Tory Lanez Menswear Cover for FAULT Magazine 28

Tory Lanez X FAULT Magazine

 

Photography: Miles Holder

Stylist: Rachel Gold

Grooming: Shamirah Sairally

 

Words: Trina John-Charles

We bundle out of the photo shoot and into a waiting car. Tory Lanez is clearly rattled by a previous incident and I believe everything he is threatening to do if the car doesn’t move promptly. Although quite intimidating when the switch has been flipped, he remains polite and quite chatty with me – revealing some amazing tidbits off mic, but sadly, we are not that type of publication. As we weave in and out of the busy central London traffic, Tory rolls the biggest blunt I have ever seen and our 20-minute conversation about the new album ‘Memories Don’t Die’, the cultural appropriation police and derogatory terms in music, begins…

 

FAULT: On the song ‘Happiness’ you talk about losing your mother. How difficult was it making a song like that?

Tory Lanez : I had to record that song like, four different times. I just kept crying every time I tried to record it. I knew it would resonate with people, because of the way it resonated with me.

 

FAULT: People always talk about stark similarities between the street culture in London and the street culture in Toronto. Having been here many times, have you noticed this yourself?

Tory Lanez : Definitely. Like, they way we talk… the way we say, ’mandem’, or when we talk about somebody we’ll say, ‘a man did this’. I think it’s the way we are all brought up. It has a bit of a Caribbean edge to it. I think that’s where the similarities come in.

FAULT: Are you planning on working with any other London, or British based artists?

Tory Lanez : Of course, I want to work with a lot of people from here. I want to do a whole project thats just with people from here. I definitely want to work with Nines, Stefflondon, J Hus, Dave, Stormzy… of course Skepta.

 

FAULT: Keeping the British theme, there is a Zayn Malik sample on the new album. It is done in a great way and it isn’t the most obvious choice. Why did you choose that particular sample?

Tory Lanez : I didn’t. I didn’t even know it was a Zayn sample until after I was trying to clear it. That’s when I found out it was a One Direction sample. The producer, Christian Lou, brought that beat to me.

 

FAULT: …And Sting’s influence on the album?

Tory Lanez : Sting specifically asked us to use his song instead of ours. We had like an interpretation that sounded like his song and Sting said, ‘no, I want them to use the real one, the real song’… so that’s what happened with that. Sting loves it… It’s dope that he allowed us to use his song and was like, ‘use the real song, I don’t want you to use something like it, I want you to use the real thing’. 

 

FAULT: When you talk about being younger and people trying to bully you, it’s almost like you developed a very defensive ‘fuck all of you’ kind of attitude. Is it fair to say you still have that now towards negative people?

Tory Lanez : Yeah. I’m always like that. I grew up like, you fend for yours and if somebody tries to take yours, you show them why they should have never tried it. So for me, I’m the type of person… I just don’t take no bullshit – with anything.

 

FAULT: You have already addressed the issue you had with an upmarket clothing store assistant being rude and dismissive towards you, because of your appearance and in retaliation you spent $35k (of record label money) with a different assistant to prove a point. There was a lot of chatter online about this not being the best way to handle the situation. It is great this conversation is being had because this is something that has been happening for years. In retrospect and if it was your own money and not the record label’s, would you have dealt with the situation in the same way?

Tory Lanez : Some of it was my own money… and yeah, I would have still dealt with it the same way. I didn’t do anything wrong. All I was doing was shopping for clothes. That store being the only store that sells high end designer fabrics, I still had to buy what I was going there to buy, I just didn’t give the commission to the person who was looking down on me.

Do you know what’s crazy… what the actual fucked up part is? The black mentality… and this is so harshly and blatantly true… the black mentality, because we have been oppressed for years, when we do feel like we are no longer second class and we have made something of ourselves, we have gotten our money and we have acquired whatever it is that we have acquired, when we go into stores, there are certain things we don’t want to happen. You don’t want to go into a store and ask for something and they bring you something less expensive. You don’t ever want them to act like you cant afford it… and because, as black people we feel so under privileged our whole lives, the fact that we are in a situation of more privilege, we tend to take more of an advantage of it, to prove to whoever the authority is, that we can do it to. It’s really stupid, but the pride and the underprivilege leads you to it.

 

FAULT: Very loosely leading on from that, Skepta recently in an interview that the term ‘white bitch’ is racist and should not be used. Some people agreed, some disagreed. I just wanted to know your thoughts on that, as you use the term on the album. 

