FAULT Focus: Screenwriter and novelist Kelly Oxford for FAULT Issue 19

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Kelly Oxford was shot at her LA office by Brian Ziff. Interview by Chris Purnell.
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Most of us had heard of her back around 2010 when the number of followers one had became a big deal. Twitter personalities where starting to break into the mainstream, and she was one of the first. But we didn’t know her name. We were told that she was the Canadian housewife with a million Twitter followers who parleyed that into a screenwriting career, had a glamorous life in LA and pissed off a million writers that wondered how she got so lucky.

But the truth was less sensational. It involved hard work, practice and years of writing for little to no money. It wasn’t the American dream I had imagined. Or even cared to.

Now Kelly Oxford is famous, despite what she tells us. She is a New York Times bestselling author, she has a TV deal, a movie deal, she gets to talk to FAULT, and still finds time to annoy the Kardashians and their legions on Twitter: “If you can name 5 Kardashians but can’t name 5 countries in Asia, stick a knife in an electrical socket.”

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Get the full shoot and interview – only in FAULT Issue 19.
Click here to order your copy for delivery worldwide!

FAULT: Do you know how the story of you coming out of nowhere came about?

Kelly: The first time I got picked up by the media was a charity event in Los Angeles called ‘Night of 140 Tweets’ at the very beginning of 2010. That was a celebrity event where people would read a Tweet was to raise money for disaster relief in Haiti. I was the only one out of 140 people that wasn’t a celebrity. I was just a writer from Canada. I was a housewife. I was somebody who nobody really knew and I was only invited because people that were involved with this – actors and writers – liked me on Twitter and thought, “if we put her on this it’ll make sense because she’s very popular on Twitter and this is a night of tweeting.” All of a sudden I was part of a group of people when I really wasn’t one of them.

How did it [really] begin for you?

If I had been born in the United States, I’m 100% sure that when I graduated high school I would have moved to Los Angeles and started a normal writing career by becoming an assistant and working my way up the ranks. But I was Canadian. That sort of thing wasn’t an option for me. I could have moved down here and done all that stuff, lots of Canadians have, but I wasn’t ambitious about getting a career. I’d rather have a family and stay at home and pursue my passion. So I just did what I did, which was to just take some writing classes and write things on my Geocity page and just wonder if anybody would read it.

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 19 – The Millions Issue – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

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Tyga – FAULT Issue 19 Music section cover star

 

Tyga - FAULT Issue 19 Music cover

FAULT Issue 19’s Music section cover star Tyga was shot by Dove Shore and styled by Leah Adicoff and Leah Henken.
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Cash Money/Young Money rapper and entrepreneur Tyga is hard at work perfecting The Gold Album: 18th Dynasty, set to drop November 18th. This could explain why, despite numerous efforts to connect with Tyga, he was unavailable to speak with FAULT. Nevertheless, this third studio release seems to be an early 25th birthday present, a passion project that has been gestating since the summer.

Tyga has been steadily rolling out select tracks from the album, including ‘Wait For a Minute’ featuring Justin Bieber and ‘Hookah’ featuring Young Thug. Additionally, Tyga has teamed up with past collaborator Chris Brown for the Fan of a Fan 2 mixtape, the follow-up to the 2010 release that featured ‘Deuces’.

Tyga for FAULT Magazine Issue 19

Tyga wears designs by Official Last Kings, Saint Laurent, Givenchy & more in this FAULT exclusive shoot.Words by Vanessa Willoughby

Like any good mini-mogul, the rapper has made efforts to gain inside knowledge of his business ventures. The rapper flew from California to New York City to attend NY Fashion Week, where he made an appearance at Alexander Wang’s Spring 2015 show.

With such a packed schedule, it’s easy to see why Tyga is always on the go. After all, when you’re busy overseeing a fledgling empire, who really has time to make small talk?

