Swarovski showcases an array of effervescence at the Russian Ballet Icons Gala 2018

Warrior of Light world premiere at the Russian Ballet Icons Gala 2018. Photo credit Daniel Kulakov

Celebrating the 200th anniversary of Marius Petipa, the master of Russian ballet, the English Opera House hosted an incredible set of performances from the world’s most known ballet dancers in order to celebrate the master’s bicentennial.

Swarovski sponsored the production of the costumes that stunned the audience on Sunday evening for the world premiere of Warrior of Light. Gracing the stage, we had the pleasure of witnessing the spectacular talent of Maria Sascha Khan, Nadia Khan, Nicholas MacKay under Julian and Nicholas’s MacKay stellar choreography. All dancers were donned in Theresa Khan MacKay’s stellar costume design featuring carefully embellished Swarovski crystals in awe-inducing patterns.

 

 

Warrior of Light world premiere at the Russian Ballet Icons Gala 2018. Photo credit Daniel Kulakov

The programme of the evening also included the eponymous Don Quixote, Swan Lake, La Sylphide and also a world premiere of Warrior of Light. Gracing the stage with sublime examples of the theatrical craft were some of the prime figures in contemporary and classical ballet, from rising stars to established talent.

Ballet is rightfully considered as one of the symbols of Russia and the diverse nature of the programme and the performers all united under their love of dance. From established stars to new talent, the Russian Ballet Icons is one of the most poignant events in the cultural life of the British capital.

Warrior of Light world premiere at the Russian Ballet Icons Gala 2018. Photo credit Daniel Kulakov

Since the year 2006, Ensemble Productions has brought the Russian Ballet Icons Gala to London and the show at the Coliseum has become a hub for culture lovers. Stars of the Bolshoi and the Mariinsky – but also the Royal Ballet and the leading companies of Europe have joined forces for more than a decade to celebrate the strength and creativity of Russian artistic traditions.

Ballet is one of the most powerful images of Russia and its accurate representation depends on everyone involved in the production – from the Orchestra to the Décor to the Costumes. Swarovski has managed to transform a world of fantasy into a reality to graces the stage. A spectacle of light emerged during the world premiere of ‘Warrior of Light’ when an array of incredibly crafted and carefully embellished costumes adorned the frail yet powerful bodies of the dancers.

Warrior of Light world premiere at the Russian Ballet Icons Gala 2018. Photo credit Daniel Kulakov

The evening was an all-encompassing celebration of art, culture, tenacity that culminated in an exhilarating experience worthy of repeat – celebrating everything that Russian decadence represents.

Coverage: Adina Ilie

KYGO – EXCLUSIVE ONLINE COVER SHOOT AND INTERVIEW

Jacket by Frame | Tshirt by London Denim | Jeans by Zadig & Voltaire |

Kygo – real name Kyrre Gørvell-Dahll – is always on the go. When we caught up with the tropical house sensation, he was in New York, doing promo for his new sophomore album, ‘Kids In Love’. It won’t be long until he’s jumping on a plane to his next destination.

 

The 26-year-old DJ and producer wasn’t planning a career in music, but what started off as experimentation on Soundcloud has resulted in a meteoric rise to fame, billions of streams, and shows at huge festivals such as Coachella and TomorrowWorld. We caught up with Kygo to chat about mixing up his sound, his dreams to work with Ed Sheeran and never sitting still.

Hoody by Kygo Life | Trousers Kygos own

 

How has your unexpected success affected you personally and how do you stay grounded when you’re playing gigs to thousands of people on an almost daily basis?

It’s about the people you surround yourself with. I’ve kept all my old friends, my manager, my girlfriend. They keep me grounded. It [fame] doesn’t really affect me that much. I see my family, I keep busy by always traveling and playing shows. I get to do what I love for a living.

 

You popularised tropical house to the point where you were working with superstars such as Ellie Goulding and Selena Gomez. How did you arrive at this unique personal sound?

It was just through a period of experimenting. When I was studying [at university] I would play music in my bedroom all the time. I spent hours and hours experimenting with different sounds. I was inspired by [artists like] Avicii and Swedish House Mafia but I felt like everyone else was trying to sound like them, so I started listening to other stuff like deep house and found the sound I have now. It wasn’t like a plan, it was just stuff that I thought was cool.

