LFW Feb ’14: Day 4 AW14

FAULT‘s fashion team hit the catwalk shows and backstage at London Fashion Week (Feb ’14) to bring you our favourite pieces from the Autumn / Winter 2014 shows. Stay connected – on TwitterFacebook or right here on FAULT Online – for our round-up of the designers and trends that we have our eye on.

 

 Roksanda Ilincic

roksanda-ilinic

Is it safe to assume that come AW14 the colour Royal blue is going to be EVERYWHERE? Here it cropped up again in Roksanda Ilincic’s new collection. The pieces looked strongly influenced by modern art with staggered hemlines, interesting, angular draping, with strong use of colour and blocks of colour with sheer panels plus angular pattern repeating throughout. Stripes made a subtle appearance and could be seen on the edges of hems, around collars and and on the larger patterns of the clothing. Thick woolen, luxurious-looking pieces made way to a confetti dress made up of shards of colour, this then continued more subtly onto the other pieces that followed in the collection. Cute flat shoes and ankle socks reigned supreme, as did gorgeous chunky gold belts leaving us with a vision of the thinking woman’s wardrobe.

Words by Rachel Holland

 

OSMAN

osman

The Osman A/W14 collection was a beautiful collision of the Middle Eastern- Moorish prints, Byzantine blue, dusty Moroccan pink- with the surrealism of Europe in the 1920s. These influences played off each other beautifully, with sleek, minimalist silhouettes allowing for intricately ornamental embellishment, surreal embroidery, and exotic details such as sashes. The palette was bold without being too much, with shades that felt well-researched and prints that seemed authentic. It felt that this collection really took a journey and paid tribute to the nuances and intricacies of another culture. Yousefzada laid out a new shape, with asymmetrical hemlines and skinny cropped trousers that seemed a nod to Raf Simons at Dior. The surreal details – bold eyes and manicured hands – did not impose, instead adding a lightness and playful quality to what was otherwise a very heavy, luxe look.  From full evening dresses to separates and accessories, this is a collection that will translate well both in print and on the shop floor. On the runway, the richness of colour and print made a striking impact, but the finer details of the texture and elegant tailoring really took this collection to another level.

Words by Will Ballantyne-Reid

 

Marios Schwab

schwab

In what felt like a much more commercial collection for Schwab, which felt less focused on the red carpet and more about bringing the label into the closets of modern women, an edge of cool could be seen throughout. With a play on hemlines, structure and with most of the hemlines super-short, this was a focused collection from someone who knows their target audience well. Leather jackets, bomber jackets and capes were slung over pretty dresses or leather trousers. Sheer layers with elegant shapes and even trains featured in the catwalk show, there’s something in this collection that would appeal to everyone and that, lies in it’s success.

Words by Rachel Holland

 

Erdem

erdem

Erdem’s collection took on elements of the 1960’s with references of fine couture and heritage techniques woven into delicate fabric, with the designers signature flowers and blooms. With many of the pieces having a purposely unfinished feel. The attention to detail, as always expected with this label, was exquisite. Gold, black and cream brocade sat alongside wet-look coats and jackets for an interesting contrast. Some coats and dresses were unexpectedly slashed at the elbows, sheer panels popped up at the neck and the focus on embroidery and embellishment could be seen in each piece. Far from being stuffy, this is a modern Erdem glimpsing at the past while striding forcefully into the future.

Words by Rachel Holland

 

David Koma

koma

David Koma’s show was a slick affair, with each piece being well thought out, edited back and refined so that the brand’s message was completely clear. That the Koma woman means business. Open-toed boots or shoes clad every model, the boots of note being the knee-highs – giving the outfits a feeling of restriction yet freedom. The first looks that entered the catwalk were a rich purple in a complete body colour-block – a bold statement. This led to grey to white to black and finally to pops of royal blue. Caging detail and harnessing revealed hints of flesh, looking decidedly stern, yet, the full skirts were more of a feminine, pretty detail. Leather and ‘angular lace’ however were far from pretty, creating a bold, strong statement that despite the dominatrix overtones, look surprisingly wearable.