Tory Lanez : Is black bitch the same, or no?

FAULT: Well, Skepta argued that nobody would ever say ‘black bitch’, because there would be such uproar…

Tory Lanez : I’d say black bitch, or white bitch …and feel absolutely no way about it, what do you mean? When I say ‘black bitch’ I don’t mean, black bitch. I am not calling a woman a bitch. I’m not saying, ‘Yo, you black bitch’. When I am with women, or when I am with girls, they will say, ‘I’m with my bitches’… A bitch is a female dog. My friend is my dog. If I say, ‘this is my dog’ I mean this is my dog, he’s my friend, he’s my companion. If I say, ‘I’m with my bitches’, they are my dogs too, just the female type. It doesn’t matter if they are white or black. What people should really be mad at, is the fact that I’m saying bitches. If you are mad at me calling you a bitch, then be mad at me calling you a bitch, but don’t say white bitch is more racist than black bitch, or that I would never say black bitch so why is it ok to say white bitch. If you are going to have a problem with that, just have a problem with the word bitch, don’t have a problem with the colour. If a girl is a whore and she is white, she is a white whore. If a girl is black and she’s a whore, she’s a black whore. I hate for it to sound so blatant and so rude, but you have to get mad at the word, not the colour it’s associated with. You cant get mad at someone calling you a black bitch, be mad at the word bitch… you’re black, that can’t change, be mad at the word that is derogatory.

 

FAULT: Finally, what is your FAULT?

Tory Lanez : My only FAULT is that I was cursed with like these devilish, devilish good looks. It is not the worse curse to have, but that’s my fault, Sorry. Sorry to all those I may have offended with them [laughs].

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 28 – THE STRUCTURAL ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

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Vance Joy for FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Vance Joy x FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Vance Joy FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Words and Photography: Miles Holder
Fashion: Rachel Gold

Vance Joy first caught our eye back in 2013 with the release of his debut album EP God Loves You When You’re Dancing which featured his runaway hit ‘Riptide’. In February 2018 Vance Joy returned with his second album record Nation of Two which featured hits ‘Saturday Sun’ and ‘I’m With You’. About to embark on his worldwide tour, we caught up with Vance to find out more!

FAULT: You’re about to embark on your Nation Of Two world tour, excited?

Vance Joy: We did a short European tour last month, and it was so much fun to see the fans and reconnect with them in person. It’d been three and a half years since we’d last played in Europe, so it’ll be great to relaunch with the big shows and play some new material. IT should be a lot of fun, and everyone is really excited.

Do you find that your songs suddenly take on new meaning when you get to play them live to your fans?

Vance Joy: I’m always surprised to find that so many people know the lyrics to a bunch of songs and it’s such a warm and enthusiastic vibe when I’m playing, and it’s super encouraging. You don’t know what songs people will know and recently on tour we played some of the deep album tracks, and it was great to see people enjoying them. As we tour, I’m getting more comfortable with the songs and finding new ways to sing them and wear them in a bit. ‘We’re Going Home’, and ‘Saturday Sun’ are tracks in particular which are starting to feel good to perform on stage.

Vance Joy FAULT Magazine Issue 28

 

Is there a date in particular or festival in particular that you’re especially excited for?

Vance Joy: I’m looking forward to going to LA for a rehearsal for a few days, so I’m looking forward to the band and me having a relaxing time out there. We’ll do a couple of shows and then head to Coachella which is a big one that everyone will know. There are also dates in huge venues which will also be a new challenge and experience for us, but it’s exciting to play to bigger rooms and larger audiences. I’m looking forward to seeing how it all goes!

Nation Of Two released a couple of months ago now; do you ever find yourself wanting to make changes or fixes to it or do you feel like the project was exactly what it needed to be at the time and it should remain that way?

Vance Joy: I’m quite relaxed when it comes to that stuff; I think you need a deadline and know when to say goodbye. I feel like when you have a song that you feel strongly about but there’s pushback, and people say, “I don’t think you quite nailed it on this song”, then I listen. I listen to all of those perspectives and then eventually you’ve got to release it and say “that’s it”. I sometimes think instead of looking too closely and getting too stuck on the minutia you can get distracted. Certainly, after two months you might hear it on the radio and say “oh, I’m seeing it differently now” but I think you can get distracted and go off course with perfection and I don’t think there’s such a thing.

