Vance Joy for FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Vance Joy x FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Vance Joy FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Words and Photography: Miles Holder
Fashion: Rachel Gold

Vance Joy first caught our eye back in 2013 with the release of his debut album EP God Loves You When You’re Dancing which featured his runaway hit ‘Riptide’. In February 2018 Vance Joy returned with his second album record Nation of Two which featured hits ‘Saturday Sun’ and ‘I’m With You’. About to embark on his worldwide tour, we caught up with Vance to find out more!

FAULT: You’re about to embark on your Nation Of Two world tour, excited?

Vance Joy: We did a short European tour last month, and it was so much fun to see the fans and reconnect with them in person. It’d been three and a half years since we’d last played in Europe, so it’ll be great to relaunch with the big shows and play some new material. IT should be a lot of fun, and everyone is really excited.

Do you find that your songs suddenly take on new meaning when you get to play them live to your fans?

Vance Joy: I’m always surprised to find that so many people know the lyrics to a bunch of songs and it’s such a warm and enthusiastic vibe when I’m playing, and it’s super encouraging. You don’t know what songs people will know and recently on tour we played some of the deep album tracks, and it was great to see people enjoying them. As we tour, I’m getting more comfortable with the songs and finding new ways to sing them and wear them in a bit. ‘We’re Going Home’, and ‘Saturday Sun’ are tracks in particular which are starting to feel good to perform on stage.

Vance Joy FAULT Magazine Issue 28

 

Is there a date in particular or festival in particular that you’re especially excited for?

Vance Joy: I’m looking forward to going to LA for a rehearsal for a few days, so I’m looking forward to the band and me having a relaxing time out there. We’ll do a couple of shows and then head to Coachella which is a big one that everyone will know. There are also dates in huge venues which will also be a new challenge and experience for us, but it’s exciting to play to bigger rooms and larger audiences. I’m looking forward to seeing how it all goes!

Nation Of Two released a couple of months ago now; do you ever find yourself wanting to make changes or fixes to it or do you feel like the project was exactly what it needed to be at the time and it should remain that way?

Vance Joy: I’m quite relaxed when it comes to that stuff; I think you need a deadline and know when to say goodbye. I feel like when you have a song that you feel strongly about but there’s pushback, and people say, “I don’t think you quite nailed it on this song”, then I listen. I listen to all of those perspectives and then eventually you’ve got to release it and say “that’s it”. I sometimes think instead of looking too closely and getting too stuck on the minutia you can get distracted. Certainly, after two months you might hear it on the radio and say “oh, I’m seeing it differently now” but I think you can get distracted and go off course with perfection and I don’t think there’s such a thing.

Vance Joy FAULT Magazine Issue 28

What is your favourite tour story?

Vance Joy: I was fortunate and got to play the AFL Grand Final, and I was playing with another band called Living Head, and the main headliner was Sting. After we played, we were chilling out in the green room, and I felt someone hug me from behind, and I turned around, and it was Sting! It was surreal, I just shook his hand and said: “lovely to meet you!”

What is your writing discipline, do you sit down at a writing station and try to get through it or do you just let them come to you naturally?

Vance Joy: I think there’s a bit of both and always a push and pull. If you haven’t written a song in a while, you can get frustrated. Sometimes you just have to pick up your guitar, and a song comes, and other days it feels like you’re trying to force it out. I think ultimately the excellent stuff songs happen mysteriously and catch you off guard. Some days you can write and take the chance that magic will happen again but sometimes you have to approach it with a bit more discipline. The best stuff happens when you’re not trying to force it too much.

What is your FAULT?

Vance Joy: I can be impatient, and when I’m in a bad mood, the atmosphere can be quiet and cold. I might not say anything, but people can tell! I’m learning to try and remove myself at times when I’m annoyed (or hungry) but it doesn’t happen too often, but I’m trying to notice when it does.

Vance Joy FAULT Magazine Issue 28

 

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Daniel Bruhl covers our Film section inside FAULT Issue 28

Daniel Bruhl – FAULT Issue 28

 

Daniel Bruhl for FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Photographer – Udo Spreitzenbarth
Stylist – Ty-Ron Mayes
Groomer – Nate Rosenkranz
Imaging – Lorraine Baker
Photo Assistants – Daniel Stauch & Nate DeCarlo

Words: Alex Bee

You might call Brühl an Actor-demic: his performances as an actor are always backed up by extensive, academic-level research. For his role in American period drama ‘The Alienist’, Brühl studied. Hard. The intelligent star, known for his credits in Good Bye Lenin!, Rush and Inglorious Basterds, embodies pioneering criminal psychologist Dr. Laszlo Kreizler in the eight-part series.

FAULT: How did you prepare for your role in ‘The Alienist’?
Daniel Bruhl: I didn’t know the book before but it’s one of those that you cannot put away. I felt like a 12 year old with a book and a torch under the blanket. I read it very quickly and was immediately fascinated by the world that Caleb Carr [the author] created, about each of the characters and the fact that it’s the beginning of so many things at the time that are so important now. My wife [psychologist Felicitas Rombold] put me in touch with criminal psychologists and I’d read a lot about these famous psychologists at the time the story is set. I also read books about New York in the late 1800s just to get an idea of how that place was back in the day.

