The Rise Of Owen Teague – Taken From FAULT Magazine Issue 24

Owen Teague – Taken From FAULT Magazine Issue 24

Photography: Lionel Deluy @loveartistsagency | Stylist: Angel Terrazas | Grooming: Michelle Harvey @opusbeauty | Post Production: Pixretouch.com | Location: Special thanks to US Alteration | Production @loveartistsagency

 

Words: Miles Holder

Owen Teague first caught the eye of FAULT during his captivating performance as Nolan Rayburn in Netflix’s ‘Bloodline’. Despite his young age, Owen’s talent matches that of a performer far beyond his years. Currently filming for upcoming thriller entitled ‘The Empty Man’ and with other large projects in the pipeline, I wanted to catch up with the actor while he’s propelled to greatness.

 

It looks like you have a lot of thrillers and horror projects in your future. Do you find the darker productions more enjoyable?

I’ve always been attracted to darker things, ever since being a little kid. I’ve found that thrillers seem to have the fullest characters, regarding having both a dark and a light side. It’s been these kinds of flawed characters that have drawn me to the darker projects.

 

You play the part of Nolan Rayburn in Bloodline, are there parallels between Nolan’s character and your own personality?

Definitely. We’re both searchers, in at least an existential sense. His search is also for home, and how he’s going to eat and sleep and all that, but he also searches for a philosophical home, where he belongs in the world. I also feel that way. So because of this, we’re both kinds of distrustful of the world, and we protect ourselves, in our different ways. Nolan and I also are pretty creative people. We like making stuff. That’s only hinted at through Season 2, but it’s something I think is a big part of his personality.

That being said, our lives are incredibly different, and we deal with problems in very different ways. Everyone who knows the show tells me I’m so different from him, and it’s mostly true. But there is undoubtedly a part of me in Nolan.

 

What do you look for most when auditioning for a part?

I’ve found I really enjoy playing messed-up people. Not bad, or evil, per-say, but troubled. They’re complex, and becoming those people is always a combination of fun and difficult. 

 

What’s been the favourite part of your acting journey so far?

Bloodline, and playing Nolan. When you’re with a character for a long time — multiple episodes, multiple seasons — they start feeling real to you because you know them so well. So Nolan has become this weird kind of other-me, and the Rayburns this other-family. And working on Bloodline is always such a wonderful experience, because of the people and the feeling of the set. And, you know, the Keys aren’t too bad either. 

 

If you could play any part (even if it’s already been done), what role would be the dream role?

Oh man… well, if they ever made a movie about Jack Nicholson, I would love to play him. I mean, I’d love to work with him above that, but I’d also love to play him. He’s a big source of creative inspiration. 

 

Who is your biggest professional inspiration?

Leonardo DiCaprio. I love his movies and what he’s done as an actor, and also his work for the environment. He’s used his power as a celebrity to do something good for the world — in this case, work to combat what is probably Earth’s biggest issue right now, and will be for a long time to come: climate change — and I think that’s admirable, and important. 

Gets To Know ‘The Gifted’ Star Sean Teale

 

Words: Miles Holder

In recent years, comic book adaptations have dominated box office record books, and with the release of ‘The Gifted’, it would seem that the same magic is being brought to the small screen as well.  

Taken place within the X-Men universe and centred around one’s family’s journey to find acceptance, peace and place to call home – we caught up with actor Seal Teale to find out about the role he plays and just why he loves playing it.

 

FAULT: Could you tell us a bit about The Gifted and the role you play in it? 

Sean Teale: The basic premise of the show revolves around an all American family and a government agency called ‘The Sentinal Services’ who are mobilised to prosecute mutants before their powers are activated.

Thunderbird, Polaris and my character called Eclipse, run an underground mutant network, and we try to find safe passage for persecuted mutants.

Eclipse is a new character created for the show,  he was born to a wealthy family, and at the moment his power is to absorb light and fire them out of his palms. He was born in Bogata and got kicked out of his family for being a mutant, and now he’s in the US looking for a family and a place to finally call home.

 

FAULT: While ‘The Gifted’ is an original storyline, it’s derived from the much loved Marvel comics landscape – do you feel pressure to do fans of the comics justice through your portrayals of characters new and old?