Vance Joy FAULT Magazine Issue 28

What is your favourite tour story?

Vance Joy: I was fortunate and got to play the AFL Grand Final, and I was playing with another band called Living Head, and the main headliner was Sting. After we played, we were chilling out in the green room, and I felt someone hug me from behind, and I turned around, and it was Sting! It was surreal, I just shook his hand and said: “lovely to meet you!”

What is your writing discipline, do you sit down at a writing station and try to get through it or do you just let them come to you naturally?

Vance Joy: I think there’s a bit of both and always a push and pull. If you haven’t written a song in a while, you can get frustrated. Sometimes you just have to pick up your guitar, and a song comes, and other days it feels like you’re trying to force it out. I think ultimately the excellent stuff songs happen mysteriously and catch you off guard. Some days you can write and take the chance that magic will happen again but sometimes you have to approach it with a bit more discipline. The best stuff happens when you’re not trying to force it too much.

What is your FAULT?

Vance Joy: I can be impatient, and when I’m in a bad mood, the atmosphere can be quiet and cold. I might not say anything, but people can tell! I’m learning to try and remove myself at times when I’m annoyed (or hungry) but it doesn’t happen too often, but I’m trying to notice when it does.

Vance Joy FAULT Magazine Issue 28

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 28 – THE STRUCTURAL ISSUE –  IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

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Ady Suleiman: Exclusive shoot for FAULT Issue 28

Ady Suleiman was shot by Miles Holder and styled by Edith Walker Millwood exclusively for FAULT Magazine Issue 28 – the Structural Issue. Interview by Will Soer.

Ady Suleiman knows who he is. Since he started singing his own songs aged 18 he’s been through a lot; collaborations with superstars (Chance the Rapper, Joey Bada$$, Erykah Badu), major label deals, and intense promotion schedules. His blend of honesty and groove formed irresistible rolling RnB, that explored the issues of his life in real time. Last year he wrote an article for the Independent opening up about recent mental health issues, a heavy stall on his mind and career that had taken a lot of work and lifestyle changes to release. Today I’m talking to him a couple of weeks before his debut album Memories will drop, and one day before he thinks he’ll be over a flu, but things are calm where he is. He’s enjoyed the excuse to binge-watch TV in his London flat and feels excited to be back on the road. Before getting into the interview we talk about another recent experience he enjoyed; his photoshoot with FAULT chief-editor Miles Holder; ‘it’s a skill for the photographer to get a natural look, as standing in front of loads of bright lights is always a bit tense.’

FAULT: Do you find photoshoots that different from performing in gigs, in terms of aesthetically presenting yourself?

Ady Suleiman: With music you always have the song. Any time I get lost and start thinking ‘oh shit there’s a lot of people in here’ and that’s in my mind, I say to myself ‘listen to the music’ and I can get back into character.

One thing I noticed in your music is that there’s a lot of direct addresses, to friends and lovers, when performing these tracks do you go into that headspace?

I think it’s really good to, as it’s like a scripted performance; you can perform the lines in a million ways, some are right. You can just go onstage and perform, and people would think it’s alright, but I want that extra level; the songs are personal and emotional and quite direct, so I want people to feel that story. I don’t necessarily visualise the person I’m addressing, but I always think about me as a character, what am I showing here to the audience, the emotion I was feeling when I wrote that song.

Do some of your tracks have an element of you talking directly to yourself?

100%, it works in both ways. For example, with Why You Runnin Away, it came about from me being frustrating with someone close to me, I was like why the fuck are you doing this shit. As I wrote it I related it to myself; maybe me running away doesn’t have as much consequence as yours does because you’re in a more severe matter, but I can still apply this to myself.

I recently read an article that connected the rise of quiet-storm style RnB in the US with political tension, as it’s a time when people need help with pessimism and anxiety. Do you think about your music as something that could help people like this?

Definitely. It always depends on the concept, sometimes it is just a story, but sometimes I think what am I trying to say with the story? Why am I telling it? Music is stuff that you say, you know everyone goes through, I can get away with saying it by singing it. Like with Running Away maybe I didn’t actually say that stuff to my friend. Some other people are comfortable just saying that stuff normally, but me not so much.

Do you feel like, this ability to express yourself more through song than through spoken word is aided by your musical lineage? Do you think that, in comparison to other genres, your style empowers you more?