Words by Rachel Holland

 

Burberry Prorsum

burberry

Burberry was a painterly affair this season with botanical prints on bags, scarves and jackets with more than a passing nod to the artists muse or the 70’s bohemian, which is an unusual spin for AW14 but one that we can thankfully embrace. The longer skirt lengths, the cinched waist and the easy, draped shawls, blankets and sheepskin coats made for a high-class aristocratic mood, but one where the heroine runs away with a penniless poet, painter or musician. The monogrammed scarves, the caped trench and the hand painted bags will no doubt sell out fast as the must-have buys for the new season. The pretty delicate dresses and the wearable, statement coats will undoubtably be do well amongst the labels core fans. The Burberry powerhouse is showing no signs of slowing down, so it was fun to see Bailey having a lighter mood this season and looking to the bohemian for his inspiration, we applaud it.

Words by Rachel Holland

 

Peter Pilotto

peter

This was a pleasant surprise from Peter Pilotto this season after previous seasons displaying a more restricted and refined aesthetic. There was colour and print and lots of it, having varying levels of success in some pieces more than others. Literally every piece was unexpected and just when you thought that you had the collection ‘fixed’ in your head, a new equally dazzling look would emerge down the catwalk. An alpine print was used to great effect in both a dress and a padded suit, the sporty, patterned coats felt extremely ‘now’, whilst the colourful patterned detail picked up where Mary Kantranzou has left off and took us in a new direction. I loved the slouchy layering of contrasting patterned knits, more so than the earlier pieces, I can imagine the effortless comfort of wearing these looks and yet looking totally wild and eclectic at the same time. Despite reading conflicting reviews elsewehere, this collection gets a big thumbs up from me.

Words by Rachel Holland

 

GILES

giles

Giles is the designer who we can rely on to represent the cool British girls. This season he focused on playfulness and anarchy. The show was set in a dark car park in the East End of London to set the mood, with strobing lighting to add to the overall rebellious ‘Giles’ vibe. Punky looking girls strode the catwalk, with Brit model, Cara, snapping selfies of herself and the front row, creating an iconic catwalk moment. The theme was rebellion, the clothes either tropical bright, lime tartan or monochrome. Hummingbirds were the motif of the collection, trickling out towards the end as bugs crawling the edges of cocktail dresses. It did, as a whole feel a bit haphazard, however there were coveteable pieces in there, namely the capes, the long straight dresses, the leather items and the shorter dresses. The accessories will be perfect for wearability alone – long, leather gloves, huge scarves and punked-up boots will add an instant update to any winter wardrobe. Giles’ previous seasons are hard to follow, however we have no doubt that the best is yet to come.

Words by Rachel Holland

 

TOM FORD

tom-ford

Showing a wicked sense of humour, Tom Ford took a cultural reference and spun it on it’s head with his upgraded version of the ‘Tom Ford 61’. A knockoff top that’s been doing the rounds in sub-culture – Ford’s now turned into a glittery party dress. The rest of the collection felt 60’s and a bit rock n roll with a sombre mood. Monochrome featured heavily throughout the collection, with splashes of bold red, copper and leopard print. There was a big play on textures with sequins, leather, velvet and wool. Of note were the long velvet dresses, so casual and wearable, yet so high-end at the same time. They could easily be dressed up for the red carpet with some striking jewels or down with a pair of rugged biker boots.

Ford proves season after season that’s he’s a master of the catwalk. With a huge celebrity turnout, plus using big name models such as Karen Elson, Liberty Ross, Stella Tennant and Georgia Jagger during his show, his pulling power is clear to see. And that’s the reason why we keep coming back, because we just can’t get enough Tom Ford in our lives.

