Talking to Jamie Lawson about life on the road with Ed Sheeran

 

With an incomparable support slot on Ed Sheeran’s current 46-date tour, Jamie Lawson is conquering arenas around the country with emotional new single ‘Fall into Me’. We sat down with Jamie for an interview before he hit the stage.

 

FAULT: You’re in the middle of a tour with Ed Sheeran, how’s it going?

JL: Yeah, at St James’ Park tonight – it’s crazy.

 

Did you ever think you’d be playing at such large stadiums?

JL: Not really no, it was never on my bucket list really. We’ve got Hampton Park, St. James’ Park and Wembley next week. Then the Principality Stadium the week after.

 

You’ve played Manchester and Glasgow already, how were they?

JL: Yeah they went well, crazy. Everything’s been great; was nice to play in Ireland but it’s great to be back in the UK which meant I got to go home for a few days which has been great. 

 

Give us an insight into a tour day with Ed, what happens?

JL: There’s a lot of sitting around waiting for things to happen. I’ll take you through the day; we have a soundcheck on the first day of the run so we leave for the venue at around 11am, and go straight to the catering and have some food, because the food is amazing. Then we go and soundcheck, we run through all the songs and today we tried out a new song which is cool. Now we’ve got a few hours to kill before we go on. We’re on about half 6, before Anne-Marie. We’ll stick around and have some food and watch Anne-Marie and then watch Ed. Then we’ll try and get out before everyone else leaves because it’s just mayhem when 50,000 people all try to leave the stadium at the same time.

 

Do you get to sit down all 3 of you, to chat about how the show was?

JL: Yeah kind of, we do. I made a huge faux pas in Glasgow by mentioning London in the night so that was amazing, I don’t know how I did it; I’d already mentioned Glasgow about 50 times and then for some reason London came out. We talked about that and they were both incredibly shocked by [laughs]. But yeah we have drinks and all the crews get together and have a chat about how life is on this sort of thing.

 

On social media you’ve posted that you’ve been working on writing new songs, can you tell us more?

JL: Yeah I have, yeah. So the last few days we’ve been in Glasgow and been in a house where we set up in the living room. We’ve been rehearsing new songs and kind of recording them in a very basic manner, just to demo them and see what they sound like. One of those songs we’re sound-checking today with, it’s really nice to hear how it sounds in a big, big venue to see if the sound works in that sort of environment. Some of the songs don’t but this one did. That’s what we’re doing really, trying to use the down time the best we can. It will be more likely that I write a few more songs in August to October and then record in November and December time, with hopefully a new record out by next April, something like that. Fingers crossed that I write the right songs, thats always important. [Laughs]

 

You released your latest album last year on Ed’s label, how has the reception been?

JL: Pretty well in terms of people liking it, it’s definitely my best record to date. I know Ed liked it a lot so I think it was pretty good. Saw that since the tour started it’s gone back into the iTunes chart which is nice and so has the ‘Jamie Lawson’ record. That’s pretty cool. We’re reaching new people everyday because of the arena.

 

Has your new single ‘Fall Into Me’ been received well on tour being on the setlist every night?

JL: Yeah it has, it’s the one we open with actually. It does the job to make sure people get up and get ready to start clapping along and that they’re in for a night to remember, you know. It’s the song that kicks the whole evening off so it needs to be a big song to do that and it seems to do the job well.

 

How do you prepare to go on stage?

JL: It feels very different to one of my own shows. Even though we only play for half an hour I need to get ready a lot earlier so I actually start 2 hours before; singing and warming up in the dressing room and getting into the mindset of what I’m going to do. You kind of have to build yourself up to such a level where you’re at the end of your show already before you even start. So it’s really weird and it wipes you out even though it’s only a short time. I don’t know how Ed does it to be honest, he plays for an hour and a half, so he must be absolutely exhausted.

 

Going back to your roots, is there a dream venue you’d like to play?

JL: Well I originally did Shepherds Bush Empire in London and that was definitely one of my dreams coming through. That was one of the venues I always wanted to play so that was great fun, I loved it. It was a great tour in March, really enjoyable. We played a few lovely venues in here and in Europe as well. But now that I’ve done that, I’ve got my eyes set on the Royal Albert Hall next. I don’t know if I’ll ever get to that level but that would be cool, in such an iconic place, you know? If we ever get there that would be a dream come true.

 

Any fears on going out to a crowd of over 40,000 people?

JL: No, not bothered about that really; it’s surprisingly easy. [laughs] It probably shouldn’t be but it really is. It’s more about loving it rather than knowing it, it really is about the enjoyment of it and feeling very at home on the stage. It’s always been that way for me for whatever size that stage has been, I’ve always felt comfortable. I don’t know if thats a rare thing or not but if you know the book by Tracey Thorn, ‘Naked at the Albert Hall’; talking about how frightening it is but it’s always been the opposite for me. I’ve always found it very easy.

 

What is your FAULT?

JL: Probably a thousand, I wouldn’t know when to stop counting. The biggest thing in my career that has set me back is what they would call ‘networking’. Speaking to other people and meeting the right people, that sort of stuff. I’ve never been any good at that so I don’t know if that’s a fault. Talking about yourself positively all the time is a little arrogant but some people are very good at it, but I never have been. The album was out in Ireland 5 years previously before Ed put it out. But I never met the right people and I guess you just wait until someone good comes along and for me it happened to be the biggest pop star on the planet, so that was lucky. [Laughs]

 

 

You can catch Jamie Lawson and his band as the tour rumbles onto Cardiff’s Principality Stadium on the 21st June for 4 nights before heading to Amsterdam Arena on the 28th June for 2 final nights. New single ‘Fall into Me’, taken from his latest album Happy Accidents (Gingerbread Man Records / Atlantic Records UK) is out soon.

