David LaChapelle solo exhibition in Holland

Good news for modern man: the future is bright. If you need any convincing to pop over to the pretty city of Groningen in Holland, the David LaChapelle solo exhibition should sway you in the right direction. Not the most obvious place to showcase the photographer’s raunchy images (after all, he has a history photographing Beyonce, Miley Cyrus and Lady Gaga), but this latest anthology returns to his artistic roots, and complement Groningen’s old town juxtaposed with modern buildings, which nestle on the canal in the north of the Netherlands.

David LaChapelle The Rape of Africa

Known for producing experimental fashion editorials, commercials and music videos for high profile clients, LaChapelle has worked with every big name in the industry, and is one of the most respected and in demand photographers around the world; So it is interesting to find that the Gronginger Museum, already owns one of his controversial, hyper stylised works, and is the place he chose for his first solo exhibition in the Netherlands.

To the broad minded Dutch nation- naked bodies, interracial relationships and liberal religious views are widely acceptable, and a show that comments on sexuality, birth, death and nature in an idyllic, utopian world would appear to be the perfect partnership. Taking over the modernistic Museum (which was redesigned by Philippe Starck and Alessandro Mendini) adds a unique, modern focus to the university town. Situated in a central location on the canal, and directly opposite the ancient architecture of the train station it offers a juxtaposition of eras, but this is something that works so well in Holland.

A bit of a rebel himself, LaChapelle ran away to New York aged 15, and worked as a busboy in Studio 54. Immersing himself in glamorous New York disco scene, he got to know the “It” crowd and partied with the movers and shakers of the eighties pop art scene including Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. It is also where he was introduced to Andy Warhol and his infamous “Factory”. Already photographing people, LaChapelle soon gained recognition for his uniquely raw images. Snapped up by Warhol, he became the photographer for ‘Interview’ magazine and exhibited alongside other 80s pioneers Doug Aitken and Karen Kilimnik.

His style emphasising lewd, larger than life subjects became him trademark, and he embraced the flamboyant characters of the nineties and noughties. Celebrities, high fashion magazines and advertising clients were queuing up to get immersed in La Chapelle’s irreverent gaze- where anti-perfection was approved and surrealism encouraged.  However, the celebrity bubble seems to have peaked for LaChapelle, as his more recent work is a much more personal representation of transfiguration, regaining paradise, and the notion of life after death.

David LaChapelle The Rape of Africa

Breaking boundaries, La Chapelle uses fine art as a basis for his work and is the first to admit he explores the darker side of reality. Often using props, he is the master of creating make believe worlds where anything is possible. The hyper-real landscapes blend urban and suburban environments to create a make believe setting which is also super real and accessible. This form of art is contrary to what other commercial photographers were presenting, and opened up a niche market for emotions.

In fact, after shooting every celebrity (and their dog) in 2006, he stepped away from commercial work, retreating to an isolated former nudist colony in Maui, Hawaii to focus on fine-art photography and farming. Whether this break was a rejection of the fast moving lifestyle where celebrity photography comes with its own celebrity or it was a time to reflect as he openly talks about his friends who died of AIDS, his consequential work has a more personal influence.

David-LaChapelle-The-House-at-the-End-of-the-World-2005

‘Good News for Modern Man’ is filled with sins and redemption is a deeply personal insight into LaChapelle’s life. With over 70 pieces, the narrative is as jerky as it is unanticipated, yet it seems to flow. Clearly inspired by fine artists Edward Hopper, William Blake and the Old Masters, LaChapelle has a knack of combining the two disciplines -fusing photography with art; Resulting in large scale representations of joy, lust, and paradise which are symbolic and timeless.

Mostly, these works reject the material world and are deeply spiritual or religious, with obvious reference to the greats. In particular, you can recognise Michelangelo’s ‘Renaissance’ in ‘The Deluge’ series. An immersive piece of art which engulfs the viewer in the ginormous seven metres wide span. On closer inspection you can see the sitters are big names from celebritydom, with Kanye West as Jesus, Lil’ Kim as the Virgin Mary and Naomi Campbell as Venus, which might be highly irreverent for some.

Part of LaChapelle’s work is tongue in cheek. Courting exploitation, he chooses religion to express popularity; Nothing is sacred or forbidden and his modern day representation of religious icons brings a new dimension to opinions of life after death and questions the metaphysical side of life.

