FAULT Magazine interview with Jack Brett Anderson

Photography: Miles Holder

StylistEdith Walker Millwood 

Grooming: Charmanique Thompson

Assisted by Leslie and Felicia

While you might know Jack Brett Anderson’s face from the stage with a lead role in Tina Jay’s ‘Held’ or his portrayal as Prince Edward in the Christopher Marlowe’s King Edward II, many art and history buffs have recently fallen in love with the young actor following his portrayal of Honoré Joseph Géry Pieret in National Geographic’s Genius: Picasso. . With so many prestigious roles behind him and we’re sure many ahead, we caught up with Jack to find out more about one of 2018’s most exciting acting talents.

 

When you’re depicting a historical figure as opposed to a fictional character, is there more pressure on you as an actor to depict them exactly as they were or are you able to interoperate and change the roll to more suit your style?

I think telling anything factually has a huge sense of responsibility, to portray it as accurately as possible so people get a true reflection of the story. So yeah, I think there’s a lot more pressure as opposed to a character that has been created, that’s when you can add your own flare.

What first drew you to the character of Géry Pieret when you saw the script?

When reading and doing my research on this character, it came to light that he was a free spirit with such poise and confidence in the face of the most powerful characters and one way or another he made his way. I loved that about him and his involvement in Picasso’s life and all the ways that he influenced him.

What’s been the best part about playing such an interesting character?

The freedom of it and I guess, getting to play out scenes that I can never do myself, like steal from the Louvre and sell them to Picasso haha. Doing those scenes, knowing they happened once upon a time, that was the best part for me.

Did you have much previous knowledge on the whole story of Picasso and his life before joining the project?

Yeah, I knew of Picasso, from school, his art and that he has a huge impact on the world. I think that’s the best thing about this job – the retelling of real stories and how much you can learn and then be able to share what you’ve learnt and created. One thing I did know about Picasso was his Cubism. Picasso’s genius was his Cubism. How he did that is incredible. He was a true visual artist, an original trendsetter.  

What’s been the favourite part of your acting journey so far?

This job has been one of the hardest to get and keep but once you do get your foot in the door, but it can be the most rewarding. I’ve been able to see the world, so much of it while doing what I love, to perform, and I can say it’s all been a dream so far but my favourite part is meeting all the amazing people I have. I think that’s what life is about, meeting people and forming relationships. That’s why we tell stories right?

What’s next for you this 2018?

This year has been one busy time for me already and I’m real proud of the stuff that people are getting to see and the things that I’ve done already. I’m gonna take my time and find the best project, something fruitful and that the fans can get their teeth into, but coming next will be my film ‘Acceptable Damage’ a british Indie and ‘Intrigo:Samaria’ – directed by Daniel Alfredson.

 

What is your FAULT?

You know what is my fault, us being here talking about all this, that’s my fault because I worked really hard and never gave up and I guess that’s my message too. Never give up on whatever you want to do, you never know what may come of it.

 

Keep up to date with Jack’s projects over on Instagram @jackbanderson 

Alexander McQueen fever is officially in the air.

Inferno Alexander McQueen_Spread_12 Inferno Alexander McQueen_Spread_16 Inferno Alexander McQueen_Spread_15 Inferno Alexander McQueen_Spread_07

‘Inferno: Alexander McQueen’ by Kent Baker and Melanie Rickey

Five years after his untimely death, London is celebrating this genius London talent with two major exhibitions (‘Savage Beauty’ at the V & A and Nick Waplington’s ‘Woking Progress’ at the Tate Britain), alongside the stunning picture book ‘Inferno’ by Kent Baker and words by Melanie Rickey.

Focussing on one show- the breakout AW 1996 ‘Dante’, described as groundbreaking couture meets club culture, which took place at a Crypt in the midst of Jack the Ripper’s killing ground on a freezing March evening, in East London.

The venue in itself set the scene for mystery and intrigue, and the off the beaten track show was bound to be controversial with the fashpack who were keen to see what was next from the inventive young designer.

Coffee table book ‘Inferno’ is an insider’s view of that night. It showcases exclusive, intimate behind the scenes photographs, as viewed from the lens of fashion photographer Kent Baker; After meeting Lee through mutual friends, he casually asked if he could take document the evening, not imagining he would say yes!

The infamous show, set in the apparently haunted venue of Christ Church in Spitalfields, complete with skeleton on the front row, has never been re-created, but you can now see for yourself the buzz and excitement of the show preparation, unseen portraits, model shots, hissy fits and the master at work.

With words by fashion journalist Melanie Rickey, Lee’s peers, his ex, the creative teams, and models that walked for him, all tell their version of what it was like to know and work with the legend on the show. High energy, raw, dramatic, are all phrases that crop up time and time again, alongside tales of the freaky vibe, dark spirits and electricity, which make the anecdotes worth their weight in gold.

Known for always pushing the boundaries in fashion and production, this show was bound to be remembered- as a performance as well as the designs. With Lee once stating “You’ve got to know the rules to break them. That’s what I’m here for”

This is a book for everyone that agrees with that, and can appreciate couture, and a dark, thoughtful visionary. Long live that sentiment. Even now you’re gone.

By Sara Darling

Inferno: Alexander McQueen by Kent Baker and Melanie Rickey is published by Laurence King Publishing in March, available from www.laurenceking.com

.