Tyga - FAULT Issue 19 (inside 2)

Get the full shoot and interview – only in FAULT Issue 19.
Click here to order your copy for delivery worldwide!

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 19 – The Millions Issue – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

Debby Ryan – our Style section cover for FAULT Issue 19

debby ryan - fault issue 19 style cover

FAULT Issue 19’s Style section cover star Debby Ryan was shot by Brian Ziff and styled by Avo Yermagyan.
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Debby Ryan‘s staggering diversity as an artist sits nicely with a very healthy dose of natural talent and her near-zealous work ethic. It is the combination of these factors that marks Debby out as an anomaly in an age when so many of her peers seem content to reach a certain point before resting on their laurels. For Debby, it seems, her work has only just begun.

Ryan’s big break came in 2008 when she landed the role of Bailey on the Disney Channel’s original series ‘The Suite Life on Deck’. She now not only stars in Disney’s smash hit show ‘Jessie’, but has also produced, directed and written for the series.

This Summer the actress released a long-awaited debut album, One, with her band, The Never Ending. Featuring crystal clear vocals from Ryan, the simple, straightforward style with which she has launched her music career away from Disney has seen her gain widespread acclaim from critics and fans alike.

FAULT had the pleasure of spending the day with Debby on our exclusive shoot for Issue 19. We took the opportunity to pinpoint her various inspirations for tracks on her album, her direct involvement with changes to her character on ‘Jessie’ and what lies ahead for the star in the near future.

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Production by Zizi Zarkadas + Leah Blewitt

FAULT: You recently released your album One with your band, The Never Ending. How did you came up with your group’s name and how did you and your bandmates meet?

Debby: I was actually working on another music project and started writing a lot of songs with friends. Throughout the process these lyrics and melodies really started to develop as part of the collaboration, all of which really felt like “me” – not to sound cliché [laughs]!

It was definitely a passion project, bringing my songs, words and sounds all together and telling a story. Music to me is something that lasts longer than ourselves. The idea of being a successful musician or artist is really never-ending because you’re always growing and being inspired- so that is how the band name came about.

What’s it been like for you to basically grow up in the public eye? Do you ever get used to fame and to your fans being interested in what you do both on and off the screen?

Well, due to social media, things have changed a lot since I first started. There is definitely way more access to peoples lives. I’m inherently a private person – believe it or not. It’s funny to me what the media focuses on and things that make “the news” – like hair color changes [laughs]! Don’t get me wrong: I am truly blessed and I love my fans – it’s just [that] sometimes the assumptions people, [and] media make about you or [when they think] that they truly know you on a personal level….

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Interview by Leah Blewitt

How would you describe you own personal style?

I wear a a lot of black on black and I LOVE vintage. Definitely a laid back, comfortable style but always with a feminine touch. I love mixing and matching, taking basic black jeans and pairing a more casual piece from Topshop with a designer like Balenciaga.

What is your FAULT?

Well, if you asked my friends they will tell you [that] I’m the mom – or act like a mom! So hmm… I’d say taking in strays. I really love animals and just adopted another kitten recently.

I also take in drummers – my dummer is living with us as well [laughs]!

debby ryan - fault issue 19 (inside 3)

Get the full shoot and interview – only in FAULT Issue 19.
Click here to order your copy for delivery worldwide!

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 19 – The Millions Issue – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

FAULT Interviews: Aubrey Plaza from ‘Parks and Recreation’ and ‘Life After Beth’

She’s the star of new rom-zom-com Life After Beth, the story of a woman who comes back from the grave to her loving boyfriend before he then has to deal with her slowly turning into a Romero-esque zombie. She plays the dead-pan April Ludgate on the long running American sitcom ‘Parks and Recreation’. She is the girl whose face you know from that thing you thought was funny.

She also hurt my feelings.

It wasn’t personal. I got the sense that she hates all journalists.

