Gabriel Kane Day Lewis Photoshoot and Interview with FAULT Magazine Preview

 

 

 

 

Art Direction & Photography: Leonardo De Angelis & Eric Francis Silverberg 

Stylist: Marc Anthony George 

Groomer: Roberto Morelli

Stylist Assistant: Evan Grotevant

Location SplashLight Studios NYC

 

 

Words: Carolyn Okomo

 

While music appears to be the emerging pop crooner’s chosen love, the Day Lewis hasn’t cast off the idea of trading a microphone for a script, though he admits he still has much to learn about the artform.

 

“I have, and I do want to act. It just has to be right. The right director, the right cast, the right screenplay.  I want to be in something noteworthy” he says. “But before I just throw myself into acting I want to take classes and learn. I feel it’s important for all artists to go through a certain learning process, regardless of talent.”

 

Day Lewis recently spoke with FAULT about his influences, regret, bullies, and forging his own unique brand of celebrity.

 

How did you discover your passion for music?

 

I wouldn’t say that I discovered music. It was a gradual thing, and it’s definitely been ingrained in me for as far back as I can remember. I’ve just always loved everything about music, and as I got older I started showing a pretty natural interest in the hands on aspect of music, and picked up the piano and guitar.

 

The first song I wrote was for my babysitter Kelly. I was five,  I think. The song was called “Pretty”, and it was basically me singing the word “pretty” over and over again to the tune of “Twinkle twinkle little star”. Wrote my first “original” song when I was eleven or twelve. I’ve been writing songs since.

 

 

Who are some artist you’d like to work with?

 

It’s hard to pinpoint, the youth is crushing pop at the moment. So many new faces, and insane amounts of talent. Everyone’s doing their thing and it’s really cool. I’d like to work with James Bay, his vibe is really what I’m about at the moment. Ed Sheeran would obviously be a dream collaboration. He just writes the most incredible songs.

 

You’ve written off your hip hop-influenced video, ‘Green Aura,’ as a misrepresentation of you as an artist. Do you feel the same way about it? How do you think you’ve grown, and what do you feel you’ve learned, since making that video — good and bad?

 

Green Auras. I used to always avoid questions about the viral music video I made when I was eighteen because it was still somewhat of a fresh wound, if you will. But now that I’ve been able to distance myself and completely come to terms with all the shade the internet threw at me back then, and look on it with some perspective from life experiences I’ve had since then.

 

I don’t really have anything I regret. If anything it was a valuable lesson and I learned it early on. The internet us a playground for bullies. In the track for that video, I made my biggest mistake by opening up about some real personal issues I hadn’t addressed back then, and people were just flat out mean about it. I was young and didn’t think the video would ever get the attention it did. I don’t care anymore, it blew over and it’s in the past now.

 

 

How did growing up in NYC influence you as an artist?

 

NYC has been just as good for my creativity, as its been stifling. What I love about the city is it’s constant flow of energy, the diversity. There’s always something to do and people to meet.  It feels so familiar to me. There’s something about the city that makes me feel on top of the world. That feeling of being unstoppable with infinite possibilities. It becomes energy that can be processed creatively. But I had to take a break from New York, it was wearing me out. I’ll be back soon.

 

What is your FAULT?

 

Hopeless romance.

 

SYLVIAN HYDE : NYFW INTERVIEW

 

Sylvian Hyde is the newly favorable and elevated neoclassical menswear brand to crave and desire. Birthed just last year of October 2017, Belize born Sylvian Hyde has introduced a new conversation to menswear titled with unswerving fearless confidence. A striking debut in summer’s heat, making everyone melt at every thread, much is to be expected from this evolving brand. An exuberant color palette seasoned with spark and spice and just to our explorative delights. We caught up for a little bit of chatter to learn some more about this engaging enterprise. 

FAULT: Who is Sylvian Hyde? As you are a very young brand, born just last year yes? How did it come about?

Sylvian Hyde: So yeah, I’m Sylvian Hyde, 25 years old, originally from Belize, migrated to the states in 2014. Yes, so I’ve lived there the majority of my life but I relocated here in December 2014 for political asylum. Um yea, so the brand started, like you said, last year in October. Really I just had a bunch of sketches and I always said one day I want to have my own line and then being friends with Jabari; I knew his interest in fashion, the administrative business side, and he had also interned for fashion week twice; so he shared stories with me. So one day we’re like let’s just stop talking about it – he has the business side, I have the design side, so we just started and once the ball started to roll and we saw our samples being made, and were like “Woah this really is a reality” and then every day it just got more serious and more serious till where we are today. 

How long have you been sketching? When did it start?

Sylvian Hyde: I’ve been drawing from when I was a kid. It’s like architecture, automotive design, it’s fashion. It wasn’t until I came to the states, that I really chose fashion. I really thought, growing up I would have done architecture, because where I was in Belize, a career in fashion or starting your own brand there, it’s like, “Ya you can do it but you’re not going to have the success rate to make a living off of it.” So it wasn’t until I got here I was like, “Wow, I’m living here in New York City, the fashion capital of the world. It’s possible.”