 

How do you prepare to play live? Do you have any pre-show rituals?

I like to take ten or fifteen minutes before the show to concentrate and get in the zone. There’s always so much stuff going on and so many people around.

Jacket and T- Shirt by Prevu London | Jeans by Zadig & Voltaire

You’ve recently collaborated with a plethora of artists such on your new album; some which are well known, like John Newman and OneRepublic, but some which are still largely under the radar like The Night Game. Why did you choose to work with these artists in particular?

My label sets up a lot of studio sessions for me. They recommend people to work with. I like to be very open-minded about people I work with. Even some songwriters or artists I’ve never heard of before, I’ll just try it and see what happens.

 

Is there anyone you’d love to work with down the line?

There’s a lot of people! Always on top of the list is Ed Sheeran. I did some remixes of Ed Sheeran four years ago. The Weeknd would be cool. Coldplay could be cool. Imagine Dragons as well.

 

In what way is your new album, ‘Kids in Love’ the follow-up or partner album to your last record, ‘Cloud 9’?

I think it’s a follow-up. There’s definitely some of the same sounds in there but a little different. I’ve tried to have fun with myself and my sound and mix it up. I didn’t want to make the same album or a similar album all over again, I wanted to make something new. I’m very happy with it. Some of the songs I’d be jamming on the piano but some of the songs were demos that would get sent over that I’d feel really inspired by. With the OneRepublic track and The Night Game track, we wrote those both from scratch together.

Coat by Coach 1941 | Shirt by Diesel Black Gold | Hoody by Kygo Life | Trousers by Michael Kors

Do you have a favourite song from the album?

It’s always tough to pick a favourite as I like all the songs on the album but I think ‘Kids In Love’, the title track if I had to pick, would probably be my favourite.

 

Is it because it means the most to you?

Yeah, it does! I’d been working on the song for over a year. When I make a track it only takes three days or a week or two, then after a while, you make some tweaks and release it. I usually like to tweak a song but it doesn’t make it much better. It’s not good to change it too much. This song sounded so big and powerful that I wanted to make sure it was perfect before I released it, so I spent a lot of time on it.

Jacket by Frame | Tshirt by London Denim |Jeans by Zadig & Voltaire

What is your FAULT?

I’m definitely always late. I can’t sit still. If I’m sitting in a chair I always have to move my feet. It must be quite annoying – not for me but for the people around me!

 

Words: Aimee Phillips 

Photography: Conor Clinch 

Styling: Dee Moran

Grooming: Graziella Vella using Becca and Kevyn Aucoin

Production: Adina Ilie

 

FAULT Magazine 10 year anniversary @ UNIT London with Bulldog Gin & Snog

FAULT Magazine 10 year anniversary event & Issue 27 launch

FAULT Magazine 10 year anniversary: FAULT Magazine director Nick Artsruni (left) with Issue 27 front cover photographer Jack Alexander (right)

FAULT Magazine director Nick Artsruni (left) with Issue 27 front cover photographer Jack Alexander (right)

We celebrated the FAULT Magazine 10 year anniversary in style with the likes of Rizzle Kicks’ Jordan Stephens, Rae Morris, Felicity Hayward, GIRLI, Dakota Blue Richards, Jonny Nelson and Sascha & Mimi Bailey at UNIT London gallery last week.

While the BULLDOG Gin sponsored bar served their signature gin & tonics (with a slice of crisp grapefruit on the rim) downstairs, guests enjoyed an exhibition of some of our favourite-ever FAULT shoots with the likes of Kylie Jenner, Usher, Ellie Goulding, Ben Barnes, Big Sean, Nick Jonas and Gary Numan. Well, we hope they enjoyed them, anyway!

Pride of place, of course, was our latest cover with Liam Gallagher. Shot by Jack Alexander, the front cover for FAULT 27: the Best of British Issue was the focal point for our showcase event that was catered exclusively by stupendous fro-yo trailblazers Snog and their brilliant new brand, Beltane & Pop.

The official ‘FAULT Magazine 10 year anniversary afterparty’ took place at Mahiki Mayfair…we think. To be honest, we weren’t quite sure where we were once our private section started overflowing with bottles of vodka and Mahiki’s trademark treasure chests!