What do you think makes the series so successful in telling the story of the time?
Daniel Bruhl: What helped tremendously was the passion that was put into that show in recreating the time because its so real and so authentic. When we were working on it we didn’t feel that it was fake, which sometimes can happen if there’s not enough energy and money and passion on a project. I come from movies, and when I was young when I would read a script for a period film and it would say there will be 500 extras and 50 characters and on the day you have one carriage, an old donkey and three extras and then you are supposed to recreate the magic – it just doesn’t work! What was very nice was the chemistry and the friendship we had. Dakota, Luke and I even spent most of our downtime together. Almost every weekend we met and I think that chemistry is something you cannot take for granted.

Daniel Bruhl for FAULT Magazine Issue 28

What series have you been watching at the moment?
Daniel Bruhl: ‘Mindhunter’ [a Netflix series that explores similar developments in criminal psychology] is amazing. I was absolutely blown away by ‘The Handsmaid’s Tale’, it’s a masterpiece! I was very pleased to meet Elizabeth Moss at The SAG Awards, who I think is one of the best actresses around, and I was happy to be able to tell her how magnificent she is. I also spent some time with Matt Smith who is such a great guy and interesting in ‘The Crown’ portraying Phillip – I’m hooked on that show!

How do you find the time to keep up to date with the latest programmes?
Daniel Bruhl: I always find the time! I have a couple of days where I can watch shows in my downtime or I’ll watch them when I’m travelling on the plane.

What was it like working on the third installment in the ‘Cloverfield’ series, which unexpectedly hit devices all over the world after a surprise announcement during a Superbowl ad break?
Daniel Bruhl: It was such a great ensemble. It was interesting because you have astronauts from all over the world and they managed to get all these wonderful actors from different countries, so the opportunity to work with them all was really great. Also, it was something really different for me as I am usually always travelling back in time and this was the first time that I’d actually explored the future.

Daniel Bruhl for FAULT Magazine Issue 28

How does working on an – equally cinematic – series compare to a film?
Daniel Bruhl: It’s the luxury of time that you have. You don’t feel so restricted as you do when working on a movie when sometimes you feel that pressure. To have that privilege of 10 hours a day and 100 shooting days with one character and the ability to explore the character to the core is very rewarding.

As a pacifist, how do you find taking on roles that are often borne from a conflict?
Daniel Bruhl: That’s whats fascinating about our job as actors: to try and get into the skin and the head of somebody who is different.

What bands or artists are you listening to at the moment?
Daniel Bruhl: There’s a band called War on Drugs that I’m listening to lately and someone from the US called Francis and The Lights. Also Roosevelt, Sigur Ros and Alt-J. There is a lot of great music here in Berlin too with artists and DJs like Frank Wiedemann, Henrik Schwarz and David August – I can highly recommend coming to Berlin for clubbing.

Daniel Bruhl for FAULT Magazine Issue 28

 

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Ady Suleiman: Exclusive shoot for FAULT Issue 28

Ady Suleiman was shot by Miles Holder and styled by Edith Walker Millwood exclusively for FAULT Magazine Issue 28 – the Structural Issue. Interview by Will Soer.

Ady Suleiman knows who he is. Since he started singing his own songs aged 18 he’s been through a lot; collaborations with superstars (Chance the Rapper, Joey Bada$$, Erykah Badu), major label deals, and intense promotion schedules. His blend of honesty and groove formed irresistible rolling RnB, that explored the issues of his life in real time. Last year he wrote an article for the Independent opening up about recent mental health issues, a heavy stall on his mind and career that had taken a lot of work and lifestyle changes to release. Today I’m talking to him a couple of weeks before his debut album Memories will drop, and one day before he thinks he’ll be over a flu, but things are calm where he is. He’s enjoyed the excuse to binge-watch TV in his London flat and feels excited to be back on the road. Before getting into the interview we talk about another recent experience he enjoyed; his photoshoot with FAULT chief-editor Miles Holder; ‘it’s a skill for the photographer to get a natural look, as standing in front of loads of bright lights is always a bit tense.’

FAULT: Do you find photoshoots that different from performing in gigs, in terms of aesthetically presenting yourself?

Ady Suleiman: With music you always have the song. Any time I get lost and start thinking ‘oh shit there’s a lot of people in here’ and that’s in my mind, I say to myself ‘listen to the music’ and I can get back into character.

One thing I noticed in your music is that there’s a lot of direct addresses, to friends and lovers, when performing these tracks do you go into that headspace?

I think it’s really good to, as it’s like a scripted performance; you can perform the lines in a million ways, some are right. You can just go onstage and perform, and people would think it’s alright, but I want that extra level; the songs are personal and emotional and quite direct, so I want people to feel that story. I don’t necessarily visualise the person I’m addressing, but I always think about me as a character, what am I showing here to the audience, the emotion I was feeling when I wrote that song.