Sean Teale: There is a pressure to take on such a loved series of comics. The team are exploring what the X-Men is all about and taking into account how important the universe is to the fans. There is a middle ground with my character, in one way I can go back and read the comics for background on the world that Eclipse lived in but I also have the joy of introducing a brand new character into the fray.

 

FAULT: As you said, Eclipse hasn’t appeared in the comic or cinematic universe, how did that affect your research process?

Sean Teale: For me, it was always about remembering that while Eclipse is an original character, he comes from the same universe of which the X-men and mutant-kind live. In that mind, there is still a vault of knowledge that I could draw from for my character’s motivations as they pertained to that world. Also, culturally  I’m Venezuelan, and I’ve been to the countries my Eclipse comes from so in many ways we shared a similar cultural history too. Not forgetting that Bryan Singer and Matt Nix who are have been huge parts of the X-Men were on board for any questions I might have had.

 

FAULT: Does being on television as opposed to the big screen help tell character-led stories such as ‘The Gifted’?

Sean Teale: I think you can lose a lot of heart on the big screen with all the spectacle of the special effects, but I don’t believe down-to-earth storytelling is the intention of those blockbuster movies. ‘The Gifted’ has a large budget, and we do have massive set pieces, but we are striving for the best of both worlds.

The intention for me as an actor is to make sure our quieter scenes match the same intensity of the large action ones. I think it’s quite relevant, in today’s world and to be honest, any other decade prior. There has always been people fighting for their fundamental rights regardless of skin colour, sexual orientation, religion, sexuality and that’s what this show is all about.

 

FAULT: You’ve been working on lots of sci-fi projects – is that where your heart lies?

Sean Teale: For me, I just want to try everything and tell good stories. My last few jobs have been sci-fi but what I love so much about all the roles is their inclusion of stories which mirror our real world. That could be environmental issues, immigration, percussion and it just so happens that it’s the sci-fi projects which have been telling those stories.

FAULT: You were born in 1992, which means you grew up with the X-Men animated series on TV, were you sad to not see a rail full of similarly bright costumes?

Sean Teale: I think the whole cast is really hoping that at some point we’ll get to don the bright coloured suits. I know that Emma Dumont is really hoping to wear the bright green and cape Polaris costume but as enjoyable as it’d be, it’s not right for the story we want to tell. We’re not superheroes, we’re trying to tell such a grounded story that donning a cape and flying around wouldn’t be correct for this time in the show.

 

FAULT: What is your FAULT?

Sean Teale: It’s always plagued me professionally and personally; I am my harshest critic. When I was younger there was a project about to be in a big movie, and it fell through for an amalgamation of reasons but this one was personal, I was young, and it was too close to a done deal than it should have been. That knocked me a fair bit. A director once said that if you leave the room feeling like you could have done more then that’s your motivation to do better on the next project. If you’re an actor who always feels you can do more, that can hurt your self-confidence and lead to a vicious cycle of disappointment.

 

 

Jared Harris: Exclusive FAULT Magazine Issue 27 interview & photoshoot

Jared Harris

“Acting… it’s playing, isn’t it? That’s what’s great about the job. If you don’t enjoy playing then why would someone enjoy watching you do it?”

Jared Harris for FAULT Magazine Issue 27

Photographer | Osvaldo Ponton
Stylist + Art Director | Chaunielle Brown
Groomer | Scott McMahan @ Kate Ryan
Set Designer | Lauren Bahr @ Kate Ryan
Photo Assistants | Nicasio Andrade + Xiangyun Chen
Fashion Assistants | Francis Harris + Ariane Velluire

A far cry from the typical, theatrical masks sputtering their pre-fabricated phrases, Jared Harris is a poised and reflective interviewee. As we banter about Brexit, Boris, and all that bullshit, there’s no suggestion that he’s keen to move things along in the direction of some scripted lines about his next role.