Words by Rachel Holland

 

KTZ

ktz

In the last year, KTZ has reached a whole new level of iconic brand identity. With the likes of Rihanna and A$AP ROCKY on board, the label has swiftly made an imprint upon the mainstream with its monochrome palette, bold prints and edgy proportions. In this vein, it can be easy to assume you’ll know what a KTZ show will look like before it comes down the runway. However the label somehow continues to challenge its own aesthetic, finding a new innovation whilst satisfying its cult following. This season the look was a sort of Medieval-Bionic-hybrid, with tabards and tunics in the form of oversized and embellished shirts and dresses, worn with leggings and trousers in beautifully manipulated silk and leather. Ribbed leather leggings had the look of machine parts, whilst jackets and tunic had a heavy luxury, weighted with geometric jewel patterns and studs. For their menswear presentation this season, the label sent models down the runway with snow-shrouded faces and this Arctic influence carried over; from the puffa jackets to the Doctor Zhivago hoods in pale silk lace. To put it simply, this was yet another triumph for a label that is already taking the world by storm. Who knows where they will be by next season?

Words by Will Ballantyne-Reid

 

 

The Waiting Game: Terry Whitaker’s FAULT

The Waiting Game - T.Whitaker - Look 1 (1)

Jacket by Chanel
Top by Fendi
Skirt by Chanel
Shoe by Fendi
Ring by Maison Martin Margiela

 

Jacket by Fendi  Skirt by Chanel Necklace by Chanel Shoes by Christian Louboutin

Jacket by Fendi
Skirt by Chanel
Necklace by Chanel
Shoes by Christian Louboutin

 

Coat by Saint Laurent Dress by Saint Laurent Boots by Saint Laurent  Rings by Carat  Cuff by Chanel

Coat by Saint Laurent
Dress by Saint Laurent
Boots by Saint Laurent
Rings by Carat
Cuff by Chanel

 

The Waiting Game - T.Whitaker - Look 3

Coat by Saint Laurent
Dress by Saint Laurent
Boots by Saint Laurent
Rings by Carat
Cuff by Chanel

 

Dress by Prada Boots by Christian Louboutin Gloves by Chanel Cuffs by Chanel

Dress by Prada
Boots by Christian Louboutin
Gloves by Chanel
Cuffs by Chanel

 

The Waiting Game - T.Whitaker - Look 6

Coat by Chanel
Skirt by Philosophy
Shoes by Fendi
Belt by Chanel

 

The Waiting Game - T.Whitaker - Look 7

Cape by Alexander McQueen
Dress by Giles
Clutch by Lanvin
Booties by Christian Louboutin
Bracelet by Chanel
Necklace by Chanel
Earrings by Chanel

Photographer: Terry Whitaker @ www.terrywhitaker.co.uk
Model: Amelia @ Leni’s Model Management London
Stylist: Jen Michalski-Bray @ www.jen-michalski.com
MUA/Hair: Nina Fay Robinson @ www.ninafayrobinson.tumblr.com using Laura Mercier and Bumble and Bumble

London Fashion Week: Day 4 Highlights

Monday was arguably the most anticipated day of LFW with numerous big names showing, most notably FAULT Favourite Burberry. Our day began with the geometric prints and striking yellows of Roksanda Ilincic, her collection once again showcasing her unique palette sampling expertise.

Roksanda Ilincic

Roksanda Ilincic

Next it was on to the eagerly awaited Christopher Kane show, proving a favourite amongst many show goers season after season, Kane returned with another strong collection and one of our favourite shows. Using more autumnal, wintery cuts and compositions than other designers of the day but balancing them out with delicate fabrics and floral prints.

Christopher Kane

Christopher Kane

Erdem followed and delivered a strong monochrome collection featuring delicate lace detailing and the reoccurring sheer motive, ever popular throughout SS14.

Erdem

Erdem

In a stark contrast from the morning’s shows young designer Nasir Mazhar brought street wear to the stage with his logo-heavy presentation in the Topshop Show Space. Borrowing heavily from the mens show presented at LC:M the collection is sure to draw in yet more high profile fans.

Nasir Mazhar

Nasir Mazhar

A carefully considered digital presentation by Cristina Sabaduic followed, a beautifully produced video of her new collection projected behind models that showcased her designs how they were envisaged. A collection brought to life by movement with sheer fabrics and feminine shapes in abundance, the collection erfectly encapsulating a nostalgic summer.