Do some of your tracks have an element of you talking directly to yourself?

100%, it works in both ways. For example, with Why You Runnin Away, it came about from me being frustrating with someone close to me, I was like why the fuck are you doing this shit. As I wrote it I related it to myself; maybe me running away doesn’t have as much consequence as yours does because you’re in a more severe matter, but I can still apply this to myself.

I recently read an article that connected the rise of quiet-storm style RnB in the US with political tension, as it’s a time when people need help with pessimism and anxiety. Do you think about your music as something that could help people like this?

Definitely. It always depends on the concept, sometimes it is just a story, but sometimes I think what am I trying to say with the story? Why am I telling it? Music is stuff that you say, you know everyone goes through, I can get away with saying it by singing it. Like with Running Away maybe I didn’t actually say that stuff to my friend. Some other people are comfortable just saying that stuff normally, but me not so much.

Do you feel like, this ability to express yourself more through song than through spoken word is aided by your musical lineage? Do you think that, in comparison to other genres, your style empowers you more?

I don’t think so, because I don’t really think of genres as doing a specific thing. I think I’d still be direct if I was into metal. If someone gave me a hip hop beat, a reggae beat, a soul beat, a jazz beat, what I’d do on top of this would be similar in terms of my delivery. Genre for me is more the instrumentation and what you put around it, rather than delivery. I think I got that from Amy Winehouse, because she was doing Jazz on that first record, but her lyrics were like ‘I need to get the right angle so he can fuck me right’. That’s why I really liked it, it was contemporary; she spoke the same way that we speak. I wanna talk the way I talk and speak freely.

So is she the GOAT for you?

Vocally, yeah 100%. She made me believe in myself, because she did that jazz/hip hop cross when I was wondering if I’d be able to the music I wanted to make.

She gave British music more hunger for that kind of direct honesty and strident character, that broke away from the semi-American ambiguous Simon Cowell delivery.

Yeah absolutely, I feel like I knew her, like she was my mate. When I went to see that documentary about her everyone in the cinema left feeling the same way, and I felt annoyed, like ‘you don’t know her better than me!’ I don’t think we’ll see anyone like that for some time.

Listening to the 6 minute version of Need Somebody To Love makes it clear how central rhythm is to your voice, even the acapella section keeps a headnod going, and I could tell when the track’s end came without checking my phone screen because your voice broke time and curtails off. Where do you think that flow in your voice comes from? I’m assuming it’s not Amy Winehouse.

I don’t know, maybe hip hop, I listen to a lot of stuff like Damian Marley and Lauryn Hill. This is just me making sense of the question, it might not be true, but I think it’s because of my dyslexia. My reading comprehension is actually quite bad, so when I write something I freestyle. The freestyle has a specific flow, and I write to that flow. Some people can write something and then change the melody afterwards but that’s not how my brain works, it’s too fucking slow. I wish I could, because it takes ages to write this way, but once I’ve written something it’s already got an accent. Because I write in this instinctive manner I feel stuck to this flow. The music’s put around that; I don’t write to beats, it always starts with me and the guitar. It’s always so natural, which can be a fault sometimes because I want to just write a sentence, but at the same time it helps bring that uniqueness. Like I don’t focus on that flow in my music, it’s not a conscious thing, it’s just me. If you really want to be unique, even if you can’t sing, just crack your voice on a record, because no one else has your voice.

You sing about your social anxiety in Pass The Alcohol; is it difficult to re-access songs that are about being in that dark place?

Absolutely not. Those songs written about my mental fragility, I find it really easy to slip back into them, probably because I still have those thoughts but I respond differently to them. That song was about a time when I was using alcohol to deal with social anxiety, and I can still imagine doing that, but I’m choosing not to. Serious and State of Mind can be harder because they’re more about me having a theory, and I’ve developed on those theories now; I see naivety in them.

Do you wanna keep it that way, or would you consider rewriting songs to fit where you are now?

The only thing I sometimes do is in the outros, I’ll add little bits on, it’s a reflective period. And that’s actually how Need Somebody To Love was, the rappy part after the big chorus when it’s like *sings ‘bam bam bam bam’ beautifully*, in the story it’s like ‘cool, now I’ve met that person.’ But because it’s all me it’s not hard to go back to those places.

Do you think that your ability to slip into the mindset of something that’s been hard for you is easier once that you’ve solidified it into a song?

There’s a sense of that, because there’s a distance from it. When I come offstage I’m not still in that song, it’s over, though that depends where you are in your life. When I wrote Drink Too Much and performed it in those months, I’d come offstage and think about it, and I’m having a fucking drink. This is why I called the album Memories, because these songs are like little segments, little thoughts. Have you seen that Harry Potter thing, where he pulls memories out and puts them in a bowl? I can go into the songs and then come back out, without it sticking.

