FAULT MAGAZINE BACKSTAGE AT LFW – SIBLING SS16

 

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Credit: Daniele Fummo


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Credit: Daniele Fummo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

International Alert opens ‘Peace From the Street Up!’ exhibition

ART4PEACE exhibition

As part of International Alert’s Talking Peace Festival which takes place throughout the month of September in London, an exhibition of urban art is on display at the Old Truman Brewery in London. The pieces, all exploring themes of ‘peace’, have been donated by artists from all over the world including Egypt, Syria, France, Italy, Chile and Nepal, as well as the UK. Legendary DJ turned visual artist Golide has also donated artwork.

The exhibition, titled ‘Peace From the Street Up!’ is open every day until 20th September from 12pm to 8pm at Shop 12, Dray Walk, The Old Truman Brewery, London. A live mural will be created on 19th September at the exhibition with the pieces auctioned off to raise funds for International Alert on 2nd October at The Club at The Ivy.

Street art for peace

Urban Art International Alert

 

No Entry artwork

Lights of Soho art gallery launches open call for submissions

Lights of Soho open submissionDo you want in to London’s hot new art gallery and members’ lounge? Are you an artist looking to show your work? Lights of Soho have announced their first open call for submissions for their next show, guest curated by renowned light artist Robert Montgomery.

The new show ‘Signs That Say What You Want Them To Say…’ will be a showcase of up-and-coming artists working with the medium of light at the gallery who has exhibited work by Tracey Emin, Gavin Turk, Chris Bracey and Robert Montgomery since it opened in May.

Hamish Jenkinson, Curator at Lights of Soho said, “With this show, I’m hoping that we can reach artists who are well into their craft or just discovering it. I’d like to show young artists that art is a democratic experience and that they too can be featured in a London gallery.”

Lights of Soho art gallery

Lights of Soho © Dave Hogan

The show has been named after a 1992 photo series by conceptual artist Gillian Wearing titled ‘Signs That Say What You Want Them To Say, And Not Signs That Say What Someone Else Wants You To Say’ which also explored themes of democracy in art and communication.

The previous shows, ‘City Lights’ and ‘The Art of Burning Man’, have mixed high profile artists with the newest creative talent. The gallery’s dedication to emerging artists, in addition to its members’ bar which is a meeting hub for London’s creative community, is fast making Lights of Soho one of the most exciting venues in the capital.

Ahead of the open submission show, Lights of Soho will also be hosting a three day pop up exhibition ‘Ignis Fatuus: Dreams & Delusions’, curated by Mehta Bell Projects to mark the opening of Start Art Fair and also featuring a selection of budding talent from the contemporary art world. The pop up will run from 11th to 13th Setpember.

Light artists can submit images and details of their work for the open submission show by emailing open@lightsofsoho.com before 14th September. Successful artists will be notified by 19th September and will win a membership to Lights of Soho as well as their work included in the show. For more information visit www.lightsofsoho.com/open.

‘Signs That Say What You Want Them To Say…’ will run from 8th October until 21st November.

 

FAULT Favourite Flo Morrissey releases debut album ‘Tomorrow Will Be Beautiful’

 

FAULT Favourite Flo Morrissey, who we featured for FAULT Online in March, will be releasing her debut album ‘Tomorrow Will Be Beautiful‘ next week, on Monday 15th June (Glassnote Records.)

Tomorrow Will Be Beautiful, (Glassnote Records), released June 15th

Tomorrow Will Be Beautiful, (Glassnote Records), released June 15th

We were able to have a listen to the record before Flo releases it into the world and it is a remarkably strong statement for a debuting artist (especially one who is only 20 years old.) Her voice is haunting and unique, richly retro-inspired, and hallmarked with the influence of Kate Bush, Devendra Banhart, Bjork, and Jeff Buckley. Her lyrics have a child-like fragility, and we see her exploring the journey into adulthood (especially pertinent given that she herself is on the cusp of a similar leap into the spotlight.) ‘Pages of Gold‘ and ‘Show Me‘ are statement tracks, with pop-power and surging melodies, whilst ‘Wildflower‘ and title-track ‘Tomorrow Will Be Beautiful‘ are somehow both ghostly and anthemic- an unexpected and beautiful balancing act. ‘Why’ almost teeters too far into fairytale-territory, with it’s lilting melody reminiscent of the Disney score for Sleeping Beauty (perhaps this particular reference says more about me than Morrissey), but its searching vocals are intriguing and anchor the track in emotion and experience. It is impossible to ignore the force of Morrissey’s artistry, and just how enchanting her voice truly is. Full of range, story-telling character, and effortless stylistic variations, we have no doubt she will continue to captivate as this album finally reaches its eagerly-awaiting public.