With a clear shift in focus from commercial commissions, this exhibition displays LaChapelle’s personal and intuitive concepts. Split into categories. ‘New World’ shares his personal search for Eden using thinly disguised biblical references which have the background of his sanctuary in Hawaii. However these pieces are seen more as art than photography as the two disciplines are fused to produce hyper-surreal images which burst into thousands of colours in front of you.

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The exhibition will no doubt question the viewer’s spiritual beliefs, and LaChapelle even questions himself on how long modern art actually lasts. It is a must-see for anyone with an inquisitive nature as the show is not just about the artworks, but is an important slice of history which makes a profound commentary on the contemporary world.

The exhibition LaChapelle: Good News For Modern Man can be seen from 21 April to 28 October 2018.

Head to Groningen for the exhibition and stay the weekend. This up and coming city is well worth a visit and only two hours from Amsterdam, you can have the perfect weekend away!

Jesus is my homeboy

FACTBOX

Gronginger Museum

*Hotel*

A pretty, listed 4star hotel,  dating back to the 15th century.

NH Groningen Hotel de Ville

Oude Boteringestraat 43-45, 9712 GD Groningen

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*Canal Trip*

The perfect way to see the city without walking across the cobbles.

Rondvaartbedrijf Kool

Stationsweg 1012, 9726 AZ Groningen

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*Restaurant*

Delicious, healthy modern cuisine. Open late, but must book.

Brasserie  Midi

Folkingestraat 42, Groningen

Lights Of Soho X Fenwick Of Bond Street unveil ‘Women in Neon’ Exhibition

 

FAULT Favourite creative venue, Lights Of Soho have brought their creative nous to the high street with their latest partnership retail behemoth – Fenwick Bond Street.

Entitled ‘Women in Neon’ all works on display were created by female artists. While the whole collection of works can be viewed on the first floor – LOS have also taken over the window display at the street level where Federica Marangoni’s ‘Art Has No Sex’ neon unashamedly illuminates their message.

While all artists have worked with Neon for this exhibition, they all hail from different disciplines and creative backgrounds, the display is fluid and stands as a testament to how both individualism and collaboration can come together to create a true work of art.

“Women in Neon” will be taking a four week residency on the 3rd floor of Fenwick of Bond Street on 20th March and all pieces displayed will be available to purchase.

Read more info on the artists displaying work below:

Linda Bracey is creative director of God’s Own Junkyard, founded by her late husband Chris Bracey. Linda has designed neon artworks and studio ranges for several exhibitions at the Lights of Soho gallery. She has also curated an exhibition of her late husband’s artworks in various London gallery spaces.

Lauren Baker is a British contemporary multidisciplinary artist who exhibits internationally. Her work explores the fragility of life, energy-fields, the after-life and other dimensions. She’s created installations at The V&A, Tate Britain, ran an art workshop at Tate Modern and directed the windows of Selfridges.

Rebecca Mason is a UK based artist using light to convey the darkness within human life, existence and emotion. Rebecca has exhibited in various UK locations including restaurants, bars and galleries.

Dianna Chire is a London based artist. Her practice frequently employs visual puns and bawdy humour as well as a commentary on female identity. Dianna works in mediums of sculpture, performance and neon.
Federica Marangoni is a Venetian artist and designer, working internationally has researched on various materials and technological media throughout her career and has exhibited in many international museums including MoMA (New York 1980), Peggy Guggenheim Foundation (Venice, 2001) and La Triennale di Milano (2016)

International Alert opens ‘Peace From the Street Up!’ exhibition

ART4PEACE exhibition

As part of International Alert’s Talking Peace Festival which takes place throughout the month of September in London, an exhibition of urban art is on display at the Old Truman Brewery in London. The pieces, all exploring themes of ‘peace’, have been donated by artists from all over the world including Egypt, Syria, France, Italy, Chile and Nepal, as well as the UK. Legendary DJ turned visual artist Golide has also donated artwork.

The exhibition, titled ‘Peace From the Street Up!’ is open every day until 20th September from 12pm to 8pm at Shop 12, Dray Walk, The Old Truman Brewery, London. A live mural will be created on 19th September at the exhibition with the pieces auctioned off to raise funds for International Alert on 2nd October at The Club at The Ivy.

