FAULT Weekly Playlist: Amanda Mair

For fans of Lykke Li, Kate Boy, and Tove Styrke, Amanda Mair is a Stockholm native who gained attention as a teenager with her debut single, “House” in 2011. After an extended hiatus, Amanda announces a new forthcoming EP and teases it with the single “Empty Blockings.” Like so many of her Swedish contemporaries, Amanda displays a flair for breathy vocals over hypnotic drums and glittering synths. We can’t wait to hear more from Amanda, but in the meantime, we asked her to put together a playlist of tracks that inspire her as a musician.

 

 

Lana Del Rey – High by the Beach

“I LOVE Lana Del Rey and have listened to a lot of her music. This song just hit me directly with the quite melancholic melodies and the discreet beat.”

Banks – Gemini Feed

“For me ‘Gemini Feed’ is the perfect balance of dark and lightful. Myself I have a bit hard time writing uptempo cheerful music. With the chorus very direct and open but the verses being more innocent, it’s just the perfect match.”

Mura Masa, Bonzai – What if I go? (Feat. Bonzai)

“This song just makes me wanna dance every single time. Love the bouncy beat and the sound.”

Jai Paul – BTSTU

“I’m a huge fan of Jai Paul. I love his calm falsetto together with the more aggressive sound.”

Emelie Nicholas – Nobody Knows

“This song just hits my heart. The pads are goals and when the sleepy swiping melodies meet the drum machinge likely chorus it’s like releasing a bird or something.”

Lykke Li – Love Out of Lust

“This one just had to be in the list. A big influence since I was young. Especially the airy drums, the big timpani, an innocent cowbell and something I suppose are whistles. Its a sound I really can relate to.”

Susanne Sundfor – Memorial

“I feel like I get sent to heaven, a safe place with soft clouds when I listen to ‘Memorial.'” I love the ecclesiastical vibe.

It’s so mighty?! And the arpeggiator makes it extraterrestrial and the choir is just GENIOUS. The melodies, the vocal, the strings, the piano outro. Why didn’t I write this song? I can’t stop:)”

Saturday Monday, Julia Spada – The Ocean (Feat. Julia Spada)

“Drums, drums and more drums please! The one key to my heart. I like the energetic perky beat together with the soft cold strings.”

The Blaze – Territory

“Another key to my musical heart is a distinctly acoustic piano. And when that adapts of a deep kick, weird vocals and sounds, I’m sold.”

Massive Attack – Teardrop

“This one also have the ingredients of High on the beach. The dark instrumental go down deep but the airy vocal lifts the song and it’s like an on going fight between them. Perfect.”

Amanda Mair Socials:
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Bundle of Joy: Burgeoning London-based songstress Joy Crookes Releases Third Single ‘Bad Feeling’

Despite being only 18-years young, seemingly everyone from the established indie blogosphere right through to Brooklyn Beckham are sitting up and taking notice of London-based trip-hop, soul-infused singer, Joy Crookes. Having released 60’s-soul inspired, twilight hour baroque-pop ballads in Sinatra and New Manhattan last year, Crookes releases third single ‘Bad Feeling’, a musical shift towards jazz-enthused, R&B grooves showing a tongue-in-cheek side to the singer who wears a myriad of cultural influences on her sleeve.

Citing a range of genres and artists as seemingly polarising as Lauryn Hill, Nancy Sinatra, The Clash, and Van Morrison as inspirations, Crookes’ has developed a mature, multi-faceted sound which bodes well for her forthcoming debut EP release, produced by Tev’n (SBTRKT, Celeste, Lily Allen). Sold out shows last year included a packed-to-the-rafters Hoxton Square Bar & Kitchen, with forthcoming gigs at Bushstock Festival in London and a performance at Live Nation’s renowned Source Night on 14th July offering must-see opportunities to see a star in the making.

We recently sat down with Crookes to discuss her intriguing background and how her influences have filtered into a distinctly signature sound.