 

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It’s fair to say that a fair few artists, actors and musicians hate talking about their work to magazines and newspapers. We’re seen as a part of the ugly side of show business. And we get it: Aubrey Plaza was deposited in a small, modern but clinical hotel room in Edinburgh before a million interviewers came in and asked her an endless series of the same questions all day. We’d hate it too.

With that in mind, we wanted to get through all the basic stuff up front so that we could find out who she really is.

FAULT: You must get asked the same questions all the time, so could you go through the answers that you give everyone else?
Aubrey: I improvised a little bit but we didn’t have that much time because we were on a really tight schedule. I did not prepare by watching any other zombie movies because I wanted to create my own zombie and I didn’t want to copy any other zombies and also, zombies aren’t real so there’s not like one zombie that I could watch to be like, that’s not an authentic zombie. A zombie can be whatever you want it to be, I like spaghetti… Night of the Living Dead, Dawn of the Dead… I don’t know. I really don’t like to be asked what my favourite anything is because I don’t like favourites.

Why not?
Because I’m indecisive and I don’t feel strongly about anything.

 

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Not caring does seem like your persona. I’m wondering how much of that is true.
I don’t know. I don’t know who I am. I don’t have a very good perspective on myself. You should ask my therapist. She would know better.

Do you watch any of the stuff you’re in?
No.

Maybe that will give you perspective.
Why? Those are just characters. Because my voice sounds monotone people think I’m being sarcastic all the time. When I’m in things on film or TV, people think I’m doing the same thing over and over again – but this is just how I sound normally.

Do you get that a lot?
Yeah, all the time. People say I’m, like, being dead pan or something – which I am sometimes when the role calls for it – but sometimes I’m not. My voice just sounds like that.

That sounds really dismissive…
That’s what people do, they just dismiss you.

People do? Like who?
People like you, interviewers, reviewers, everyone does it.

Yeah, we do. On any kind of long running show people are going to start to see you just as that character an nothing else. Do you consciously try and do something different?
I think because I’ve been on a TV show for so long, and because it was one of the first things I did, that’s just the first impression people have of me and they can’t get it out of their head. So I’m always trying to do things to surprise people – but I’m not so much concerned with that as I am with just doing good work. I don’t make decisions based on trying to battle my TV persona – but it is in my head. I can’t help it. It’s frustrating to be pigeon-holed but I like the challenge of changing people’s minds.

 

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So what do you look for in a role you take on?
It’s case by case. My acting coach told me that the parts that I want or the parts that I am drawn to are ones where the character has struggles that I am also trying to work out in my own life. I use them as therapy for myself. If I’m feeling really angry, like now…

No one is making you talk to me.
I’m drawn to parts where I get to be really physical and just kick some people’s ass or something. It’s cathartic.

That sounds great if you’re aware that is what you’re doing. Have you always been aware of that?
No, not always. I just realised recently. When I read scripts I think about them in terms of, “will this be something that would be good for me in my life right now?” Some actors can treat it like a job and then, when they go home, they go back to being themselves – but I just get really obsessed. I have to choose things that I really want to take over for a month or two months, or however long it’s going to take, because I’m inviting this thing into my life and I have to really embrace it.

 

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That sounds like a lot of pressure. Is that fun?
It’s fun while I do it, because I’m in it and not aware of what I’m doing, so I’m just being. Whenever I finish a movie, I always get really depressed. It’s like withdrawal. Being a character is like a drug that’ll get you high two months doing, then when it’s over you just stop and go home. I guess you’ll have to interview me while I’m shooting a movie and see if I’m acting like a crazy person or not.

I’ll check my schedule.
I’m going to call you every day to check.

I might be busy
Doing what?

How dare you! Writing about actors that I don’t care about. Feel that sting? Words hurt, don’t they?
I don’t care!

You established that earlier on!