Where does your name come from? It’s so interesting and regal. Is there a backstory to it?

Sylvian Hyde: It’s the name my mom had. Interesting back story, so I changed my first name recently to Sylvian. My first name originally is Terrell which is the name my dad gave me from his best friend, and I changed it because I – it’s a whole long back story into my family background, but when I relocated here, starting over, a fresh start, I decided to take the name my mom wanted for me. I was the first child for both parents, so normally the guy gets to name his son. 

What would you say are your greatest influences for your designs and your day to day? Does Belize have an influence?

Sylvian Hyde: I feel the biggest influence coming from Belize is the depravation – the lack of opportunity. Now that I have the opportunity, it makes me want to work harder and appreciate the opportunity. In terms of influences for me my biggest is when I watch the red carpet events. When I see these distinguished men, looking like the help, I just wish men would make more fashion statements. That is my angle to make great fashion statements with men on the red carpet. Starting where I am at now, it’s to try to have guys evolve their style on a day to day basis. 

What sets Sylvian Hyde apart from other menswear designers?

Sylvian Hyde: I definitely say more use of untraditional menswear fabrics, and just doing things out of the box. For example, recently we just did some tailored suits out of athletic mesh. From the onset of designing I just really try to put my mind into the mind-frame to try to do something original. So I don’t pay attention to trends. I just do what I feel comes to me natural and is original. 

Does Sylvian Hyde function as a unisex brand?

Sylvian Hyde: When we started we didn’t think of ourselves or aspire to be a unisex brand, but however the women who have attended our shows and have seen our clothes have expressed interest and said, “Oh I would wear that.” So that definitely opened up our eyes to that possibility and it’s one that we are happy to entertain and foster. 

When and will you start thinking about venturing into a womenswear or swimwear brand?

Sylvian Hyde: I’d like to have my first womenswear collection by 2020. That’s kind of the goal. 

Aside from womenswear and considering how far and fast you have come, what other directions do you see the brand going? What else would you like to branch into with Sylvian Hyde?

Sylvian Hyde: 10 years plus I really see us becoming a real lifestyle brand. As I said I have interest in architecture, all different facets of design. I mean going way farther than interior design I mean actual architecture itself. Having a real designer home. With just details, details, details. If I could collaborate with an automator that way Victoria Beckham did with Landrover; she designed the interior for the Land Rover Range Rover Evoque. That type of stuff I would love to see the brand to do in the future. 

In another year, where are you looking to be, considering how fast you have moved in less than one year?

Sylvian Hyde: I think headed in the direction where I hope for it to go, which is guys just being a little more free and expressive with their style and not as limiting. For me I hope my influence is – I admire that the industry allows women to have clothing that flatters their body. I want guys to be able to have that same opportunity without it having any type of labels or stereotype. I’d like to see menswear make that jump. And society also to make that jump. 

If you could live in any other time, period and place, where would that be and why?

Sylvian Hyde: I would like to live in the future. Because hopefully in the future, I would be that much closer to realizing my vision and just enjoying the progression of society. 

What is your FAULT?

Sylvian Hyde: My fault is I could learn to be a little more patient. To just trust the process of things. But I also feel, let me try to clarify…I feel that with my impatience, I don’t like hearing no and I don’t like limitations and I see how that has helped us to achieve so much in such a short space of time. But I need to work on knowing and identifying, the little things that you  know, some things you are supposed to put some brakes on or just let it go. I guess choose battles better I guess. Choose projects better I guess and just let it get wrought out. 

Words + Interview: Chaunielle Brown | Images: Jennifer Laurantius 

SWONNE : MFW SS19 HIGHLIGHTS

Katie Golinczak is the new menswear talent to watch. After having solid exposure working for Ralph Lauren, John Varvatos, Levi’s, to name a few, Katie launched her debut collection for Swonne at NYFW Men S/S 2019. Her first collection is inspired by Mod Rockers of the 60s, and consisted of a seasonless denim collection, t-shirts, biker jackets, parkas with tailoring details. Her SW1 parka, which is one of her (and our) favorite piece, is designed, constructed and hand painted in Brooklyn, NY. Swonne’s debut collection definitely lived up to our expectations and we look forward to see what it has to offer next season!

Katie Golinczak, Designer of SWONNE

Words + Images: Jennifer Laurantius Art Design/Layout: Chaunielle Brown

 

ALESSANDRO TRINCONE | MFW SS19 | HIGHLIGHTS

A modern day set whimsical romance orchestrated for pleasures play. Menswear reimagined for a possible futuristic walking strut of design, fantasy and exploration. A carefree confidence floating on air with ruffles, waves, tiers of tulle and femme delights. With imagination and disco discovery we’re presented with stapled stamped pieces of a light plush blush palette and marshmallow. Recollections of Viktor & Rolf echoed with ease; alas a fearless collection with no boundaries or limits. Ingenious strolling works of art and visionary obsessions. Tinsel streams of silver, metallics, glitters, gloves and knee highs, leaving mouths ajar for the elements of surprise. Alessandro Trincone has us kept in an excess of life’s secret garden.