Following a now trademark frantic rush to Kensington Gardens, I was greeted with walls of paparazzi and hoards of screaming One Direction fans, this could only mean two things. 1. I’d arrived at the Burberry show and 2. a certain young band member was also in attendance… The anticipation and excitement surrounding the Burberry show, is unlike many similar events, warranted. Burberry always manage to deliver. The buzz inside the glass structure this season was furthered more-so with rumours of lace detailing and updates on classic shapes – how better to impress than to improve classic favourites? The collection comprised of soft pastel hues complimented with the rumoured lace detailing, soft hues paired with soft fabrics, cashmere and wool both prevalent. The show was as theatrical as ever with the finale seeing Brit favourites Cara Delevingne and Jourdan Dunn along with the other perfectly cast models, strolling down the catwalk to breezy summery music as petals fell from above. Burberry once again proving they know how to steal the show.

Burberry SS14

Burberry

Later on, KTZ delivered their hard-hitting street wear inspired collection to a captivated audience in Somerset House. The perfectly complimenting music mixed by A-Trak keeping crowd excitement at peak throughout. The collection played host to trademark studs and bold print, all cut to perfection with strong silhouettes comprised of numerous layers. The go-to street wear brand of the moment once again showing they’re the ones to beat.

KTZ

KTZ

Pringle of Scotland showcased a beautifully composed collection of colour and shapes in The Connaught Hotel with Cobalt blue once again showing up as a colour of SS14. We particularly liked the cutout detailing seen in the tops from the collection.

Pringle of Scotland

Pringle of Scotland

To end the Monday fashion marathon it was down to Giles and Tom Ford to compete with the days shows. Both more than worthy competitors. First was Giles with their beautifully realised collection of printed dresses juxtaposed with the evening gowns seen later on. My personal favourite would have to be the dress printed with a 90’s Prada advert featuring Amber Valletta.

Giles

Giles

FAULT Favourite Tom Ford is not a designer you would consider doubting and once again proved why. Evening wear at it’s very finest, leather, lace and more leather with more than a hint of sparkle, all immaculately crafted and as flattering as physically possible, I can guarantee these designs will be seeing more than just a few red carpets.

Tom Ford

Tom Ford

 

Words by Louis A W Sheridan

London Fashion Week Highlights – Day 4

Words: Katlin Siil

Gone are the days when London as a fashion capital took the backseat while Paris and New York dominated the scene. Still underfunded, London nonetheless boasts some of the most remarkable talent out there, drawing from its underground roots and adapting to a demanding commercial market. Day 4 at London Fashion Week demonstrated what sets us apart – we are the capital of forward thinking and innovative power, but we also pay tribute to our heritage. The combination of the two have created the perfect environment for nurturing fashion designers who, fresh out of LCM and CSM, are ready to take on the world.

Louise Gray

Peter Pilotto

Darker than usual, fashion duo Peter Pilotto and Christopher de Vos opened the morning with a Spanish renaissance inspired collection of their signature style prints and clever silhouettes. Full of bold reds and bright blues, the collection referenced fine art with its bold brushstrokes, along with the blazing Mediterranean sun. Last season favorite, the puffa-jacket, returned to the stage, along with a new looser jacket and coat, slashed skirts and the very Pilotto overdose of prints.

Louise Gray

Antonio Berardi

Detailing was also the name of the game at Antonio Berardi. He presented a cohesive collection in a limited colour palette, mainly in dark grays and blues, paying tribute to the female form with his constructed shift dresses, waistcoats and jackets. The simplicity of the collection was balanced by the long train. It made an appearance on several occasions attached to short dresses, jackets and most notably in the long gowns of the finale set.

Louise Gray

Louise Gray

Louise Gray’s collection was the much appreciated colour pop in an otherwise dark day. Typically Gray, it was a somewhat schizophrenic cacophony of mismatched prints, clashing colours and ironic styling in the form of librarian glasses and oversized bags. But it all melted together into a playful collection that made total sense. Broken down, it consisted of strong, wearable pieces from cute knits to fun short dresses to tailored separates.