Interview by: Stuart Williams

FAULT in conversation with Warpaint’s Theresa ‘TT’ Wayman

Words: Jennifer Parkes

 

Have you heard of TT? The moniker may not be too familiar right now, but you’re almost certain to know of Theresa Wayman, founding member of iconic indie rock band Warpaint, and otherwise known as TT.

 

While the group’s psychedelic dream pop has enticed and entranced fans for the past 14 years, last month saw Wayman release her own offering, LoveLaws, under her two-lettered alter-ego. But this is no band break-up – Warpaint shows no signs of slowing down, with several tour dates in the diary for 2018. FAULT caught up with Wayman in between shows to talk more about her debut solo offering, the challenges facing women in the music industry, and dream festival line-ups…

 

So, you’ve just released a solo album, which is pretty exciting! What made you decide to do that alongside Warpaint?

I just needed to be expressing more than I can do in Warpaint; it’s been 14 years being in a collaborative process, and I wanted to experience being on my own and having more control.

 

Did you approach this album differently at all to how you approach creating an album as a band? What were the challenges in that?

I didn’t have to do it in any specific timeframe, so I was able to indulge myself and question things more. It was scary to do that at times, and I worried I would never make it to the end – sometimes it seemed like I could keep questioning forever, but I figured it out!

 

You examine love and relationships in a number of ways across different tracks, but I’m also intrigued by the album’s title ‘LoveLaws’ – how did that come to be?

I thought of that title as a good concept to build an album from. I was feeling ruled by love and romance, and also seeing love as being a fundamental of life in so many ways. It seemed important to write about it.

 

Who would you say your influences have been, both in your own music and as a band? 

First and foremost, my music is always influenced by my emotions and mood. I tend to go into starting a song feeling blind, like I have no idea what will come out of me until I see it on the page. But then I start to hone it and let influences in, like Al Green, Sade or Trip Hop like Portishead and Massive Attack. Also current artists like King Krule, Rihanna and Adele, and that song ‘Get Free’ by Major Lazer.

 

How do you feel Warpaint’s sound has developed over the last 14 years?

I think Warpaint has gone in many directions over the years; we’re becoming more concise with our arrangements and clearer in what we’re saying. We used to jam a lot and write together in a room, but we did less of that on this last album – I think we’re into the idea of going back to that again, just because that old way now seems like something new and different.

 

 

It’s impressive that, as an all-female four-piece, Warpaint has stood the test of time in a notoriously misogynistic industry – how have you dealt with challenges that you’ve faced over the years in this respect? 

I think there’s more freedom in the indie-rock world for a girl band to exist, and not feel as much pressure and expectation to be something appealing to men. I think that’s a lot more common in the pop world.

 

I’ve generally felt very welcomed by our male peers, although there are times I’ve felt excluded from “the boys club”, like I can’t be a part of some technical conversation or ask questions. But I think the guys that act like that are the most insecure, and ultimately want to exclude women just because they just don’t know how to talk to them or don’t feel attractive to them.

 

Are there any new artists that you’re into at the moment you think we should keep an ear out for?

Kali Uchis, who I’m sure you’ve already heard of! And Dick Stusso – he’s from Oakland, he’s a really great singer/guitar player/overall musician, and he’s self-produced.

 

You guys have a few tour dates  over summer, including playing at All Points East Festival – are there any bands you happened to catch while you were there, or at other festivals?

Yes! War On Drugs at All Points East, and I saw Bjork and Fever Ray at Primavera – they were absolutely incredible!

 

If you were to host a festival, anywhere in time and space, what would your dream location and line-up be? 

Probably on the beach somewhere in the Caribbean. It would be Bjork from the Homogenic tour, so that she’s playing songs from debut and post too, with Portishead, Nirvana, Al Green, Kendrick Lamar, Fever Ray, Tina Turner, Aretha Franklin, Nina Simone, and Bob Dylan playing all my favourite songs from over the years (I would get to choose)… the list could really go on and on!

 

Lastly, something we ask all of our guests, what is your FAULT?

I can be really stubborn and not let things go, and I always need to be right. I’m working on it!

 

LoveLaws is available to buy now – visit ttlovelaws.com for more info.

 

First Aid Kit talk Ruins, burnout & brave new beginnings for FAULT Online cover

FAULT Magazine X First Aid Kit

Photographer: David Yeo, Fashion Editor: Rachel Holland

 

FAULT: Stay Gold came out in 2014. What were you doing for the four years until Ruins?

Johanna (First Aid Kit): We toured Stay Gold intensely for about a year and a half following it’s release. After that we felt quite burnt out and exhausted. We could’ve kept touring forever. However, since we’d toured pretty much non-stop since we were teenagers we felt like we needed a little break. We needed time to figure out our lives, beyond First Aid Kit. We lived in separate countries. I stayed in Stockholm while Klara moved to Manchester for two years. It was necessary to get a break from not just the band and the music, but from each other. It was pretty difficult but we feel like we learnt so much about ourselves and about life during this time period. We built serious relationships, bought our own apartments. Klara started taking acting classes. I got a driver’s license. We needed to catch up on some grown up things we’d been missing out on.

 

When did you start work on Ruins?

Johanna (First Aid Kit): When we took our break we told ourselves we didn’t need to work on new material straight away, we didn’t want to rush another record. We didn’t even have to listen to any music or go to any shows if we didn’t want to. However, pretty quickly after the touring ended we felt quite eager to perform and write again. Klara broke up with her boyfriend and had a little bit of a life crisis. This inspired the theme of the album and sort of got us started on it.

We went to Los Angeles for six weeks in April 2016. We rented a house in Echo Park and went on road trips across California. We hung out with other musician friends and gathered inspiration. That’s when we finished writing most of the tracks that ended up on Ruins.

 

 

How does it differ to your previous records?

