LFW SS18, Sunday 17th September, Day Three Highlights

     

Mary Katrantzou

To kick off Sunday off, an ‘idealised infancy’ was the theme running through Mary Katrantzou’s SS18 collection; a bright nostalgia trip that anyone from the 80s could understand. Colour-block panelling stood sharply against a backdrop of paint-by-number florals, iron-on Hama beads formed Katrantzou’s signature intricate digital designs and sequinned Lego block skirts matched perfectly with lace up jelly shoes. It was as if the she made her inner child to design this collection, only with the added feminine, athletic silhouettes.

Balloon hems and sleeves added volume to each piece, whereas sporty windbreakers, racer backs and scuba tops punctuated with toggles and go-faster stripes gave it that athleisure look and feel. In a world where we’re technology by tech, Katrantzou grounded herself in her childhood and revisited the building blocks that tasked her creativity.

Lizzie Griffin

 

     

Chalayan

Living in today’s digital age, everyone is entitled – the notion of self worth has become a concept directed by the opinion of others. Blank post-it notes were dotted on dresses and models circled the space wearing sheer veils and sunglasses – a reflection of how consumers miss out on the exchange of digital information.

As with every season, Chalayan’s SS18 collection was all about clean lines and linear silhouettes. Master of tailoring, this collection had asymmetric folds, abstract construction and a nod to the 80s power shoulder, only smoother for the modern age. This neutral show had splashes of sunshine yellow and demanding red; on the back of the checked blazers the fabric darted out like a cape, a playful way to add some volume. Ditching the runway, this felt more like an artistic exhibition; a breath of fresh air and a sideways step from commerciality.

Lizzie Griffin

 

      

Emporio Armani

For the reopening of the Emporio Armani Store in New Bond Street, London, only a spectacular show would do. Walking down the runway in a soft palette of purple, pink and blue, sheer pastels, this season’s show was a total celebration of femininity. Models stormed down clad in sea life prints in candy-striped colours, which transcended to a heritage series of tight blazers and loose tailored trousers with a sports-luxe feel – the outfit we’ll be styling into next season. Punctuated metallic trousers and devoré tops, this playful collection undoubtedly got everybody’s heart racing. Thoughts? It kind of felt like we inhaled a pastel explosion, oh and the checked out two-pieces were the things that every cast member of Clueless would thank you for.

Lizzie Griffin

 

Margaret Howell

Margaret Howell did was she does best and this season focused on proportion, bringing imagination and styling to the most humble of clothing. This contemporary collection was slightly reminiscent of school children’s uniforms, taking inspiration from utilitarian pieces and proving that fashion should equal functionally. With hair and makeup like blank canvases, models strode the runway in checked shirts, knee length of course, and black buckled shoes. The silhouette was simple with boxy-sleeved shirts worn under lightweight duffle coats, just with a sporadic oversized collar or wide trouser leg that attracted the eye as if breaking the school dress code. The collection was monochromatic apart from the flash of khaki that coloured the intermittent showing of socks and light knitted tops. However the reintroduction of boxers and bermuda shorts paired with navy blazers were worn by both men and women, blurring the boy-girl-boy format that you used to find in school.

Sarah Barnes

 

TOPSHOP

There was an undeniable party mood dancing around in the air at the SS18 TOPSHOP show. Inspired by the brands muse Kate Moss (who sat front row) and 90’s nightlife, each piece in the collection clashed in a truly fantastic way. Retro sliver mini dresses were styled with not much else, while snake print tops sat undress yellow lemon suits- right out for a music video. Texture played a hefty role as the models were draped in faux fur coats and pink satin bomber jackets. Leather trousers in shades of blue cleverly contradicted beaded tops and burgundy ruffled dresses, somehow all expected on the dance floor. The show closed with a glamorous parade of double denim, each model with a spray painted t-shirts with their name. This season’s concept of personalisation is available with the brands ‘see now buy now’ ethos at flagship stores, so we can all finally dress like we are in a modern day remake of clueless.

