Gary Numan: Exclusive FAULT Magazine photoshoot and interview preview

Gary Numan

I know exactly what I’m doing and I’m in a really good place.”

Photo: David Richardson
Styling: Margherita Alaimo
Grooming: Gemma Webb
Words: Flora Neighbour

Given his new-wave edge and awkward façade, not to mention his well-documented Asperger Syndrome, you’d be forgiven for thinking that Gary Numan was a shy, introverted man. You’d be mistaken. The quick-witted and honest songwriter has a lot to say – both about his own past and his (partly) Trump-inspired vision of a near-apocalyptic future. Despite maintaining a cult following to this day, the 80s electro trailblazer has only recently returned to the limelight with Savage, his first top 10 UK album since I, Assassin all the way back in 1982.

FAULT: How’s the tour going?

Gary Numan: It’s great! Last night in Bournemouth was fantastic – much better than the first night, which was a huge shock to the system. I’m still trying to get to grips with it all again while remembering my lyrics. It’s been a completely different experience to my other tours, but I’m really enjoying it.

Do you feel more in control of your work nowadays?

I’ve always felt that I had a say but, now that I manage myself, it’s opened up a whole new path for me. I was always fairly in control of my work before: I’ve always written everything and been hands-on in the process, so it doesn’t feel that different. The thing about my new album, Savage, is the self-managing aspect. It’s been the first big project that I’ve been in charge of from beginning to end without anyone to lean on. I’ve had to make all the big decisions myself, which was a bit daunting to begin with but, strangely enough, once I got into it, I began to realise it wasn’t that too difficult. There’s no black magic involved, just staying organised.

 

Can you talk us through the ideology of Savage?

It came from a book I’d been writing, which was set in a post-global warming future. The idea being that the earth’s temperature wasn’t controlled and it became this unstoppable phenomenon, leaving the planet with a large amount of desert and full of despair. That’s it in a nutshell.

If you go into it further, it looks at people living in that world and how brutal it would be. It looks at the evaporation of [grouped] eastern and western cultures and the potential for us to become far more fragmented and tribal. The album presents snapshots of how brutal it would be, and how unforgiving and savage the environment would become.

It was also influenced by Trump and how he’s come along and started to undo all the good that has been done. I didn’t write the album because of Trump but he certainly helped it along.

 

Gary Numan was shot at Cable Street Studios, London

How has your style developed over the years?

Visually it’s certainly evolved, but I have adapted musically as well. I think it’s easier because my music is essentially electronic. Every time I’ve started a new album, there’s been new technology that helps me to adapt my style and create new sounds. It’s difficult not to change your sound and move forward if you’re working with electronic music – every album should sound like a progression of the one before. My early stuff was very minimal and simple and, as I’ve grown as an artist, it’s become more complicated and heavier. The thing that has never changed – in terms of being recognisable – is my voice.

Would you call yourself a British icon?

No way! I don’t really know what makes an icon. What qualifies an icon? There are many people I look up to but I wouldn’t call them icons. I’m a huge Trent Reznor [Nine Inch Nails] fan. I think he’s done pretty amazing things but he’s not British.

There aren’t many people I would say I look up to, but there are many British people I admire. If you have a look at the music industry now there are some pretty phenomenal artists. For example: M.I.A. In terms of what she’s trying to achieve – both in the music industry and outside [it], she’s definitely someone I admire. There are definitely a lot of artists doing a hell of a lot of good.

What is your FAULT?

I don’t think you’d have enough ink! If I have to choose one, it would probably be my lack of patience. My wife, however, would say that I’m very, very moody. Actually, let’s go with that. My kids would love that I’ve admitted to being moody.

Find out who else will appear in the issue here

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 27 – THE BEST OF BRITISH ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

 

FAULT Magazine 10 year anniversary @ UNIT London with Bulldog Gin & Snog

FAULT Magazine 10 year anniversary event & Issue 27 launch

FAULT Magazine 10 year anniversary: FAULT Magazine director Nick Artsruni (left) with Issue 27 front cover photographer Jack Alexander (right)

FAULT Magazine director Nick Artsruni (left) with Issue 27 front cover photographer Jack Alexander (right)

We celebrated the FAULT Magazine 10 year anniversary in style with the likes of Rizzle Kicks’ Jordan Stephens, Rae Morris, Felicity Hayward, GIRLI, Dakota Blue Richards, Jonny Nelson and Sascha & Mimi Bailey at UNIT London gallery last week.