Street art for peace

Urban Art International Alert

 

No Entry artwork

Stylish Rotterdam- Exhibitions for Autumn

Rotterdam never fails to disappoint in the style stakes. With modern architecture and its canal setting, it’s a great place for a weekend break. My second visit to the city felt like visiting a favourite cousin- the lush green parks, clean streets and hospitable locals making it more of a pleasure than a work chore!

 

My home for the weekend was the newest pad in town, and I was excited to sample a room on the penthouse floor of the latest addition to the city’s five star offerings, The Mainport Hotel. Aptly situated near the port, it commands spectacular views of the city and sunset. Viewed all the better in the luxury spa complete with swimming pool, Turkish bath, sauna, treatment rooms and gym on the 9th floor. Perfectly situated for a stunning view and opening hours from 6.30am – 11pm, there is no excuse not to wind down here!

 

With great sights promised on my weekend agenda, it is only right to mention that this hotel is a preferred partner of the current James Bond exhibition at the Kunsthal Museum. “Designing 007: 50 years of Bond Style” is the definitive showcase for Bond fans. Celebrating the iconic world of the world’s best-loved action man (in all his guises). The style and sex appeal of 50 years worth of films is fully explored in a blockbuster of a show. With more than 500 gadgets, costumes, classic vehicles, props and film clips, carefully curated by London’s Barbican Centre, and presented in an out of this world multimedia experience of the world’s favourite secret agent. (Whichever actor is your preference!) Back at the hotel, a speedboat ride, Bollinger (Bond’s preferred champagne) and his shaken not stirred Martini are on offer. But I would recommend the boat ride pre martini- it really is quite speedy!

bond4bond3

With two major style exhibitions on offer this autumn, I was very much looking forward to the `The Future of Fashion is Now´ which opened last week until 18th January 2015, at Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen. This promised to be a completely different experience – fusing art, design, photography, technology and fashion. Not specifically targeted to fashion fans, or art historians, this is a must see exhibition about the future of what we wear and how we wear it.

 

Showcasing more than fifty contemporary international designers, artists and creators including renowned names like Viktor&Rolf, Hussein Chalayan and Nick Knight to emerging talents such as Ana Rajacevic and Rejina Py; the gallery has been transformed into a present-day playground for the next generation of designers, who showcased their innovation interpretation of the concept of ‘fashion’.fof2

 

The exhibition has been in the making for quite some time and six cutting edge designers were carefully chosen by an international judging panel and awarded the coveted title of The Future of Fashion. These included Iris van Herpen (Netherlands), Lucîa Cuba (Peru), Craig Green (UK), and OLEK (Poland/USA) who showcased their exclusive site-specific work at the exhibition; It is worth checking the online platform at www.futureoffashion.nl for an insight into the creative process.

 

With fashion being such a commercial enterprise in the 21st century, it is interesting to see how the next generation of designers is given a free range to develop their exciting visions and take on the notion of fashion of the future. The show takes us on a journey where they re-define the concept of the traditional fashion calendar. Six monthly seasons and trends have been boycotted and the focus is on well and truly on fashion being fun, exciting, innovative and perhaps not even wearable- fusing fashion with wearable art. The technically advanced designs offer an insight of what fashion might look in the future.

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Pushing boundaries is what the Netherlands is good at, and it seems only right that this exhibition was launched in Rotterdam, a very forward thinking city in more ways than one.

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Once you have had your fill of fashion, it is definitely worth a visit to another Rotterdam highlight- the recently opened Markthal Rotterdam. The much talked about food walhalla, is one of the cities most welcome and tasty additions, offering a wide range of fresh, modern delicacies in beautiful surroundings in a glass horse-shoe shaped arch in the heart of the city. Open every day of the week until 8pm, you can be sure to want a second visit- before or after hitting the local shops- including the newly launched and biggest H & M store in Europe!

 

So if it’s art, fashion, culture, food or shopping, you are after, you can soak it all up in a weekend in Rotterdam, and with flights from City Airport, London, taking just 40 minutes, I know I will be back.

 

For more information check out the extremely helpful tourist board

www.holland.com

 

Accommodation

Mainport Hotel

www.mainporthotel.com

 

Museums

Designing 007: Fifty Years of Bond Style, until 8th February 2015.

www.kunsthal.nl

 

The Future of Fashion is Now, until 18th January 2015.

www.boijmans.nl

 

By Sara Darling

‘40’: A Retrospective of Kate Moss by artist Russell Marshall (from 17th Jan)

On the eve of the fourth decade of iconic model and personality Kate Moss, artist Russell Marshall will reveal his latest body of work in her honour. A connoisseur of celebrities due to his time working as the art director for one of Britain’s top newspapers, the artist is drawn to celebrate those personalities who stand out as ‘legendary’ as opposed to ephemeral upon the crowded media landscape. In this spirit, he has engaged with Moss as a subject to produce canvases depicting the model in her various states of glory, through his preferred medium of screen printing.