Photographer: Miles Holder
Fashion: Edith Walker Millwood
Grooming: Shamirah Sairally
Words: Will Soer

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Janelle Monae Covers FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Janelle Monae X FAULT Magazine

janelle Monae FAULT Magazine dirty computer

Fashion Editor: Rachel Holland | Photographer: David Yeo | Make Up Artist: Jessica Smalls | Hair Stylist: Nikki Elms | Nail Artist: Diana Drummond | Photographer’s Assistant: Anna Forbes | Stylist’s Assistant: Anna Cirnu | Photographed at Handel & Hendrix in London handelhendrix.org

 

Words: Miles Holder

Special Thanks: Handel & Hendrix

In 2007, Janelle Monae released her EP entitled ‘Metropolis: Suite I (The Chase), the first in a seven-part conceptual series set in the year 2719’s civilisation of Metropolis and told through the eyes of a sentient android, Cindi Mayweather.

The story continued through her 2010 album ‘The ArchAndroid’ and 2013’s ‘The Electric Lady’ and fans followed Cindi Mayweather as she fell in love with a human and travelled back in time to warn of the imminent threat posed by the secret organisation, ‘The Great Divide’.

For her 2018 Album entitled ‘Dirty Computer’, Janelle will be leaving Cindi behind and telling a new story, the story of Janelle Monae. The first two releases from the record ‘Django Jane’ and ‘Make Me Feel’ are still filled with Janelle’s signature style, Afrofuturism and punk soul swag. While a departure from the narrative fans are accustomed, it nevertheless provides what so many have a craved – a glimpse into Janelle’s personal life.

Could it be that as our reality begins to mimic that of the fictitious dystopian future of Metropolis, as too has Janelle been forced to follow in the footsteps of Cindi Mayweather and save the present day from its own “great divide”? Only time will tell. For Janelle at least, it’s all about being present, and at long last, finding the confidence to tell her own story.

 

janelle Monae FAULT Magazine dirty computer

 

FAULT Magazine: You’ve always included social commentary within your music but it was vailed within the narrative of Metropolis. On Dirty Computer, the message is a lot more in your face – why?

Janelle Monae: I knew I was supposed to make Dirty Computer before my first album came out and I always wanted to speak out, but I put it off because I needed to understand where my anger was coming from and how best to channel it.

I am such an honest person and speak very candidly when I’m with friends and family, and that’s what you’ll hear on this album. I sing about politics, race, sexuality, gender on the record but to release the album, I needed to make sure I had the confidence to not self-edit. I needed to be vulnerable, honest and open.

This project is about my freedom and challenging myself to live in the present and not in 2719 through Cindi. I feel like I can contribute to the present day and that I should contribute. I’m choosing to live in the now and to celebrate the people that are not celebrated in the present day. I want to honour those living on the outskirts of society due to their sexuality or gender identity. These are people who I love, and that love me but waking up as an American who cares deeply about the American dream and the rights of all people to it, I feel there is too much at stake to be quiet and to mince my words on specific issues.

 

Despite the social commentary, it doesn’t feel like a sad or hope lost album. There are many songs about self-love and sexual discovery that it ends up as quite an empowering record, was this the intention?

I’m happy you said that because it’s not meant as a sad album, it’s intended as a celebration for the “dirty computers” of the world who get told that they’re dirty and that they have viruses making them different which they need to have taken away. Dirty Computers should see their uniqueness and their so-called viruses as positive attributes which make them valuable to society.

 

What’s given you the confidence to say “Right, it’s time to tell the world who Janelle is and tell my story”?

Janelle Monae: There is power in vulnerability, and I think that it needed to start with me. I was inspired by many movies, some of which I’ve been a part of and the stories I read and people I’ve met; when people shared their stories with me so honestly, it resonated.

I’ve been talking about it, but I feel I wasn’t entirely embracing the things that made me unique. I was telling others to as part of my music, but I wasn’t living it, and I think that I was afraid I would lose supporters for doing so.

I had a lot of conversation with myself about who was going to be the subject of the album myself or Cindi, but I’m here now, and I think it’s right that I stay in the present and share my story and walk in my truth as fearlessly as possible.

janelle Monae FAULT Magazine dirty computer
And how does one live fearlessly?

Janelle Monae: It’s not that I don’t experience fear, but in those moments, I choose freedom and freedom is not free. Freedom always comes with great sacrifice, and there will be people who say hurtful things and not support me because I’m living my truth.

 

Does it scare you to put yourself out there for scrutiny when people won’t just discuss your music, they’ll twist your music and message and start discussions on you as a person and your personal life?

Janelle Monae: No, I have soul searched, and this time around, I think being honest is most important. It’s about being able to say “hey I’m ok if people don’t like that I’m embracing this side of me”, it’s the side that my friends and family get to see and they still love me the same. I think that my evolution is more important than pleasing people and I may not say it right, I might get some things wrong, and I may stumble along the way but was I honest, was I sincere, was my heart in the right place? Yes, yes and yes.

What scares Janelle Monae?

Janelle Monae: That I won’t have a family within the time frame that I want to have a family. I want to have children, but I don’t want to miss that time because I was so focused on my career and because I didn’t plan accordingly. That scares me most now more than anything. I do want to usher in a new generation of babies that will be better than me and able to dream bigger than me and go out into this world and turn it upside down in a very positive way.

janelle Monae FAULT Magazine dirty computer (1 of 1)
What is your FAULT?