Johanna (First Aid Kit): We wanted to try new things on Ruins. Because it’s dealing with a relationship ending, the lyrics are both more personal and more universal than on our previous records. Before our lyrics were a lot more fictional and had more story telling elements. This time the songs are more direct. I think it stems from us being older, more experienced and more in touch with our own emotions. We’re also braver in a sense, it takes a lot of courage to write so openly about your inner feelings.

We decided to work with a new producer in a new city, so we reached out to a long-time favorite producer of ours, Tucker Martine. We told him we wanted to make an album that was less polished, had more of a live feel and a little more edge. Previously, we’d been pretty strict about the sounds we allowed on our records. It had to be very folky, pretty and acoustic. This time we sort of through all those ideas away, and we’re very open to new things. Whatever fit the song, we went for. It was super refreshing.

 

First Aid Kit - FAULT Magazine

Johanna Wears: Red Silk Slip Dress by Amanda Wakeley, Black Poloneck Top by Alice McCall, Red Boots by Zadig & Voltaire, Pearl Hooped Earrings by Dower & Hall

 

Obviously, this is your fourth album, has the process been different to your others? 

Klara (First Aid Kit): The songwriting process hasn’t changed that much since we started, but this time we wanted to make sure we really took the time we needed not to rush the record. All songs stem from a line, an idea, a lyric and then we work from there. Sometimes that takes less than five minutes, sometimes it takes years. In the end the most important thing for us is that we end up with songs that feel real and interesting. Something that makes us curious.

This time the recording process was different because we had a live session band that improvised a lot in the studio. It was so much fun! Getting to hear all these musicians that we’ve looked up to for so long play on our songs was a dream come true.

 

First Aid Kit - FAULT Magazine

Klara Wears: Black Blazer by Stine Goya, Red Tule Skirt by Amanda Wakeley, Black Top by Black Gold by Diesel, Red Loafers by Kim Kwang, Gold Curved Earrings by Dower & Hall, Silver Ring by Dower & Hall

 

How have you grown since your 2010 debut?

Johanna (First Aid Kit): When I watch old YouTube clips of us performing I feel like we’ve changed so much. We were just kids when we started out, although we felt like we were so much older back then. We were pretty insecure. We can hear in our old songs when we’re trying to imitate our idols and it’s kind of cute. It’s definitely not something we’re ashamed of.

We’ve always been good at what we do and had a strong core in our music, but we’ve just grown so much more confident with the years. Both in the studio and on the road, we trust our instincts much more and can relax. I don’t think we care so much about what people think anymore. We’ve always sort of been following our gut feeling, and it’s lead us this far…so we must be onto something, right?

 

Does this last album feel like the most “First Aid Kit” like album?

Johanna (First Aid Kit): I think all records are very ”First Aid Kit”-like in their own pretty ways. They’re just documents of who we were at that certain period of our lives. We think of them as time capsules. We don’t want to stick to a sound too much, we truly are open for experimenting. Who knows what the future will bring, getting too comfortable in a certain style is boring.

 

So talking about Ruins, can you tell me a bit about the lyrical inspirations behind it?

Klara (First Aid Kit): When we went to Los Angeles to write the record I had just gone through a breakup. The wound was quite open. I thought I was going down one road and then it all changed. The songs came through that and so of course, they all mirror that intense experience of this major loss. Visually, we see the record as a ruin of a relationship, walking around it, exploring it and trying to understand it. It felt like an important record to write as honestly and boldly as possible. That is how you get a real connection with people, which is always what we strive for.

 

And musically?

Klara (First Aid Kit): We always follow where we feel the songs want to go, arrangement wise. We usually have more a broad sense of what we want a record to be – this one we felt needed to be a little more raw with more of a live sound. Honestly, it’s all about the gut feeling. You go on in with ideas and expectations but in the end you go with what feels right and good.

We were listening to a lot of different music during the writing process, like Big Thief, Angel Olsen, Whitney and Mitski. We are always returning to our old favorites Townes Van Zandt, Joni Mitchell, Gram Parsons, Bob Dylan too. The list is endless. It’s hard to pinpoint where the inspiration comes from, it can be so random.

 

You’ve said that most of the record is about questioning yourself following the breakdown of a relationship. Can you tell me a bit about that?

Klara (First Aid Kit): It’s so easy to grow comfortable and be blinded by what you once thought was good. It’s hard to uproot yourself and leave it all behind. You feel so very lost. In the midst of all that it’s hard not to second guess yourself, looking for simple answers to things that will never really make sense. The record was written during a really vulnerable, exciting, scary time.

 

Do you find it cathartic to write about these kinds of subjects?

Klara (First Aid Kit): It is very cathartic. Writing is the way that we deal with whatever is hard in life, which is why our music is so sad, haha. Getting to share our deepest emotions with people, even though that can be scary, is so rewarding. The connection that we feel with people who love our songs is so special. Playing shows and singing the lyrics to another human being in the crowd, seeing their reaction and knowing the song means so much to them, there is nothing like it.

 

You’ve previously said that you wanted this album to be “more real”. Can you tell me about the ideas behind that? 

Klara (First Aid Kit): That wasn’t something that we planned to do but the songs ended up being more direct and open. Like we previously stated, we wanted to have more of a raw feel, of a live performance.

 

First Aid Kit - FAULT Magazine

Klara Wears: Tan Leather Jacket by Scotch & Soda, White Embroidered Shirt by MCQ by Alexander McQueen, Black Leather Skirt is Klara’s Own, Black & White Ankle Boots by Malone Souliers, Silver Ring by Dower & Hall

 

Is it difficult knowing that such personal songs will be listened to around the world?

Klara (First Aid Kit): All the songs and themes are very universal. We left out names or anything that felt too personal. The songs are still very emotional and of course that can be scary but it’s ultimately the most rewarding thing, when people react to something that came straight from the heart.