Nick Artsruni with Jordan Stephens of Rizzle Kicks

 

FAULT Magazine editor Miles Holder with women’s fashion editor Rachel Holland

 

TV presenter Jonny Nelson

 

Felicity Hayward and Rome Fortune with Nick Artsruni

 

Presenter James Stewart at FAULT Magazine 10 Year anniversary event

 

Rae Morris

 

Dakota Blue Richards

Mimi Nishikawa-Bailey, Sascha Bailey, Nick Artsruni (l-r)

 

FAULT Magazine contributor Adina Ilie

 

GIRLI and friend (l-r)

 

Guests enjoy SNOG

 

 

Lucy Chappell with photographer Jack Alexander

 

Roxxxan with Nick Artsruni

 

Sophie Hopkins with Jack Alexander

 

Miles Holder with Melisa Whiskey

 

Model Alexander James

 

Model Chad Kuzyk

 

FAULT Magazine contributor Olivia Pinnock (centre, red hair) and guests

 

FAULT Magazine contributor Aimee Phillips

 

Some of the prints on display at the exhibition are available for sale.

 

Please contact us if you would like to inquire about any of the works listed below:

From left-right:

  • ‘Kylie Jenner for FAULT Magazine Issue 20’ – photographed by Lionel Deluy (black and white A0 canvas print)
  • ‘Ben Barnes for FAULT Issue 15’ – by Sinisha Nisevic (black and white A0 canvas print)
  • ‘Ellie Goulding for FAULT Issue 15’ – by Louie Banks (full colour A2 canvas print) – not for sale
  • ‘Usher for FAULT Issue 19’ – by Sinisha Nisevic (black and white A0 canvas print)
  • ‘Liam Gallagher for FAULT Issue 27 cover’ – by Jack Alexander (full colour foam board print)

 

  • ‘Nick Jonas for FAULT Issue 21’ – by Matt Holyoak (full colour A2 canvas print) – not for sale
  • ‘Kylie Jenner for FAULT Magazine Issue 20’ – photographed by Lionel Deluy (black and white A0 canvas print)
  • ‘Gary Numan for FAULT Issue 27’ – by David Richardson (full colour A0 canvas print)
  • ‘Big Sean for FAULT Issue 15’ – by Steven Gomillion & Dennis Leupold (full colour A2 canvas print) – not for sale

N.B: Where the works are not available for sale, we encourage you to contact the photographer directly!

 Special Thanks:

UNIT London Gallery

BULLDOG Gin

Outer Insight

Snog and Beltane & Pop

Mahiki Mayfair

Photographers on display: Lionel Deluy, Sinisha Nisevic, David Richardson, Matt Holyoak, Louie Banks, Jack Alexander

Amazing people who went above & beyond for us: Hermione Benest, Tim Lucas Allen, Vassilissa Conway

FAULT Team on the night: Miles Holder, Rachel Holland, Adina Ilie

This is your FAULT

 

Liam Gallagher – Exclusive FAULT Magazine Issue 27 Covershoot and Interview Preview

 

Liam Gallagher

As you were. As you are.

 

Words: Adina Ilie

Photography: Jack Alexander

Menswear Editor: Kristine Kilty

Grooming: Natalya Chew

 

FAULT Magazine is proud to present our Issue 27 cover story with non-other than Liam Gallagher. With a career spanning over 25 years and a myriad of stories to tell, we sat down to discuss the ups and downs of his career and get to know Liam Gallagher as he was and as he is. Enjoy.

 

FAULT: Do you recall the first 24 hours after Noel quit the band? What was going through your mind at that point?

Liam Gallagher: Oh fuck. That very moment I just went– right, there have been certain powers at play. It wasn’t too big an argument; we’ve had worse arguments. What went down was something that was pre-planned.

 

FAULT: What was the lead up to that point that makes you so sure that it was pre-planned?

Liam Gallagher: Lots of things. A lot of sneaky little meetings. People might say that it’s paranoia. But you can never be too paranoid in life. I kind of knew he was going to map it at some point. It was going to happen at V or it was going to happen at Reading. It only got postponed until Paris. I knew he was going to jump ship at some point. And that’s what made me feel that my paranoia was right. Or maybe I’m clairvoyant; I’ve got 6 senses.

 

FAULT: Did you feel Noel’s absence while writing this record?