Words by: Chaunielle Brown | Photographer: Jay Blum

FAULT Favourites: Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

“Yes, I was thinking: we live without a future. That’s what’s queer …” Virginia Woolf

Marius Janusauskas SS18

The Marius Janusauskas SS18 collection marries “a wish-landscape”, mythopoetic categories and queer temporality. The refusal of a certain natural order opens up new possibilities for hope and diversity in the present moment. This celebration of the moment signifies utopian potentiality and an escape from the constraints of reality.

The collection is inspired by uniforms, Andy Warhol’s early hand-drawings and camouflage, which is this context is viewed as an artistic approximation of nature. The process of deconstruction of regular military, white collar and workers uniforms with soft silks and transgender body has progressed into creation of original garments. The suggestion of which is like an unregistered story or a poem.

 

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Photographer: Paulius Zaborskis

Full Collection by Marius Janusauskas SS18

Grooming: Kristina Pasaka Busilaite

Model: Nikita at imagegroup

See more at www.mariusjanusauskas.com

FAULT MAGAZINE REVIEWS Katie Eary LFWM AW/17

Amidst the backdrop of pre-watershed nipple balloons, Daisy Lowe returned to the catwalk to open day two of LWFM. Was this a silken whimsical dream? It felt like it. Following dear Daisy came a psychedelic slumber party drawing from the gritty alleyways of 70s Soho, London. Paul Raymond, property mogul, strip club owner and the OG of London’s seedy post-war sex scene, heavily influenced Katie Eary’s burnt orange vision this season.

Adorned in sensually cut silk negligees, pjs and robes, Eary’s collection whispered ‘come-to-bed’ in a kind of cheeky, Carry On way. Of course there had to be; garish geometric prints, tobacco browns and rich plums (because it’s the 70s, right?), as well as cute repeat print lizards emblazoned across the show. The girls towered down in heels and high hems, and guys sleazily opened their robes just enough to see gold2 chains (and a couple of chest hairs). Oh, and we couldn’t help but love the combination of the smoking jacket with the adorable teddy bears (referencing Brideshead Revisited) clutched in-hand.

What we learnt? Bed head rules. This swinger-chic display was a retro-spectacular tribute to that glamorous sex-infused era. Eary closed the show fittingly donning heart-shaped nipple tassels. Love.

Words: Lizzie Griffin

 

Fault Magazine Reviews Belstaff LCM SS17 Presentation

 

Taking inspiration from Bruce Brown’s Motorcycle classic, Belstaff decided to bring the dirt track to London with a film-set homage to On Any Sunday, making it a weekend to remember. Heavily influenced by the “King of Cool”, Steve McQueen, the models lazed back on the vintage cars and motor cycles dressed in hand-waxed leather clad and aviator shades. The cast had a carefree attitude exuding off of their rugged exterior – you could almost smell the motor oil radiating off of them. Integral to this collection was the personalisation of the leather jackets and the references to the sun-bleached palette of the film. Recognisable personas from the track were replicated in this collection: Romero with a diamond hand-waxed leather application and Mashburn’s black and yellow colour schemes. These pieces celebrated the pioneering era of 1970s racers as Frederik Dyhr, Belstaff VP Men’s Design explains, “[It] was a defining time for Belstaff because leather manufacturers on both sides of the Atlantic were really embracing this idea of personalising leatherwear and so began an era of strong colour direction”.

 

Rough-edged, lived-in looks, rich tobacco tonals and black burnished finishes set the tone for most outfits. Paying tribute to racing as a coveted sport, we saw relaxed open necklines – an ode to the racing shirts of the 1970s. As a nice surprise Belstaff showed us five looks from the Women’s SS17 pre collection, again taking carefree biker-goddess attitudes as well as hand-waxed suede and lightweight straight-leg denim. The show carried on outside thrilling the public with Twelve-time Trial World Champion Dougie Lampkin MBE performing crazy bike stunts a stones throw away from Queen Liz’s 90thbirthday luncheon. A rather noisy, but lovely birthday surprise, we think!

Words: Lizzie Griffin

‘KALEIDOSCOPE’: FAULT Exclusive Editorial – Viridiana Flores’ FAULT

001

 

 

003

ALL: BLANK CANVAS by DIEGO GUMIEL

cardigan FOREVER 21
Shirt SELECTED.

cardigan: FOREVER 21  shirt: SELECTED

vest COS
pants ACNE STUDIOS
socks ASOS

Vest: COS  Pants: ACNE STUDIOS Socks: ASOS Shoes (stylist's own)

Shirt: Zara

Shirt ZARA

Shirt ZARA

T-shirt COS

T-shirt COS

Cardigan: FOREVER 21 Pants: AMERICAN VINTAGE headphones:BEATS

Cardigan: FOREVER 21 Pants: AMERICAN VINTAGE
headphones:BEATS

Vest: COS Pants ACNE STUDIOS

Vest: COS
Pants ACNE STUDIOS

 

Photographer: Viridiana Flores 
Stylist: Diego Gumiel 
Make up and Hair : Rocío Calvente 
Ph Stylist: Andrés Pulido
Model: Oscar Kindelan (UNO Models)