 

How has your relationship with each other changed during this album?

Johanna (First Aid Kit): I think our relationship is stronger now than ever. Touring together for so long has been hard. We’ve been put under a lot of pressure and pretty much been around each other 24/7. No wonder we some times argue and can’t get along.

For a while I think we were on totally different wavelengths. We wanted different things for the band but didn’t express it clearly enough. We’re much better at communicating now to make sure we’re on the same page. We also know when we need space from each other. We have so much more fun together now, too!

 

Now that it’s out, how has the reception been?

Johanna (First Aid Kit): Honestly, it’s been pretty darn amazing. Releasing Ruins was scary, especially after that four year break in-between albums. We didn’t know what kind of reaction to expect from either music critics or our fans. We didn’t know if anyone was still into our music. We never expect anyone to care or take our popularity for granted.

Also, when we’re making music we’re constantly torn between feeling like what we’re doing is the greatest thing ever and feeling like it’s a complete piece of shit. Sometimes when you’re in the studio singing a song you feel like it’s a masterpiece. Then when you get home and get some perspective on it, you listen to it and get doubts about it. That definitely happened with Ruins in a sense. However, it’s been amazing playing these sold-out tours full of crowds who know the new songs by heart. When we look at our listeners we can tell that the songs mean so much to them. It’s powerful.

 

First Aid Kit - FAULT Magazine

Johanna Wears: Pink Embroidered Suit by Alice Archer, Silver Silk Shirt by Bogdar, Silver Mules by Jones, Gold Earrings by Dower & Hall, Silver Rings by Dower & Hall, Bracelet by Dower & Hall

 

What do you want people to take away from your latest album? 

Johanna (First Aid Kit): We want people to feel comforted, to not feel alone in their feelings. We hope it’s a relatable album. Everyone goes through heartbreak in their lives, one way or another. It’s important to realize that it’s completely normal and that things are going to be OK. That’s the beauty of sad songs. They allow you to wallow in those sad feelings for a while and then hopefully gather the strength to move on.

What are you working on next?

Johanna (First Aid Kit): Though we just started touring Ruins, we’re already thinking about the next record and future tours. We can’t say much at this point. All we know is we think we’ve got a really exciting future ahead of us.

 

Interview by Ely Watson

To find out more and to purchase RUINS, visit here.

Photographer: David Yeo
Fashion Editor: Rachel Holland
Make-up artist: Jaimee Thomas at Untitled Artists
Hair Stylist: Jordan Leigh
Nail Artist: Diana Drummond
Stylist’s Assistant: Ana Carnu
Photographed at Yoyo Studios

MNEK roars back with exclusive FAULT Magazine Photoshoot and new video ft. Hailee Steinfeld

Words & Photography: Miles Holder

Styling: Edith Walker Millwood

Grooming:Bianca Simone Scott

Styling Assistants: Leslie & Felicia

 

MNEK returns today with a brand new track from his upcoming debut album! It’s hard to imagine, but despite years of releasing hits to the world, MNEK is still only 23 years old. New track entilted ‘Colour’ also features vocals from Hailee Steinfeld. We sat down with MNEK to talk all things music, his big battles and look to what will no doubt be, an even brighter future.

 

In other interviews, you’ve mentioned never having a figure like yourself in the industry, is it harder to pen an album when you don’t have a reference to learn from? 

I think when I say that, I mean that I don’t have an artist who is like me. Just as far as being out and being an openly gay musician and I drew influence from different areas of music that I love. I always grew up loving 90’s rob, prominent voices and dance music and so it was just an amalgamation of all those things but with my spin on it. Doing it without a point of reference makes it more fun too because there aren’t any rules that I have to follow.

Colour by MNEK & Hailee Steinfeld on VEVO.

 

Your early music and all-around demeanour at the start of your career was far more muted that it is today, did you ever feel like you were being pressured to tone it down back then?

 

I think I was figuring it out. I think sometimes we get so caught up in the evolution of artists being a sudden “now I’m the real me and doing when I want” but really evolution is about the changes that lead up to that point. I can say that getting to that point 18/17 when I was releasing records, that’s who I thought I was. There were some things that I was maybe surprising, but I guess that comes from the knowledge that I have now. Now, when I’m surpessing something, I know that I’m doing it, but more importantly, I remember when to stop. When I first started putting out records, I didn’t think I was gay. So all the rudimental records stuff, was me figuring things out while growing up and being on tour and getting into the Industry and it was a lot! Now thankfully I’ve established myself as a writer-producer which has given me the comfortability to be myself and find myself

 

 

What would you say is the goal of this record?

I have a bigger goal and more of a target and what more my career can do. I think when I was putting out music, these were all songs that I loved and I’d written, but now I come with the knowledge that if I’m putting myself out there, it has to help people or for me to be the template for young artists that I didn’t have.

 

And what is the overall goal of your career in music?

To be the template, I think the main thing for me is not to be the main one, while it’s great for me to be out here saying “I’m the only openly gay pop star” what my goal is, is for me not to be the last.

 

You’ve made a point about always being yourself, but that can be a detriment to your fanbase and people who don’t agree with your choices – why not stay silent?

 

Everything happens for a reason, and I have a unique career in the way that it’s not conventional for the person I am to be making music that I’m making. I think that everything I’ve done up to this point has happened for a reason and I’m at a point where I’m doing all that I could have dreamed of.

 

It’s a great album, I was expecting because of the messaging, for it to be a more melancholic album, but it’s really uplifting!

I sometimes think when it comes down to the gay narrative, it can come across as unrequited love and sadness or that being gay is a hard knock life when in fact, being gay is jokes and so much fun. I have great friends, incredible stories to tell both mine and others and I think there are ways of singing about our experiences and still having a good time. I have ballads on there which are sad, but it’s mixed with sass and my score sting.

