Tory Lanez Menswear Cover for FAULT Magazine 28

Tory Lanez X FAULT Magazine

 

Photography: Miles Holder

Stylist: Rachel Gold

Grooming: Shamirah Sairally

 

Words: Trina John-Charles

We bundle out of the photo shoot and into a waiting car. Tory Lanez is clearly rattled by a previous incident and I believe everything he is threatening to do if the car doesn’t move promptly. Although quite intimidating when the switch has been flipped, he remains polite and quite chatty with me – revealing some amazing tidbits off mic, but sadly, we are not that type of publication. As we weave in and out of the busy central London traffic, Tory rolls the biggest blunt I have ever seen and our 20-minute conversation about the new album ‘Memories Don’t Die’, the cultural appropriation police and derogatory terms in music, begins…

 

FAULT: On the song ‘Happiness’ you talk about losing your mother. How difficult was it making a song like that?

Tory Lanez : I had to record that song like, four different times. I just kept crying every time I tried to record it. I knew it would resonate with people, because of the way it resonated with me.

 

FAULT: People always talk about stark similarities between the street culture in London and the street culture in Toronto. Having been here many times, have you noticed this yourself?

Tory Lanez : Definitely. Like, they way we talk… the way we say, ’mandem’, or when we talk about somebody we’ll say, ‘a man did this’. I think it’s the way we are all brought up. It has a bit of a Caribbean edge to it. I think that’s where the similarities come in.

FAULT: Are you planning on working with any other London, or British based artists?

Tory Lanez : Of course, I want to work with a lot of people from here. I want to do a whole project thats just with people from here. I definitely want to work with Nines, Stefflondon, J Hus, Dave, Stormzy… of course Skepta.

 

FAULT: Keeping the British theme, there is a Zayn Malik sample on the new album. It is done in a great way and it isn’t the most obvious choice. Why did you choose that particular sample?

Tory Lanez : I didn’t. I didn’t even know it was a Zayn sample until after I was trying to clear it. That’s when I found out it was a One Direction sample. The producer, Christian Lou, brought that beat to me.

 

FAULT: …And Sting’s influence on the album?

Tory Lanez : Sting specifically asked us to use his song instead of ours. We had like an interpretation that sounded like his song and Sting said, ‘no, I want them to use the real one, the real song’… so that’s what happened with that. Sting loves it… It’s dope that he allowed us to use his song and was like, ‘use the real song, I don’t want you to use something like it, I want you to use the real thing’. 

 

FAULT: When you talk about being younger and people trying to bully you, it’s almost like you developed a very defensive ‘fuck all of you’ kind of attitude. Is it fair to say you still have that now towards negative people?

Tory Lanez : Yeah. I’m always like that. I grew up like, you fend for yours and if somebody tries to take yours, you show them why they should have never tried it. So for me, I’m the type of person… I just don’t take no bullshit – with anything.

 

FAULT: You have already addressed the issue you had with an upmarket clothing store assistant being rude and dismissive towards you, because of your appearance and in retaliation you spent $35k (of record label money) with a different assistant to prove a point. There was a lot of chatter online about this not being the best way to handle the situation. It is great this conversation is being had because this is something that has been happening for years. In retrospect and if it was your own money and not the record label’s, would you have dealt with the situation in the same way?

Tory Lanez : Some of it was my own money… and yeah, I would have still dealt with it the same way. I didn’t do anything wrong. All I was doing was shopping for clothes. That store being the only store that sells high end designer fabrics, I still had to buy what I was going there to buy, I just didn’t give the commission to the person who was looking down on me.

Do you know what’s crazy… what the actual fucked up part is? The black mentality… and this is so harshly and blatantly true… the black mentality, because we have been oppressed for years, when we do feel like we are no longer second class and we have made something of ourselves, we have gotten our money and we have acquired whatever it is that we have acquired, when we go into stores, there are certain things we don’t want to happen. You don’t want to go into a store and ask for something and they bring you something less expensive. You don’t ever want them to act like you cant afford it… and because, as black people we feel so under privileged our whole lives, the fact that we are in a situation of more privilege, we tend to take more of an advantage of it, to prove to whoever the authority is, that we can do it to. It’s really stupid, but the pride and the underprivilege leads you to it.