Joy Crookes Bad Feeling

 

Many people are linking your music so far to Lauryn Hill – would you say that was a fair assessment?

I love Lauryn Hill, Amy Winehouse, Grace Jones. I love artists that seem real or authentic, so I can say I love their authenticity. I wouldn’t say I was directly inspired by Lauryn Hill. I think it’s more complex than saying I’m inspired by one female artist. I think it’s more that people want to understand what you’re about before they listen to you, and sometimes you get comparisons. I never thought I’d be compared with Lauryn Hill, it’s crazy! I grew up on The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill, but I’m from a very eclectic background of music.

What would you say are the most prominent influences from your background?

I’m from South London, which is just a melting pot of cultures. I’m part of one of the biggest Latino communities in London, which is linked to Caribbean and West African communities, while my Dad is Irish. I’m an ethnic chic so I understand the comparisons with someone like Lauryn Hill, but when I’m making music I tend to think more of Nancy Sinatra and Eartha Kitt. I’m quite an emotional person, and I’ve had things happen with family and mental health issues so I think when you suffer experiences like that from an early age, you observe things differently and it can make you quite mature. You feel ten times more than anyone else feels at the time.

Tell us a bit more about the creative process behind your latest single ‘Bad Feeling’?

It’s very tongue in cheek and I wrote the chorus part in that vein. Eartha Kitt is incredible and she’s so cheeky, when she does her videos she looks like a lion or a tiger, so Bad Feeling was much the same in that it was a cheeky song and it was done very quickly. It’s a surface level song, you know, we’ve all been through it. It’s not about immigration or anything, it’s simple. I wrote it during a writing camp and there was a funny moment during the experience that I exaggerated and made it about myself.

You hear a lot of songs taking about relationships where the protagonist is worried the other person is going to leave them, while your take on romance on ‘Bad Feeling’ is more about not being sure of yourself.

I am such a cheeky character but I don’t think you grasp that on New Manhattan or Sinatra. New Manhattan reflects more my Irish emotional side, while Bad Feeling represents the charm and whit of my mum who moved over from Bengal when she was just sixteen. She inspired me to be memorable and I think when you meet people like that you get excited, so I wanted to reflect that side of my personality in the song, and show people that I can be funny and quite cheeky as well as being emotional.

 

Going back to previous releases such as New Manhattan and Sinatra, there seems to be a lot of dreamy, emotive, Lana Del Rey inspired imagery on those songs, was this a conscious direction in sound?

The one thing I can say about Lana is that if David Lynch made music the result would be her, with the themes of drugs and sex. I’m hugely into Massive Attack, as I grew up listening to the whole Bristol music scene. Their song ‘Unfinished Sympathy’ is a good example, where they have a soul singer with an orchestra and Latin percussion backing her. There is so much going on and so many influences in their music that I couldn’t replicate everything. New Manhattan is a commercially sounding track, but the guitar does have that Lynchian/Nancy Sinatra sound, while the drum beat is straight out of a Massive Attack song.

It’s amazing to be compared to people like Lana Del Rey because that means people are trying to understand the music from a commercial degree, but then if you look in more detail and learn the reasons behind why I added certain influences then it’s a little more complex. I’m 18 years old and a girl from South London who is sponge when it comes to life experiences, so anything my family or my boyfriend says, or even the music I listen to has an impact, so I’m as much of a melting pot as my location and cultural upbringing.

What’s the story behind New Manhattan?

It’s a place in Brussels that I visited with my boyfriend, and I just felt compelled to write an observational story about the area, which quickly developed into a love song. There was a red-light district, so that’s where the lyric ‘I took a picture with my eyes, and I’m frightened of girls in plastic heights’ came from. It hurt to be in an area like that and realise that a country home to the European Commission can also have streets that are filled with hookers and others which are family street markets in contrast, so it was quite difficult for someone who hadn’t been in an area like that before. The general idea with the song was that you can be anywhere and be comfortable as long as you have the right person next to you.