Liam Gallagher: Yeah – because I don’t want to be solo. I don’t want to do it on my own. I’m not a guitar player or a prolific songwriter. I can write a few songs every now and again but I miss being in a band. I miss my brother the way he was back then. I miss singing those great songs that we all made great.

 

FAULT: Were you disappointed that your former bandmates did not reach out to you in times of crisis? Are you resentful in any way?

Liam Gallagher: My older brother has always been there. I thought I’d at least get a call from Noel, but there was no call. I thought I’d get a call from my other manager, but nothing from them fucking cunts. But then I met Debbie and she’s been there all the way. A lot of my mates are gone; I don’t really have anyone in London and that is fine. The universe is my mate.

 

Liam Gallagher: I’ve been through a lot of shit, but it was shit that I caused. When you cause shit – you man up and fucking deal with it. Sometimes you have to fucking man up to your shit.

 

 

 

FAULT: Did you ever feel that you were done? That you hit your peak in ’96 in Knebworth and then it was all downhill from there? 

Liam Gallagher: I feel like I’ve maintained it without turning into the traps of the business. I’m still outspoken, I’m still wearing my heart on my sleeve and if people like it that’s fine. If you don’t then you don’t. I’m not a ‘yes man’.

 

FAULT: Did you ever see yourself hitting the top once more by yourself?

Liam Gallagher: The night Oasis split I felt absolutely disappointed and then I felt exactly the opposite when my album went number 1. In this day and age, rock’n’roll has got cobwebs on it. I never actually saw myself hitting the top once more. But if you truly believe, things will happen. I’ve been good to rock’n’roll and I reckon rock’n’roll will be good to me. It saved me twice.

 

FAULT: Hollywood is ablaze with accusations of sexual assault against Harvey Weinstein. Have you seen similar occurrences in the music industry? 

Liam Gallagher: : Not really, but you know it’s there. The shady little fuckers at the top. It’s not even with just men and women, it’s men and men too. All these pop bands – you hear about it with Take That but I’ve never witnessed any of it. Nobody would come near us. We were caught up in our own bubble. We weren’t hanging about with the record company. We’d go to the awards show and they’d be there, but we’d just get off and do our own thing. And I certainly didn’t see any weird shit.

 

FAULT: What changes do you reckon we should make to keep things safe for both men and women alike?

Liam Gallagher: That’s a big tough question. Obviously get rid of all the shit bags. Obviously, if everyone took care of their shit – everything would be cool. We all live together under one sky at the end of the day. Everyone just needs to cool the fuck out.

 

FAULT: Do you think Liam Gallagher has the power to get people to go back to the roots of rock’n’roll?

Liam Gallagher: I’ve got a lot of fans out there and I always have. My oldest kid is 18 and my friends have kids about the same age – so they’re going to bring them to the shows. That’s a good thing. All you can do is make good music and do good gigs. Do good interviews and try to sell it how it is. Stay honest to what you are and don’t get carried away with all the show business shit. That’s all that I can do. I’m definitely not the savior of music, I’m the savior of me.

 

Liam Gallagher:I don’t get involved with the industry and the business side of it. I let my manager do that. That’s the problem with music today – it’s got no fucking soul. I get being business minded, but it can overpower. You forget about the fucking music.”

 

Find out who else will appear in the issue here

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 26 – THE BEST OF BRITISH ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

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Harry Styles brings London to its knees for a second night in a row at the Apollo

 

As much as you brace yourself for the sheer excitement of 5000 young girls yearning for a glimpse of Harry Styles, nothing can prepare you for the caliber of high octane screams that occur when his figure appears anything but shyly from behind his eponymous pink curtain.

Outside the venue, the sight is awe-inducing. Thousands of girls had camped overnight – you can spot under the scaffoldings hundreds of mattresses and sleeping bags piled one on top of the other.

Harry’s seen as a safe haven by his millions of fans. In a way – he is a refuge. Inside the venue, thousands of people show up with rainbow flags and Black Lives Matter posters are spotted all across the front row of the venue. Hundreds of girls and boys alike proudly strut the hallways of the Apollo wearing his pink merchandise.  Treat People With Kindness it says. If their idol wears his heart on his sleeve, then so should his fans.

 

You wonder whether Styles is an activist or an artist. Is this a concert or a rally? It’s a bit of both. Harry’s idols would not turn their concerts into safe places – but Harry’s carving his own path. His platform is our youth – our future doctors, future politicians and future parents. If this is his way of educating the masses, then it’s a way that we should all stand behind.