Revisit our exclusive feature with Flo here, with photographs by Kurtiss Lloyd.

Flo Morrissey, photographed exclusively for FAULT Online by Kurtiss Lloyd in March 2015.

Flo Morrissey, photographed exclusively for FAULT Online by Kurtiss Lloyd in March 2015.

Lights of Soho – the global home of creative neon art

Lights of SohoLights of Soho is the new hangout where the neighbourhood’s creative community meet under the glow of seedy neon signs in a former brothel to conspire, collaborate and create. Not only is it London’s first gallery dedicated to light art, but with the addition of a members’ bar in its basement, it aims to become a hub for the meeting of minds.

The venue may be new but the ambience isn’t; reviving the days when Soho’s notorious sex industry lit up the narrow lanes in hot pink and the cheap prices of the area brought in artists, musicians, actors, filmmakers, designers and the like. In keeping with the current interest to uphold the district’s creative legacy despite the rapid gentrification, Lights of Soho has landed just in time to send the message that they too want to keep Soho’s ne-on!

Lights of Soho basement

The first exhibition is called City Lights and brings together world-renowned artists and up-and-coming names in one space, earning the gallery the title of the ‘global home of creative neon art’. For the first time ever Tracey Emin, who has helped popularise the use of neon in art, is exhibiting alongside Chris Bracey, known as ‘The Neon Man’ for his iconic strip club signs which appeared all over Soho in the 1970s. Other artists in the group exhibition include Gavin Turk, Chris Levine, Christian Furr, Rob & Nick Carter and Rob Montgomery. At the private view, sponsored by Hoxton Gin, we discovered artworks ranging from poignant statements about love emblazoned in neon, to a Mona Lisa-esque lenticular of Kate Moss, to classic commercial signs promising ‘models upstairs’. The space is a spectacular visual overload.

City Lights at Lights of Soho opens today at 35 Brewer Street, London, W1F 0RX until 5th July. Open Mon-Sun 11am until 8pm. For membership enquiries visit www.lightsofsoho.com.

FAULT Favourite: Yoko Ono collaborates with Tiger on ‘Conceptual Photograpy’

 

The inimitable Yoko Ono, creative legend and FAULT Favourite, has collaborated with Danish brand Tiger on a new project- a conceptual art book centred on the idea that art should be accessible to all. The 159-page hardback, entitled ‘Conceptual Photography’, coincides with the artist’s latest exhibition, ‘Yoko Ono: One Woman Show 1960–1971’, taking place at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

coverA conceptual coffee-table tome, this project plays with words and photography in a beautifully poetic way, drawing the reader deep into Yoko’s wonderfully eccentric universe. A fantastical film script conjures a musical score consisting of an audience instructed to “hold bunch of white flowers, and pick them slowly”, whilst Ono urges the reader to “rearrange the photos in their mind.” By taking us on such an immersive journey between enigmatic narrative and poetic instruction, ‘Conceptual Photography‘ challenges us to perceive the world in a different way.

Two years in the making, Tiger and Ono have agreed to release the book for just £10-a nod to the idea of making the artwork accesible to all- and it is available in select Tiger stores across the UK. Mai Due Brinch, Concept Development Manager at Tiger comments, “Conceptual Photography breaks down genre borders, creating a fascinating ‘universe’ of text and images. The collaboration with Yoko Ono felt symbiotic given we share the same mission; to democratise access to art and move towards a truly inclusive experience, fair to both artist and spectator.”

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image courtesy of Yoko Ono and Tiger

 

Conceptual Photography is now available in selected UK Tiger stores. Yoko Ono’s exhibition entitled ‘Yoko Ono: One Woman Show 1960–1971’, at MoMA, New York, from May 17–September 7, 2015.

www.tigerstores.co.uk

FAULT Focus: Marie Naffah returns with #Blindfold – a special collaboration to raise awareness of visual impairment

 

FAULT Favourite Marie Naffah, MTV’s Unsigned Artist for 2014 and a star of FAULT 18 (The RAW Issue), has returned with a special project.

In a not-for-profit project to raise awareness and understanding of the issues surrounding visual impairment and sight loss, Marie has teamed up with a group of six blind and visually-impaired musicians to record and release for free her song ‘Blindfold’: as a documentary-style video exploring the disability and the importance of music to those who suffer from it.

Photography: Constance Meath Baker

Photography: Constance Meath Baker

The song itself was written by Marie, who is 22, as a response to her grandmother’s experience with blindness and the implications it had had on her life and the lives around her. Having performed the song to senior BBC broadcast journalist Tony Shearman, who is also blind, Marie was invited to play and be interviewed on Insight Radio – the official radio station of the Royal National Institute of Blindness (RNIB).