It’s a little surprising that he isn’t fervently plugging what promises to be another significant milestone in his storied career: the role of Absalom Breakspear in Amazon’s 2019 series ‘Carnival Row’. After all, the show reportedly has an enormous budget, stars eye-widening leads in Orlando Bloom and Cara Delevigne, and has been put together largely by his former college pal, René Echevarria. But it’s clear that Jared’s been around the block a few times. When he speaks, it’s with the assurance of someone who knows that the next role is never very far away. And it’s reassuring to get the sense that he’s treating our interview with the same sense of enjoyment as he has the rest of his career to date. It’s all part of the job, after all, so you might as well make the most of it…

FAULT: Tell us about your current project [AMC’s ‘The Terror’]

Jared Harris: The job’s great. It’s sort of special, really: the showrunner is a friend of mine from Duke University, so I’ve known him for a really long time. My younger brother’s on it as well, so I get to work with him. That’s always been a personal goal of mine.

The show itself is really well written, and that’s always the first question that one asks: how’s the script?

Jared Harris for FAULT Magazine Issue 27

There’s often a temptation to qualify actors based on a role call of who they’ve worked with – and you’ve worked with some of the biggest names in the business (Tarantino, Soderbergh, Guy Ritchie, David Fincher etc). How important is that to you? To what extent do you take jobs based on the personnel vs the project?

First of all, it’s the script. That said, when I was starting out – and I’ve kept some of those scripts – I remember reading Dracula (by Francis Ford Coppola) and thinking what a load of old tosh it was! It was almost softcore porn – there were a lot of scenes with girls in flimsy blouses getting their boobs out, and I thought to myself, “What on earth is he doing this for? It’s just dreadful!” But then, of course, you go to see the movie and you think, “wow!”

That’s when I got my first education in dealing with really great directors. You just don’t know what they’re going to do with the project. You have to assume that, with films in particular, it’s almost like a lump of clay. Not quite, because scripts are never entirely shapeless, but the great directors fully intend to reshape the material. That was true when I worked on Natural Born Killers. I read the original Tarantino script and it was completely different to the final film as it was directed by Oliver Stone. So, with films in particular, the director is almost more important than the script.

That said, it’s very difficult to improve a bad script. The shape and the structure has to be there to begin with, otherwise no-one really knows what they’re supposed to be doing. You’ve just got so many people trying to tell a story: the costume designers, the cinematographer… the script is the starting point for all of them.

Jared Harris for FAULT Magazine Issue 27

On that note, what level of influence do you – as an actor – have when it comes to interpreting the script?

It really depends. There are so many different factors at play: what type of movie it is; who’s making it – is it studio or independent; who’s directing it; the size of your role… Generally speaking, if it’s a studio film and you’re not the lead, you have very little input at all and no-one’s really interested in hearing your opinion…! They all just want to cozy up to the movie star and stay there.

That said, when I was working on Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows there was total collaboration with Guy Ritchie and Robert Downey Jr. What tends to happen with that sort of film is that the screenwriter is trying to deliver a fresh product – a new take on an old story – and then, during the endless period of noting (where studio executives give notes on the script), it tends to deviate back to something incredibly familiar. Or, to be blunt, something that you’ve seen a thousand times before…

The studios’ obsession is, “when in doubt, re-state the plot.” Tell the audience what’s going to happen, what’s happening as they’re watching it develop, and then tell them what they just saw. And, of course, it’s fucking boring. So they [Ritchie and Downey Jr] tried to figure out a way of taking out as much of the exposition and plot as possible and delivering just enough so that the audience could stay ahead of the story and yet still be surprised be it: because no-one was as far ahead as Sherlock Holmes.

 

You’ve said that actors nowadays don’t have the same opportunities to rehearse as often as you used to. How do you manage to go between so many different, diverse roles so quickly and without that opportunity to really get into gear?

Well, I’ve never had that opportunity, to tell you the truth. From the beginning, I was always cast late. If you’re the main person on the movie, or the person whom the financing is lining up behind, then you know what you’re going to be doing well in advance. But with me…

George Hall, my principal at Central School of Speech and Drama, said it best, in my opinion. He told us, “You’re not going to have time. You’re going to have to learn how to sketch. You’re going to go into an audition and you’re going to be handed material with 5 minutes to figure something out. You can’t afford to be precious: you can’t do research and character study and work on a back story… you’re not going to have time to do that.” That was some of the most pertinent advice I got from that school.