 

Interview by Chris Purnell

 

 

Meet The Dove & The Wolf

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By Corrina Gramma

The Dove and The Wolf are two French girlfriends who started to play music together at age 14. They came to FAULT’s attention through Nowness that recently shared Lou + Paloma’s The Words You Said music video directed by Zack Spiger and featuring models and actors Paul Boche and Jessamine Bliss Bell. A special thanks to Paloma’s mother for matching these two souls together and to fashion designer Gaby Basora + singer Rachael Yamagata who sort of boosted up their music career… Meet the dove, Paloma Gil, and the wolf, Louise Hayat-Camard.

FAULT : Louise, Paloma, who are you ?

Paloma : We are both twenty-four and were full-time students up until 6 months ago – as we were offered to go on a 7 week long US and Canada tour, we both decided to drop out of school. I was studying cinema.

Louise : And I was studying architecture.

FAULT : School is out of mind, forever ?

Paloma : We’ll see. For now we’re taking the year off to focus on music, because that’s what we really want to do.

FAULT : How did you two connect ? Tell us how it all started please.

Louise : We actually met online, ten years ago, at age 14. I was living in Martinique and I met Paloma’s mother IRL, at a dinner party. We had a very long talk and I guess I somehow reminded her of Paloma so she thought it’d be fantastic to meet. But because I lived across the Atlantic, that had to happen on MSN messenger!

Paloma : Yes, we were only talking about music. We met two months later, in April 2004, when Lou was visiting her father in Paris.

FAULT : Where does this passion for music come from ?

Paloma : I don’t really know… I started playing the viola when I was 4, and then I got into playing the guitar when I was 13. I enjoyed it more cause I could sing along.

Louise : I started with the piano, and played it for years – I was taking lessons but I smoothly stopped as I was not really into reading music sheets… So at 13, I swapped the piano for the guitar. The first guitar I played was my birth’s gift from my father.

FAULT :  How would you describe your musical genre ?

Paloma : A friend of ours once described us as a ‘ambient pop-folk’ band, and I liked it. I think it is pretty accurate.

Louise : It is a tricky one. We don’t really have a specific genre – it is a mix of 1960’s harmonies and modern sounds.

FAULT : Where do your respective musical influences meet ?

Paloma : We listen to the same music. I mean, we first became friends because we were listening to the same bands…

Louise : And we spend almost all of our time together, so our references are very similar. We used to listen to a lot of British bands but most of the music we listen to now, is american. We listen to everything… From Boyz II Men to Grizzly Bear, Sharon Van Etten, James Blake.

Paloma : And Beyoncé !

FAULT : What is on your mind at the moment ?

Louise : I recently went to see Phox live – they gave such a generous performance, it was magical !

Paloma : Blake Mills’s new record just came out and I have been listening to it a lot… We also went to see Lauryn Hill a few days ago. It felt amazing to immerse ourselves in her music again.

FAULT : Why did you pick an English name for your French band ?

Paloma : Lou woke up one day and said she had a dream about us being called The Dove and The Wolf. It felt right.

Louise : Paloma is Spanish for « dove » and people call me « Lou » which is almost « Loup », « wolf » in French.

FAULT : And do you think it suits both of you in the end? Paloma being the dove and Louise, the wolf…

Paloma : I think there is a little bit of both in each of us.

FAULT :  Woodstock, NY vs. Paris : was it more inspiring to record in NY ?

Louise : I’m not sure whether or not it was more inspiring to record in NY, it was just a very different experience. One thing is for sure, we enjoy recording in houses surrounded by the woods! We recorded our first EP (4 tracks) two years ago in the countryside two hours away from Paris. We packed the car with a bunch of instruments and recording equipment that we borrowed from friends and we locked ourselves in for ten days to make music. And six months ago, we went up to Woodstock, NY, to record a full album. It was such an incredible experience. We’re only releasing two of the songs we recorded because right now we do everything ourselves, from A to Z, and it would’ve been difficult to mix, master and press a full record all by ourselves. It will be our first full album and we want to do it the right way. We’re hoping to release it with the help of a label ; we will see after touring with Rachael Yamagata what is next for us.