Sarah Barnes

 

Versus

Donatella Versace took to the archives to inspire millennials this season at the Versus show, with an eclectic mash up of western boots, frayed jackets and bucket hats. The female models black eyeliner was rebelliously smudged and the men carried over sized bags with graphic logos printed in an unavoidable font. Sharp black matching suits were lined with red piping and low-slung trousers resurfaced with cowboy style belts. The print of the season was a thin tartan that covered tight mini skirts and shorts, only to be interrupted by the interjection of hot lime green that coated bags and shoes, creating a wardrobe for stylist rebels everywhere.

Sarah Barnes

 

‘Classic Bloom’- FAULT Magazine Online Editorial, Benjo Arwas’ FAULT

 

 

Photographer: Benjo Arwas

Model: Avery Tharp @ Photogenics LA

Stylist: Eddie Schachnow @ Art Department, LA

Makeup: Nicole Chew @ Art Department, LA using MAC Cosmetics

Hair: Abraham Esparza using R and CO

‘Exotica’ – FAULT Online Fashion Exclusive: Domonick Gravine’s FAULT

Sleeveless top: Alexander Wang Skirt: Alexander Wang Necklace: Stylist’s Own

Sleeveless top: Alexander Wang
Skirt: Alexander Wang
Necklace: Stylist’s Own

Sweater: Prabal Gurung Pants: Proenza Schouler

Sweater: Prabal Gurung
Pants: Proenza Schouler

Sleeveless top: Alexander Wang Skirt: Alexander Wang Necklace: Stylist’s Own

Sleeveless top: Alexander Wang
Skirt: Alexander Wang
Necklace: Stylist’s Own

Shirt: Adidas by Mary Katrantzou Skirt: Alexander Wang Necklace: Stylist’s own

Shirt: Adidas by Mary Katrantzou
Skirt: Alexander Wang
Necklace: Stylist’s own

Skirt Adidas by Mary Katrantzou Skirt: Opening Ceremony Leggings: Adidas by Mary Katrantzou

Skirt Adidas by Mary Katrantzou
Skirt: Opening Ceremony
Leggings: Adidas by Mary Katrantzou

Shirt: Adidas by Mary Katrantzou Skirt: Alexander Wang Necklace: Stylist’s own

Shirt: Adidas by Mary Katrantzou
Skirt: Alexander Wang
Necklace: Stylist’s own

Sleeveless top: Stella McCartnery Jacket: Stella McCartnery Skirt: Proenza Schouler  Handbag: Proenza Schouler

Sleeveless top: Stella McCartnery
Jacket: Stella McCartnery
Skirt: Proenza Schouler
Handbag: Proenza Schouler

Top: Tim Coppens Dress: Alexander Wang

Top: Tim Coppens
Dress: Alexander Wang

 

Photographer: Domonick Gravine
Stylist: Charlie Ward 
Assistant stylist: Lara Glassman
Makeup: Brian Dean 
Hair: Kelley Louisse
Model: Carla Mattei with VNY models 

London Fashion Week Highlights – Day 3

Words: Katlin Siil

The third day of London Fashion Week was bursting with creative energy and talent as British fashion giants (Mulberry, Temperley) took to the stage alongside our bright young stars (Jonathan Saunders, Preen by Thornton Bregazzi). We also witnessed a catwalk debut (Whistles), and two trends were very noticeable: constructed punk and cleverly manipulated PVC and putting dresses over trousers and skirt suits.

Preen by Thornton Bregazzi

Preen by Thornton Bregazzi

The morning star was Preen by Thornton Bregazzi with their sci-fi punk collection. There were typical punk features such as black leather, PVC and an overdose of metallic zips, but these were balanced with pretty floral prints, making the collection, against all odds, perhaps one of the softest we have seen from the duo.

 

Margaret Howell

Margaret Howell

Margaret Howell referenced the French resistance during World War II and despite the somewhat morbid subject matter it was a typically Howell-like collection of understated chic in muted hues and relaxed silhouettes. Perfectly appropriate for the English winter, it boasted soft cashmere, tweeds and comfy cottons. So very nonchalant, we will always love Howell for her own unique style and signature.

Mulberry

Mulberry

Emma Hill at Mulberry took her inspiration from swinging London. The a-line skirts (the favorite shape for the season, it seems) were short, the jackets were boxy and the puff-sleeved dresses had an almost coquette quality to them. There was, of course, lots of leather – expect skirt-suits in brown and olive green leather and detailed lady-like bags to take centre stage come fall. Not to mention the ever so adorable pups!