Russell Marshall - rock chick, mother, model, love her 2011

Russell Marshall – ‘Rock chick, Mother, Model, Love her’, 2011

FAULT will be present at the unveiling of Marshall’s latest body of work to preview the impact of these interesting ideas of media legend upon viewer and artist alike.

Organized in collaboration with Imitate Modern, one of the eminent galleries of the Marylebone set, and Beautiful Crime, a fresh  and interesting new art brand and promotions company, this exhibition will surely draw a new lease of life from an already fascinating example of British pop culture.

Russell Marshall - 'Westwood Geisha', 1992

Russell Marshall – ‘Westwood Geisha’, 1992

Where: Imitate Modern Gallery, 27a Devonshire Street, London, W1G 6PN
When: 17th Jan-15th Feb (open Monday-Saturday, 10am-6pm)

Words by Kat Rutherford

Tyra Banks presents art show, 15, in collaboration with the team behind our FAULT Issue 15 Beauty cover shoot – Udo Spreitzenbarth & Ty-Ron Mayes

TYRA BANKS Presents:15

TYRA BANKS Presents: 15

From September 9th – November 9th ’13 at Jack Studios, New York City, supermodel Tyra BanksFAULT’s Issue 15 Beauty section cover star– will present an exhibition of photographs of herself taken in the style of some of her famous modelling counterparts.  Tyra has once again collaborated with the team that worked on her shoot for FAULT – photographer Udo Spreitzenbarth and creative director Ty-Ron Mayes – to create a series of unretouched, monochramatic images that seek to capture the essence of iconic fellow supermodels – friends, colleagues and competitors alike.

“When Spreitzenbarth and Mayes approached Banks in 2012 about working on an art project together, Banks shared with them her vision of 15. The series then became a reality through artist collaboration with hairstylist Sher Rae Tucker–a protégé of the legendary Oribe, and Emmy award-winning make-up artist Valente Frazier.

In the age of pixilated veils, there is no digital manipulation to the imagery. 15 is Tyra Banks in raw, un-retouched images: the photography, styling, and transformative hair and make-up, along with Banks’ extraordinary ability to emulate each character, takes the notion of “black and white” beyond the portrayed models’ varying ethnicity and a description of the photographs.”

… “Named for the number of the iconic women portrayed, and the age at which Tyra began her modeling career, 15 includes interpretive images of Banks personifying the supermodels: Cindy Crawford, Linda Evangelista, Lauren Hutton, Jerry Hall, Iman, Kate Moss, Twiggy, Brooke Shields, Claudia Schiffer, Carmen Dell’Orefice and Grace Jones. Banks also portrays the new wave of talent that has resurrected the genre: Kate Upton, Karlie Kloss and Cara Delevingne. Rounding out the 15, an adult Tyra emulates herself at 15 years old.

With the generous support of Chantelle and VeeV, Tyra Banks Presents: 15 will open on September 9, 2013, with a VIP reception from 7-8pm followed by a general reception from 8-10pm at Jack Studios, 601 W 26 St. (12 FL), New York City

 

Tyra Banks Presents: 15

Images of Banks as 15 iconic supermodels

Photographs by Udo Spreitzenbarth

September 9-November 9, 2013

 Jack Studios, 601 W 26 St. (12 FL), New York City

About Udo Spreitzenbarth

Udo Spreitzenbarth is an international fashion and art photographer. Spreitzenbarth was born in Germany and currently lives in New York City with his wife, model/actress Melissa Kurland. While studying architecture at the Technische Universität Darmstadt, Spreitzenbarth developed an interest in modeling and fashion photography. It was then that he realized his passion for being behind the camera. After his first year in New York City, he shot his first billboard campaign that landed on a screen in Times Square. His editorial photography has been featured in Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Elle, Marie Claire, Cosmopolitan and more. His art photography has received international acclaim with a successful series of solo exhibitions in Berlin, Frankfurt, Shanghai, and Beijing.