I don’t think so, because I don’t really think of genres as doing a specific thing. I think I’d still be direct if I was into metal. If someone gave me a hip hop beat, a reggae beat, a soul beat, a jazz beat, what I’d do on top of this would be similar in terms of my delivery. Genre for me is more the instrumentation and what you put around it, rather than delivery. I think I got that from Amy Winehouse, because she was doing Jazz on that first record, but her lyrics were like ‘I need to get the right angle so he can fuck me right’. That’s why I really liked it, it was contemporary; she spoke the same way that we speak. I wanna talk the way I talk and speak freely.

So is she the GOAT for you?

Vocally, yeah 100%. She made me believe in myself, because she did that jazz/hip hop cross when I was wondering if I’d be able to the music I wanted to make.

She gave British music more hunger for that kind of direct honesty and strident character, that broke away from the semi-American ambiguous Simon Cowell delivery.

Yeah absolutely, I feel like I knew her, like she was my mate. When I went to see that documentary about her everyone in the cinema left feeling the same way, and I felt annoyed, like ‘you don’t know her better than me!’ I don’t think we’ll see anyone like that for some time.

Listening to the 6 minute version of Need Somebody To Love makes it clear how central rhythm is to your voice, even the acapella section keeps a headnod going, and I could tell when the track’s end came without checking my phone screen because your voice broke time and curtails off. Where do you think that flow in your voice comes from? I’m assuming it’s not Amy Winehouse.

I don’t know, maybe hip hop, I listen to a lot of stuff like Damian Marley and Lauryn Hill. This is just me making sense of the question, it might not be true, but I think it’s because of my dyslexia. My reading comprehension is actually quite bad, so when I write something I freestyle. The freestyle has a specific flow, and I write to that flow. Some people can write something and then change the melody afterwards but that’s not how my brain works, it’s too fucking slow. I wish I could, because it takes ages to write this way, but once I’ve written something it’s already got an accent. Because I write in this instinctive manner I feel stuck to this flow. The music’s put around that; I don’t write to beats, it always starts with me and the guitar. It’s always so natural, which can be a fault sometimes because I want to just write a sentence, but at the same time it helps bring that uniqueness. Like I don’t focus on that flow in my music, it’s not a conscious thing, it’s just me. If you really want to be unique, even if you can’t sing, just crack your voice on a record, because no one else has your voice.

You sing about your social anxiety in Pass The Alcohol; is it difficult to re-access songs that are about being in that dark place?

Absolutely not. Those songs written about my mental fragility, I find it really easy to slip back into them, probably because I still have those thoughts but I respond differently to them. That song was about a time when I was using alcohol to deal with social anxiety, and I can still imagine doing that, but I’m choosing not to. Serious and State of Mind can be harder because they’re more about me having a theory, and I’ve developed on those theories now; I see naivety in them.

Do you wanna keep it that way, or would you consider rewriting songs to fit where you are now?

The only thing I sometimes do is in the outros, I’ll add little bits on, it’s a reflective period. And that’s actually how Need Somebody To Love was, the rappy part after the big chorus when it’s like *sings ‘bam bam bam bam’ beautifully*, in the story it’s like ‘cool, now I’ve met that person.’ But because it’s all me it’s not hard to go back to those places.

Do you think that your ability to slip into the mindset of something that’s been hard for you is easier once that you’ve solidified it into a song?

There’s a sense of that, because there’s a distance from it. When I come offstage I’m not still in that song, it’s over, though that depends where you are in your life. When I wrote Drink Too Much and performed it in those months, I’d come offstage and think about it, and I’m having a fucking drink. This is why I called the album Memories, because these songs are like little segments, little thoughts. Have you seen that Harry Potter thing, where he pulls memories out and puts them in a bowl? I can go into the songs and then come back out, without it sticking.

Photographer: Miles Holder
Fashion: Edith Walker Millwood
Grooming: Shamirah Sairally
Words: Will Soer

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 28 – THE STRUCTURAL ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

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…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

FAULT Magazine 10 year anniversary @ UNIT London with Bulldog Gin & Snog

FAULT Magazine 10 year anniversary event & Issue 27 launch

FAULT Magazine 10 year anniversary: FAULT Magazine director Nick Artsruni (left) with Issue 27 front cover photographer Jack Alexander (right)

FAULT Magazine director Nick Artsruni (left) with Issue 27 front cover photographer Jack Alexander (right)

We celebrated the FAULT Magazine 10 year anniversary in style with the likes of Rizzle Kicks’ Jordan Stephens, Rae Morris, Felicity Hayward, GIRLI, Dakota Blue Richards, Jonny Nelson and Sascha & Mimi Bailey at UNIT London gallery last week.