Although it’s still early days, what do you hope to achieve in music?

I would like to be known as iconic, and to feel like I’ve made a difference to people. My favourite subject at school was history, and I had this brilliant history teacher who taught me about different cultures and mental health, which was quite inspirational while growing up in Elephant and Castle at the time. The main issue I remember her talking about was American history and the misuse of power, which can happen to everyone no matter how big or small. I always wanted to write songs from the perspective of being a woman with colour and how it has shaped my life.

Words Jamie Boyd

 

Stream Joy’s new track BAD FEELING below:

FAULT Weekly Playlist: Benji Lewis

Let the sound electronic sounds and falsetto vocals of Melbourne artist Benji Lewis and his latest single “Drift” carry you away. “Drift” comes ahead of his “Home For Now” EP and the track’s warm melodies are sure to put any of your woes at ease. Co-written and produced with Golden Vessel, this song explores the ebbs and flows of a melodic-electronic soundscape accented by a strong synth beat and firefly-like twinkles.

We asked Benji to put together a playlist of some of his current favorite Soundcloud releases including tracks from Aquilo, Lapsley, and WOODES. Take a listen below.

Aquilo – Silhouette

“I love everything about this song. The beauty, the emotion behind the vocals and that piano. It has you from the start, love these guys. their sound and what they do.”

Slumberjack ft. Vera Blue – Fracture

“Already being a fan of Vera Blue and her beautiful voice. Was pretty easy to get hooked on this big song with all the right beats to go with her powerful voice. Always turn this one up!”

gnash ft. wrenn – fragile

“This song is just perfect. The simple acoustic guitar and the two voices of gnash and wrenn is all you want to hear and keep hearing once the song starts. It has a sadness to it, but it’s speaking of a story in such a truthful way. So beautiful!”

Lapsley – Falling Short

“Ohhhh this womans voice, just LOVE! I love how the piano, vocals, the effects and loops all just roll so effortlessly from one to the other and together in the best of ways.”

Woodes – Rise

“I mean the style of production from the intro already has you and then when Woodes starts singing, I’m done. Really cool, uplifting song.”

Alex Vargas – Higher Love

“This guy’s voice is just sooo good, so already loving that plus the power and pumping up feels that come with this song. Always a good listen.”

The Weeknd ft. Lana Del Rey – Stargirl Interlude

“This guy’s music is always cool and has a good beat, add the beautiful voice of Lana Del Rey and the way she delivers her vocals. So simple, elegant, relaxed, sexy and beautiful. Just a short interlude, but I love it!”

Golden Vessel ft. Woodes – Vines

“I have been a fan of the production style of Golden Vessel since I first came across his stuff last year. This song is no different, it’s relaxed, minimal and leaves all the space for the cool and beautiful vocals from Woodes. Good chill out song.”

Mallrat – Uninvited

“Only got on the Mallrat train recently, through a crossing of networks. It’s such a fun cool song to have on at all different times of the day. Gets ya moving and singing along.”

JOY. – Heads or Tails

“I always come back to this EP from Joy. Her song ‘Like Home’ got hooked again to that and all her music again. This is now my favourite. The melodies, how her cool and beautiful voice go together with the music. All the emotion and true lyrics, I relate to it and love it. To listen to, turn up with headphones on and sing along to. Yusssss”

Benji Lewis Socials:
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FAULT Exclusive Online Interview: The Hunna

IMG_106CROP

Hertfordshire 4-piece The Hunna have taken the music world by storm over the past few months. With a steady but secure rise to the top, the boys are just on the edge of releasing their debut album on the 26th of August. Over the past months, they’ve toured Europe, the UK and America. Talk about having a lot of gigs under their belts. And it seems that things are looking even bigger and better for the boys in the months to come. You’ll see them at Lollapalooza, Leeds festival and they’ve got their own UK tour lined up. We caught up with the 4-piece earlier this week and here’s what they had to say about working with Lana del Rey’s producer, jumping continents and their close relationship with their fans.