 

FAULT: Very loosely leading on from that, Skepta recently in an interview that the term ‘white bitch’ is racist and should not be used. Some people agreed, some disagreed. I just wanted to know your thoughts on that, as you use the term on the album. 

Tory Lanez : Is black bitch the same, or no?

FAULT: Well, Skepta argued that nobody would ever say ‘black bitch’, because there would be such uproar…

Tory Lanez : I’d say black bitch, or white bitch …and feel absolutely no way about it, what do you mean? When I say ‘black bitch’ I don’t mean, black bitch. I am not calling a woman a bitch. I’m not saying, ‘Yo, you black bitch’. When I am with women, or when I am with girls, they will say, ‘I’m with my bitches’… A bitch is a female dog. My friend is my dog. If I say, ‘this is my dog’ I mean this is my dog, he’s my friend, he’s my companion. If I say, ‘I’m with my bitches’, they are my dogs too, just the female type. It doesn’t matter if they are white or black. What people should really be mad at, is the fact that I’m saying bitches. If you are mad at me calling you a bitch, then be mad at me calling you a bitch, but don’t say white bitch is more racist than black bitch, or that I would never say black bitch so why is it ok to say white bitch. If you are going to have a problem with that, just have a problem with the word bitch, don’t have a problem with the colour. If a girl is a whore and she is white, she is a white whore. If a girl is black and she’s a whore, she’s a black whore. I hate for it to sound so blatant and so rude, but you have to get mad at the word, not the colour it’s associated with. You cant get mad at someone calling you a black bitch, be mad at the word bitch… you’re black, that can’t change, be mad at the word that is derogatory.

 

FAULT: Finally, what is your FAULT?

Tory Lanez : My only FAULT is that I was cursed with like these devilish, devilish good looks. It is not the worse curse to have, but that’s my fault, Sorry. Sorry to all those I may have offended with them [laughs].

 

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Vance Joy for FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Vance Joy x FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Vance Joy FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Words and Photography: Miles Holder
Fashion: Rachel Gold

Vance Joy first caught our eye back in 2013 with the release of his debut album EP God Loves You When You’re Dancing which featured his runaway hit ‘Riptide’. In February 2018 Vance Joy returned with his second album record Nation of Two which featured hits ‘Saturday Sun’ and ‘I’m With You’. About to embark on his worldwide tour, we caught up with Vance to find out more!

FAULT: You’re about to embark on your Nation Of Two world tour, excited?

Vance Joy: We did a short European tour last month, and it was so much fun to see the fans and reconnect with them in person. It’d been three and a half years since we’d last played in Europe, so it’ll be great to relaunch with the big shows and play some new material. IT should be a lot of fun, and everyone is really excited.

Do you find that your songs suddenly take on new meaning when you get to play them live to your fans?

Vance Joy: I’m always surprised to find that so many people know the lyrics to a bunch of songs and it’s such a warm and enthusiastic vibe when I’m playing, and it’s super encouraging. You don’t know what songs people will know and recently on tour we played some of the deep album tracks, and it was great to see people enjoying them. As we tour, I’m getting more comfortable with the songs and finding new ways to sing them and wear them in a bit. ‘We’re Going Home’, and ‘Saturday Sun’ are tracks in particular which are starting to feel good to perform on stage.

Vance Joy FAULT Magazine Issue 28

 

Is there a date in particular or festival in particular that you’re especially excited for?

Vance Joy: I’m looking forward to going to LA for a rehearsal for a few days, so I’m looking forward to the band and me having a relaxing time out there. We’ll do a couple of shows and then head to Coachella which is a big one that everyone will know. There are also dates in huge venues which will also be a new challenge and experience for us, but it’s exciting to play to bigger rooms and larger audiences. I’m looking forward to seeing how it all goes!

Nation Of Two released a couple of months ago now; do you ever find yourself wanting to make changes or fixes to it or do you feel like the project was exactly what it needed to be at the time and it should remain that way?

Vance Joy: I’m quite relaxed when it comes to that stuff; I think you need a deadline and know when to say goodbye. I feel like when you have a song that you feel strongly about but there’s pushback, and people say, “I don’t think you quite nailed it on this song”, then I listen. I listen to all of those perspectives and then eventually you’ve got to release it and say “that’s it”. I sometimes think instead of looking too closely and getting too stuck on the minutia you can get distracted. Certainly, after two months you might hear it on the radio and say “oh, I’m seeing it differently now” but I think you can get distracted and go off course with perfection and I don’t think there’s such a thing.

