Jared Harris: Exclusive FAULT Magazine Issue 27 interview & photoshoot

Jared Harris

“Acting… it’s playing, isn’t it? That’s what’s great about the job. If you don’t enjoy playing then why would someone enjoy watching you do it?”

Jared Harris for FAULT Magazine Issue 27

Photographer | Osvaldo Ponton
Stylist + Art Director | Chaunielle Brown
Groomer | Scott McMahan @ Kate Ryan
Set Designer | Lauren Bahr @ Kate Ryan
Photo Assistants | Nicasio Andrade + Xiangyun Chen
Fashion Assistants | Francis Harris + Ariane Velluire

A far cry from the typical, theatrical masks sputtering their pre-fabricated phrases, Jared Harris is a poised and reflective interviewee. As we banter about Brexit, Boris, and all that bullshit, there’s no suggestion that he’s keen to move things along in the direction of some scripted lines about his next role.

It’s a little surprising that he isn’t fervently plugging what promises to be another significant milestone in his storied career: the role of Absalom Breakspear in Amazon’s 2019 series ‘Carnival Row’. After all, the show reportedly has an enormous budget, stars eye-widening leads in Orlando Bloom and Cara Delevigne, and has been put together largely by his former college pal, René Echevarria. But it’s clear that Jared’s been around the block a few times. When he speaks, it’s with the assurance of someone who knows that the next role is never very far away. And it’s reassuring to get the sense that he’s treating our interview with the same sense of enjoyment as he has the rest of his career to date. It’s all part of the job, after all, so you might as well make the most of it…

FAULT: Tell us about your current project [AMC’s ‘The Terror’]

Jared Harris: The job’s great. It’s sort of special, really: the showrunner is a friend of mine from Duke University, so I’ve known him for a really long time. My younger brother’s on it as well, so I get to work with him. That’s always been a personal goal of mine.

The show itself is really well written, and that’s always the first question that one asks: how’s the script?

Jared Harris for FAULT Magazine Issue 27

There’s often a temptation to qualify actors based on a role call of who they’ve worked with – and you’ve worked with some of the biggest names in the business (Tarantino, Soderbergh, Guy Ritchie, David Fincher etc). How important is that to you? To what extent do you take jobs based on the personnel vs the project?

First of all, it’s the script. That said, when I was starting out – and I’ve kept some of those scripts – I remember reading Dracula (by Francis Ford Coppola) and thinking what a load of old tosh it was! It was almost softcore porn – there were a lot of scenes with girls in flimsy blouses getting their boobs out, and I thought to myself, “What on earth is he doing this for? It’s just dreadful!” But then, of course, you go to see the movie and you think, “wow!”

That’s when I got my first education in dealing with really great directors. You just don’t know what they’re going to do with the project. You have to assume that, with films in particular, it’s almost like a lump of clay. Not quite, because scripts are never entirely shapeless, but the great directors fully intend to reshape the material. That was true when I worked on Natural Born Killers. I read the original Tarantino script and it was completely different to the final film as it was directed by Oliver Stone. So, with films in particular, the director is almost more important than the script.

That said, it’s very difficult to improve a bad script. The shape and the structure has to be there to begin with, otherwise no-one really knows what they’re supposed to be doing. You’ve just got so many people trying to tell a story: the costume designers, the cinematographer… the script is the starting point for all of them.

Jared Harris for FAULT Magazine Issue 27

On that note, what level of influence do you – as an actor – have when it comes to interpreting the script?

It really depends. There are so many different factors at play: what type of movie it is; who’s making it – is it studio or independent; who’s directing it; the size of your role… Generally speaking, if it’s a studio film and you’re not the lead, you have very little input at all and no-one’s really interested in hearing your opinion…! They all just want to cozy up to the movie star and stay there.