 

You’ve only started releasing music in late 2015. What’s your story? How did everything come together?

I met Dan when we were in college and we started a band together. After that, about 4 years ago, we came together as you see us now. About 3 years ago, after we started writing music together and recording, we got things going. And now, we’re here.

 

Your debut single ‘Bonfire’ was produced by Tim Larcombe (Lana del Rey’s producer) and mixed by Dan Grench who’s also worked with Wolf Alice and Circa Waves. How did it all come together? Was there something in particular that you wanted them to encapsulate in your music?

When we worked with Tim Larcombe, we had a really good relationship with him. We call him uncle Tim now. It all came together in a very natural way. We had the song for quite a while and took it up to him. We shared the same vision for how we wanted things to sound. And both Tim and Dan really managed to capture our sound. They knew what we wanted and they had a vision on what we had. We wanted it to sound like it did live and less is more with our set-up.

 

You’ve already toured Europe, have some UK dates in the bag and you’ve only just got back from America. How would you differentiate the three?

America was insane, it was like a movie. It’s something that I’ve always wanted to do, so it was very much a dream come true. We tried to take it all in and have as much fun as we could. Meeting the American fans for the first time was amazing, they’re all really nice and really supportive. Obviously, over here we’re doing like bigger venues, so it was all kind of like when we first started in the UK. It’s kind of going back to that, but it’s a really nice vibe. The fans sung along, we played our first festival, people were singing along to our songs and that was great.

 

You’re releasing your album at the end of August. What should your fans expect from it?

It’s definitely got ‘The Hunna’ stamp on it. From start to finish, it’s just the story of everything that we’ve experienced trying to finally be in a recognized band and the things that have happened to us along the way. Also, there are lots of different vibes, different sounds on the album that people haven’t heard from us yet. It kind of shows a different side to us. We worked really hard on it to make sure that it’s good enough for the fans. We wanted to make sure that it was the best it could be.

 

Speaking of your fans, you’ve got quite a close relationship with them. What do you think draws people to your music?

Everyday experiences. We write about things that we’ve all been through personally and together, from before we got signed and released up until now. And yeah, as long as we keep things real, we’ll keep people connected. Which is why we wanted to do this. We have artists and bands that we listen to and connect with. We want to do that as well. And also, the music is raw but it’s catchy. It’s also about capturing a sound that people are interested in.

 

What’s your favourite track off of it and why?

I’ll go with Bonfire because it was our first single. We’ve had lots of different versions of it, but we refined it to a version where we felt that it captured exactly what we wanted it to capture. And also, the video with it is good fun. But to be honest, for us, just having an album is mind-blowing.

 

In terms of influences, is there anything in particular that has translated clearly into your album?

We like to think that we’ve got our own sound. But there’s obviously stuff like AC/DC, Led Zeppelin, Queen, Jimmy Hendrix, Bob Marley. We’ve got some hip-hop influences as well, I feel like that can come across sometimes. Soul as well – vocally speaking. On stage, we’ve got a bit of a throwback Nirvana vibe. And also, 30 Seconds to Mars are a bit of an influence.

 

What else do you have lined up for 2016?

So much. We’ve got Leeds festival, a UK tour, Lollapalooza, we’ve got an HMV in store show, and we’ll be going to America again. We’re very busy.

 

What’s your FAULT?

We’re too noisy. Too loud – very loud.

 

FAULT Magazine Weekly Playlist – XYLØ

xylo

Los Angeles Brother/sister duo XYLØ first captured our attention this summer with the decidedly dreampop single “Between The Devil And The Deep Blue Sea,” with singer Paige’s meandering vocals backed by lush synths and piano chords. Their music is dark yet hopeful, simultaneously capturing all of our ambitions and regrets. We asked Chase and Paige to put together some of their favorite songs and the result is a mix of classic tunes (Bruce Springsteen) and a few more recent hits (Rihanna and Selena Gomez), proving that their musical tastes are as diverse and richly layered as their own productions.

