Justin Prentice – exclusive shoot & interview for FAULT Magazine Issue 26

Justin Prentice exclusive shoot for FAULT Issue 26 – Click to order your copy now

13 Reasons Why has been the most talked about show on Netflix over the past year. Produced by Selena Gomez, the show follows the trail of 13 teenagers as they uncover the reasons for their friend Hannah’s suicide. Heavily influenced by the negative impact of social media, teenage bullying and sexual assault, the show brings to light an unexplored side of leisure television. Speaking to Justin Prentice who plays Bryce Walker – Hannah’s sexual abuser – FAULT uncovers whether it’s beneficial or irresponsible to expose a young audience to explicit suicide.
 

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What were your initial thoughts going into a show like 13 Reasons Why with such a heavy character to play?

It’s always rewarding to play such meaty characters. I was excited for the challenge. I was also thrilled to be working with Brian Yorkey, Tom McCarthy, Selena Gomez, and Anonymous Content. Each has cemented themselves as power plays in the industry, so that alone were ample reason to climb aboard the show.

 

Having Selena Gomez as Executive Producer on the show – did you have any preconceived ideas in regards to the end result and what was your overall experience of working with her?

I knew that this project was going to be special, in part because of how much it meant to Selena. She and her mother, Mandy Teefey, have been a main force in adapting this story from the Jay Asher novel. If it weren’t for the two of them, we wouldn’t have a show. I’ve had a great experience working with Selena. She is a great boss to have.

Photography: Lionel Deluy @love artists agency
Styling: Angel Terrazas
Grooming: Melissa Walsh using jack black
Special Thanks: RCNSTRCT

To say that your character is not likable would be an understatement – how did you approach playing him so accurately and were you at any point reluctant?

Yeah, Bryce isn’t the best kind of person. I was never reluctant to play the part, but I was concerned with portraying him accurately. I had many conversations with psychiatrist Dr. Rebecca Hedrick and sexual assault expert and advocate Alexis Jones. They gave me great advice on people like Bryce and were instrumental in bringing Bryce to life. I wanted Bryce to be recognizable to the viewers. We all thought it would be more powerful if audiences were able to relate Bryce to someone they knew in their own lives vs. Bryce being a sheer monster. Not to say that his acts weren’t monstrous, but he still needed to be human.

 

The show in itself holds a strong responsibility towards young people battling depression and social bullying. Did you ever feel that it might be harmful to put out a project so heavy? There have been reports of a suicide in Austria that followed 13 Reasons Why’s formula with the tapes.

Any time you have a show that unapologetically sheds light on controversial issues, there’s going to be controversy. 13 Reasons Why is often times hard to watch because it can hit so close to home, but that makes it real. It gives people an opportunity to talk about these deep issues that are so often hard to initiate conversations about. We get so many letters and so many people coming up to us in person thanking us for the show and our portrayal of the events in the show. It’s definitely helping people. I wouldn’t say they followed the formula in 13 Reasons Why. For starters, their method was different than Hannah’s. They also didn’t leave any tapes. Any blame on the show is just speculation at this point. The girls had recently watched the show, but it has been admitted that there is no conclusive evidence of any correlation. Cases like this are heartbreaking, and our hearts go out to all people who are going through similar things. We have heard from several experts that a show does not cause someone to take their own lives. Anxiety, depression, stress, etc can. Our show gives people an outlet to talk about these issues that they may be experiencing.

 

Interview by Adina Ilie

What do you think are the positives of putting a character like Bryce Walker out there?

Most people know someone similar to Bryce Walker, and if they don’t personally, there are many cases of privileged athletes who get away with rape. Bryce is real. That’s terrifying, but true. Film and Television have the wonderful roles of spotlighting problems in society. The lack of education on sex and what consent looks like create people like Bryce and create people who think they can take whatever they want. These are kids, who would, often times, never do such things if they were just given the proper guidance early on.

 

13 Reasons Why has been confirmed for a second season  – where is the story going for Bryce?

My lips are sealed [laughs]! I can say that it’s going to be great! There is more to see in all of these characters. Season two takes some interesting turns.