Jared Harris for FAULT Magazine Issue 27

Special Thank You (Location) | Tomcats Barbershop and Renee McCarty

 

What’s your FAULT?

Oh God. Forget the magazine; you’ll have a phonebook to fill!

I’m never happy with the work that I’ve done. Someone told me once on ‘Mad Men’ that I’d just done an iconic scene, and asked me if that was the one that my character would be remembered for, and that I’d be remembered for then how would I feel about that? And I remember saying, “Can I do it again? Because I think I can do it better…”

Jared’s next project to appear on screens is The Terror for AMC which begins broadcasting right after the finale of Walking Dead. The Terror is an adventure/horror story that fictionalises the real life events surrounding the disappearance of The Franklin Expedition in the Arctic during the Winter of 1847.

 

Find out who else will appear alongside Jared Harris in the issue here

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 27 – THE BEST OF BRITISH ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

Gary Numan: Exclusive FAULT Magazine photoshoot and interview preview

Gary Numan

I know exactly what I’m doing and I’m in a really good place.”

Photo: David Richardson
Styling: Margherita Alaimo
Grooming: Gemma Webb
Words: Flora Neighbour

Given his new-wave edge and awkward façade, not to mention his well-documented Asperger Syndrome, you’d be forgiven for thinking that Gary Numan was a shy, introverted man. You’d be mistaken. The quick-witted and honest songwriter has a lot to say – both about his own past and his (partly) Trump-inspired vision of a near-apocalyptic future. Despite maintaining a cult following to this day, the 80s electro trailblazer has only recently returned to the limelight with Savage, his first top 10 UK album since I, Assassin all the way back in 1982.

FAULT: How’s the tour going?

Gary Numan: It’s great! Last night in Bournemouth was fantastic – much better than the first night, which was a huge shock to the system. I’m still trying to get to grips with it all again while remembering my lyrics. It’s been a completely different experience to my other tours, but I’m really enjoying it.

Do you feel more in control of your work nowadays?

I’ve always felt that I had a say but, now that I manage myself, it’s opened up a whole new path for me. I was always fairly in control of my work before: I’ve always written everything and been hands-on in the process, so it doesn’t feel that different. The thing about my new album, Savage, is the self-managing aspect. It’s been the first big project that I’ve been in charge of from beginning to end without anyone to lean on. I’ve had to make all the big decisions myself, which was a bit daunting to begin with but, strangely enough, once I got into it, I began to realise it wasn’t that too difficult. There’s no black magic involved, just staying organised.

 

Can you talk us through the ideology of Savage?

It came from a book I’d been writing, which was set in a post-global warming future. The idea being that the earth’s temperature wasn’t controlled and it became this unstoppable phenomenon, leaving the planet with a large amount of desert and full of despair. That’s it in a nutshell.

If you go into it further, it looks at people living in that world and how brutal it would be. It looks at the evaporation of [grouped] eastern and western cultures and the potential for us to become far more fragmented and tribal. The album presents snapshots of how brutal it would be, and how unforgiving and savage the environment would become.

It was also influenced by Trump and how he’s come along and started to undo all the good that has been done. I didn’t write the album because of Trump but he certainly helped it along.

 

Gary Numan was shot at Cable Street Studios, London

How has your style developed over the years?

Visually it’s certainly evolved, but I have adapted musically as well. I think it’s easier because my music is essentially electronic. Every time I’ve started a new album, there’s been new technology that helps me to adapt my style and create new sounds. It’s difficult not to change your sound and move forward if you’re working with electronic music – every album should sound like a progression of the one before. My early stuff was very minimal and simple and, as I’ve grown as an artist, it’s become more complicated and heavier. The thing that has never changed – in terms of being recognisable – is my voice.

Would you call yourself a British icon?

No way! I don’t really know what makes an icon. What qualifies an icon? There are many people I look up to but I wouldn’t call them icons. I’m a huge Trent Reznor [Nine Inch Nails] fan. I think he’s done pretty amazing things but he’s not British.

There aren’t many people I would say I look up to, but there are many British people I admire. If you have a look at the music industry now there are some pretty phenomenal artists. For example: M.I.A. In terms of what she’s trying to achieve – both in the music industry and outside [it], she’s definitely someone I admire. There are definitely a lot of artists doing a hell of a lot of good.