CHASE 

Bruce Springsteen – I’m on Fire

“This is soundtrack for a warm summer night drive, it has this tension and sexiness. He has such a commanding presence to his vocals (almost has me convinced I should have sex with him). I love the atmosphere the synthesizer adds, it almost doesn’t fit, wait…it totally fits. Brilliant.”

Lana Del Rey – Young and Beautiful
“I love the song writing, it’s so somber. She’s so vulnerable, it’s almost pathetic, but it’s ok because her voice is so darn cute. Lovely strings as well.”

Rihanna – Bitch Better Have My Money
“This is a great song to listen to while sitting in LA traffic to help distract you from the living hell your experiencing. Trust me.”

PAIGE

Disclosure – Magnets ft. Lorde
“I love the lyrics and the picture they paint….’smoke and Sunset off Mulholland…’
I would listen to this as I’m putting on my make-up for a night out. #amiriteladies !?”

Selena Gomez – Same Old Love
“This is a laid back tune, yet it has a really sassy vibe to it. Which is a common trait of our music. It’s a signature Charli XCX melody performed by a sultry Selena.”

The Smiths – There Is A Light And It Never Goes Out
“Personally , I believe that this is one of the best love songs ever written. A hopeful song for a hopeless soul. The pleasure, the privilege is mine…”

XYLØ on Socials:
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FAULT Favourite Flo Morrissey releases debut album ‘Tomorrow Will Be Beautiful’

 

FAULT Favourite Flo Morrissey, who we featured for FAULT Online in March, will be releasing her debut album ‘Tomorrow Will Be Beautiful‘ next week, on Monday 15th June (Glassnote Records.)

Tomorrow Will Be Beautiful, (Glassnote Records), released June 15th

Tomorrow Will Be Beautiful, (Glassnote Records), released June 15th

We were able to have a listen to the record before Flo releases it into the world and it is a remarkably strong statement for a debuting artist (especially one who is only 20 years old.) Her voice is haunting and unique, richly retro-inspired, and hallmarked with the influence of Kate Bush, Devendra Banhart, Bjork, and Jeff Buckley. Her lyrics have a child-like fragility, and we see her exploring the journey into adulthood (especially pertinent given that she herself is on the cusp of a similar leap into the spotlight.) ‘Pages of Gold‘ and ‘Show Me‘ are statement tracks, with pop-power and surging melodies, whilst ‘Wildflower‘ and title-track ‘Tomorrow Will Be Beautiful‘ are somehow both ghostly and anthemic- an unexpected and beautiful balancing act. ‘Why’ almost teeters too far into fairytale-territory, with it’s lilting melody reminiscent of the Disney score for Sleeping Beauty (perhaps this particular reference says more about me than Morrissey), but its searching vocals are intriguing and anchor the track in emotion and experience. It is impossible to ignore the force of Morrissey’s artistry, and just how enchanting her voice truly is. Full of range, story-telling character, and effortless stylistic variations, we have no doubt she will continue to captivate as this album finally reaches its eagerly-awaiting public.

Revisit our exclusive feature with Flo here, with photographs by Kurtiss Lloyd.

Flo Morrissey, photographed exclusively for FAULT Online by Kurtiss Lloyd in March 2015.

Flo Morrissey, photographed exclusively for FAULT Online by Kurtiss Lloyd in March 2015.

FAULT Future: Freddie Dickson

 

We recently spent the afternoon with Freddie Dickson, the young voice setting music blogs ablaze with his dark ‘Doom Pop’ sound. Courting comparisons to Lana del Rey and the legendary Nick Cave, Dickson has just today released the video for his new single ‘Speculate‘,  which has already been played on Annie Mac’s show on Radio 1 and Jo Good’s on XFM.