FAULT :  How did you meet Rachael Yamagata?

Paloma : We met Rachael two years ago after she played in Paris and we had a mutual crush on each other. We kept in touch and she invited us to sing with her in NYC a few times when we were visiting. When she heard that we were going to record an album in Nashville, she said there was no way we’d go there and that we were to record in her home studio in Woodstock, NY. No question asked! So we did, and it was amazing!

FAULT : I read a piece about you and your very first video Springtime through the New York Times blog. Nice for a young French duo…

Paloma : We collabotared with Gaby Basora, the fashion designer for Tucker, for our Springtime video. The deal was to make a promotional video for her new collection and in exchange we’d have a music video for our new track. It was shot at Far Rockaway, in Queens. It was a lot of fun. The director had planned that I would be driving a car in the video. Except that I didn’t have my licence! So in the video, when you see me arriving in a legit 1968 Mustang, I am actually being pushed by the team not to take any risks: the owner of the car was on set! (Laughs) Anyways, It was a fantastic experience.

Louise : The director, Yelena Yemchuk, is a wonderful artist. I feel very lucky we got to work with her. She also paints and does photography ; she has directed music videos for The Smashing Pumpkins before… So the combo of the indie New Yorker fashion designer + the young french duo + the artist/director caught the eye of the New York Times and they wrote a piece about it.

FAULT : And this post led you to acclaimed photographer Sebastian Kim.

Louise : It was an incredible experience to work with Sebastian. It was so easy to pose for him. We stayed in touch since ; the cover of our new record is actually an illustration by Corinna Gramma based on one of the photographs he took for the New York Times.

FAULT : Since your early beginnings, what are the best encounters you’ve made ?

Paloma : The Swedish singer Isabel Sörling who sang on two of our former tracks and the singer/guitar player of the band The Shivers. I saw him play at a house show in Brooklyn ; we talked and kept in touch. We asked him to play on our new album because he is just so fucking talented…

FAULT : You seem to be surrounded by a cool crowd of friends… Can you tell us more about your collaboration with Zack Spiger please ?

Louise : A friend, who works with Zack told me about him. I started watching all of his videos and I literally fell in love with his work. He has a very unique way to film music, I’m not sure how he does it but it is magic! And I find it so amazing that he uses film only. We both really support that.

Paloma : About a year ago, we met up and started talking about working together. When we got back from Woodstock, we played him the rough mixes, and he picked The Words You Said.

FAULT : How do you two write and compose ?

Louise : We write and compose together. Paloma sometimes comes up with a chord progression and I find a melody to go with it or vice-versa. It’s a bit like in our daily routine when we finish each other’s sentences… For the most part we write the music first and the words come along.

FAULT : And the words naturally come in English…

Louise : To be honest, we don’t really know how to write songs in French!

Paloma : And besides the fact that we both speak english a lot on a regular basis, our musical background is mostly American, so writing in English feels more natural to us.

FAULT : Can you tell us about your Sofar Sounds experience please ?

Louise : I first heard about this series of gigs through friends. Our mutual friend Sophie attended a gig and she thought it would be awesome to have us performing at the next session so she introduced us to the Parisian organizer and he contacted us. We played in a beautiful apartment at les Abbesses. I had never experienced that before. An acoustic set can be very tricky but playing for people who were being very attentive, with no glasses being broken or doors being slammed, that was amazing.

Paloma : We had played at the Bus Palladium the night before so it was definitely different! And even if the audience didn’t know us at all, they were really listening to our music. Makes playing and singing a lot easier!

Louise : And when we played our sing-along song and they sang with us. It was a lot of fun.

FAULT : What if music wears you out one day… ?

Paloma :  It won’t ever happen !

Louise : For the moment we have no other aspirations than to share our music and I hope it will stay that way.

FAULT : What is your FAULT ?

Louise + Paloma : We are too cool for school !

 

Tour dates US & Canada, with Rachael Yamagata, October 2nd – November 18th.