While the BULLDOG Gin sponsored bar served their signature gin & tonics (with a slice of crisp grapefruit on the rim) downstairs, guests enjoyed an exhibition of some of our favourite-ever FAULT shoots with the likes of Kylie Jenner, Usher, Ellie Goulding, Ben Barnes, Big Sean, Nick Jonas and Gary Numan. Well, we hope they enjoyed them, anyway!

Pride of place, of course, was our latest cover with Liam Gallagher. Shot by Jack Alexander, the front cover for FAULT 27: the Best of British Issue was the focal point for our showcase event that was catered exclusively by stupendous fro-yo trailblazers Snog and their brilliant new brand, Beltane & Pop.

The official ‘FAULT Magazine 10 year anniversary afterparty’ took place at Mahiki Mayfair…we think. To be honest, we weren’t quite sure where we were once our private section started overflowing with bottles of vodka and Mahiki’s trademark treasure chests!

Nick Artsruni with Jordan Stephens of Rizzle Kicks

 

FAULT Magazine editor Miles Holder with women’s fashion editor Rachel Holland

 

TV presenter Jonny Nelson

 

Felicity Hayward and Rome Fortune with Nick Artsruni

 

Presenter James Stewart at FAULT Magazine 10 Year anniversary event

 

Rae Morris

 

Dakota Blue Richards

Mimi Nishikawa-Bailey, Sascha Bailey, Nick Artsruni (l-r)

 

FAULT Magazine contributor Adina Ilie

 

GIRLI and friend (l-r)

 

Guests enjoy SNOG

 

 

Lucy Chappell with photographer Jack Alexander

 

Roxxxan with Nick Artsruni

 

Sophie Hopkins with Jack Alexander

 

Miles Holder with Melisa Whiskey

 

Model Alexander James

 

Model Chad Kuzyk

 

FAULT Magazine contributor Olivia Pinnock (centre, red hair) and guests

 

FAULT Magazine contributor Aimee Phillips

 

Some of the prints on display at the exhibition are available for sale.

 

Please contact us if you would like to inquire about any of the works listed below:

From left-right:

  • ‘Kylie Jenner for FAULT Magazine Issue 20’ – photographed by Lionel Deluy (black and white A0 canvas print)
  • ‘Ben Barnes for FAULT Issue 15’ – by Sinisha Nisevic (black and white A0 canvas print)
  • ‘Ellie Goulding for FAULT Issue 15’ – by Louie Banks (full colour A2 canvas print) – not for sale
  • ‘Usher for FAULT Issue 19’ – by Sinisha Nisevic (black and white A0 canvas print)
  • ‘Liam Gallagher for FAULT Issue 27 cover’ – by Jack Alexander (full colour foam board print)

 

  • ‘Nick Jonas for FAULT Issue 21’ – by Matt Holyoak (full colour A2 canvas print) – not for sale
  • ‘Kylie Jenner for FAULT Magazine Issue 20’ – photographed by Lionel Deluy (black and white A0 canvas print)
  • ‘Gary Numan for FAULT Issue 27’ – by David Richardson (full colour A0 canvas print)
  • ‘Big Sean for FAULT Issue 15’ – by Steven Gomillion & Dennis Leupold (full colour A2 canvas print) – not for sale

N.B: Where the works are not available for sale, we encourage you to contact the photographer directly!

 Special Thanks:

UNIT London Gallery

BULLDOG Gin

Outer Insight

Snog and Beltane & Pop

Mahiki Mayfair

Photographers on display: Lionel Deluy, Sinisha Nisevic, David Richardson, Matt Holyoak, Louie Banks, Jack Alexander

Amazing people who went above & beyond for us: Hermione Benest, Tim Lucas Allen, Vassilissa Conway

FAULT Team on the night: Miles Holder, Rachel Holland, Adina Ilie

This is your FAULT

 

Ben Hardy Earns His Wings In Our FAULT #23 Photoshoot Preview

Ben Hardy first appeared on UK screens playing Peter Beale in the popular TV soap, ‘Eastenders’. Like many before him, there was always a chance that Ben would fall into the “soap trap”, becoming the face of his onscreen character and settling into a lifetime stint that’d find him rarely taking on other roles due to a rigorous filming schedule.