What is your FAULT?

I don’t think you’d have enough ink! If I have to choose one, it would probably be my lack of patience. My wife, however, would say that I’m very, very moody. Actually, let’s go with that. My kids would love that I’ve admitted to being moody.

Find out who else will appear in the issue here

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 27 – THE BEST OF BRITISH ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

 

Clean Bandit – Exclusive Online Cover Shoot and Interview

Clean Bandit, formed of Grace Chatto and brothers Jack and Luke Patterson, are known for their inescapably catchy hybrid of electro-classical-pop. The band, which originated in Cambridge, won a Grammy for their song, ‘Rather Be’ and have had three number one hits in the UK to date, a figure that will no doubt continue to climb as they release new music.

We caught up with the trio following their exclusive shoot for FAULT’s online cover, to talk about their upcoming sophomore album, dream collaborations, love of touring and not letting the pressures of success get to them.

GRACE – Top: River Island, Trousers: Aphid, Shoes: stylists own / JACK – Suit: New & Lingwood, T-Shirt: River Island, Shoes: Converse / LUKE – Jumper: Cheap Monday, Trousers: River Island, Shoes: Converse

‘New Eyes’ was released three years ago and you’ve got a follow-up album in the works. Can you tell us anything about the focal themes?

Grace: I think the first album was a lot more lighthearted, whilst our second album, with the lyrics anyway, are more serious. Some of them are about breaking up, like ‘I Miss You’ and ‘Tears’, which will both be on the album. The music is still quite dancey.

Jack: I think other acts find it easier to put out a larger volume of music at a time but as we produce and write all our own stuff, and we also produce and make the music videos, it just takes us so much longer to create each piece of music, so we’ve really been focusing on that the last few years. We were touring our first album for a really long time as well. But our second one is in the works and it’s nearly done. Hopefully early next year.

You’ve previously said that you focus on making individual songs rather than making music as a collective body of work. Is this the approach you’re continuing with?

Luke: I reckon so, yeah. It kinda suits the way we work. We’ve been getting into the video side of things even more since the last [album]; making things even more extravagant working with bigger crews, trying not to limit ourselves.

Grace: A lot of our singles have been quite different styles but one thing that unifies this album is the way that we made it. It was much less produced from the beginning. With the last album, we would think about the sounds and make them on the computer but with these, it was more about the piano and voice firstly, then thinking about all the electronics afterwards.

Jacket, Topshop – Tee, River Island

You’ve collaborated with a number of British solo artists – from Anne Marie and Louisa to Jess Glynne – all of whom, at the time of working with you, were still up and coming. Did you choose to work with these singers because you feel it’s important to help nurture homegrown talent like yourselves?

Jack: All of those people are just so talented in their own right. We’re always looking for amazing voices to either write with or record and perform songs.

Grace: We always try to think about what voice will work best with the song we’ve got. We took ‘Rather Be’ to Jess Glynne and quite a few other singers as well to try out different voices but it worked best with hers. ‘I Miss You’ was different because we wrote it with Julia Michaels and it’s a very personal song to her. We heard Zara Larsson singing at a festival a few years ago, showed her ‘Symphony’, she loved it and came on board with it straightaway. It totally transformed the track. It’s exciting when someone brings a whole new personality and vibe to a song.

GRACE – Top: Monki, Trousers: Monki, Shoes: Jimmy Choo / JACK – Top: Coach, Trousers: Jack’s own, Shoes: Converse / LUKE – Top: Urban Outfitters, Trousers: Luke’s own, Shoes: Converse

Who would you absolutely love to work with?

Jack: Beyonce, Lana del Rey, Drake, Kendrick Lamar…

Luke: Stormzy.

Jack: Frank Ocean.

Grace: Miley Cyrus, Bruno Mars, Bryson Tiller.

You’ve got a big US tour lined up for next year. Do you enjoy life on the road?

Grace: I love it. It’s really cathartic thing for me because I love travelling and seeing real people react to our music in real time. There’s no feeling like it. I also love playing with other people.

Luke: I love being out there. I love dedicated time to tours when you know you’re going to be away for a month and you can really get into the zone.