 

You’ve written a lot for other artists, how different is your process when writing for yourself?

It’s both different and the same. When I’m writing for another artist, I’m tailoring it for them. I’ve got to talk to them, and I ask “what are you going through” but when it’s for me, it’s the same conversation, but I’m just having it with me. The way I see the world is different to how DUA will see the world or Zara or Beyonce so I can help paint the picture but it’s got to come for them.

Is it hard putting so much of yourself into your music

No, because I started in the industry when I 14, what was I going to write about at that age. So I grew up and went through things, and that inspires what I sing about now, and I don’t have a problem with it. What’s exciting about releasing this album, is it not belonging to me anymore and it will belong to the fans.

 

What’s your biggest fear?

Failure, but that comes in different forms. I haven’t learnt to drive a car, but I’ll be damned if I have to kill someone and to be in control of my transport.

 

What is your FAULT?

I’m incredibly self-conscious which is more from a vanity point of view, as a result of being a big kid and having the weight issue. I’m working at it, and we should all work on our mental health every day and making sure we are our best selves.

 

Macklemore covershoot and interview for FAULT Magazine 28

Macklemore X FAULT Magazine

Macklemore FAULT MAgazine Miles Holder.jpg

Photography: Miles Holder | Stylist: Rachel Gold | Groomer: Lauren Griffin using MAC Cosmetics | Photography Assistant: Chloe Ackers | Fashion Assistant: Alexx Dougherty | Grooming Assistant: Bethany London

 

Words: Miles Holder

Macklemore’s road to success hasn’t been a smooth one, despite the runaway success of 2012 album ‘The Heist’ with then collaborator Ryan Lewis – behind the scenes the pressure caused the artist to slip from his addiction recovery and withdraw within himself.

In 2017, Macklemore released album ‘Gemini’, his first solo album in twelve years and for many, the first time they’d seen him without his longtime companion Ryan by his side. With a brand new track ‘These Days’ currently sitting at number one in the UK charts and the announcement on daughter number two ringing in our ears, we sat down with Macklemore to learn more about his solo journey, fatherhood and the ever present elephant in the room, white privilege.

 

Around 2012 with the release Can’t Hold Us and Thrift Shop many journalists referred to you as “new kid on the block” and as a “runaway newcomer” despite you already having a decade of music releases under your belt. Did that label annoy you?

Macklemore: It didn’t annoy me, I think that in a lot of ways I was an underground rapper and then six months later I was this international Pop Star, so it was a very different role very quickly, so I understood why they said it. People don’t see the work that goes into this stuff. I think mainly with the internet and social media; kids get famous quickly now, and for a good bulk of my career the internet wasn’t a thing that was accessible to a lot of people as it is today. It happened extremely quickly when it did, but it was a good decade before that that I was honing my craft.

Macklemore FAULT MAgazine Miles Holder.jpg

You’ve been active in trying to explain your white privilege, even releasing a song of the same title onto your 2005 album ‘The Language of My World’. While commendable, why do you feel it’s essential for you to get the message across (possibly to the detriment of your fan base)?

Macklemore: To me, it’s the truth, and I want to acknowledge the systems in which we operate under in America. We are all under the system of white supremacy, and I do benefit from the colour of my skin in numerous ways, and that plays a factor in how I have an advantage regarding my art and concerning my career. To take from specific cultures and not acknowledge what’s going on is disingenuous. If I know the truth about it, it’s crucial for me to speak on the subject matter.

 

In that vein, why aren’t more artists doing it?

Macklemore: I think in a lot of ways some artists find it easier to stay quiet and think it’s easier for them not to say the wrong thing if they’re ignorant of the matter. There’s a lot of unpacking to do, and it’s not a subject where artists can say “oh I get it now” you’ve got to have conversations and do your research first. You’ve got to go back to the origin of America to see how this isn’t a philosophy or an ideology but that white supremacy has a history and has impacted the laws and systems in place today. For some, it’s easier just not to educate themselves.

Musicians and other media personalities often get called out for taking a political stance or are told to “shut up and dribble”, why is it essential for you as an artist to make your political opinion known?

Macklemore: I think that we as artists have platforms and we have the opportunity to engage with our fan base. I also don’t believe that it’s essential that all artists do that. Often people ask me “do you think that more people should be speaking up?” I feel that if you’re compelled to, and it comes from a real place, and it’s in your heart then that’s amazing. Music has always been a weapon of resistance for the people. There are songs that I wrote for Gemini which are much heavier but ended up not making the album because I didn’t feel like I was hitting it from the right angle. The songs weren’t saying what I wanted them to say and I don’t think that anybody should ever think that “ok now we have to have a political song to hit that quota”. These songs should always come organically should not feel contrived, or like you’re pandering. If it feels like I’m pandering, then I stay away.

 

What has been the hardest moment of your musical journey so far?

Macklemore: Adjusting to the fame in a condensed period and not staying sober has been the worst. There was a rapid transition and to have the world’s eye on me all at once with back- to-back number ones, and all the accolades that came with it – I didn’t know how to deal with it. I didn’t know how to adjust, so I escaped. I think a lot of that peak season when I was around a bunch of people, doing sold out Arenas across the world was me isolating and using drugs. I used drugs to cope it and to get out of my head. Dealing with the love, criticism and outside public perceptions is a balancing act. Over the years I figured out how to deal with it, and it’s by not giving a fuck. People always say, “I don’t care what people think of me” but we all care! We are all insecure, and it’s a human fault that ties us all together, but when you can acknowledge that, you can work consistently in a spiritual practice that lessens how much you care. When you realise who you sincerely are, and not through somebody else’s eyes but through your soul and your spirit, all of a sudden there’s inner peace. It takes work and maintenance, and if you’re paying attention to the media and you’re on social media all the time to look for validation, it’ll never come. There will always be somebody that’s disagreeing with what you’re saying; you have to be at peace with yourself.