As the lights go down and Styles makes his appearance, there’s a secret yearning for earplugs as you shield yourself from the deafening screams. It’s all in good spirit though.

As he jumps from song to song with the flair of a performer with three decades under his belt, it’s obvious to the naked eye that Harry Styles was in his element in One Direction as much as he is on his own. It’s his versatility that’s catchy. He’s at ease and in good spirits. His vocals silence the room with the rendition of Ariana Grande’s Just A Little Bit Of Your Heart. Fan favourite Kiwi is clearly Styles’ favourite to perform though. His inner Mick Jagger shows up as Harry glides and kneels and prances, much to the joy and arousal of his audience. He’s a teaser.

“Feel free to be whatever you want and whoever you want in this room,” Harry chants to the audience. That’s what they’re here for, after all. “I wouldn’t get to do this if it hadn’t been for you” he carries on with the grateful innocence of a child. And a child he is – one that might not even be aware of what even greater of a journey lies ahead of him. “He’s a Bowie in the making,” I hear shyly from an eager fan sat behind me. He’s not – He’s Harry Styles in the making.

 

 

Coverage: Adina Ilie

Justin Prentice – exclusive shoot & interview for FAULT Magazine Issue 26

Justin Prentice exclusive shoot for FAULT Issue 26 – Click to order your copy now

13 Reasons Why has been the most talked about show on Netflix over the past year. Produced by Selena Gomez, the show follows the trail of 13 teenagers as they uncover the reasons for their friend Hannah’s suicide. Heavily influenced by the negative impact of social media, teenage bullying and sexual assault, the show brings to light an unexplored side of leisure television. Speaking to Justin Prentice who plays Bryce Walker – Hannah’s sexual abuser – FAULT uncovers whether it’s beneficial or irresponsible to expose a young audience to explicit suicide.
 

 ORDER YOUR COPY OF THE ISSUE TO SEE THE FULL SHOOT & INTERVIEW

 
What were your initial thoughts going into a show like 13 Reasons Why with such a heavy character to play?

It’s always rewarding to play such meaty characters. I was excited for the challenge. I was also thrilled to be working with Brian Yorkey, Tom McCarthy, Selena Gomez, and Anonymous Content. Each has cemented themselves as power plays in the industry, so that alone were ample reason to climb aboard the show.

 

Having Selena Gomez as Executive Producer on the show – did you have any preconceived ideas in regards to the end result and what was your overall experience of working with her?

I knew that this project was going to be special, in part because of how much it meant to Selena. She and her mother, Mandy Teefey, have been a main force in adapting this story from the Jay Asher novel. If it weren’t for the two of them, we wouldn’t have a show. I’ve had a great experience working with Selena. She is a great boss to have.

Photography: Lionel Deluy @love artists agency
Styling: Angel Terrazas
Grooming: Melissa Walsh using jack black
Special Thanks: RCNSTRCT

To say that your character is not likable would be an understatement – how did you approach playing him so accurately and were you at any point reluctant?

Yeah, Bryce isn’t the best kind of person. I was never reluctant to play the part, but I was concerned with portraying him accurately. I had many conversations with psychiatrist Dr. Rebecca Hedrick and sexual assault expert and advocate Alexis Jones. They gave me great advice on people like Bryce and were instrumental in bringing Bryce to life. I wanted Bryce to be recognizable to the viewers. We all thought it would be more powerful if audiences were able to relate Bryce to someone they knew in their own lives vs. Bryce being a sheer monster. Not to say that his acts weren’t monstrous, but he still needed to be human.

 

The show in itself holds a strong responsibility towards young people battling depression and social bullying. Did you ever feel that it might be harmful to put out a project so heavy? There have been reports of a suicide in Austria that followed 13 Reasons Why’s formula with the tapes.