For Ben, this was not the dream. With his eyes set on the big screen he took off to the states and landed the role of Archangel in the upcoming X-men Apocalypse movie. As part of our FAULT #23  X-Men Special, we caught up with Ben for this exclusive photo-shoot and interview.

 

Leaving a solid role in the UK and heading off for the states must have been daunting. Did you have a job lined up before you left?

No, I just left really. It’s one of those things you’ve got to just get out there to do otherwise I might find myself waking up in 10 years wondering what could have been.

 

 

Angel is quite a different role to the one you played on Eastenders. Did you know much beforehand?

Ha yes, the characters are a little different. I’d seen all the x-men films and watched the cartoon growing up but I hadn’t read many comics. I have done since getting the role and learnt a lot.

 

Angel has appeared in the X-men films before played by Ben Foster, were you able to draw much from his character to play his younger self?

As the timeline has completely warped and while I did watch X-Men: The Last Stand,  I went into playing Angel as a brand new character altogether. I’m drawing on Angel’s character as dictated by the script and my own interpretation of him without worrying too much on past appearances.

 

Is the transformation from Angel to Archangel true to the comics?

I can’t say! But I will say that it’s a really awesome transformation scene.

 

How did you adapt to all the special effects used in the movie?

It was pretty weird. I’m like, ‘OH GREAT! I get to see the X-Mansion’ and I get in there and it’s one platform and green screen [laughs]. My wings are always CGI so I’m on set flapping my arms about a lot.

 

Moving forward, will you and the younger cast members be taking over the mantle of the X-Men?

As far as I know, the original X-Men actors will remain in the franchise. But I think there is a great young cast in Tye Sheridan, Sophie Turner, Alex Shipp and Lana Condor, who have so much talent to bring to X-Men in the future.

 

There are a lot of British people in the movie! Did you all gel well on set?

Definitely! And of course the British connection helped with the banter, we could always just say, ‘well, how about that Tesco amirite!’ as a counter haha.

 

What is your FAULT?

There’s plenty! I’m a massive binge-eater. I’m either training hard and eating super healthily or I’m the opposite. There’s no in-between!

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 23 – THE ART ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE FOR PRE-ORDER NOW

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Don Broco – Exclusive Photoshoot + Interview with FAULT Magazine Online

miles-holder

Words ADINA ILIE
Photography MILES HOLDER

 

You’re just about to release your second album, Automatic. What can you tell me about it?

Well, it’s the album that we’ve been working towards for a year and a bit now and it’s the longest time that we’ve ever actually spent away from touring and being a band. I think for us, life in the studio was quite a change of pace.  We wrote our first album in about 2 months, recorded it like boom bosh and out. After that, we went on tour and then suddenly it was the right time to start writing the second album, so we just pulled ourselves out of the game for a year and wrote it. It was definitely an interesting period of self-discovery for us. Working out exactly who we wanted to be as a band and experimenting with different sounds to create the album. But now we’ve got it and it’s all done and it feels really good.

How did the writing process go this time?

It was the first time we ever wrote with our new bass player, Tom, so that was quite exciting, like finding out each others taste and boundaries and pushing each other and seeing how far we’d go. But once we got into a flow, we found it was a very collaborative process. We’re very much a band, we’re not one person calling the shots -with us, all four of us are very deeply involved in every process of the song. It’s all about the teamwork.

bon-brocco

What effect do you think it’s gonna have on people? Do you expect a different reaction as opposed to your first album? 

Yeah, I think it’s definitely going to take a few people by surprise.  But at the same time, if you’re a fan of the band already, you’re gonna really enjoy it.  It might open you up to new music and hopefully question what you’re listening to and make you think like “okay, this isn’t a band that sound like anyone else.” We’re hoping to make our mark on the world of music and stand out as a band, stand out as a group. You know, bring in all our interests and joys, make up a musical landscape and refine that into one sound. We’re hoping it’s gonna get people talking.

miles-holder-2

For you, in what way is your second album different to your first? What have you done differently now, if anything at all?