Janelle Monae: One of my FAULTs is that I’m a self-editor and perfectionist and I don’t enjoy my experiences when I’m so focused on being consistently perfect in every situation. It’s something that I’ve had to work on my entire life actively. It used to consume my experience, and I couldn’t enjoy things because I was so focused on how they were going to be presented. I was so concerned with what people thought, but now I’m just at this point in my life where I’m finding strength in my imperfections, and I realise that I connect more with myself and with other people when my FAULTs are being shared for all to see.

 

 

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Dylan Sprouse – Hollywood’s next IT Boy – Exclusive FAULT Online Cover

 

 

 

Things have changed drastically for Dylan ever since his early days as a Disney superstar – but all for the better. Dylan is currently diving head-first into his soon to be opened meadery All-Wise Meadery,  all while expanding his wings into independent film and proving to the world that he’s a multi-faceted performer. Dylan is part of a new generation of actors that bring hope to the industry. At the close of award season, we spoke to Dylan as our March Online Cover Star about all things Hollywood and the positive aspects of the #metoo movement. In spite of his young age, he’s wise beyond his years and sets the examples that we’ve so desperately needed to have. Here’s Dylan Sprouse – FAULTs and all.

Let’s talk about your newly started business – All-Wise Meadery. What do you reckon is the most rewarding part of being an entrepreneur and what advice do you have towards young people looking to start their own business?

I would say that the most rewarding thing for me has been the realization of this project with my friends who are now also my business partners. Particularly because they were people who believed in me and not only invested their time but also their money in the prospect that we could really succeed together. The only advice that I’ve got for young entrepreneurs who are looking to start a business is that it’s easy to think that you won’t succeed if you don’t put a lot of your own money upfront and that’s not true. The first step to actually succeeding is just starting and thrusting yourself into uncomfortable scenarios. Just learning the ropes of how to open a business and really getting in there. If you look at it from the outside and you never step in, you’ll never figure it out. And you’ll never get anything done. So I would say just start. Immediately.

 

What were the biggest challenges on an emotional level that you’ve encountered along the way?

 

The biggest emotional challenge was, on a similar level, knowing that my friends invested so much in the meadery that our futures were intertwined. If one of us slips up, all of us do. That was particularly nerve-racking. But on an emotional level, probably the most rewarding thing has come recently when we were actually stood in the space of All-Wise Meadery after nearly two years of trying to put it together. Seeing it physically, tangible – was just overwhelming.

Your latest released film – Dismissed – features quite an intense troubled young man. What catches your eye when you’re going through a script and how did you manage to identify with Lucas?

There are a bunch of different things. One criterion that I use is doing something that I’ve never done before. Even if we’re talking about a negative character – in the case of Lucas. But also – Do I think that the cast and crew will be good to work with? That’s huge for me. You could be doing the coolest role ever, but if you don’t like any of the cast and crew, it’s going to be a terrible shoot. And it will also show in the end result. I’ve been away for so long that I want to stretch my acting again and I want to do things that are different. When my audience sees me in a role, I want them to go like – he’s definitely got more range than I thought he did.

How did you manage to identify with Lucas or empathize with him in any way, shape or form?

I only identified with a part of him. Definitely not his actions. But with parts of him, I certainly did. The stress of wanting to succeed for your family’s sake in a classroom setting is something that I think any student can identify with. The fact that you’re potential future hinges on a single individual and their personal opinion of you can be really damaging and frightening. I think that’s the part of Lucas that I really identified with. When I was young, we were kind of a lower class family and so I was very desperate to bring things to my family and elevate them. That’s something that made me relate to Lucas. It was the struggle of having to succeed in any way and not just for yourself, but also for your loved ones and your family that made me understand him.

 

 

When looking at your acting career – it’s been Disney and then you’ve gone into independent film. How do you feel you’ve managed to find your identity outside of the Disney bubble, considering the fact that you were involved in it at a very impressionable age?

It was a little bit of everything. Diving into my hobbies, like my meadery, has defined me in a way. I also think that taking time away from the industry and letting people forget about me for a while was a good thing. Furthermore, I think I’m also trying to do different roles. The truth is that I don’t think I’ve got the angst to define myself against Disney. I don’t care that much. But at the same time, I would like to do other things. Needless to say that I played Zack for 7 years before I took my break! Doing the same thing was tiring after a while.

 

You and Cole are very distinguishable in terms of the paths that you’ve both chosen to pursue. Yet while growing up, you still had to go through self-identification – while having someone identical to yourself by your side, working in the same industry and being in the public eye. Was it difficult for you to find your own separate ways?

 

I don’t think it was too difficult. As twins do, sometimes you just try to push away from the other, in terms of fashion and hobbies. And I think we did it in college, but it was never a moment of us being like ‘no, fuck you, see you later’. We were never combative about it. We’re actually pretty tame. There are twins who go through this mental awakening whereas we were just like ‘meh, I like this, you like that’. Although we were also careful not to step on each other’s toes. At the same time, I don’t like photography for example; I don’t personally like doing it. Even if Cole hadn’t started his photography, I wouldn’t have picked it up. If I started doing photography after he did it, it would seem bizarre.