 

Lastly – what’s your FAULT?

I suck at time management! I’m working on it. We only have one life, that we know of, so I should spend less of it procrastinating. There are a lot of things that I hope to accomplish. All of which are going to be hard to achieve if I don’t start cracking down…

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Sophie Cookson – Queen of Kings – kills it in FAULT Issue 26 – The Millennial Issue

Sophie Cookson exclusive for FAULT Issue 26 – Click to order your copy now

When she first hit our screens with a starring role in Kingsman: Secret Service in 2014, it was hard to believe that it was Sophie Cookson’s first big-time project since leaving drama school. An alumna of the National Youth Music Theatre and Oxford School of Drama, her career has taken an impressive and rapid trajectory – from being named as one of Screen International’s Stars of Tomorrow in 2014 to securing roles in blockbuster titles and starring alongside industry greats.

Now, reprising her role as the ass-kicking Roxy in Kingsman: The Golden Circle, fans of the franchise can look forward to seeing Sophie and her fellow Kingsman spies face a deluge of dangers, with their headquarters in ruins while the world is held hostage by a nefarious new nemesis…

Things are obviously going to be a bit different in Kingsman: The Golden Circle. How do you think Roxy has developed as a character by this point? Will we learn more about her?

You’ll have to wait and see! She’s definitely now an established working cog in Kingsman with a great suit… apart from that, I can’t tell you much more!

 …

Sophie wears looks by Ralph Lauren, DSQUARED2, and Zeynep Kartel in our shoot

 

As most people will be aware, the Kingsman series has comic book origins – is that a genre that interests you, or are there others you’re more into?

I have to say, I’ve never been a comic book fanatic – but, through Kingsman and the fact that the movie industry does seem focused on that genre at the moment, I’ve learnt a lot about it in the last few years.

For me if it’s a great script and concept then I’m interested, regardless of genre. Having said that, I do love a good psychological thriller; something intriguing, with dark undertones. Right now I’m loving The Handmaid’s Tale – it’s so brilliantly harrowing and moving.

 

Photography: Roberto Aguilar
Styling: Rachel Gold @Red Represents and BTS Talent
Hair: Diego Miranda Hair @BTS Talent using Dyson supersonic & Sebastian professional
Make up: Emily Dhanjal @BTS Talent using Rodial skincare & MAC cosmetics
Nails: Nickie Rhodes-Hill @BTS Talent using Barry M
Photographer’s assistant: Khalil Musa
Interview: Jennifer Sara Parkes
Production Manager: Adina Ilie

 

You’re also starring in Gypsy on Netflix– what’s your character, Sidney, like in the show?  

Sid is super complicated, which is what drew me to her. She talks about owning your circumstances and living this authentic ‘I don’t care what anyone else thinks’ life – yet, at the same time, she lies and has this deep- rooted vulnerability. She can lie and manipulate, but also has this amazing zest for life and ability to draw people out of themselves. I was so excited to play someone who straddles the good and bad side of human nature. It’s still rare to see such three-dimensional women on screen.

Gypsy is, refreshingly, quite a female-led series – did you find it to be a different vibe on set, with women in so many of the production and on-screen roles we often see going to men?

There are sensitive issues we deal with in the show, and I was definitely happy to have all my intimate scenes with Naomi directed by women. There’s an implicit level of safety and understanding that is perhaps more automatic than when you’re working with a director of the opposite sex. It’s the first time I’ve done a scene of that nature surrounded by so many women – it felt empowering.

And, lastly, what is your FAULT?

I can be incredibly stubborn – I like to see it as determination, but it can definitely swing the other way!

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SUNDARA KARMA RELEASE NEW TRACK ‘A YOUNG UNDERSTANDING’ – EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH FAULT ONLINE

 

Reading’s golden boys Sundara Karma have only just unveiled their new single ‘A Young Understanding’. The indie-pop quartet has seen undeniable success over the past year with only just two EPs under their belt and things seem to be getting bigger and better for the boys. They haven’t even released an album yet and they’re already set to globetrot around Europe’s festivals on the same bill as Years and Years, The 1975 and many other household names. It’s difficult not to label them as the next big thing. We caught up with Oscar Lulu, Sundara’s lead singer, and we’re tempted to say that England’s new wave is in safe hands.