Fault Focus: ‘Human Relations’ curator Sascha Bailey and artist Mairi-Luise Tabbakh

Having recently wrapped up their successful exhibition Human Relations, curator Sascha Bailey and artist Mairi-Luise Tabbakh spoke to FAULT about their work, the show itself and their plans for the future…

 

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Mairi-Luise Tabbakh and Sascha Bailey photographed by Chase Roberts

 

FAULT: Sascha, could you tell us a bit about the process of curating the show?

S: I picked the images from Mairi and Fenton [Bailey, Sascha’s older brother] that I felt would work well together, then it came down to working out the logistics of getting the work printed, framed and mounted.

 

Mairi, did you have much of a say in which images of yours were used in the show?

M: I just sent Sascha a bunch of my images and let him make the selection as the curator. Honestly, I quite liked the fact that I didn’t have to make those decisions, as I am very indecisive!

 

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‘Eliane T5’, ‘Eliane T2’ and ‘Shawnee at Frankies II’ by Mairi-Luise Tabbakh

 

Did you have a favourite piece in the show?

S: Funnily enough I have a favourite from each artist; ‘Leyton‘ and ‘Id‘!

M: My favourite piece was Fenton’s ‘Bathtub‘. I wish I had taken that one!

 

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LEFT: ‘Girl with Flower’; RIGHT: ‘Tokyo Sunset’ – both by Fenton Bailey

 

Do you feel that your personal relationship with Mairi and Fenton was an advantage in curating the show, or did it make it more of a challenge for you?

S: It did make it a bit more of a challenge. If you don’t know someone it’s easier to be more straightforward and business conscious, but when you have a personal relationship with the people you are working with, they might try and use that connection to get more involved in certain aspects of the process that normally they wouldn’t have much access to.

 

Sascha, did your being from a very artistic family add pressure on you?

S: It did add pressure, but most of that just came from wanting to put on a good and successful show. I didn’t really tell my dad [iconic photographer David Bailey] about the exhibition until about a month before the opening. We wanted to work independently and only consulted him when we really needed to.

 

And what kind of advice did he give you?

S: He didn’t so much give us advice as he told us that we were doing good and that we should carry on doing what we were doing.

 

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‘Eros’ by Mairi-Luise Tabbakh

 

What have you gained from this experience?

S: It’s given me more confidence, and it reaffirmed that I am doing the right thing for myself at this point in my life.

M: Having my work put out there and all the attention ‘Human Relations’ has brought with it, I feel I’ve gained a lot more confidence in sharing my work to the public! Also, it’s great that I now have Damien Hirst and Dereck Chisora (good luck to Dereck with the Malik Scott bout in July!) to add to Lord Bath and Marco Pierre White on the list of people who own my work!

 

So is curating something you would like to continue with?

S: For the foreseeable future yes, but who knows? I kind of want to do everything!

 

If you could choose anyone to curate a show for, who would it be?

S: I would love to work with Damien Hirst!

 

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‘Id’ by Mairi-Luise Tabbakh

 

Mairi, there is a distinct feeling of intimacy in your work, how would you say you achieve that?

M: Well I’m very friendly and open and people tend to feel comfortable with me. In turn I always try to make my subjects as comfortable as possible! It’s always a laugh and relaxed on my shoots!

 

What can we expect to see from you next?

M: I want to do more erotica shoots, definitely. Carry on in that genre. There are a couple of other things up ahead as well, but I’m keeping that under wraps for now. I don’t want to jinx it!

S: I have a couple of shows that I am planning to do in the near future. One is with an oil and acrylic based illustrator named Taline Temizian, whose work is quite fashion based. The hope is to open it in February 2014. Later on I want to do a show with my sister Paloma, featuring her paintings.

 

Interview by Veronica Skoglund

Somerset House exhibits 1941-60 works by the Blumenfeld Studio: New York

From May 23rd – September 1st Somerset House is holding an exhibition focusing on the work of fashion photographer Erwin Blumenfeld. Berlin-born Blumenfeld (1897–1969) was one of the most internationally sought-after portrait and fashion photographers in the 1940s and 1950s. America’s leading magazines, including Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar, hired him for his imaginative and highly individual shots. With his innovative and experimental photography, Blumenfeld created an extensive body of work and some of the most iconic fashion images of the 20th century. The show focuses on the little-known history of his photography studio at 222 Central Park South in New York. If you’re in London this summer, be sure to catch this exhibition! Check out Somerset House’s official website for more information.