 

Would you say that you’re quite opposite characters then?

I think yes and no. I mean, we’re not super different, but definitely, enough so that we moved into different directions with our hobbies, for sure.

 

Hollywood is currently ablaze with sexual accusations left and right. Have you ever witnessed similar occurrences while on Disney?

I’ve never seen or experienced anything of that sort while I was on Disney. But my heart goes out to people who have. What’s giving me hope is that so many people are responding to it. So many people are speaking out, which is the first step in order for a major movement or change to take place. I’m hopeful, I have hope. In a way, I think it sounds bad right now, but actually, it’s a great time to be in the entertainment industry. The bad times were previously. Because people were literally being bullied into being silent. Now is the good time to be in this industry because this bullshit isn’t going to happen anymore.

 

What do you think people in the industry should do to in order to make it safe for both men and women?

I think that these occurrences are happening by and large because of individuals who are corrupt. The best thing that can be done is what’s already being done. But it’s also boycotting and taking a personal stance against artists that you don’t agree with. I hear the same thing a lot, which is ‘I really dislike them as a person but they make great films.’ Well okay – you shouldn’t watch them then. Because when you do, you support their personal habits indirectly. People are notorious for having really corrupt practices and we hold them as artists still. And without naming names, I would say – just stop.

How do you support good art and not support bad behavior if the two are intertwined?

 

You can be a good artist and not have a bad behavior. The two aren’t linked. I think people like seeing and talking about this idea of the ‘insane artist’. There were painters in the medieval period who used to cut people’s heads off and everyone went like ‘oh my god, he’s the best’. Okay, but at the same time, he’s cutting people’s heads off and you shouldn’t be supporting a guy like that. There are so many great artists in the film and television industry that don’t cut people’s heads off that you should support. It’s baffling to me how people support the movement and wear black at awards shows yet continue to support artists and filmmakers like these. It’s very hypocritical – take a stance and really stand by it. I think that way everyone can bring change to the industry from inside his or her household.

 

What’s your FAULT?

I’ve got an intense love of food – up to a point where that’s a fault. Because I’m not a chef and I’m not equipped to cook well and I’m also lazy. So I spend so much money on food that it’s becoming ridiculous.

 

 Interview: Adina Ilie

Photography: WOLAND

Hair and Make Up: Valentina Creti using Charlotte Tilbury

 

Get to know Liza Anne with FAULT

The Beast from the East is in full swing when we meet with Liza Anne in East London, just days before she heads back to the States to embark on a Spring tour, including a stop in her hometown of Nashville: ‘I haven’t played there in like three years, so that will be fun’.

 

The buzz surrounding Liza Anne and her music is growing within the US and beyond, and it isn’t hard to see why; her deep and genuine lyrics, brought to life with haunting authenticity by her outstanding vocals, resonate with people on a level that is perhaps unexpected, given the vibrant pop energy of her latest album, Fine But Dying. Speaking with as much passion about her music as she does about dairy-free cheese, Liza is refreshingly open as we talk about everything from her family and future, to her own relationship with mental health, and a surprising admission to being something of a Hilary Duff fangirl…

 

So, you were performing at Kings Cross last night, how are you enjoying things in London?

I love it! I lived in Clapham Junction for six months one summer, and I’ve been here so many times it’s as if I was at home. All the clothes and record shops I like to go to are near here, so it’s a great place to be. And there’s so much good food too!

 

Last night was so fun, although I was worried because I woke up and couldn’t speak a word, so all day I just watched Princess Diaries and drank ginger tea! I did an interview with Radio X too, which was amazing – they played four songs from the new record, two of which are actually my favourites.

 

There were some great reactions on social media following that, about how your songs spoke to people’s own struggles with anxiety and mental health. Do you find people relate to your music in that way quite often?

I think that people are just waiting for someone to give them permission, in a way, which was the same for me for so long; I was just waiting for someone to give me a space to be fully myself or to feel whatever emotion I was feeling, so it’s interesting how people react when you create that space for them to exist in. More often than not people are just beyond kind and generous about how much the songs have helped them, which is really sweet to hear.

 

What’s been your journey through music, to get to where you are now?

 

When I try and think of what I wanted to be when I was a kid, I can’t remember anything except the moment that I wanted to start doing this. I started writing poetry when I was 8 years old, and started putting my poems to music when I was about 14. I think Taylor Swift was pretty big then, and I was like ‘Oh my gosh, I could totally do this!’

 

Interesting! So, was Taylor the sort of music you were into back then?

I definitely did not listen to a lot of Taylor Swift! I didn’t really listen to much country music, even though I grew up where that was very dominant. I listened to a lot of The Cranberries and Joni Mitchell, but I grew up in a really religious household, so I wasn’t allowed to listen to much ‘secular’ music.