 

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You’ve just finished recording your first album. What can you give away?

I can give away that it’s done and that we’re proud of it. It’s a really weird and difficult thing to say. To be honest, I don’t really want to say it. I find it difficult letting things go.

Have you done anything different with the album or is it going to be a continuity of what you’ve released so far?

We’ve released two EPs and I think the album is just going to be an evolution from those two EPs. Our second EP was a progression from our first EP and I think the album will just be a natural progression from the two combined. If you’re fans of the EPs, you’ll be fans of the album. There isn’t a direct distinction.

What’s your production process?

Well, I’m the main writer so it just comes from me singing in my room and messing around, thinking of ideas. Sometimes literature can be a source of inspiration or a certain philosophy that struck a chord.

You’ve also got a tour lined up in March. This is going to be your second headline tour after supporting acts like The Wombats, Wolf Alice and Circa Waves. What do you have in store?

This is going to be our second headline tour, so it should be fun. I couldn’t say what to expect from our shows except for a really good night out. Let’s just say that they’re going to be like an extreme house party.

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Let’s talk a bit about what you’ve released so far. Vivienne and Flame are some of your most popular tracks. What can you tell me about those two?

The early versions of both of those tracks were so different to how they sound now, after we’ve recorded. I think there’s something in the four of us. When we come together, we have this unidentifiable quality that suddenly comes to life. So I suppose those two tracks came to life the same as the others. Flame is more of a wake up call. If someone says something, it shouldn’t be taken at face value. There are different possibilities and there is more to life than meets the eye. That’s what Flame is about. As for Vivienne, we like to think of it as a classic love song.

What about the visuals for the tracks? How much input do you get on them?

For Vivienne, I put that together along with the director. We’re hands on with everything we do, creatively speaking. I feel really strongly that as an artist, you can’t be complacent or lazy about it. You need to be on top of all of it. Especially now, with social media and everything, because people never look at an album cover and see just that. It’s got a lot more to do with the music videos or the pictures that you upload on Instagram. It’s a bigger beef rather than just your music.

What was your concept behind the Vivienne video then?

Tragedy and escapism I suppose.

Do you always have a certain thing that you try to convey through your tracks? As you said, they all come across as a form of escapism, from the outside looking in at least.

I think that the broader message within the tracks is hard to define. You know, I’m 20 years old and I’m still young. I don’t feel like an adult. At all actually. Everything is coming from a very young point of view and it’s just my way of seeing the world at this very moment. I’m trying to stay away from mundane, cliché things. What interests me is obsession and ritualism. Love, hate, sex and drugs.

It’s not your job to tell people what to take away from your music, but if it was, what would you want people to take away from it?

Joy or happiness, if you can.

What are you listening to at the moment?

Let It Happen by Tame Impala and 15 Step by Radiohead.

What’s your FAULT?

Impatience.

 

 

You can check out Sundara Karma’s new single below.

 

 

Words: Adina Ilie

 

Don Broco – Exclusive Photoshoot + Interview with FAULT Magazine Online

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Words ADINA ILIE
Photography MILES HOLDER

 

You’re just about to release your second album, Automatic. What can you tell me about it?

Well, it’s the album that we’ve been working towards for a year and a bit now and it’s the longest time that we’ve ever actually spent away from touring and being a band. I think for us, life in the studio was quite a change of pace.  We wrote our first album in about 2 months, recorded it like boom bosh and out. After that, we went on tour and then suddenly it was the right time to start writing the second album, so we just pulled ourselves out of the game for a year and wrote it. It was definitely an interesting period of self-discovery for us. Working out exactly who we wanted to be as a band and experimenting with different sounds to create the album. But now we’ve got it and it’s all done and it feels really good.

How did the writing process go this time?

It was the first time we ever wrote with our new bass player, Tom, so that was quite exciting, like finding out each others taste and boundaries and pushing each other and seeing how far we’d go. But once we got into a flow, we found it was a very collaborative process. We’re very much a band, we’re not one person calling the shots -with us, all four of us are very deeply involved in every process of the song. It’s all about the teamwork.