Jack: Weirdly it’s only on tour that we find a routine. When we’re back in the UK what we’re doing is so disjointed.

Grace: Having a tour manager that looks after us all is like being on a school trip; telling us where to go, what to do [laughs]!

Jacket, Issey Miyake

Which are your favourite songs to play live?

Jack: ‘Disconnect’, our collaboration with Marina and the Diamonds. Some good keyboard moments in there.

Luke: It’s still ‘Rather Be’. We’ve changed it up a bit and have some insane key changes at the end of the song which just take it up a notch.

Jack: We like to remix older tracks as well when we’re playing live.

Grace: ‘Rockabye’ and ‘Birch’.

GRACE – Dress: Amanda Wakeley, Shoes: Stylist’s own / JACK – Top: Levi’s Jeans: River Island, Shoes: Filling Pieces / LUKE – Shirt: Paul Smith @ Finnicks Trousers: All Saints Shoes, Jimmy Choo

You’ve had three number one hits in the UK so far. There must be quite a lot of pressure to keep producing chart-toppers. How do you stay on top of your game and not let this get to you?

Luke: There’s a lot of collaborations that go on that are all about the fame game, but our mentality is just to write a quality tune rather than remixing something just for the sake of it.

Grace: We just try and make songs that we like rather than making what we think other people will like.

Jacket & Jeans, Topshop / Shoes, Grace’s Own

What is your FAULT?

Grace: I’m bossy. It can get on other people’s nerves but it can also help get stuff done.

Luke: What’s my fault?

Jack: Your fault? You’re a bastard [laughs]!

Luke: That’s not my fault, that’s your fault!

 

Find Clean Bandit on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

 

Words: Aimee Phillips

Photography: Jack Alexander

Styling: Holly Ounstead

Make-Up: Elaine Lynskey using MAC Cosmetics

Hair: Narad Kutowaroo using Unite Hair

Styling Assistants: Ellie McWhan and Jordyn Antunes

Special thanks: Burlock

Kojey Radical Speaks to FAULT about ‘In Gods Body’

At just 24 years-old, Kojey Radical is a trailblazer with a strong sense of artistic and personal vision. Nominated for two MOBO awards last year, the London-based poet, musician and mixed media visual artist is mostly known for his unique hybrid of spoken word and rap. But he’s so much more than his music; Kojey’s also the founder of creative collective PUSHCRAYONS and the art director of menswear brand Chelsea Bravo. More recently, he’s joined VOXI by Vodafone as a curator. VOXI is a new mobile service by Vodafone created for and by young people, enabling them to use their phone in the way they want and need. The VOXI SIM lets you use social & chat apps, as much as you like. And it doesn’t affect your data allowance. With as much calling and texting as you want, the freedom to roam in Europe as you do at home, and no contract, VOXI is accessible, flexible and completely transparent. 

We caught up with Kojey to talk about his latest project, ‘In Gods Body, being a curator for VOXI and reflecting one’s authentic self online.

You got into music through your love of painting and poetry, but it’s become your career focus. Do you ever wish you had pursued one of the others instead? Or do you intend to integrate your passions into a project at some point?

I feel like art has always been one entity for me. Everything that I’ve learned over the years has been a different medium to help me create. Me doing music was more from an art focus than a music career focus. It was a means to express myself. I’ve never necessarily switched off from the other mediums. I think eventually, as I have more successes with music, I definitely wanna to turn my hand to creating other experiences to help other generations.

You dropped your latest album, ‘In Gods Body’ two months ago. How has the reception been?

Crazier than I expected because I never intended it to be an album, I think people heard it and appreciated it so much that for them it’s an album. For me, it’s a living and growing project. I don’t think it’s really begun to take shape yet, I think people are still digesting the music. It’s been beautiful to see how much people have connected with it and how much they love it. I think at the moment I’m just in a period of being grateful. There’s definitely more to come.

Which is your favourite track from the album and what does it represent to you?

It changes every week but my favourite two at the moment are ‘Mood’ and ‘Icarus’. ‘Mood’ because it represents so much for me in terms of my creative team coming together to pull off things I never thought were possible. The space that I was in when I wrote it was genuine, so I think it’s one of my most honest pieces. ‘Icarus’ because of the stories I’ve heard in response to people listening to it. Things like that make all the difference when you’re a creator.