 

My first concert was Hilary Duff – August 11th2004! I genuinely, to this day, am obsessed with her. She’s incredible! My aunt, who’s kind of my muse, gave me a mix tape when I was about 13, which had Joni Mitchell and The Cranberries on it, and I was like ‘Oh my God, I could sound like this!’

 

That’s really interesting about your aunt, what is it about her that makes her your muse?

 

She’s a visual artist, and she’s just one of the most raw, real and kind human beings I have ever met. I think she just looks at life in this very specific way, which gave me permission to look at life as I needed it to be and as I wanted it to be. As well as her giving me records when I was a kid, her husband was the one who loaned me a guitar for the summer when I went to camp, and I learned how to play it there.

 

Are there any artists that you’re into at the moment you think we should keep an ear out for?

 

So many! I mean St Vincent isn’t exactly up and coming but, my gosh, I cannot get over her! It is just the most refreshing thing to see a woman do something so unapologetically. There’s so much intent behind what she creates. As far as new things I’m loving, there’s this one girl, Caroline Rose, who is unbelievable. I came across her on Spotify last week and I have listened to her record maybe 10 times since then. She’s incredible – her lyrics, her voice, everything about her.

 

It’s not that I only listen to female artists, because there are a lot of male artists that I really do enjoy, but I think it’s so important, as a woman, to support other women who are carving out a space for themselves. I think I naturally gravitate towards those sorts of acts.

 

Your songs address some rather dark and melancholy emotions, but still manage to be very ‘pop’ in style – how do you go about balancing that sound with the subject matter?

 

I think you have to sometimes trick people in a way; like, people might avoid [the music] if it felt heavy, but if you lure people in with a poppier sound, they accidentally end up finding more of themselves.

 

I think I realised early on that what I wanted to do was appeal to the person who, perhaps, wouldn’t necessarily enjoy or choose a sad song, but they’re the ones who are usually suppressing those emotions the most. I wanted to give even the most unlikely person a door to more of their emotions. That’s not to say that I haven’t written a slew of sad songs too!

 

How do you think your sound has progressed over the years?

 

I think from playing live shows, I started to want to feel louder, to have more of a full, cinematic sort of show; I was just by myself with an electric guitar, so there was only a certain level I could really reach. I started listening to St Vincent when I was already quite far into writing this album, as well as Lady Lamb, Broadcast and The Cranberries – and all of those things that I was naturally pulling from before felt like they finally had a place in the art I was creating. So more than just being something I enjoyed, I realised I could channel those things in my own music.

 

Your new album, Fine But Dying, is out this month, which is pretty exciting! How have you found writing this latest record?

 

It’s crazy, I wrote the first song on this record three and a half years ago! It’s always therapeutic. I think that writing, or art in general, has the ability to save whoever is experiencing it, as much as they let it. I went into this record wanting to be on different terms with my panic disorder than I had been before; I wanted to have a healthy relationship with it, and I wanted to have a healthier relationship with myself and with my partner. I think the intention behind making the record was for it to be a cathartic experience.

 

And what sort vibe do you want people to get from it, is there something in particular you’re wanting to communicate?

 

Like with any of my music, I just want people to have this space to completely be themselves, to feel their emotions and feel free and validated. I want to create a portal for people to explore themselves, just like I want the shows to feel like this wave of emotion – with high energy moments and real introspective moments. I just want it to feel natural and alive.

 

What’s next for you? Is there anything on your bucket list you want to tick off soon?

I don’t know, play Jools Holland probably! I just want to keep outdoing every last thing I did. I don’t like setting crazy goals, I feel like it removes you from the present moment in a way. It’s like, thinking ahead to the biggest thing that I might do when I’m in my thirties sort of takes away from the fact that I’m 24 now, and I get to record and tour this record that I wrote, you know? I think I just want to try to be as present as I can over this whole journey.

 

And lastly, Liza, what is your FAULT?

 

Oh no, so many things! I guess with the job that I have, you can get a little bit self-reliant and self-centred in a way. I mean, I don’t feel like I’m an egotistical person but sometimes I’m just like, damn, Liza, you should really consider people outside of yourself. Absolutely that.

 

Fine But Dying is available to buy now. For more information visit www.lizaannemusic.com

Words: Jennifer Parkes

Oliver Stark ‘Breaking The States’ FAULT Magazine Interview

Oliver Stark: Breaking The States 

(Originally published inside FAULT Issue 25)

 

Photography by Irvin Rivera at Graphicsmetropolis Styling by Monica Cargile Grooming by Preston Wada at Opus Beauty using Kevin Murphy using V76 Photography assistance by Phill Limprasertwong at phillldotcom

 

Words: Miles Holder 

Fans of British tv and cinema will likely recognise Oliver Stark from various independent movies and UK television dramas. While the roles were small, they gave Oliver the confidence he needed to join a long list of British actors to head to the states with hopes of landing a big time role in Hollywood. It’s a move that many make but one that very few manage to succeed at and while Oliver knows all too well what defeat can feel – he conversely has seen what persistence, courage and the drive born from those setbacks can produce. On his second attempt to crack the US television market, Oliver landed the role of Ryder on AMC’s ‘Into The Badlands’ and the rest, as they say, is history. Now reaping the rewards from years of dedication to his craft, the only way is up for this young actor. As his career climbs to new heights, we sat down with Oliver to discuss his journey into Hollywood and to find out what’s next for the London-born actor with so much more to give.