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What effect do you think it’s gonna have on people? Do you expect a different reaction as opposed to your first album? 

Yeah, I think it’s definitely going to take a few people by surprise.  But at the same time, if you’re a fan of the band already, you’re gonna really enjoy it.  It might open you up to new music and hopefully question what you’re listening to and make you think like “okay, this isn’t a band that sound like anyone else.” We’re hoping to make our mark on the world of music and stand out as a band, stand out as a group. You know, bring in all our interests and joys, make up a musical landscape and refine that into one sound. We’re hoping it’s gonna get people talking.

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For you, in what way is your second album different to your first? What have you done differently now, if anything at all?

We’ve written better songs that really work together and take you on a bit of a journey, rather than just a random collection of ideas. There are ideas that are developed and messed about with in our heads. From a listener’s perspective, I think you’re gonna leave feeling like you’ve actually listened to a more well rounded bunch of songs and a better album. Musically, we experimented with a lot more instruments on this album. We got to play in a pop studio to begin with, as opposed to the usual recording on a computer that we did on our first album. On this one, we went to a proper studio where we really embraced the live band sound and made sure that everything sounded as real as possible. If we had to play things a couple of times to get them right, we did that, without being perfectly accurate in everything.  The perks of being in a studio is that we’ve got all these instruments, we got to play around with a lot of keyboard sounds, old school organs. We managed to do a couple of songs with string arrangements, so for us it was fun, like discovering instruments that take you out of that basic guitar, bass, drums. So I think that’s probably the main difference, from a songwriting perspective, the use of electronics and instrumentation.

Tell me a bit about the video for Automatic. Did you have any input on the visuals?  

Yeah we did. The basic idea was born out of our artwork. We wanted to create something strong, visually striking for our album and we spoke to various designers and photographers about trying to achieve what we wanted. The easiest idea to get it done and make it look good was to fly out to the location in Malibu. We were talking about either Miami or Malibu, somewhere where you have sea and the weather and the palm trees and create something that wasn’t pastiche but still gain reference to that sort of bygone era where exciting music was coming out in the 80s where a band still sounded like a band. You know, once we had the collection of songs that really reflected the sound of the album, we wanted the visuals to represent that. So yeah, we went out to Malibu and then to LA and came across this incredible villa in Malibu where we shot the album artwork. The video for Automatic was kind of born from the idea of that. Our director really wanted to play on this visual reference of static motion and things kind of reflecting. I guess that’s cause the song is called Automatic. His idea was to show people having a good time and show this kind of high society that you associate with that Miami aesthetic. A lot of the references were guided towards our artwork.

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Will you be doing a headlining tour after the album release? 

Yeah, we’ve got an album release launch show on the 7th, then we’ve got a week tour and we’re going back to some of the venues where we first started playing a couple of years ago. That’s gonna be the first time we get to play a lot of the new songs on the album. We’re really excited about that, it’s gonna be the first time in 3 years that we’re actually gonna get to play those venues that made us into the band that we are today. We’re extra excited.

It sounds like you really miss touring.

We do! Touring is our favourite part about being in a band and we did enjoy the studio, but at the same time, touring is what it’s all about for us. When you’re on the road, it feels like you’re actually achieving what you’re set out to do. It gives you that sense of “okay, we’re making the right call being a band.”

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A lot of bands aim to break America. Is that something that’s been on your mind or something that you’d potentially like to achieve at some point in the future? 

Yeah, I think definitely. I think for us it’s not specifically America, it’s everywhere really. I mean, the more we get to tour and the more we get to explore the world and see new and exciting places, the more driven we are about being in a band. We’re hoping to get out to America next year; it will be the first time we go out there and play, which should be fun. But there’s so many other countries we haven’t been to, we only scratched the surface. So yeah, I think this album, if things go well, will give us the opportunity to travel and explore the world.

What’s your FAULT? 

I think it’s probably being too caught up and not looking at the bigger picture. I mean for us that’s what Automatic was all about actually. Staying into the moment and not worrying.