Steve Plowman, a blind drummer living just outside of London, heard Marie on Insight Radio and impressed by the poignancy of the lyrics, as well as the tuneful song itself, he asked Marie whether there would be an opportunity for him to perform it with her.

With help from the RNIB, five more blind and partially sighted musicians expressed interest in the project, and so it was decided that a documentary/recording of the track would be made: to emphasise the importance of music in the lives of visually-impaired people and to show how, contrary to public opinion, a disability such as blindness does not automatically prevent a person from being able to perform music.

The 12 minute documentary, made by filmmaker Constance Meath Baker, consists of a series of interviews with the musicians followed by the track itself, recorded at a studio in High Wycombe with help from producer David Lane.

www.facebook.com/marienaffahmusic

www.twitter.com/marienaffah

FAULT Future: Freddie Dickson

 

We recently spent the afternoon with Freddie Dickson, the young voice setting music blogs ablaze with his dark ‘Doom Pop’ sound. Courting comparisons to Lana del Rey and the legendary Nick Cave, Dickson has just today released the video for his new single ‘Speculate‘,  which has already been played on Annie Mac’s show on Radio 1 and Jo Good’s on XFM.

It’s taken from an EP, of the same name, out April 13th on Columbia. Dickson has also announced an intimate headline show at The Waiting Room in Stoke Newington on 1st April, before heading out on the Communion New Faces tour on the 20th.
Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

What are your influences and how have you arrived at this current ‘Doom Pop’ sound?

In the early days it was Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Van Morrison, and all those guys I had grown up on. Then as I got older I became more into production- The XX, Lana del Rey, Florence + the Machine, Plan B. I wanted an all-encompassing style for my music.

When did you start writing?

I didn’t start singing until I was 18 at an open mic, but I had been writing since I was 15/16. It just got to a point where I realised I didn’t want anyone else to be singing my songs.

When you did start performing, was it something that came easily to you?

No, I was so shy! But I just drilled my way through endless open mics. I guess I ‘Ed Sheeran’d’ my way through it! (laughs)

Were people quick to take notice?

No, not until I changed my sound. To begin with, I was just too stuck in the past. I was trying to be Bob Dylan, and no-one should try that! I got bored myself, and I did a gig in East London when I was 21 and a friend was just like “that was really bad.” And I knew it.

But I went away, and got Logic on my laptop, and started developing the sound I have now. The artists I want to be like are the ones who constantly change- Plan B, Kanye, Bowie. I get bored so easily (laughs)

Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

It’s interesting, watching sessions and live performances that you’ve done, to see how you take that production-based sound and transfer it into the realm of the live experience. How do you find the music changes when you perform it live?
I think the live experience has to be so different from the record – if you just try to mimic the recorded version, there’s nothing worse. It’s almost like you have to do a cover of your own song, and put some twist on it.

The visuals seem very important to your music- is that something you’re closely involved with?
Yeah I think it’s so important. All the artists I like – Nick Cave, Patti Smith – they created all this powerful imagery. It would be weird, given how dark my sound is, if I was styled with bright neon clothing, right? (laughs) I think it all has to fit together; how you’re photographed, how you look, the live performance.

Part of that process is collaboration, which seems to underpin so much of today’s music industry. Is that something that comes easily to you?
When I was first signed I had so many co-writing sessions set up for me, and none of them really worked. But  I eventually hit it off with someone and now I have this great team of musicians and producers who help me reach the exact thing I want. I’m not an accomplished musician, and I don’t even try to aspire to greatness because the singing is really my thing.

Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

Does the writing process come easily to you?
No not at all! And I think that annoys so many of the people I work with (laughs) I like to make sure every word is perfect, and that every syllable comes out of my mouth easily. I could never be one of these people who writes three songs a week, they’d all sound the same!

It’s interesting to hear you talk in terms of before and after being signed. How has the process changed since being signed- are there new pressures that come with having a label?
Not really- my label has been really nice. We still do it in the same way, writing away in my bedroom, and they give me my own recording space with good speakers which is great. It’s like having a little office (laughs)

As you’re writing music, are you constantly listening to new material by other artists, or do you try to cut yourself from other people’s work?
No, I follow a lot of blogs and love just diving into new music. I’d love to work with a hip-hop band, or a dream collaborator like Nas or Sia! I think she’s amazing because it’s so much about the songs and the voice.

Are you excited to be going on the Communion New Faces tour at the end of April?
Yeah I can’t wait  – it’s such incredible exposure! At the moment I can see how the fans are spread out and there are so many in places like Russia and Eastern Europe, but not enough in England yet (laughs)

Finally, what is your FAULT?
Scotch Eggs. And not being able to write songs very quickly.

 

All photography by Constance Meath Baker