 

What is it about a script or a role that draws you in?

I think that’s changed over the past year. Now, I really want to be involved in projects focussed on what’s happening around us at the moment and tell a story that has a relevance to society. The way the world is now and where it’s going as a population, I think there are stories that need to be told and I’d love to be a part of that.

 

Much like the parallels Into The Badlands shares with gun control laws?

That’s something that I didn’t expect to come into the discussion with Into The Badlands but it’s great to be a part of things and see it’s connected with people that way. I want to get people talking about real life and even though the show is in such a different world, it’s great it’s a vehicle for wider discussions.

 

How daunting was your move to LA?

I first came out here in January 2014 and I originally came for two months with a head full of dreams and didn’t actually have the best time if I’m honest with you. I wasn’t very busy and I didn’t do very well in auditions so I came home very dejected after that. The second time I went out was a much bigger deal for me because I had to rebuild all the confidence I’d lost and it was on that trip that I booked Into The Badlands.

It’s a big commitment to British actors to do it because it’s a lot of money and you have to readjust your entire life so there is a certain level of commitment to the craft actors show when they make the jump.

 

Even if it has already been done, what would be your dream role?

Some part of me has always wanted to be involved in a football movie! One of those by the numbers movies when it’s very clear who is going to win but is also very heartfelt and glory to all at the end. I’ve always wanted a movie which lets me show off my football skill too! [Laughs]

 

 

What’s it like to meet fans of Into The Badlands?

I think the greatest compliment I can receive is “I didn’t know you were British” because that is always a phew moment because it means I’ve got the accent nailed at the very least.

 

What is your FAULT?

The inability to escape my own head at times because there is always that voice back there that in a room full of great actors will ask “do I deserve to be here?” I think it’s something that everyone struggles.

The Rise Of Owen Teague – Taken From FAULT Magazine Issue 24

Owen Teague – Taken From FAULT Magazine Issue 24

Photography: Lionel Deluy @loveartistsagency | Stylist: Angel Terrazas | Grooming: Michelle Harvey @opusbeauty | Post Production: Pixretouch.com | Location: Special thanks to US Alteration | Production @loveartistsagency

 

Words: Miles Holder

Owen Teague first caught the eye of FAULT during his captivating performance as Nolan Rayburn in Netflix’s ‘Bloodline’. Despite his young age, Owen’s talent matches that of a performer far beyond his years. Currently filming for upcoming thriller entitled ‘The Empty Man’ and with other large projects in the pipeline, I wanted to catch up with the actor while he’s propelled to greatness.

 

It looks like you have a lot of thrillers and horror projects in your future. Do you find the darker productions more enjoyable?

I’ve always been attracted to darker things, ever since being a little kid. I’ve found that thrillers seem to have the fullest characters, regarding having both a dark and a light side. It’s been these kinds of flawed characters that have drawn me to the darker projects.

 

You play the part of Nolan Rayburn in Bloodline, are there parallels between Nolan’s character and your own personality?

Definitely. We’re both searchers, in at least an existential sense. His search is also for home, and how he’s going to eat and sleep and all that, but he also searches for a philosophical home, where he belongs in the world. I also feel that way. So because of this, we’re both kinds of distrustful of the world, and we protect ourselves, in our different ways. Nolan and I also are pretty creative people. We like making stuff. That’s only hinted at through Season 2, but it’s something I think is a big part of his personality.

That being said, our lives are incredibly different, and we deal with problems in very different ways. Everyone who knows the show tells me I’m so different from him, and it’s mostly true. But there is undoubtedly a part of me in Nolan.

 

What do you look for most when auditioning for a part?

I’ve found I really enjoy playing messed-up people. Not bad, or evil, per-say, but troubled. They’re complex, and becoming those people is always a combination of fun and difficult. 

 

What’s been the favourite part of your acting journey so far?

Bloodline, and playing Nolan. When you’re with a character for a long time — multiple episodes, multiple seasons — they start feeling real to you because you know them so well. So Nolan has become this weird kind of other-me, and the Rayburns this other-family. And working on Bloodline is always such a wonderful experience, because of the people and the feeling of the set. And, you know, the Keys aren’t too bad either. 

 

If you could play any part (even if it’s already been done), what role would be the dream role?

Oh man… well, if they ever made a movie about Jack Nicholson, I would love to play him. I mean, I’d love to work with him above that, but I’d also love to play him. He’s a big source of creative inspiration. 

 

Who is your biggest professional inspiration?

Leonardo DiCaprio. I love his movies and what he’s done as an actor, and also his work for the environment. He’s used his power as a celebrity to do something good for the world — in this case, work to combat what is probably Earth’s biggest issue right now, and will be for a long time to come: climate change — and I think that’s admirable, and important.