Is it a lot of pressure to have a newborn child and suddenly having to leave to be on tour?

Macklemore: I don’t know if pressure is the right word, but it’s strange to spend eight days with my newborn and then to leave and go on tour. It’s tough to look at pictures, and O feel like I’m missing something, and in a way, I don’t even know my baby yet. I’ve been away from her more than I’ve been there and it’s hard, but FaceTime is a beautiful thing in the meantime. My baby wasn’t planned so we’re adjusting, and people have been doing this forever so I am looking forward to eventually slowing down and just honing in on family life and being a dad for a good while.

 

What is your FAULT?

Macklemore: Addiction. I think that’s the thing that always reminds me that I could lose all of this at any minute. If I stop prioritising the daily recovery program that I do to maintain sobriety – I will lose it all. It’s bigger than my career and more significant than record sales – it’s my family. It’s my happiness, my life. A lot people at the beginning of the recovery wish they were normal and asked, “why can’t I just drink and do recreational drugs like other people?” I don’t think like that anymore; I think my program has been a way for me to get closer to god and for me to figure out who I am. Recovery helped me discover my character defects and my shortcomings and how I can progress to become a better version of myself. It’s there to remind me that this life isn’t permanent and I can lose it if I don’t work to maintain that sobriety on a daily basis.

Lottie Moss Style section cover for FAULT Issue 28

Lottie Moss x FAULT Magazine

Lottie Moss FAULT Magazine Issue 28 Style cover

Photography Stephanie Yt
Fashion: Ozzy Shah @carol Hayes Management
Hair: Diego Miranda @bts Talent Using Oribe
Makeup: Emily Dhanjal @bts Talent Using Charlotte Tilbury
Nails: Naima Coleman Using Chanel Ballerina
Fashion Assistant: Keeley Dawson
Words: Adina Ilie
Special Thanks: W Hotel, London

In the era of the social media supermodel, Lottie Moss is carving her own niche. With the mammoth ‘MOSS’ legacy name behind her, Lottie appears utterly unfazed by the pressure that comes with it. Rather than picking up her older sister’s mantle by strutting the catwalks, Lottie revels in the freedom of being a campaign model. To have such a significant social media following at such a young age is nothing new. Indeed, given her background, it’s little wonder that other young and aspiring models see her as source of advice. By contrast, the sense of responsibility she clearly feels for curating her digital platform is refreshing for someone at her stage in life. In striving to speak out for the portrayal of healthy body image online and in the media, not to mention her unflinching honesty and directness in interviews, Lottie epitomises the new breed of young, socially conscious online influencers.

We spoke to Lottie after our Style section cover shoot at Soho’s W Hotel to discuss her plans for taking over the fashion world – one campaign at a time.

FAULT: You decided to pursue modeling in favour of going to university. What led you towards that decision when many of your peers went into a different direction?
Lottie Moss: I never felt like school was for me. Modeling also kind of landed in my lap a little bit, and I’m so happy it happened. It’s not something that happens to everyone, it’s a very rare thing ever. I’m lucky to have the opportunity.

What has been the biggest challenge that you’ve encountered after diving head first into a cut-throat industry?
Lottie Moss: It’s been hard with the media knowing what you do all the time.

Lottie Moss FAULT Magazine Issue 28 Style cover feature

 

What is the main thing that you choose to promote with the help of your platform?
Lottie Moss: I usually use my platform in a body-positive way. I post pictures where you can see lumps and bumps, just to show that nobody’s perfect and that it’s okay if there are parts of yourself that you don’t like. I strongly believe in body-confidence. I do it to show that you can do whatever you want – I’m a model and I’m not even remotely tall enough to be one. You can do whatever you want if you just try hard enough.

There are many young girls who look up to you at this point. How do you take that responsibility and react towards it?
Lottie Moss: I always try to post positive things and I’m very careful with what I post on my social channels, especially when I go on nights out. You have to remember that these girls are young and that they’re watching.

Lottie Moss FAULT Magazine Issue 28 Style cover feature

 

Have you ever tried to educate them in a certain direction?
Lottie Moss: Not intentionally, but I do try my best to give out advice when people ask. Girls always DM me and ask me how to become a model and I reply to them in that sense. I would love to get involved in something bigger though.

Do you have any insecurities from when you were young that you’d like to share with your fans for them to learn and grow from?
Lottie Moss: It has to be my height and weight. When you’re younger, you don’t really put on any weight when you eat, and then I obviously started to gain weight when I got older. Growing up with social media, I used to get quite sad over the girls I saw on Instagram. But I realized that I’m special in my own way and that’s what matters.

Many young models have gone through phases of body dysmorphia and anxiety caused by the industry’s unrealistic standards. Is this something that you’ve experienced at any point? And if so – how did you counteract it?
Lottie Moss: I haven’t actually experienced any anxiety as a model, as I’m usually portraying myself so I wouldn’t know what advice to give in that direction. Everyone gets stressed, but I’m lucky as I rarely do.

Lottie Moss FAULT Magazine Issue 28 Style cover feature

What individual aspects do you want to bring to your work to set yourself apart?
Lottie Moss: There are so many directions that I want to take. I’m currently working on my own label. It’s going to be amazing – very LA vibes.

You’re very good friends with a lot of models in the industry who come from a similar family background rooted in entertainment. Do you ever feel competitive against each other?
Lottie Moss: I’ve never felt like I’ve ever competed with anyone, but I’ve also never felt like I was a proper model. I’ve never done runway shows or anything like that. The girls who do catwalks probably do feel a little bit of competitiveness, but I’ve never had.

Do you think this is a good way to differentiate yourself as a model?
Lottie Moss: I feel like I’m more of an influencer rather than a model. And I try to be a good role model and stay relevant through the content that I create on my platform.