It’s taken from an EP, of the same name, out April 13th on Columbia. Dickson has also announced an intimate headline show at The Waiting Room in Stoke Newington on 1st April, before heading out on the Communion New Faces tour on the 20th.
Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

What are your influences and how have you arrived at this current ‘Doom Pop’ sound?

In the early days it was Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Van Morrison, and all those guys I had grown up on. Then as I got older I became more into production- The XX, Lana del Rey, Florence + the Machine, Plan B. I wanted an all-encompassing style for my music.

When did you start writing?

I didn’t start singing until I was 18 at an open mic, but I had been writing since I was 15/16. It just got to a point where I realised I didn’t want anyone else to be singing my songs.

When you did start performing, was it something that came easily to you?

No, I was so shy! But I just drilled my way through endless open mics. I guess I ‘Ed Sheeran’d’ my way through it! (laughs)

Were people quick to take notice?

No, not until I changed my sound. To begin with, I was just too stuck in the past. I was trying to be Bob Dylan, and no-one should try that! I got bored myself, and I did a gig in East London when I was 21 and a friend was just like “that was really bad.” And I knew it.

But I went away, and got Logic on my laptop, and started developing the sound I have now. The artists I want to be like are the ones who constantly change- Plan B, Kanye, Bowie. I get bored so easily (laughs)

Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

It’s interesting, watching sessions and live performances that you’ve done, to see how you take that production-based sound and transfer it into the realm of the live experience. How do you find the music changes when you perform it live?
I think the live experience has to be so different from the record – if you just try to mimic the recorded version, there’s nothing worse. It’s almost like you have to do a cover of your own song, and put some twist on it.

The visuals seem very important to your music- is that something you’re closely involved with?
Yeah I think it’s so important. All the artists I like – Nick Cave, Patti Smith – they created all this powerful imagery. It would be weird, given how dark my sound is, if I was styled with bright neon clothing, right? (laughs) I think it all has to fit together; how you’re photographed, how you look, the live performance.

Part of that process is collaboration, which seems to underpin so much of today’s music industry. Is that something that comes easily to you?
When I was first signed I had so many co-writing sessions set up for me, and none of them really worked. But  I eventually hit it off with someone and now I have this great team of musicians and producers who help me reach the exact thing I want. I’m not an accomplished musician, and I don’t even try to aspire to greatness because the singing is really my thing.

Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

Does the writing process come easily to you?
No not at all! And I think that annoys so many of the people I work with (laughs) I like to make sure every word is perfect, and that every syllable comes out of my mouth easily. I could never be one of these people who writes three songs a week, they’d all sound the same!

It’s interesting to hear you talk in terms of before and after being signed. How has the process changed since being signed- are there new pressures that come with having a label?
Not really- my label has been really nice. We still do it in the same way, writing away in my bedroom, and they give me my own recording space with good speakers which is great. It’s like having a little office (laughs)

As you’re writing music, are you constantly listening to new material by other artists, or do you try to cut yourself from other people’s work?
No, I follow a lot of blogs and love just diving into new music. I’d love to work with a hip-hop band, or a dream collaborator like Nas or Sia! I think she’s amazing because it’s so much about the songs and the voice.

Are you excited to be going on the Communion New Faces tour at the end of April?
Yeah I can’t wait  – it’s such incredible exposure! At the moment I can see how the fans are spread out and there are so many in places like Russia and Eastern Europe, but not enough in England yet (laughs)

Finally, what is your FAULT?
Scotch Eggs. And not being able to write songs very quickly.

 

All photography by Constance Meath Baker

FAULT Future: Flo Morrissey

 

Flo Morrissey is a chanteuse who sits somewhere between a Lana Del Rey penchant for romantic nostalgia, the bohemian power of Florence & the Machine, the whispered and mystical vocals of early Björk, and the effortless charm of Jane Birkin or Stevie Nicks.