That said, when I was working on Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows there was total collaboration with Guy Ritchie and Robert Downey Jr. What tends to happen with that sort of film is that the screenwriter is trying to deliver a fresh product – a new take on an old story – and then, during the endless period of noting (where studio executives give notes on the script), it tends to deviate back to something incredibly familiar. Or, to be blunt, something that you’ve seen a thousand times before…

The studios’ obsession is, “when in doubt, re-state the plot.” Tell the audience what’s going to happen, what’s happening as they’re watching it develop, and then tell them what they just saw. And, of course, it’s fucking boring. So they [Ritchie and Downey Jr] tried to figure out a way of taking out as much of the exposition and plot as possible and delivering just enough so that the audience could stay ahead of the story and yet still be surprised be it: because no-one was as far ahead as Sherlock Holmes.

 

You’ve said that actors nowadays don’t have the same opportunities to rehearse as often as you used to. How do you manage to go between so many different, diverse roles so quickly and without that opportunity to really get into gear?

Well, I’ve never had that opportunity, to tell you the truth. From the beginning, I was always cast late. If you’re the main person on the movie, or the person whom the financing is lining up behind, then you know what you’re going to be doing well in advance. But with me…

George Hall, my principal at Central School of Speech and Drama, said it best, in my opinion. He told us, “You’re not going to have time. You’re going to have to learn how to sketch. You’re going to go into an audition and you’re going to be handed material with 5 minutes to figure something out. You can’t afford to be precious: you can’t do research and character study and work on a back story… you’re not going to have time to do that.” That was some of the most pertinent advice I got from that school.

Jared Harris for FAULT Magazine Issue 27

Special Thank You (Location) | Tomcats Barbershop and Renee McCarty

 

What’s your FAULT?

Oh God. Forget the magazine; you’ll have a phonebook to fill!

I’m never happy with the work that I’ve done. Someone told me once on ‘Mad Men’ that I’d just done an iconic scene, and asked me if that was the one that my character would be remembered for, and that I’d be remembered for then how would I feel about that? And I remember saying, “Can I do it again? Because I think I can do it better…”

Jared’s next project to appear on screens is The Terror for AMC which begins broadcasting right after the finale of Walking Dead. The Terror is an adventure/horror story that fictionalises the real life events surrounding the disappearance of The Franklin Expedition in the Arctic during the Winter of 1847.

 

Find out who else will appear alongside Jared Harris in the issue here

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 27 – THE BEST OF BRITISH ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

Gary Numan: Exclusive FAULT Magazine photoshoot and interview preview

Gary Numan

I know exactly what I’m doing and I’m in a really good place.”

Photo: David Richardson
Styling: Margherita Alaimo
Grooming: Gemma Webb
Words: Flora Neighbour

Given his new-wave edge and awkward façade, not to mention his well-documented Asperger Syndrome, you’d be forgiven for thinking that Gary Numan was a shy, introverted man. You’d be mistaken. The quick-witted and honest songwriter has a lot to say – both about his own past and his (partly) Trump-inspired vision of a near-apocalyptic future. Despite maintaining a cult following to this day, the 80s electro trailblazer has only recently returned to the limelight with Savage, his first top 10 UK album since I, Assassin all the way back in 1982.

FAULT: How’s the tour going?

Gary Numan: It’s great! Last night in Bournemouth was fantastic – much better than the first night, which was a huge shock to the system. I’m still trying to get to grips with it all again while remembering my lyrics. It’s been a completely different experience to my other tours, but I’m really enjoying it.

Do you feel more in control of your work nowadays?

I’ve always felt that I had a say but, now that I manage myself, it’s opened up a whole new path for me. I was always fairly in control of my work before: I’ve always written everything and been hands-on in the process, so it doesn’t feel that different. The thing about my new album, Savage, is the self-managing aspect. It’s been the first big project that I’ve been in charge of from beginning to end without anyone to lean on. I’ve had to make all the big decisions myself, which was a bit daunting to begin with but, strangely enough, once I got into it, I began to realise it wasn’t that too difficult. There’s no black magic involved, just staying organised.