What’s your FAULT?
Lottie Moss: I have literally no self-control. And I’m really messy too, so untidy!

Lottie Moss FAULT Magazine Issue 28 Style cover feature

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 28 – THE STRUCTURAL ISSUE –  IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

 

Isaac Gracie for FAULT Issue 28

Isaac Gracie X FAULT Magazine

Isaac Gracie for FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Photography: Joseph Sinclair
Styling: Gary Salter
Grooming: Charlotte Kraftman
Words: Jack Lloyd

For Isaac Gracie, the last two years have been nothing more than a journey of self-discovery and introspection. It just so happens that along the way, Isaac has caught of the ears of millions of listeners and radio stations worldwide. After selling out many of the UK’s most prestigious venues, Isaac is about to embark on an even bigger journey after the release of his eponymous debut album on 13th April.

Whilst formulating a series of songs with poetic precision and articulated with such devastating beauty, Isaac has pieced together a record that he claims is a physical representation of a heavy and formative time in his life and as a result unveiled to the public the unravelling of a bold new voice.

We sit down with one of Britain’s most sought-after artists.

FAULT: First of all, how are you and how has your year been so far?

Isaac Gracie: It’s been good – I’ve been good. I just came back from Europe where I finished off the record which is coming out next month. It’s all kind of coming together nicely.

Talk to me about that moment you submitted your demo track ‘Last Words’ and how it got picked up by BBC. Where were you when it all started?

Isaac Gracie: I was on my summer holiday between first and second year of university and I was spending most of my time at home or working in a coffee shop. It was there that I started getting a strange amount of interest whilst I was washing dishes and cleaning tables. I was getting emails from record labels which I had never even thought about and all the while trying to fumble together a decent wage at a coffee shop, it was definitely surreal.

I was also in like a strange headspace then as well. It was summer and I was in the middle of university so I was in a lot of places at one time, so the music felt definitely like an abnormal thing to blow up.

Isaac Gracie for FAULT Magazine Issue 28 srcset=

Was music not a priority at that time?

Isaac Gracie: I was just getting on with making a little bit of money so I could have some spending cash at uni, focusing on studying as well and finding a place to live. I had all of these things going on that were completely not related to music – the music was just a personal hobby and a passion – I really had no intention beyond that. It was definitely part of my life – but large notions of success were completely out of the picture.

Is your family musical at all?

Isaac Gracie: No one played necessarily, it wasn’t a run in the family type thing. I was raised on music only in the way that my mum loved music. Bob Dylan was always number one with my mum and when I was growing up, my dad used to play The Bends in the car when we were driving. I can remember going along listening to The Bends when I was like four years old and really digging it.

Where did you record the album?

Isaac Gracie: It was recorded in a few places, we did a big bulk of it at RAK Studios and then we did some at Westpoint Studios in Shepereds Bush and Crouch End. It was recorded over a long period of time in a lot of different set ups so it really does represent the journey of that time. It isn’t just one singular block of experience or creativity but more of an evolution and a reflexion of the changes that happened over that period of time.

Do you find it easier to write a particular song more than others or did you ever struggle at all when writing the album?

Isaac Gracie: I struggle with it all the time. The nature of the songs is kind of like you’re wandering along a beach trying to find a treasure trove and you can walk for hours and not find anything. Obviously, sometimes things are buried closely to the surface and very easy to uncover and other times you really have to dig for them. That’s just kind of how I relate to it, there is no one way or one experience that I have in relation to songwriting.

Are there any songs on the album or on your previous EP’s that have really pushed you out of your comfort zone?

Isaac Gracie: My relationship to songwriting is pretty much on its own terms. I have a diverse and wide appreciation for music and by no means want to restrict myself but it’s purely for the time being based on the situation that I find myself in and in the songs that I still feel I have yet to write. I think right now it’s all based within that frame.

Isaac Gracie for FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Talk to me about being on tour. Do you have any highlights?

Isaac Gracie: I just love being on the road, it’s pretty awesome to turn up in a different city every day and have like a new crowd of generally speaking, really lovely interesting people there to hear you play your songs. I love the opportunity to travel and see new places but also just driving and looking out the window and being with other people.

It’s also in many respects a bit of a vacuum because you don’t necessarily feel responsible for anything other than the tour so you can kind of switch off a little bit.

What would be your dream if you weren’t a musician?

Isaac Gracie: I’d love to be in film. I’m fascinated by movies and how they’re acted, how they’re directed, how they’re written, everything about them. Obviously, right now music is without doubt the focus but If I get to a place where there was any relative level of comfort or sustainability, then anything in that world would be a dream.

Who would you most like to go and have a beer with?

Isaac Gracie: I saw Bon Iver the other day, I actually saw him twice in one week and he’s always been such a mastery of melody. Also, someone like Jonny Greenwood and be able to discuss the stuff that he’s doing at the moment with his film scores.

What’s 2018 looking like for you?

Isaac Gracie: Well I’m going on tour next month and touring the UK and Europe then I’ve got the album coming out next month as well, April 13th. Following that I’ll be playing festivals throughout the summer and then going on another tour in the winter. Being on the road and making the most of every opportunity to introduce my music to people and play to crowds who enjoy it. It’s a cool experience and the build-up to this record has been a long time coming so I just want to make the most of it when it comes out.

Isaac Gracie for FAULT Magazine Issue 28

The eponymous ‘Isaac Gracie’ album was released on the 13th April.