At only 20, her sound and lyrics are incredibly well-honed, born of influences her contemporaries haven’t heard of and a detachment from pop culture that has made her incredibly unique both to listen to, and to look at.

Having just released her debut single ‘Pages of Gold‘, and just finished her first tour in the UK supporting The Staves, we sat down with Flo to talk cinematic sounds, the world around the artist, and the power of not always saying yes…

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

How are you finding the tour so far?

I’m loving it – it’s my first one so it was quite daunting to start with, doing something new every night for people who haven’t necessarily come to see you! But it’s great to be playing with The Staves because the audience is there to really listen.

In terms of your biggest performances so far – SXSW, Green Man, etc. – it seems like you are really selective when it comes where to play. Is that the case?

Yeah, it’s just the way my path has gone. I think it’s down to the Internet- I started putting up my demos at 14 and never really did shows in pubs or clubs like other acts. I was just lucky that my manager found me online. I think people say yes to too many things nowadays, and it takes away the special nature of actually doing a show.

Is the live aspect something you enjoy, or is it something you find daunting?

I enjoy it more and more because I’m still new to it – but you never know how you’re going to feel after a show. One thing could change and you wish you had done it differently. But I want to perform more and I’m excited to do more shows. It’s just hard in the beginning! When I go on the road, I’ll hopefully have a multi-instrumentalist to play with me so it will be a little less daunting and lonely.

Beyond the live show, is sharing the actual music something that makes you feel vulnerable?

I don’t really think about it until after, when I realise how weird it can be to speak about the songs. I’d rather people had their own interpretation of it. It’s nice to think that someone else might get something from it as well.

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

The individualism of your music and vision is clearly close to your heart. As you grow as an artist- being signed and managed and touring in the UK and beyond- is it harder to retain that sense of self?

I picked my label because they completely let me do what I want to, and I don’t have to compromise. People have this idea of the music industry as this place where you always have to say yes, but you really don’t. I still do my own Facebook and Instagram, and I wouldn’t want that to ever change.

How did you start writing music?

I started putting stuff on Myspace when I was about 14. I used to sing more classical music at school, but I started playing guitar and it was just more fun! So I made my own recordings, and my own videos, and put covers online. I was this 15 year-old girl acting as my own manager, sending my music out to blogs and it just felt really natural.

In that vein of being your own manager, it seems that your vision is really all-encompassing? Is it important to you that all the elements are cohesive in that way?

I think it is really important to have a kind of world around the artist, but then you can’t think about it in that way. I just try to be natural about it.

How do you see yourself going forward? Pages of Gold, (the upcoming single), marks a shift towards a much bigger sound.

I am really open to experimentation and a lot of the songs on the album have big string sections. I’d love to bring a live band on tour because a lot of the songs are quite cinematic and I’m glad it went that way. It could have been a real folk record but I always wanted to have this more cinematic sound.

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

How was the process of recording your album in LA over the summer?

It was quite lonely at time because LA is just such a huge place. It was the longest I’ve ever been away from home but my manager lives there which was great, and I get along so well with Noah, the producer.

You are quite a quintessentially British artist- what do you see as the differences between making music in the US and the UK?

It was quite inspiring to be there because they won’t say no- they had this kind of “you go girl!” mentality (laughs) and it was actually really good for me! They strive for a lot and it’s so easy, and English, to be self-deprecating but it helped in music terms to have that empowerment on hand.

Do you feel the music industry has been really supportive so far?

I’ve been so lucky but I try not to think about it too much! I sometimes feel like my music is maybe not that accessible, especially with just me and a guitar because it’s so vulnerable and raw. It won’t appeal to everyone but I strangely like that. Usually the best things are the ones that have flaws.

On that note, what is your FAULT?

I worry too much!

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

https://www.facebook.com/FloMorrissey

All photographs by Kurtiss Lloyd