Vance Joy FAULT Magazine Issue 28

What is your favourite tour story?

Vance Joy: I was fortunate and got to play the AFL Grand Final, and I was playing with another band called Living Head, and the main headliner was Sting. After we played, we were chilling out in the green room, and I felt someone hug me from behind, and I turned around, and it was Sting! It was surreal, I just shook his hand and said: “lovely to meet you!”

What is your writing discipline, do you sit down at a writing station and try to get through it or do you just let them come to you naturally?

Vance Joy: I think there’s a bit of both and always a push and pull. If you haven’t written a song in a while, you can get frustrated. Sometimes you just have to pick up your guitar, and a song comes, and other days it feels like you’re trying to force it out. I think ultimately the excellent stuff songs happen mysteriously and catch you off guard. Some days you can write and take the chance that magic will happen again but sometimes you have to approach it with a bit more discipline. The best stuff happens when you’re not trying to force it too much.

What is your FAULT?

Vance Joy: I can be impatient, and when I’m in a bad mood, the atmosphere can be quiet and cold. I might not say anything, but people can tell! I’m learning to try and remove myself at times when I’m annoyed (or hungry) but it doesn’t happen too often, but I’m trying to notice when it does.

Vance Joy FAULT Magazine Issue 28

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 28 – THE STRUCTURAL ISSUE –  IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

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Until The Ribbon Breaks: Exclusive shoot for FAULT Issue 28

Photography ALIX SPENCE

Styling BRITTON LITOW

Grooming ALEX FRENCH

Photo Assistant ASHTON RAE

Fashion Assistant LEONARD MURRY

 

Words: Kee Chang

Hailing from Wales and now residing in Los Angeles, Until the Ribbon Breaks is childhood friends Pete Lawrie-Winfield and Elliot Wall. Straight out of a golden era when the mixtape reigned supreme, the duo’s style embraces a love of old school hip-hop, pop and electronic beats, all cleverly interwoven to create lush soundscapes, accompanied by introspective songwriting, that defy easy categorization. It’s been three years since the tastemakers’ critically acclaimed debut LP, A Lesson Unlearnt, hit the airwaves. With their self-titled sophomore album, Until the Ribbon Breaks takes their inimitable audio-visuals into realms previously unexplored, including sobriety, which Winfield found halfway through the recording of their latest effort. FAULT sat down with the frontman for a very revealing conversation.

As a concept, Until the Ribbon Breaks is genius: alluding to the literal ribbons of VHS and cassette tapes that break with too much love and play. So that you could, as you say, “lodge a pencil into the reel hole and wind the ribbon back,” takes on new meaning upon hearing about your recent journey towards sobriety. When did you decide you would need to go public with this very personal detail?

It was never a conscious decision. For me, and perhaps unfortunately, there is no separation between myself and the work. Now thankfully on the other side of an incredibly tumultuous time, I am surprised, excited, and grateful that there is even a record to speak of. Much like our first album, I had no idea what the songs were about until the whole thing was finished. I don’t write and write and cherry-pick the best. I wish I could. Instead, I have to wait for the songs to come, all in direct reference to something that has happened or is happening in my life. It really is music as therapy. I’m a British man so this is the only way I know how to talk about my feelings!

Was there any significance to self-titling the new album, maybe as a renewal for the music?

Great question. As you said at the beginning, our name originally alluded to the idea of the cassette and VHS tapes of our youth and how we would wear it out, listening and watching over and over again the magic we had discovered. This new record was born out of huge highs and lows, and huge personal shifts. Suddenly, it felt like the name meant something new. It’s about courage and strength—humanity. We keep going, keep trying, until the ribbon breaks, until we have no more left to give.

You recently gave your first live performance sober as a recovering alcoholic of fifteen years. Heading into that show you said, “You start being honest, you get honesty back.” Just how different was that experience?