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Meet New Yorker contrabassist Aakaash Israni, DoM.

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Qasim Naqvi, Amino Belyamani and Aakaash Israni

I remember when I first found out about them. It was during the Winter Jazz Festival 2014 in New York city at Le Poisson Rouge. I was primiraly coming to see perform my friend Keren Ann for a little hour, where I unexpectedly met the French couturier Maxime Simoens and his Press officer Tomek Kolarski. We chatted for a bit until the next band… Red stripe done, I was totally washed out and went to the exit when I got curious about three guys playing new sounds in the pitch dark room with tiny blue spots lighting their instruments. I wanted to listen more so I stayed and I got trapped into their lawless universe… I rushed to the NYC Law School, a few doors down from Le Poisson Rouge, to buy their record and I played it five times in a row before sleeping. The New York Times, NPR Music, Pitchfork, The New Yorker, BBC 3 recently raved about them and now FAULT invites you to take a minute and listen to their haunting -perverse in a good way- music. Meet New Yorker contrabassist Aakaash Israni of the promising band Dawn Of Midi.

 

FAULT : Who are you, Aakaash Israni ?

Aakaash: I was born in India and raised in California. I never felt quite right anywhere until moving to New York at age 29. I started music in 3rd grade, mesmerized by Beethoven’s 5th symphony and Paco de Lucia as a child…. I grew up in San Diego, which is 2 hours south of LA.

FAULT : How did you connect with Amino and Qasim –the pianist and the drummer of the band respectively?

Aakaash : We met at CalArts as friends before we ever thought of playing music together. Amino and Qasim were in a trio with an excellent bassist named Sam Minaie already, so instead we played tennis.

FAULT : Who were your mentor(s) at school ?

Aakaash : The great bassist and composer Mark Dresser and the Master Ghanaian drummer Alfred Ladzekpo.

FAULT : What does DoM mean ?

Aakaash : Dawn of Midi was a phrase Qasim spoke once describing the music of the classical composers of the early 1980’s. It was sort of a non-sequiter in relation to the music we were making at the time (Our debut album First), which was freely improvised and sort of avant-garde. It made no sense. We had no idea we would make an album years later (Dysnomia) that would make the band name appear deliberate.

When we started we only made completely improvised music, so obviously there was no leader. Dysnomia, which leans heavily on the knowledge of African rhythmic concepts, has shifted this dynamic a bit. The album was composed by Amino and myself. Both Amino and I studied in Paris, but at different times. He was at the conservatoire for piano before leaving for CalArts, whereas I left CalArts to go to Paris and study music composition.

FAULT : Can you share with us an anecdote when writing/composing for Dysnomia, please ?

Aakaash : There was a lot of tension, Qasim was losing his father to cancer and was being given these incredibly challenging drum parts to learn and we had about 150 rehearsals before we went to the studio. By the time the album was recorded, our girlfriends had all left us, Qasim’s father was gone, and the hard times were only just beginning!

FAULT : Why creating/performing in darkness ?

Aakaash : This began at CalArts when we first met. I’ve always enjoyed closing my eyes at concerts and have always wanted to give concerts in complete darkness. I think vision dominates our perception and removing it enhances our experience of sound so when we first began improvising together I suggested we do so in the dark.

FAULT : What kind of music do you listen to ?

Aakaash : A lot of African drumming music -from Ghana and Morocco. Also a lot of pop music. I like to try and understand what makes pop music work on the ear the way it does. It is extremely efficient, it has to make you fall in love in three minutes.

FAULT : What are your latest findings in music ?

Aakaash : Shing Kee by Carl Stone.

FAULT : What is your dream collaboration ?

Aakaash : A music video with dancer Marquese Scott directed by David Lynch.

FAULT : What is your FAULT ?

Aakaash : I care too much

 

Dysnomia

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Demi Lovato for FAULT Issue 19 – first look (issue is available to pre-order NOW!)