Erdem

Erdem

Erdem, known for his luscious bright florals, stuck to darker hues this season. There was still the familiar flower patterns and lace, ladylike dresses and easy wearable skirt suits, but it all had an almost gothic edge to it. It was the cleverly placed sheer details, feathers and shimmer that made the collection sexier. If a designer who has become so loved for his style still feels he wants to – needs to – take risks and explore new territories, then he really has all to gain and nothing to lose.

Burberry

Burberry

Star models strutting down the catwalk, celebrities sitting like birds on a wire in the front row – it can only be Burberry. For many, the Burberry show is the only reason to travel to London between New York and Milan. And Christopher Bailey did not disappoint – he rarely does. Burberry collections don’t re-invent the wheel, but you can count on them to be 10 minutes of absolute aesthetic pleasure. This season, the Burberry girl was clad in animal prints, ballerina flats and carrying oversized clutch bags. She was sophisticated and a bit Catherine Deneuve in Belle de Jour and she was definitely more grown up – something we’ve seen in many collections this season.

Osman

Osman

Osman gave us perhaps one his strongest collections to date. It was opulent and showered in cold brocade, but it was the refreshingly simple colour pallet of whites and pale greys that created the fitting backdrop for his crafty patterns and detailing. The sheer tops went beautifully with the heavy tailored dresses, while the furs tops complemented the brilliantly cut trousers. There is something to be said about an all-white collection: it just works. Especially after seasons and seasons of bright collections and in the midst of all this black.

Giles

Giles

Trust Giles to bring a bit of theatrics to London Fashion Week. The man known for staging some of the most spectacular shows (The Black Swan drama at the Royal Courts of Justice, anyone?) gave another stellar performance and anyone who was anyone was there to witness. In typical Giles fashion there was an abundance of print, pattern and fabric. The familiar laser-cut leather made its mandatory appearance, while the floor-length flowing gowns, oversized puff sleeves and the dusty make-up on the models gave the whole affair a very ethereal feel. That, and Kristen McMenamy opening the show. Giles, we salute you for sticking to your guns (or scissors, as the case may be) and not paying attention to trends and all that jazz!

J.W. Anderson

J.W. Anderson

J.W. Anderson can do no wrong. He can give us boys in skirts and tube tops (LCM collections ring a bell?) and we still think he is a genius. That’s probably because he is with his so very distinct, so very unique and so very-very desirable painfully simple style. A pioneer of fuss-free fashion, his Autumn/Winter 2013 collection was minimal and sleek. He gave us an almost clinical show of cleverly draped blacks and whites, paired with tennis shoes and sleek hair – something only JW Anderson can make look feminine and sexy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

FAULT Chief Stylist Tallulah Harlech’s top picks from LFW ’12

Tallulah Harlech presents a round-up from this year’s London Fashion Week.

2 minute Q&A:

FAULT: Stand-out show? T: Mary Katrantzou

Best newcomer? Maarten Van Der Horst at Fashion East

Weirdest item/style/pattern? There was some patent leather, which looked like latex that kept coming up. Did it work? For sure! Chic with an edge.

Best model moment? Doutzen walking in the Giles show

Starstruck moment?
How lame… I don’t get startstruck.

Top piece of advice for stylists looking forward to Autumn/Winter? Military, leather, fur and Morticia Adams…

General advice on styles to look for/avoid?
Floral prints have somewhat maintained their sturdy trend-although I reckon they’ll be on the out soon. Wear trousers instead of jeans. This winter has bright autumnal colours and the obvious dark shades we see time and again.

 

 

…and the top fashion films so far this year:

 

SHOWstudio: Nick Knight, Karlie Kloss, Kate Phelan for Topshop

Karlie is my favourite, completely and utterly desirable and brilliant here.

 

The Chanel Boy Bag Campaign Video

Karl Lagerfeld takes us on a journey back to the ’20s with a mini silent film. Titled My New Friend Boy, featuring Alice Dellal.