If there is a therapy to relieve anxiety and its resulting depression, I have tried it, from more traditional Western forms like CBT (cognitive-behavioural therapy) and counseling to more holistic and spiritual Eastern practises such as meditation and even Ayahuasca. As better as things have become, one thing I have never learnt is that the idea of something, the build up and the anticipation, is what creates the fear. It is just your imagination running free and unfortunately choosing the worst, rather than the best case scenarios. That is an incredibly long way of saying that the show was an amazing, beautiful experience. I was terrified, but crucially, so what? I was at least present and experiencing all of the feelings that come with standing in front of a room full of people and telling them things you wouldn’t tell your mother or therapist. For the first time, I felt truly connected to the music in the moment.

You got sober halfway through the recording of this new album. Did that change the songwriting?

Drastically! It is unintentionally a record of two halves. I suppose “One Match” and “Use Me Up” are the most indicative of a dark time and written in the centre of the storm, whereas songs such as “Meru” and “Petrichor” were written during the pink cloud, the eventual and very real relief of early recovery. Sonically and lyrically, there was a hopeful uplift and an audible shift in mood.

Could you use the track “One Match” to give us more insight into how all of the ingredients came together? You sing, “Just one match to burn it all down.” It’s powerful. What does that mean to you?

There is a lyric in the verse: “A sugar cube in water, your life in your fingertips, is that all you think this is?” It was a song written when I really knew that something had to change, but I just didn’t know how. It’s a cry for help to myself, I realise that now. That verse lyric and the chorus lyric you mention allude to the idea that, in addiction, you are quite simply self-harming. And to what end? Lives can be and are ruined by the disease of addiction and it is easier than you would think to tear your entire life down.

When you’re in the process of writing and recording, how much of that is about reflecting on what you’re going through and how much of it is your way of maybe trying to dig yourself out of them?

Another great question. I have never even considered that. I think I have always been a bit of a contradiction in terms of privacy and sharing. In my private life, I keep myself to myself and reticent to talk about personal matters with friends and family. The contradiction being that, in writing and in songs and even in things such as this, I seem to be able to be unfiltered and honest, even to a fault. This interview is like some kind of strange therapy, so thank you, I think. Usually, I’m not aware that I’m writing a lyric until it’s done. They are very stream of consciousness. I often wonder where a line comes from, where it starts. The music is work. We work to mould and shape it, change it, and question it. The words flow more. It almost feels as if I just get out of their way.

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 28 – THE STRUCTURAL ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

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Janelle Monae Covers FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Janelle Monae X FAULT Magazine

janelle Monae FAULT Magazine dirty computer

Fashion Editor: Rachel Holland | Photographer: David Yeo | Make Up Artist: Jessica Smalls | Hair Stylist: Nikki Elms | Nail Artist: Diana Drummond | Photographer’s Assistant: Anna Forbes | Stylist’s Assistant: Anna Cirnu | Photographed at Handel & Hendrix in London handelhendrix.org

 

Words: Miles Holder

Special Thanks: Handel & Hendrix

In 2007, Janelle Monae released her EP entitled ‘Metropolis: Suite I (The Chase), the first in a seven-part conceptual series set in the year 2719’s civilisation of Metropolis and told through the eyes of a sentient android, Cindi Mayweather.

The story continued through her 2010 album ‘The ArchAndroid’ and 2013’s ‘The Electric Lady’ and fans followed Cindi Mayweather as she fell in love with a human and travelled back in time to warn of the imminent threat posed by the secret organisation, ‘The Great Divide’.

For her 2018 Album entitled ‘Dirty Computer’, Janelle will be leaving Cindi behind and telling a new story, the story of Janelle Monae. The first two releases from the record ‘Django Jane’ and ‘Make Me Feel’ are still filled with Janelle’s signature style, Afrofuturism and punk soul swag. While a departure from the narrative fans are accustomed, it nevertheless provides what so many have a craved – a glimpse into Janelle’s personal life.

Could it be that as our reality begins to mimic that of the fictitious dystopian future of Metropolis, as too has Janelle been forced to follow in the footsteps of Cindi Mayweather and save the present day from its own “great divide”? Only time will tell. For Janelle at least, it’s all about being present, and at long last, finding the confidence to tell her own story.

 

janelle Monae FAULT Magazine dirty computer

 

FAULT Magazine: You’ve always included social commentary within your music but it was vailed within the narrative of Metropolis. On Dirty Computer, the message is a lot more in your face – why?

Janelle Monae: I knew I was supposed to make Dirty Computer before my first album came out and I always wanted to speak out, but I put it off because I needed to understand where my anger was coming from and how best to channel it.