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FAULT Issue 19 reversible cover star Demi Lovato was shot by Giuliano Bekor and styled by Avo Yermagyan.
Click here to pre-order your copy of this issue!

FAULT Magazine Issue 19 – the Millions Issue will feature American pop phenomenon Demi Lovato as its reversible cover star this Fall. Eminently suitable for the issue theme, Demi has over 60million fans on Facebook and Twitter alone and is one of the most influential popular culture figures in the world today.

Demi’s feature – which includes an in-depth interview and exclusive photoshoot by photographer Giuliano Bekor and stylist Avo Yermagyan – runs over 12 pages in the print issue. Demi also covers the Beauty section inside the magazine.

The shoot, based on the issue’s theme of ‘Millions’, showcases Demi as an artist whose every move has ramifications on a globally impactful scale. As a role model to millions, her words and actions are reviewed, analysed, dissected and reflected over and over again. Under those circumstances, one can only imagine what a surreal experience it must be to come face to face with the person behind the lens…

In her interview, Demi discusses the responsibility that comes with being a role model, her collaborations with people like Cher Lloyd and the Vamps, her incipient interests in philanthropy and world affairs and, of course, her music.

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Production by Giuliano Bekor + Leah Blewitt

FAULT: You’ve spoken about how the album marked a real shift in sound for you, towards more dance-inspired tracks. Was that something that you deliberately wanted to create or was it something that happened organically?

Everything that happened on the album happened organically. Nothing was really planned in terms of “I want a dance song” or anything like that- it just kind of happened! It’s exciting to show people a different side of myself.

In terms of the collaborations (most recently with Cher Lloyd and The Vamps), how do they come into being?

Sometime you come up with a part in a song and you instantly know who you’re looking for. With ‘Really Don’t Care’, [her latest single], Cher instantly came to my mind. She’s got a lot of attitude and a lot of sass and was perfect for the song. Other times it just kind of happens- you meet someone and you write together and it turns out to be an awesome song.

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Interview by Will Ballantyne-Reid

You’ve become an inspirational figure not just for your fans but even for those unfamiliar with your music as a result of your philanthropic projects and your work with anti-bullying campaigns and mental health awareness. How do these projects shape your career and your own creative process?

Well these projects were really born out of my relationship with my fans, where they are able to look up to me no matter what they’re going through. I really like being there for them in that way. I pride myself in being a role model but I’m not perfect- I curse like a sailor and I sometimes make mistakes but at the same time I want to be what I know my little sister and that younger generation needs.

Are there any difficulties that come with being in the public eye, and especially that ‘role model’ tag?

I use to get frustrated that just because I wanted to sing, I was automatically expected to be a role model. But I had to grow up and realise that no matter what I do I’m going to be somebody’s role model. It’s true what they say- “with great power comes great responsibility”- and everybody’s career is different but for me, I had to grow up and embrace it rather than resent it, as that only made me resent my career.

Demi Lovato- FAULT Magazine Issue 19 - inside Beauty section cover WEB

Get the full shoot and interview – only in FAULT Issue 19.
Click here to order your copy for delivery worldwide!

Going forward with your music and your philanthropy work, what do you feel is the next step?

I take my life day by day; some day I’m really involved with one charity, and another I’m really focussed on another. In this moment, I’m really dedicated to the scholarship program that I created in order to provide mental health services to people that can’t afford it on their own.

Demi’s album, DEMI, is out now

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 19 – The Millions Issue – IS AVAILABLE TO PRE-ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

Usher – first look at our exclusive shoot for FAULT Issue 19’s front cover

Usher cover (web)

FAULT Issue 19 front cover star Usher was shot by Sinisha Nisevic and styled by Sammy and Judy/Cloutier Remix.
Click here to pre-order your copy of this issue!