Any time you have a show that unapologetically sheds light on controversial issues, there’s going to be controversy. 13 Reasons Why is often times hard to watch because it can hit so close to home, but that makes it real. It gives people an opportunity to talk about these deep issues that are so often hard to initiate conversations about. We get so many letters and so many people coming up to us in person thanking us for the show and our portrayal of the events in the show. It’s definitely helping people. I wouldn’t say they followed the formula in 13 Reasons Why. For starters, their method was different than Hannah’s. They also didn’t leave any tapes. Any blame on the show is just speculation at this point. The girls had recently watched the show, but it has been admitted that there is no conclusive evidence of any correlation. Cases like this are heartbreaking, and our hearts go out to all people who are going through similar things. We have heard from several experts that a show does not cause someone to take their own lives. Anxiety, depression, stress, etc can. Our show gives people an outlet to talk about these issues that they may be experiencing.

 

Interview by Adina Ilie

What do you think are the positives of putting a character like Bryce Walker out there?

Most people know someone similar to Bryce Walker, and if they don’t personally, there are many cases of privileged athletes who get away with rape. Bryce is real. That’s terrifying, but true. Film and Television have the wonderful roles of spotlighting problems in society. The lack of education on sex and what consent looks like create people like Bryce and create people who think they can take whatever they want. These are kids, who would, often times, never do such things if they were just given the proper guidance early on.

 

13 Reasons Why has been confirmed for a second season  – where is the story going for Bryce?

My lips are sealed [laughs]! I can say that it’s going to be great! There is more to see in all of these characters. Season two takes some interesting turns.

 

Lastly – what’s your FAULT?

I suck at time management! I’m working on it. We only have one life, that we know of, so I should spend less of it procrastinating. There are a lot of things that I hope to accomplish. All of which are going to be hard to achieve if I don’t start cracking down…

GET THE FULL SHOOT AND INTERVIEW EXCLUSIVELY IN FAULT ISSUE 26 – AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

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Sophie Cookson – Queen of Kings – kills it in FAULT Issue 26 – The Millennial Issue

Sophie Cookson exclusive for FAULT Issue 26 – Click to order your copy now

When she first hit our screens with a starring role in Kingsman: Secret Service in 2014, it was hard to believe that it was Sophie Cookson’s first big-time project since leaving drama school. An alumna of the National Youth Music Theatre and Oxford School of Drama, her career has taken an impressive and rapid trajectory – from being named as one of Screen International’s Stars of Tomorrow in 2014 to securing roles in blockbuster titles and starring alongside industry greats.

Now, reprising her role as the ass-kicking Roxy in Kingsman: The Golden Circle, fans of the franchise can look forward to seeing Sophie and her fellow Kingsman spies face a deluge of dangers, with their headquarters in ruins while the world is held hostage by a nefarious new nemesis…

Things are obviously going to be a bit different in Kingsman: The Golden Circle. How do you think Roxy has developed as a character by this point? Will we learn more about her?

You’ll have to wait and see! She’s definitely now an established working cog in Kingsman with a great suit… apart from that, I can’t tell you much more!

 …

Sophie wears looks by Ralph Lauren, DSQUARED2, and Zeynep Kartel in our shoot

 

As most people will be aware, the Kingsman series has comic book origins – is that a genre that interests you, or are there others you’re more into?

I have to say, I’ve never been a comic book fanatic – but, through Kingsman and the fact that the movie industry does seem focused on that genre at the moment, I’ve learnt a lot about it in the last few years.

For me if it’s a great script and concept then I’m interested, regardless of genre. Having said that, I do love a good psychological thriller; something intriguing, with dark undertones. Right now I’m loving The Handmaid’s Tale – it’s so brilliantly harrowing and moving.

 

Photography: Roberto Aguilar
Styling: Rachel Gold @Red Represents and BTS Talent
Hair: Diego Miranda Hair @BTS Talent using Dyson supersonic & Sebastian professional
Make up: Emily Dhanjal @BTS Talent using Rodial skincare & MAC cosmetics
Nails: Nickie Rhodes-Hill @BTS Talent using Barry M
Photographer’s assistant: Khalil Musa
Interview: Jennifer Sara Parkes
Production Manager: Adina Ilie

 

You’re also starring in Gypsy on Netflix– what’s your character, Sidney, like in the show?  

Sid is super complicated, which is what drew me to her. She talks about owning your circumstances and living this authentic ‘I don’t care what anyone else thinks’ life – yet, at the same time, she lies and has this deep- rooted vulnerability. She can lie and manipulate, but also has this amazing zest for life and ability to draw people out of themselves. I was so excited to play someone who straddles the good and bad side of human nature. It’s still rare to see such three-dimensional women on screen.