While the BULLDOG Gin sponsored bar served their signature gin & tonics (with a slice of crisp grapefruit on the rim) downstairs, guests enjoyed an exhibition of some of our favourite-ever FAULT shoots with the likes of Kylie Jenner, Usher, Ellie Goulding, Ben Barnes, Big Sean, Nick Jonas and Gary Numan. Well, we hope they enjoyed them, anyway!

Pride of place, of course, was our latest cover with Liam Gallagher. Shot by Jack Alexander, the front cover for FAULT 27: the Best of British Issue was the focal point for our showcase event that was catered exclusively by stupendous fro-yo trailblazers Snog and their brilliant new brand, Beltane & Pop.

The official ‘FAULT Magazine 10 year anniversary afterparty’ took place at Mahiki Mayfair…we think. To be honest, we weren’t quite sure where we were once our private section started overflowing with bottles of vodka and Mahiki’s trademark treasure chests!

Nick Artsruni with Jordan Stephens of Rizzle Kicks

 

FAULT Magazine editor Miles Holder with women’s fashion editor Rachel Holland

 

TV presenter Jonny Nelson

 

Felicity Hayward and Rome Fortune with Nick Artsruni

 

Presenter James Stewart at FAULT Magazine 10 Year anniversary event

 

Rae Morris

 

Dakota Blue Richards

Mimi Nishikawa-Bailey, Sascha Bailey, Nick Artsruni (l-r)

 

FAULT Magazine contributor Adina Ilie

 

GIRLI and friend (l-r)

 

Guests enjoy SNOG

 

 

Lucy Chappell with photographer Jack Alexander

 

Roxxxan with Nick Artsruni

 

Sophie Hopkins with Jack Alexander

 

Miles Holder with Melisa Whiskey

 

Model Alexander James

 

Model Chad Kuzyk

 

FAULT Magazine contributor Olivia Pinnock (centre, red hair) and guests

 

FAULT Magazine contributor Aimee Phillips

 

Some of the prints on display at the exhibition are available for sale.

 

Please contact us if you would like to inquire about any of the works listed below:

From left-right:

  • ‘Kylie Jenner for FAULT Magazine Issue 20’ – photographed by Lionel Deluy (black and white A0 canvas print)
  • ‘Ben Barnes for FAULT Issue 15’ – by Sinisha Nisevic (black and white A0 canvas print)
  • ‘Ellie Goulding for FAULT Issue 15’ – by Louie Banks (full colour A2 canvas print) – not for sale
  • ‘Usher for FAULT Issue 19’ – by Sinisha Nisevic (black and white A0 canvas print)
  • ‘Liam Gallagher for FAULT Issue 27 cover’ – by Jack Alexander (full colour foam board print)

 

  • ‘Nick Jonas for FAULT Issue 21’ – by Matt Holyoak (full colour A2 canvas print) – not for sale
  • ‘Kylie Jenner for FAULT Magazine Issue 20’ – photographed by Lionel Deluy (black and white A0 canvas print)
  • ‘Gary Numan for FAULT Issue 27’ – by David Richardson (full colour A0 canvas print)
  • ‘Big Sean for FAULT Issue 15’ – by Steven Gomillion & Dennis Leupold (full colour A2 canvas print) – not for sale

N.B: Where the works are not available for sale, we encourage you to contact the photographer directly!

 Special Thanks:

UNIT London Gallery

BULLDOG Gin

Outer Insight

Snog and Beltane & Pop

Mahiki Mayfair

Photographers on display: Lionel Deluy, Sinisha Nisevic, David Richardson, Matt Holyoak, Louie Banks, Jack Alexander

Amazing people who went above & beyond for us: Hermione Benest, Tim Lucas Allen, Vassilissa Conway

FAULT Team on the night: Miles Holder, Rachel Holland, Adina Ilie

This is your FAULT