We’ve written better songs that really work together and take you on a bit of a journey, rather than just a random collection of ideas. There are ideas that are developed and messed about with in our heads. From a listener’s perspective, I think you’re gonna leave feeling like you’ve actually listened to a more well rounded bunch of songs and a better album. Musically, we experimented with a lot more instruments on this album. We got to play in a pop studio to begin with, as opposed to the usual recording on a computer that we did on our first album. On this one, we went to a proper studio where we really embraced the live band sound and made sure that everything sounded as real as possible. If we had to play things a couple of times to get them right, we did that, without being perfectly accurate in everything.  The perks of being in a studio is that we’ve got all these instruments, we got to play around with a lot of keyboard sounds, old school organs. We managed to do a couple of songs with string arrangements, so for us it was fun, like discovering instruments that take you out of that basic guitar, bass, drums. So I think that’s probably the main difference, from a songwriting perspective, the use of electronics and instrumentation.

Tell me a bit about the video for Automatic. Did you have any input on the visuals?  

Yeah we did. The basic idea was born out of our artwork. We wanted to create something strong, visually striking for our album and we spoke to various designers and photographers about trying to achieve what we wanted. The easiest idea to get it done and make it look good was to fly out to the location in Malibu. We were talking about either Miami or Malibu, somewhere where you have sea and the weather and the palm trees and create something that wasn’t pastiche but still gain reference to that sort of bygone era where exciting music was coming out in the 80s where a band still sounded like a band. You know, once we had the collection of songs that really reflected the sound of the album, we wanted the visuals to represent that. So yeah, we went out to Malibu and then to LA and came across this incredible villa in Malibu where we shot the album artwork. The video for Automatic was kind of born from the idea of that. Our director really wanted to play on this visual reference of static motion and things kind of reflecting. I guess that’s cause the song is called Automatic. His idea was to show people having a good time and show this kind of high society that you associate with that Miami aesthetic. A lot of the references were guided towards our artwork.

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Will you be doing a headlining tour after the album release? 

Yeah, we’ve got an album release launch show on the 7th, then we’ve got a week tour and we’re going back to some of the venues where we first started playing a couple of years ago. That’s gonna be the first time we get to play a lot of the new songs on the album. We’re really excited about that, it’s gonna be the first time in 3 years that we’re actually gonna get to play those venues that made us into the band that we are today. We’re extra excited.

It sounds like you really miss touring.

We do! Touring is our favourite part about being in a band and we did enjoy the studio, but at the same time, touring is what it’s all about for us. When you’re on the road, it feels like you’re actually achieving what you’re set out to do. It gives you that sense of “okay, we’re making the right call being a band.”

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A lot of bands aim to break America. Is that something that’s been on your mind or something that you’d potentially like to achieve at some point in the future? 

Yeah, I think definitely. I think for us it’s not specifically America, it’s everywhere really. I mean, the more we get to tour and the more we get to explore the world and see new and exciting places, the more driven we are about being in a band. We’re hoping to get out to America next year; it will be the first time we go out there and play, which should be fun. But there’s so many other countries we haven’t been to, we only scratched the surface. So yeah, I think this album, if things go well, will give us the opportunity to travel and explore the world.

What’s your FAULT? 

I think it’s probably being too caught up and not looking at the bigger picture. I mean for us that’s what Automatic was all about actually. Staying into the moment and not worrying.

Jennifer Davies Exclusive photoshoot & interview with FAULT Online!

Jacket: Tim Ryan
Dress: House of CB

Jennifer Davies is an artist who is pushing the boundaries of how music and visuals come together. With the release of her ‘Lapse of Time’ EP, Davies has created a video accompaniment for each track, all directed by Peter Wormleighton. All the music was produced with close friend Tord Knudsen of The Wombats, and the collision of dance beats and thunder-strike vocals bring to mind the punk-pop of Blondie and Gwen Stefani.
How did your debut ‘Lapse of Time’ come into being?

My background was always in bands, and when that came to an end I didn’t know what I wanted to do. I was signed as a solo artist but it just wasn’t sitting right with me, so I took the decision 18 months ago to be honest with the label about how I felt. I knew full-well that they could just let me go but my friend Tord Knudsen (who is in The Wombats) had worked with me on a few songs and I felt really good about them. I asked the label for the opportunity to see where I could take them, and decided that if the label didn’t get it we could go our separate ways. Thankfully they did!

Your creative process seems to be really innovative, and constantly evolving. How did it grow from those initial demos?