FAULT Magazine Issue 19 – the Millions Issue will feature legendary R&B recording artist Usher as its front cover feature this Fall. Having already sold nearly 23million records in the US alone, Usher is undoubtedly one of the most instantly recognisable faces in the music industry today – just as he was after the release of his first UK number one single, ‘You Make Me Wanna’, back in 1997.

Usher’s feature – which includes an in-depth interview alongside the exclusive photoshoot by photographer Sinisha Nisevic and stylists Sammy and Judy (aka renowned LA celebrity stylists The Kids) – runs over 13 pages in the print issue. Usher also covers the Men’s Fashion section inside the magazine.

The shoot, based on the issue’s theme of ‘Millions‘, is designed to showcase two distinct sides to Usher’s character. In one sense, the shoot presents the public face of a star known and loved by ‘millions’ but, juxtaposed with this, we also see a revelatory side of a sensitive, thoughtful man. The latter gives insight into the thought process of a man who has reached the point in his career where keeping his fans happy and challenging both himself and the limits of his creativity have become his most important goals.

There is an Usher who poses happily with models and plays up to the camera and also the Usher who dances in the studio as much for his own amusement as for the sake of a great photo. The great thing for Usher, one feels, is that for him– more often than not – those two worlds are intertwined.

In his interview, entitled ‘The Man Who Can Do it All’, Usher discusses his role on ‘The Voice’, his motivations and goals for producing music that he loves, regardless of commercial success, his upcoming acting role in ‘Hands of Stone’, the biopic of famed boxer Sugar Ray Leonard and, of course, the main themes of his highly anticipated new album.

Usher - FAULT Magazine Issue 19 - inside 2 WEB

Interview by Heather Seidler

FAULT: Did you learn anything from doing ‘The Voice’ that you’ll use in your own career?

Usher: Part of the reason why I did ‘The Voice’ was so people would get a chance to see a different perception of me….The more I know about life, the more I know about people, the greater the person I am, the more understanding I have about how to make music and how to do things that will grow us as people.

[So making this album was] not about making commercial hits?

I don’t feel that I’ve got to sell out this tour, or sell crazy amounts of albums, or have the number one single. It’s great to have all those things, but that isn’t what I’m doing.

Usher - FAULT Magazine Issue 19 - inside 1 WEB

Creative Director: Andre Bato Producers: Leah Blewitt & Bryant Robinson Special Thanks: Shoshanna Stone & Team Usher

 

Let’s talk about the movie you just finished, Hands of Stone. Tell me about your role as Sugar Ray Leonard.

The film revolves around a very compelling story in history. A lot of people want to know what happened with Roberto Duran and Sugar Ray Leonard during that infamous fight. Why did he quit? Why did he walk out of the ring? No one knows the truth. We address all of that. It’s going to be a great piece of work, because of everyone involved in telling this really significant part of boxing history.

I spent time with him [Sugar Ray Elonard] in Atlanta, and here in Los Angeles. We boxed together; we chilled. He became a great friend of mine, almost like a brother to me.

Get the full shoot and interview – only in FAULT Issue 18.
Click here to order your copy for delivery worldwide!

Tell me about the new album you’re working on.

It’s still a work in progress. I’m at a place where I really just want to have fun and do what I feel is significant to me.These last three years have been the hardest times of my life. I’ve wanted to break down, I’ve wanted to quit. I’ve wanted to throw in the towel but my spirit wouldn’t allow me… The one thing the album represents is confidence. Not confidence in a cocky way, but being open about what I feel, take it or leave it. If I’m not honest about my feelings then you’ll never know how I really feel.

Who are some of the people you’ve been jamming with, who’s producing and working with you on it?

I reached out to work with people that I haven’t worked with before like Ryan Tedder, Ed Sheeran, and Skrillex. Also people who I have worked with before like Diplo…and Pharrell [Williams].

‘She Came to Give it to You’ – the new single from Usher’s upcoming album – is out on 28th September

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 19 – The Millions Issue – IS AVAILABLE TO PRE-ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40