 

Temperley

Temperley

Temperley presented another sophisticated collection showcasing her tremendous talent for crafty detailing. The masterful contradiction in the feather-light Grecian dresses with their heavy beadwork was breathtaking, while the feminine skirts, blouses and day dresses (a tribute to silver screen siren and Hitchcock girl Tippy Hedren) will make the Duchess of Cambridge very happy. A celebrity favorite, Temperley front row was once again a star-studded affair with the likes of Olivia Palermo and Kate Nash making an appearance.

Topshop Unique

Topshop Unique

Topshop Unique – a show that seems to be the highlight of the LFW calendar, attracting even Queen Bee Anna Wintour – opened with Cara Delevingne and showcased even more leather and PVC. It was both edgy and feminine with soft cashmeres, pastels and fur stoles. The glittery finale series added a flirty playful touch.

Mary Katrantzou

Mary Katrantzou

Mary Katrantzou abandoned her usual bright colour pallet for a monochrome one. The results were splendid – it was probably the strongest, most refreshing collection we have seen from her. The oriental shapes were the perfect canvas for the digital prints of pastoral scenery complete with rivers and bridges – a delicate, almost nostalgic combination, perhaps the most stunning collection at LFW this season so far, dare we say.

Jonathan Saunders

Jonathan Saunders

Jonathan Saunders surprised us with a less ‘Saunders’ collection than usual – missing were the repetitive patterns we have grown to love, as well as the cute matching ensembles and knit-sets. But we (almost) forgive him as he presented a strong collection of PVC and punk in a soft, feminine way. Combined with tweeds and silks, it was more retro than punk. A-lined skirts once again made an appearance, as did the very ‘Saunders’ colour pops in baby blue, orange and pink.

Matthew Williamson

Matthew Williamson

Matthew Williamson’s collections are going from strength to strength. The former go-to designer for Ibiza party girls (Jade Jagger and Kate Moss, but party girls nonetheless) is finally all grown up, dressing her woman in city-sleek combos only tastefully reminiscent of the former hippy days. The mandatory Williamson prints will always be in the mix (and thank God!), but they are now bolder, the fabrics less sheer, the structures more sophisticated and the silhouette more practical. But underneath it all, we can still see that same girl who danced the night away on a sunny beach in Spain. Only now, she is simultaneously running an empire.

Paul Smith

Paul Smith

Paul Smith also thought outside the box this season. His collection had fewer distracting details and patterns and less fuss than we are used to seeing from him. We salute Smith for incorporating the new wider and shorter trouser shape in such beautiful way, introducing bold colours and colour combinations (who wouldn’t love those azure blues and fuchsia pinks) and generally adapting to a more modern, simpler and sophisticated fashion vernacular.

 

 

 

 

 

FAULT Chief Stylist Tallulah Harlech’s top picks from LFW ’12

Tallulah Harlech presents a round-up from this year’s London Fashion Week.

2 minute Q&A:

FAULT: Stand-out show? T: Mary Katrantzou

Best newcomer? Maarten Van Der Horst at Fashion East

Weirdest item/style/pattern? There was some patent leather, which looked like latex that kept coming up. Did it work? For sure! Chic with an edge.

Best model moment? Doutzen walking in the Giles show

Starstruck moment?
How lame… I don’t get startstruck.

Top piece of advice for stylists looking forward to Autumn/Winter? Military, leather, fur and Morticia Adams…

General advice on styles to look for/avoid?
Floral prints have somewhat maintained their sturdy trend-although I reckon they’ll be on the out soon. Wear trousers instead of jeans. This winter has bright autumnal colours and the obvious dark shades we see time and again.

 

 

…and the top fashion films so far this year:

 

SHOWstudio: Nick Knight, Karlie Kloss, Kate Phelan for Topshop

Karlie is my favourite, completely and utterly desirable and brilliant here.

 

The Chanel Boy Bag Campaign Video

Karl Lagerfeld takes us on a journey back to the ’20s with a mini silent film. Titled My New Friend Boy, featuring Alice Dellal.