Having taken control of the music side of things, I started to wonder what would happen if I worked with other young creatives that I knew. A lot of major labels just go to the same people they’ve worked with for years and often it’s not that exciting. I wanted to prove that you can’t buy creativity, and it felt like a good time to collaborate with other people on the cusp of a creative breakthrough. Each video has been directed by my friend Peter Wormleighton, and styled by my friend Nabil El-Nayal, who was shortlisted for the LVMH Fashion Prize.

Jacket & Trousers: JH Zane Shoes: United Nude

Jacket & Trousers: JH Zane
Shoes: United Nude

Who have been the biggest influence on your sound?

A lot of pop artists! I feel like ‘pop’ is often seen as bit of a dirty word, but pop culture can be so exciting. I’m drawn to all sorts of things; Garbage and Shirley Manson, Gwen Stefani, Blondie. I really like pop music with personality- and I approach it with a punk aesthetic. I don’t care if people get it or not; if the passion is there, people can see it and they will connect with it.

The visuals of your music are obviously very important to you. How do you approach them?

There are a lot of different ways I go about it. For ‘Lapse of Time’, I was really influenced by Madonna’s ‘Ray of Light’. The piano element that repeats throughout the song reminded me of people rushing around the city. I loved that idea of the contrast between the city in Liverpool, and then the vast landscapes of the North West (where I’m from.) We paired up with this young photographer named Paul Richardson and he came up with this idea of me actually being in the time-lapse. I didn’t realise when I agreed to it that it would mean standing in the same place for hours and hours outside in the cold (laughs) but I love the effect! I think everyone on my team just loves the idea of these epic visuals and it’s great to all be moving in the same creative direction.

Dress: House of CB Top & skirt: Jane Bowler Shoes: United Nude

Dress: House of CB
Top & skirt: Jane Bowler
Shoes: United Nude

With the release of the album, you’ll obviously be starting to do a lot more live performance. Is that notion of ‘epic visuals’ something you hope to take forward to the stage?

Yes definitely! To begin with, I guess it will be quite hard because it will mostly be support slots and small festivals but I’d love to just take it all the way. I saw FKA Twigs performing on Jimmy Kimmel with just a fan and this giant piece of fabric and it was amazing. I think all you need is a simple idea, and if you execute it really well, you can make a performance so memorable.

Have you always wanted to be a musician and performer?

For me it actually started with movement – I always loved to dance. Eventually I started playing piano, and I would take the songs I liked and strip them down, and then start writing my own from there. My Dad ended up getting me this broken-down, second-hand piano and I never looked back! (laughs)

 

Top & Skirt: Jane Bowler

Top & Skirt: Jane Bowler

So what’s next?

Well at the moment we’re actually working on an interactive video. We basically picked five different amazing locations and have done a single take in each, deciding that the camera would roll and I would carry on no matter what. I nearly got run over by an ambulance but it’s looking good! (laughs) I’m then supporting The Wombats on a few of their dates, and then playing a few festivals, and looking forward to finally finishing the album!

What is your FAULT?

I over-think things way too much. I know I’m guilty of it and I try to stop it but I just can’t. It’s another FAULT that’s not going anywhere!

The Lapse of Time EP is available on iTunes and as a free download: here

 

Photography: Miles Holder

Fashion Editor: Kristine Kilty @ Lovely Management

Hair & Makeup: Amy Brandon @ Lovely Management 

Fashion Assistant: Shannon McGrath

Words: Will Ballantyne-Reid

 

Ella Eyre Releases Audio for ‘We Don’t Have To Take Our Clothes Off’

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Ella Eyre was shot by Miles Holder and styled by Rachel Holland at the Malmaison Hotel for FAULT 18.

 

We first heard part of this track back in January 2013 as part of ‘Virgin Records:40 Years of Distribution’ and it obviously put Ella on our radar as we would go on to feature the star in FAULT 18. This weekend Ella Eyre has gifted us by releasing the audio to her stripped back cover of ‘We Don’t Have To Take Our Clothes Off’ on her official Vevo account.

The track is full of Ella’s raspy vocals which made so many of us fall in love with in the first place. While it goes without saying that after hearing Ella belt on track ‘Waiting All Night’ with Rudimental that her voice packed some awesome punch; it’s just great to hear her sing with her raspy jazz-tones and vulnerability exposed in such a way.

We’re hoping that we can hear much much more of this on her upcoming studio album ‘Feline‘ set for release on 4th May 2015. Listen to the track below!