to aspire to greatness because the singing is really my thing.

Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

Does the writing process come easily to you?
No not at all! And I think that annoys so many of the people I work with (laughs) I like to make sure every word is perfect, and that every syllable comes out of my mouth easily. I could never be one of these people who writes three songs a week, they’d all sound the same!

It’s interesting to hear you talk in terms of before and after being signed. How has the process changed since being signed- are there new pressures that come with having a label?
Not really- my label has been really nice. We still do it in the same way, writing away in my bedroom, and they give me my own recording space with good speakers which is great. It’s like having a little office (laughs)

As you’re writing music, are you constantly listening to new material by other artists, or do you try to cut yourself from other people’s work?
No, I follow a lot of blogs and love just diving into new music. I’d love to work with a hip-hop band, or a dream collaborator like Nas or Sia! I think she’s amazing because it’s so much about the songs and the voice.

Are you excited to be going on the Communion New Faces tour at the end of April?
Yeah I can’t wait  – it’s such incredible exposure! At the moment I can see how the fans are spread out and there are so many in places like Russia and Eastern Europe, but not enough in England yet (laughs)

Finally, what is your FAULT?
Scotch Eggs. And not being able to write songs very quickly.

 

All photography by Constance Meath Baker

Simon Ekrelius for AW13

Check out Swedish designer Simon Ekrelius’s latest fashion film entitled “The Chase” to accompany his simonekrelius.003

simonekrelius.08AW13 collection. Taking inspiration from the Patti Smith book ‘Just Kids’, it focuses on the story of love, life and loss in human nature.

With his roots in Stockholm he now lives and creates from his London base and continues to make asymmetrical cuts, contrasting textures and bold silhouettes for the confident woman. Recognizable by their architectural angle, each piece is defined by individuality and a sense of fun.

The capsule collection will be sold in London and Sweden and on his website www.simonekrelius.com

Check out the film here:

By Sara Darling

Patti Smith New Album – BANGA

Patti Smith - Banga

Patti Smith will release Banga via Columbia on June 5th, this is her her first album of new material since 2004’s Trampin’.  The LP was recorded in Electric Lady Studios with  Lenny Kaye, Jay Dee Daugherty, and Tony Shanahan. In a recent interview Smith explains the album title is a reference to the Mikhail Bulgakov novel The Master and Margarita. Banga as contains a ballad for Amy Winehouse called “This is the Girl” and a birthday song for um Johnny Depp?! called “Nine”. The first single from the album, “April Fool”, features Tom Verlaine and is out now. Patti Smith a classic FAULT.