I am such an honest person and speak very candidly when I’m with friends and family, and that’s what you’ll hear on this album. I sing about politics, race, sexuality, gender on the record but to release the album, I needed to make sure I had the confidence to not self-edit. I needed to be vulnerable, honest and open.

This project is about my freedom and challenging myself to live in the present and not in 2719 through Cindi. I feel like I can contribute to the present day and that I should contribute. I’m choosing to live in the now and to celebrate the people that are not celebrated in the present day. I want to honour those living on the outskirts of society due to their sexuality or gender identity. These are people who I love, and that love me but waking up as an American who cares deeply about the American dream and the rights of all people to it, I feel there is too much at stake to be quiet and to mince my words on specific issues.

 

Despite the social commentary, it doesn’t feel like a sad or hope lost album. There are many songs about self-love and sexual discovery that it ends up as quite an empowering record, was this the intention?

I’m happy you said that because it’s not meant as a sad album, it’s intended as a celebration for the “dirty computers” of the world who get told that they’re dirty and that they have viruses making them different which they need to have taken away. Dirty Computers should see their uniqueness and their so-called viruses as positive attributes which make them valuable to society.

 

What’s given you the confidence to say “Right, it’s time to tell the world who Janelle is and tell my story”?

Janelle Monae: There is power in vulnerability, and I think that it needed to start with me. I was inspired by many movies, some of which I’ve been a part of and the stories I read and people I’ve met; when people shared their stories with me so honestly, it resonated.

I’ve been talking about it, but I feel I wasn’t entirely embracing the things that made me unique. I was telling others to as part of my music, but I wasn’t living it, and I think that I was afraid I would lose supporters for doing so.

I had a lot of conversation with myself about who was going to be the subject of the album myself or Cindi, but I’m here now, and I think it’s right that I stay in the present and share my story and walk in my truth as fearlessly as possible.

janelle Monae FAULT Magazine dirty computer
And how does one live fearlessly?

Janelle Monae: It’s not that I don’t experience fear, but in those moments, I choose freedom and freedom is not free. Freedom always comes with great sacrifice, and there will be people who say hurtful things and not support me because I’m living my truth.

 

Does it scare you to put yourself out there for scrutiny when people won’t just discuss your music, they’ll twist your music and message and start discussions on you as a person and your personal life?

Janelle Monae: No, I have soul searched, and this time around, I think being honest is most important. It’s about being able to say “hey I’m ok if people don’t like that I’m embracing this side of me”, it’s the side that my friends and family get to see and they still love me the same. I think that my evolution is more important than pleasing people and I may not say it right, I might get some things wrong, and I may stumble along the way but was I honest, was I sincere, was my heart in the right place? Yes, yes and yes.

What scares Janelle Monae?

Janelle Monae: That I won’t have a family within the time frame that I want to have a family. I want to have children, but I don’t want to miss that time because I was so focused on my career and because I didn’t plan accordingly. That scares me most now more than anything. I do want to usher in a new generation of babies that will be better than me and able to dream bigger than me and go out into this world and turn it upside down in a very positive way.

janelle Monae FAULT Magazine dirty computer (1 of 1)
What is your FAULT?

Janelle Monae: One of my FAULTs is that I’m a self-editor and perfectionist and I don’t enjoy my experiences when I’m so focused on being consistently perfect in every situation. It’s something that I’ve had to work on my entire life actively. It used to consume my experience, and I couldn’t enjoy things because I was so focused on how they were going to be presented. I was so concerned with what people thought, but now I’m just at this point in my life where I’m finding strength in my imperfections, and I realise that I connect more with myself and with other people when my FAULTs are being shared for all to see.

 

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 28 – THE STRUCTURAL ISSUE –  IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

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Daphne Guinness Launches Second Album at London’s BFI IMAX

Album cover on BFI IMAX screen

Last night saw the launch of British fashion muse and musician Daphne Guinness ’ second album as Daphne and The Golden Chords, It’s a Riotat the BFI IMAX. As what can only be described as an extravagant homage, the heiress to Guinness – yes, the Irish stout – was the main focus of the night from the start to finish, complete with glass sculptures of the singer at the entrance and projections of her mirage covering the walls as drinks were served. As an air of nepotism swept the room, the event was bustling with friends and confidants of Daphne. From old rockers in leather jackets to big names in the fashion industry, the crowd was an eclectic mix of all ages, some of which wouldn’t have looked out of place 50 years ago.