Gypsy is, refreshingly, quite a female-led series – did you find it to be a different vibe on set, with women in so many of the production and on-screen roles we often see going to men?

There are sensitive issues we deal with in the show, and I was definitely happy to have all my intimate scenes with Naomi directed by women. There’s an implicit level of safety and understanding that is perhaps more automatic than when you’re working with a director of the opposite sex. It’s the first time I’ve done a scene of that nature surrounded by so many women – it felt empowering.

And, lastly, what is your FAULT?

I can be incredibly stubborn – I like to see it as determination, but it can definitely swing the other way!

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 26 – THE MILLENNIAL ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

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SUNDARA KARMA RELEASE NEW TRACK ‘A YOUNG UNDERSTANDING’ – EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH FAULT ONLINE

 

Reading’s golden boys Sundara Karma have only just unveiled their new single ‘A Young Understanding’. The indie-pop quartet has seen undeniable success over the past year with only just two EPs under their belt and things seem to be getting bigger and better for the boys. They haven’t even released an album yet and they’re already set to globetrot around Europe’s festivals on the same bill as Years and Years, The 1975 and many other household names. It’s difficult not to label them as the next big thing. We caught up with Oscar Lulu, Sundara’s lead singer, and we’re tempted to say that England’s new wave is in safe hands.

 

Screen Shot 2016-02-09 at 20.13.10

You’ve just finished recording your first album. What can you give away?

I can give away that it’s done and that we’re proud of it. It’s a really weird and difficult thing to say. To be honest, I don’t really want to say it. I find it difficult letting things go.

Have you done anything different with the album or is it going to be a continuity of what you’ve released so far?

We’ve released two EPs and I think the album is just going to be an evolution from those two EPs. Our second EP was a progression from our first EP and I think the album will just be a natural progression from the two combined. If you’re fans of the EPs, you’ll be fans of the album. There isn’t a direct distinction.

What’s your production process?

Well, I’m the main writer so it just comes from me singing in my room and messing around, thinking of ideas. Sometimes literature can be a source of inspiration or a certain philosophy that struck a chord.

You’ve also got a tour lined up in March. This is going to be your second headline tour after supporting acts like The Wombats, Wolf Alice and Circa Waves. What do you have in store?

This is going to be our second headline tour, so it should be fun. I couldn’t say what to expect from our shows except for a really good night out. Let’s just say that they’re going to be like an extreme house party.

Screen Shot 2016-02-09 at 20.13.55

Let’s talk a bit about what you’ve released so far. Vivienne and Flame are some of your most popular tracks. What can you tell me about those two?

The early versions of both of those tracks were so different to how they sound now, after we’ve recorded. I think there’s something in the four of us. When we come together, we have this unidentifiable quality that suddenly comes to life. So I suppose those two tracks came to life the same as the others. Flame is more of a wake up call. If someone says something, it shouldn’t be taken at face value. There are different possibilities and there is more to life than meets the eye. That’s what Flame is about. As for Vivienne, we like to think of it as a classic love song.

What about the visuals for the tracks? How much input do you get on them?

For Vivienne, I put that together along with the director. We’re hands on with everything we do, creatively speaking. I feel really strongly that as an artist, you can’t be complacent or lazy about it. You need to be on top of all of it. Especially now, with social media and everything, because people never look at an album cover and see just that. It’s got a lot more to do with the music videos or the pictures that you upload on Instagram. It’s a bigger beef rather than just your music.

What was your concept behind the Vivienne video then?

Tragedy and escapism I suppose.

Do you always have a certain thing that you try to convey through your tracks? As you said, they all come across as a form of escapism, from the outside looking in at least.

I think that the broader message within the tracks is hard to define. You know, I’m 20 years old and I’m still young. I don’t feel like an adult. At all actually. Everything is coming from a very young point of view and it’s just my way of seeing the world at this very moment. I’m trying to stay away from mundane, cliché things. What interests me is obsession and ritualism. Love, hate, sex and drugs.

It’s not your job to tell people what to take away from your music, but if it was, what would you want people to take away from it?

Joy or happiness, if you can.

What are you listening to at the moment?

Let It Happen by Tame Impala and 15 Step by Radiohead.

What’s your FAULT?

Impatience.

 

 

You can check out Sundara Karma’s new single below.

 

 

Words: Adina Ilie