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 28 – THE STRUCTURAL ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

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Tory Lanez Menswear Cover for FAULT Magazine 28

Tory Lanez X FAULT Magazine

 

Photography: Miles Holder

Stylist: Rachel Gold

Grooming: Shamirah Sairally

 

Words: Trina John-Charles

We bundle out of the photo shoot and into a waiting car. Tory Lanez is clearly rattled by a previous incident and I believe everything he is threatening to do if the car doesn’t move promptly. Although quite intimidating when the switch has been flipped, he remains polite and quite chatty with me – revealing some amazing tidbits off mic, but sadly, we are not that type of publication. As we weave in and out of the busy central London traffic, Tory rolls the biggest blunt I have ever seen and our 20-minute conversation about the new album ‘Memories Don’t Die’, the cultural appropriation police and derogatory terms in music, begins…

 

FAULT: On the song ‘Happiness’ you talk about losing your mother. How difficult was it making a song like that?

Tory Lanez : I had to record that song like, four different times. I just kept crying every time I tried to record it. I knew it would resonate with people, because of the way it resonated with me.

 

FAULT: People always talk about stark similarities between the street culture in London and the street culture in Toronto. Having been here many times, have you noticed this yourself?

Tory Lanez : Definitely. Like, they way we talk… the way we say, ’mandem’, or when we talk about somebody we’ll say, ‘a man did this’. I think it’s the way we are all brought up. It has a bit of a Caribbean edge to it. I think that’s where the similarities come in.

FAULT: Are you planning on working with any other London, or British based artists?

Tory Lanez : Of course, I want to work with a lot of people from here. I want to do a whole project thats just with people from here. I definitely want to work with Nines, Stefflondon, J Hus, Dave, Stormzy… of course Skepta.

 

FAULT: Keeping the British theme, there is a Zayn Malik sample on the new album. It is done in a great way and it isn’t the most obvious choice. Why did you choose that particular sample?

Tory Lanez : I didn’t. I didn’t even know it was a Zayn sample until after I was trying to clear it. That’s when I found out it was a One Direction sample. The producer, Christian Lou, brought that beat to me.

 

FAULT: …And Sting’s influence on the album?

Tory Lanez : Sting specifically asked us to use his song instead of ours. We had like an interpretation that sounded like his song and Sting said, ‘no, I want them to use the real one, the real song’… so that’s what happened with that. Sting loves it… It’s dope that he allowed us to use his song and was like, ‘use the real song, I don’t want you to use something like it, I want you to use the real thing’. 

 

FAULT: When you talk about being younger and people trying to bully you, it’s almost like you developed a very defensive ‘fuck all of you’ kind of attitude. Is it fair to say you still have that now towards negative people?

Tory Lanez : Yeah. I’m always like that. I grew up like, you fend for yours and if somebody tries to take yours, you show them why they should have never tried it. So for me, I’m the type of person… I just don’t take no bullshit – with anything.

 

FAULT: You have already addressed the issue you had with an upmarket clothing store assistant being rude and dismissive towards you, because of your appearance and in retaliation you spent $35k (of record label money) with a different assistant to prove a point. There was a lot of chatter online about this not being the best way to handle the situation. It is great this conversation is being had because this is something that has been happening for years. In retrospect and if it was your own money and not the record label’s, would you have dealt with the situation in the same way?

Tory Lanez : Some of it was my own money… and yeah, I would have still dealt with it the same way. I didn’t do anything wrong. All I was doing was shopping for clothes. That store being the only store that sells high end designer fabrics, I still had to buy what I was going there to buy, I just didn’t give the commission to the person who was looking down on me.

Do you know what’s crazy… what the actual fucked up part is? The black mentality… and this is so harshly and blatantly true… the black mentality, because we have been oppressed for years, when we do feel like we are no longer second class and we have made something of ourselves, we have gotten our money and we have acquired whatever it is that we have acquired, when we go into stores, there are certain things we don’t want to happen. You don’t want to go into a store and ask for something and they bring you something less expensive. You don’t ever want them to act like you cant afford it… and because, as black people we feel so under privileged our whole lives, the fact that we are in a situation of more privilege, we tend to take more of an advantage of it, to prove to whoever the authority is, that we can do it to. It’s really stupid, but the pride and the underprivilege leads you to it.

 

FAULT: Very loosely leading on from that, Skepta recently in an interview that the term ‘white bitch’ is racist and should not be used. Some people agreed, some disagreed. I just wanted to know your thoughts on that, as you use the term on the album. 

Tory Lanez : Is black bitch the same, or no?

FAULT: Well, Skepta argued that nobody would ever say ‘black bitch’, because there would be such uproar…

Tory Lanez : I’d say black bitch, or white bitch …and feel absolutely no way about it, what do you mean? When I say ‘black bitch’ I don’t mean, black bitch. I am not calling a woman a bitch. I’m not saying, ‘Yo, you black bitch’. When I am with women, or when I am with girls, they will say, ‘I’m with my bitches’… A bitch is a female dog. My friend is my dog. If I say, ‘this is my dog’ I mean this is my dog, he’s my friend, he’s my companion. If I say, ‘I’m with my bitches’, they are my dogs too, just the female type. It doesn’t matter if they are white or black. What people should really be mad at, is the fact that I’m saying bitches. If you are mad at me calling you a bitch, then be mad at me calling you a bitch, but don’t say white bitch is more racist than black bitch, or that I would never say black bitch so why is it ok to say white bitch. If you are going to have a problem with that, just have a problem with the word bitch, don’t have a problem with the colour. If a girl is a whore and she is white, she is a white whore. If a girl is black and she’s a whore, she’s a black whore. I hate for it to sound so blatant and so rude, but you have to get mad at the word, not the colour it’s associated with. You cant get mad at someone calling you a black bitch, be mad at the word bitch… you’re black, that can’t change, be mad at the word that is derogatory.

 

FAULT: Finally, what is your FAULT?

Tory Lanez : My only FAULT is that I was cursed with like these devilish, devilish good looks. It is not the worse curse to have, but that’s my fault, Sorry. Sorry to all those I may have offended with them [laughs].

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 28 – THE STRUCTURAL ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40