Once ushered into the cinema for the screening with bags of popcorn, glasses of prosecco and merchandise, FAULT was treated to a sensory eye bath. With the help of Tony Visconti, the American record producer who helped the likes of Bowie and T. Rex, Daphne’s music – set to visuals created by artist Nick Knight – made an instant impact, leaving the audience mesmerised.

Over a collection of arty clips and kaleidoscopic visuals of the singer herself, the music poured out poppy, Lauper-esque hooks with ethereal lyrics taking influence from Marc Bolan and Bowie – Visconti definitely left his mark on the album. The self-proclaimed autobiographical record visits her recent near-death experience and her life as it has progressed in last few years. Using her classical training, penchant for poetry and love of Wagner (thanks to hours chatting with Bowie in the studio), Daphne has created her own unique style of glam rock – think a lot of spoken word and catchy repetition.

The unashamedly self-assured Daphne was soon interviewed on stage by music journalist Will Hodgkinson, who’s written for the likes of The Guardian and Vogue. However, as the Q&A progressed, her coquettish facade transformed into a timid, more vulnerable persona, speaking about her fears and anxieties both in her personal life and musical career, before mentioning her new relationship with her bandmates who are, of course, also big names in the music industry, including keyboard player Terry Miles.

The singer’s 80s-inspired sound and alias is a perfect partnership and, in Daphne’s own words, completes her world. Tour? She doesn’t know. But, if she does, make sure you bring your glitter platforms and leave the Guinness Toucan Tees at home.

Words: Flora Neighbour

Flora Neighbour with Daphne Guinness

Flora Neighbour with Daphne Guinness

 

Flora Neighbour with KC and Jordon Wi-Fi from Last Night in Paris

Flora Neighbour with KC and Jordon Wi-Fi from Last Night in Paris

 

Flora Neighbour with Daphne and The Golden Chord keyboard player Terry Miles

Flora Neighbour with Daphne and The Golden Chord keyboard player Terry Miles

 

Flora Neighbour with music journalist Will Hodgkinson

Flora Neighbour with music journalist Will Hodgkinson

FAULT Magazine OTW Photoshoot and Interview with Dan Crossley

Dan Crossley X FAULT Magazine

Words & Photography: Miles Holder

Grooming: Shamirah Sairally

Despite his young age, Dan Crossley ripples within the music industry have turned to waves thanks to the release of his debut EP in 2017 and singles ‘Feel’ and ‘Nothing But Love’. Latest single ‘Talk’ caught our attention so we sat down for an interview and photoshoot with the young star on his way to stardom.

 

How would you describe your sounds to people who haven’t heard your music before?

My sound has been influenced by a number of past and present artists. I’m currently on a soulful future pop kinda vibe but we’re throwing a range of different elements in there from an urban perspective. Did I just make up a new genre? Haha.

Biggest musical inspiration?

As a songwriter, Amy Winehouse was a huge inspiration to me growing up but I could never settle on just one person. There are so many great writers and artists that I aspire to.

How easy is it for you to write openly about your life experiences – some people find it hard but for others, it can be quite therapeutic?

Writing my own material has always come naturally for me. When I was younger this was the only way I could let my thoughts and emotions out. Whatever I was going through at that particular time in my life would always come out of me through music. I struggle to sing and relate to other peoples songs unless I can feel they are written from a genuine place and feeling.

What’s a song that always makes you cry?

‘Breath Me’ – Sia – Such a powerful song.

When should we expect to hear your next release?

We haven’t set a really firm date yet. This EP is really important to me so I’m not rushing the process. The way things are shaping up I’d expect the first single to be released in the summer. I can’t wait to share it with everyone.

What are your plans for the rest of 2018?

I want to be doing A LOT of live stuff once the EP drops. Whenever I’m not in the studio I’m rehearsing and working on ideas for my live show. I really can’t wait to connect with as many people as possible and give them some epic music to relate to.

What is your FAULT?

Regretful unnecessary hangovers. Haha. No, I would say I’m impatient. I want to do it all now and have to remind myself to slow down and relax from time to time.