You were on tour for the best part of this year. Now that it’s over, do you miss life on the road?

I’m back on the road again soon. I’m going to Amsterdam, Berlin, Brazil, and South Africa. It’s been a wild experience this whole year, to be honest.

You’re currently working with VOXI by Vodafone as a curator. What does this role involve?

As a creator, I’m working with a team of young people, which is the most exciting part of this whole experience; being able to sit down and talk with new creators and find out what’s happening. Everyone’s under 25 which is completely rare for a big project like this. I think what Vodafone have created with VOXI is completely unique and I’m just there to help!

How do you hope to inspire other young people?

I just wanna be able to offer a perspective of reality. When I was growing up and trying to get into the creative field, you’re given so much overly optimistic advice, rather than actually being given key pieces of information that you can take away and learn from. I just wanna be honest with them, find out what they wanna do and help them find the best way to achieve it.

What advice would you give to your younger self?

I would say, if the milk looks off, don’t drink it. I would say, you don’t look good in turquoise, and I would also say, stay focused; remember that not every no means the door is closed but more that you have to find a new way in. I think if you have that approach to life, nothing can really defeat you.

You’re pretty active on social media and have amassed quite a loyal following. With social media being one of the main perception builders about the character of others, how do you ensure that your profile represents the artist you want to be?

The internet makes it very easy to fabricate who you are. We’re in a day and age where you can brand being yourself and monetise that. It’s a great tool to be able to kickstart your earliest ideas. Social media allowed me to do so when I first started writing poetry on the internet. I wasn’t sure how that would create links to other things but slowly and surely it did. It wasn’t about the views, it was about getting something out into the world so people could appreciate it. I think that’s one of the best things about social media and how we can use it. I don’t think you can try to be authentic, I think you wake up and you’re authentic.

What is your FAULT?

I don’t get excited by things, I’m constantly in a state of acceptance and sometimes that’s a good thing and sometimes that’s a bad thing. You wanna make sure you’re doing good for everyone when you’re on stage, you’re saying the right things and people are enjoying the music.

Words: Aimee Phillips

Paloma Faith: Exclusive Fault Magazine Issue 27 Covershoot And Interview Preview

Paloma Faith

“the world keeps spinning and somehow you find your way”

Photography: Ram Shergill

Fashion Editor: Rachel Holland

Makeup: Lan Nguyen-grealis

Hair: Eammon

Nails: Cherrie Snow

Fashion Assistants: Ana Carnu & Hebe Fox

Words Miles Holder

Since the release of her debut album, Do You Want the Truth or Something Beautiful? Paloma Faith unique vocal tone has been heard the world over. While working as a life model, Paloma’s goal was to be seen, as a Brit award-winning solo artist, Paloma’s goal was to be heard and seeming from her politically charged but optimistic upcoming album, The Architect, Paloma seeks to be a voice for the otherwise unheard. About to embark on a 17 date tour, we caught up with Paloma to discuss her career, the album and all her FAULTs.

 

Your album opens with a spoken word from Samuel L Jackson, how did you both come to be working together?

He has a charity called ‘One For The Boys’ and I did lots of work for them, and he once grabbed my arm and said ‘I owe you a favour and I’m not somebody who says that lightly.’ I was contemplating asking him to do my supermarket that week but decided to use it on something more valuable.

 

 

 

Owen Jones has a politically charged spoken word on the album, what was it about Owen that made his inclusion so significant to you?

I took him on tour with me at the end of my last campaign, and I think he’s fantastic. He’s a sign of hope for younger generations and speaks in a transparent way, which is lacking in politics today. People don’t understand what they hear a lot of the time, but with Owen, he gets through to people. He’s also an optimist and despite the fact that he’s fighting for something out of arms reach, he has an energy of hope which all the great speakers like JFK, Obama and Nelson Mandela had it. It felt important to not be like “the world is shit, and there’s nothing we can do about it” throughout the album.

 

Your song with John Legend is very uplifting, and the record isn’t all doom and gloom. Why was it essential for you to have a mixture of the two themes?