 

Can you talk us through the ideology of Savage?

It came from a book I’d been writing, which was set in a post-global warming future. The idea being that the earth’s temperature wasn’t controlled and it became this unstoppable phenomenon, leaving the planet with a large amount of desert and full of despair. That’s it in a nutshell.

If you go into it further, it looks at people living in that world and how brutal it would be. It looks at the evaporation of [grouped] eastern and western cultures and the potential for us to become far more fragmented and tribal. The album presents snapshots of how brutal it would be, and how unforgiving and savage the environment would become.

It was also influenced by Trump and how he’s come along and started to undo all the good that has been done. I didn’t write the album because of Trump but he certainly helped it along.

 

Gary Numan was shot at Cable Street Studios, London

How has your style developed over the years?

Visually it’s certainly evolved, but I have adapted musically as well. I think it’s easier because my music is essentially electronic. Every time I’ve started a new album, there’s been new technology that helps me to adapt my style and create new sounds. It’s difficult not to change your sound and move forward if you’re working with electronic music – every album should sound like a progression of the one before. My early stuff was very minimal and simple and, as I’ve grown as an artist, it’s become more complicated and heavier. The thing that has never changed – in terms of being recognisable – is my voice.

Would you call yourself a British icon?

No way! I don’t really know what makes an icon. What qualifies an icon? There are many people I look up to but I wouldn’t call them icons. I’m a huge Trent Reznor [Nine Inch Nails] fan. I think he’s done pretty amazing things but he’s not British.

There aren’t many people I would say I look up to, but there are many British people I admire. If you have a look at the music industry now there are some pretty phenomenal artists. For example: M.I.A. In terms of what she’s trying to achieve – both in the music industry and outside [it], she’s definitely someone I admire. There are definitely a lot of artists doing a hell of a lot of good.

What is your FAULT?

I don’t think you’d have enough ink! If I have to choose one, it would probably be my lack of patience. My wife, however, would say that I’m very, very moody. Actually, let’s go with that. My kids would love that I’ve admitted to being moody.

Find out who else will appear in the issue here

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 27 – THE BEST OF BRITISH ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

 

Liam Gallagher – Exclusive FAULT Magazine Issue 27 Covershoot and Interview Preview

 

Liam Gallagher

As you were. As you are.

 

Words: Adina Ilie

Photography: Jack Alexander

Menswear Editor: Kristine Kilty

Grooming: Natalya Chew

 

FAULT Magazine is proud to present our Issue 27 cover story with non-other than Liam Gallagher. With a career spanning over 25 years and a myriad of stories to tell, we sat down to discuss the ups and downs of his career and get to know Liam Gallagher as he was and as he is. Enjoy.

 

FAULT: Do you recall the first 24 hours after Noel quit the band? What was going through your mind at that point?

Liam Gallagher: Oh fuck. That very moment I just went– right, there have been certain powers at play. It wasn’t too big an argument; we’ve had worse arguments. What went down was something that was pre-planned.

 

FAULT: What was the lead up to that point that makes you so sure that it was pre-planned?

Liam Gallagher: Lots of things. A lot of sneaky little meetings. People might say that it’s paranoia. But you can never be too paranoid in life. I kind of knew he was going to map it at some point. It was going to happen at V or it was going to happen at Reading. It only got postponed until Paris. I knew he was going to jump ship at some point. And that’s what made me feel that my paranoia was right. Or maybe I’m clairvoyant; I’ve got 6 senses.

 

FAULT: Did you feel Noel’s absence while writing this record?

Liam Gallagher: Yeah – because I don’t want to be solo. I don’t want to do it on my own. I’m not a guitar player or a prolific songwriter. I can write a few songs every now and again but I miss being in a band. I miss my brother the way he was back then. I miss singing those great songs that we all made great.

 

FAULT: Were you disappointed that your former bandmates did not reach out to you in times of crisis? Are you resentful in any way?