The main album that inspired me was Marvin Gaye’s What’s Going On because that’s an album that about kindness and compassion which is missing from the world. It’s all very well looking at numbers and seeing what needs adjusting, but not enough thought is put into the people affected by those choices. I feel like this album is reaching out to be a voice for the unheard.

 

What’s been the hardest hurdle for you to climb in the music industry?

I tend to be someone who can’t do anything the easy way. I got my first job at 15 and I’ve never been surprised by the hurdles in my way because I’ve always expected there to be hurdles. I’ve accepted that, but I think the hardest thing to overcome in life as a whole would be childbirth! I’ve never had to lose weight, and I have a new respect for people who you see trying to change their life for the better because it can be hard. When you have a kid for the first time, no one has entirely told you how terrible it is, and you lay there thinking “I’ll never get my life back again”.

What is your FAULT?

I overthink things, but with FAULTs, in general, I think they manifest positively and negatively. You might go out with someone like in my case and say “he’s so bloody relaxed and it’s frustrating me so much” when I have to go to the airport, but then it’s a godsend when I go home from being stressed, and there’s air of calm throughout the whole house.

Find out who else will appear in the issue here

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 27 – THE BEST OF BRITISH ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

 

Seal Exclusive FAULT Magazine Issue 27 Menswear Covershoot Preview

Seal

“These are people who succeed.”

Seal FAULT Magazine cover

Photography: Dvora | Menswear Editor: Kristine Kilty | Grooming: Evan Huang | Fashion Assistant: Lily Davies | Fashion Assistant: Hannah Sheridan |

Shot on location at Blacks Club, 67 Dean St

Words: Miles Holder

 

With a career nearing its thirty-year milestone, Seal is one of the few British artists to reach a universally agreed upon “legend” status. Never one to compromise on his artistry, style and unique God-given vocal talents; with four Grammy awards to his name, over thirty million records sold worldwide and releasing a brand new album entitled ‘Standards‘, we sat down with Seal to discuss just what it takes to carve out a career as prestigious as his.

 

Let’s take it back to the Seal of the early 90’s, for you, what has been your greatest area of growth?

The most significant change would be my understanding of the point of performance from the perspective of the audience. Performance is about communication, and I don’t mean that as simple question and answer, but where you and your audience share dialogue on different levels. I now understand my audience appreciate that they are as much a part of the production and experience as I am. I would like to think I’ve made a much more significant point about communicating and engaging with my listeners when I’m on stage.

 

 

Seal FAULT Magazine cover

 

What’s been your hardest personal FAULT and hurdle to overcome?

Fear. Fear in all of its other forms, its hurtful and deceitful forms. The most significant hurdle for me is very much the same thing. I find myself drifting too far from the moment, and when you’re a performer, that’s not healthy.

 

Why did you think now was the best time to release a standards album?

I always toyed with the idea of a standards record, and ultimately I love the songs as opposed to them merely being “standards”. They’re written in a time which is all focused on the voice, a time where singers sang, and dancers danced.

 

You’ve said that Smile is now your favourite song and it seems the people who love the song that’s it’s therapeutic, a reminder to themselves to smile through their underlying pain, is that the same for you?

I can’t listen to ‘Smile’ without tearing up. I like it because it doesn’t matter who you, what age, your culture, gender or outlook on life, the sentiment will relate to you. At some point in your life, we have all gone through an experience where you’ve had to force a smile through a situation. Smiling even though your heart is aching and all you want to do at that point is break down in tears, and you’ve got to smile through it. I find it the happiest and saddest song for me on a personal level. I feel the song, and now in my life, I feel the song resonates more than ever before.

We are living in a very turbulent time and hearing a song like ‘Smile’; it just holds a message that I most want to communicate. It’s chaotic, and it’s turbulent, but for me, the critical thing is to find balance and always remember to smile.

 

What is your FAULT?

Relationships. They’re hard for me, but I’m learning. And that goes for relationships of all kinds. Even with my children, when I’m trying to get through to one of then, and my method is not working, I’m learning that sometimes the best solution is to try something new as opposed to keeping to the same old routine.

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 26 – THE BEST OF BRITISH ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40