Liam Gallagher: My older brother has always been there. I thought I’d at least get a call from Noel, but there was no call. I thought I’d get a call from my other manager, but nothing from them fucking cunts. But then I met Debbie and she’s been there all the way. A lot of my mates are gone; I don’t really have anyone in London and that is fine. The universe is my mate.

 

Liam Gallagher: I’ve been through a lot of shit, but it was shit that I caused. When you cause shit – you man up and fucking deal with it. Sometimes you have to fucking man up to your shit.

 

 

 

FAULT: Did you ever feel that you were done? That you hit your peak in ’96 in Knebworth and then it was all downhill from there? 

Liam Gallagher: I feel like I’ve maintained it without turning into the traps of the business. I’m still outspoken, I’m still wearing my heart on my sleeve and if people like it that’s fine. If you don’t then you don’t. I’m not a ‘yes man’.

 

FAULT: Did you ever see yourself hitting the top once more by yourself?

Liam Gallagher: The night Oasis split I felt absolutely disappointed and then I felt exactly the opposite when my album went number 1. In this day and age, rock’n’roll has got cobwebs on it. I never actually saw myself hitting the top once more. But if you truly believe, things will happen. I’ve been good to rock’n’roll and I reckon rock’n’roll will be good to me. It saved me twice.

 

FAULT: Hollywood is ablaze with accusations of sexual assault against Harvey Weinstein. Have you seen similar occurrences in the music industry? 

Liam Gallagher: : Not really, but you know it’s there. The shady little fuckers at the top. It’s not even with just men and women, it’s men and men too. All these pop bands – you hear about it with Take That but I’ve never witnessed any of it. Nobody would come near us. We were caught up in our own bubble. We weren’t hanging about with the record company. We’d go to the awards show and they’d be there, but we’d just get off and do our own thing. And I certainly didn’t see any weird shit.

 

FAULT: What changes do you reckon we should make to keep things safe for both men and women alike?

Liam Gallagher: That’s a big tough question. Obviously get rid of all the shit bags. Obviously, if everyone took care of their shit – everything would be cool. We all live together under one sky at the end of the day. Everyone just needs to cool the fuck out.

 

FAULT: Do you think Liam Gallagher has the power to get people to go back to the roots of rock’n’roll?

Liam Gallagher: I’ve got a lot of fans out there and I always have. My oldest kid is 18 and my friends have kids about the same age – so they’re going to bring them to the shows. That’s a good thing. All you can do is make good music and do good gigs. Do good interviews and try to sell it how it is. Stay honest to what you are and don’t get carried away with all the show business shit. That’s all that I can do. I’m definitely not the savior of music, I’m the savior of me.

 

Liam Gallagher:I don’t get involved with the industry and the business side of it. I let my manager do that. That’s the problem with music today – it’s got no fucking soul. I get being business minded, but it can overpower. You forget about the fucking music.”

 

Find out who else will appear in the issue here

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 26 – THE BEST OF BRITISH ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

 

 

FAULT Issue 27 – The Best of British Issue – is now available to order

We are pleased to announce that FAULT Issue 27 – The Best of British Issue – is available to pre-order NOW.

Official release: 27/11/17

FAULT Issue 27 cover star Liam Gallagher was shot by Jack Alexander and styled by Kristine Kilty. Paloma Faith was shot by Ram Shergill and styled by Rachel Holland. Click here to pre-order your copy of this issue!

FAULT Magazine – the Best of British Issue – proudly presents exclusive shoots and interviews with:

Liam Gallagher (front cover)

Paloma Faith (reversible cover)

Seal

Gary Numan

Jake Bugg

Weezer

Hurts

Fall Out Boy

Reggie Yates

Rae Morris

Jared Harris

Plus our usual FAULTless selection of the finest Film, Fashion, Music & Photography to inspire the British Isles and beyond as we celebrate FAULT’s 10 year anniversary!

This is your FAULT

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 26 – THE BEST OF BRITISH ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40