Preview – Fleur East Exclusive Debut on FAULT Magazine


Words: Olivia Pinnock Photographer: Zoe Mcconnell
Fashion Editor & Art Director: Rachel Holland
Make Up Artist: Nicky Weir @ Sarah Laird using MAC
Hair Stylist: Takuya Morimoto @ Brooks and Brooks
Nail Artist: Diane Drummond @ Baptiste Agency Set Designer: Andy Macgregor
Photographer’s Assistant: Nick Graham
Styling Assistant: Emma Ellen
Photographed At Holborn Studios


The music industry has hit out at X Factor contestants in the past for being wannabes who take the easy route. Last year’s runner up Fleur East, certainly doesn’t fall into that category. In between her first appearance on the show in 2005 as part of fiery girl group Addictiv Ladies and her show- stopping finale performance of ‘Uptown Funk’ last year, Fleur has been chasing her dreams hard.

With nothing to apologise for, Fleur is taking the first and (arguably) the hardest steps of her career as she attempts to put X-Factor defeat behind her and reach for the stars! We caught up with Fleur in an exclusive photoshoot and interview! Pre-Orders for FAULT Magazine – The Unapologetic Issue are available here.

In the mean-time, enjoy this preview below!


What made you go back to X Factor a second time?

To be honest with you, I felt like I’d tried everything else. I got to the point where I’d featured on songs, I’d done backing singing for major artists, I’d done all these shows but it was always for other people. At this point I thought ‘What do I do now?’ I either go, just get a job doing something else, but that terrified me because all I know and all I love is music. My friends and family were saying to go on X Factor. I was dreading it and I didn’t really want to, I just knew how much pressure it was and how much of a risk it would be but I thought, I’ve got nothing to lose.



What is it actually like going through the X Factor process?

It’s a lot less glamorous than it appears. It’s a lot of hard work. It’s probably the most stressful thing I’ve ever done. There’s so much pressure but I think if you really love it, if you truly love it and it’s your passion to sing, then that’s what will get through. I think if you don’t have that, you’ll realise quickly.


Was there are any part of you that wanted to be a runner up because in the past they’ve had more success?

A lot of people were saying that to me when I joined the process but I never really thought that because, how do I go into a competition and not want to win? That doesn’t even make sense. I was a little scared afterwards to be honest because I was thinking, ‘a contract is only guaranteed for the winner and I’ve come second, it’s not guaranteed for me.’

Is there a theme to the new album?

It’s all very positive, very uplifting. I think that music can sometimes be taken too seriously. I enjoy what I do and I want people to feel that. I’ve put a lot of time and a lot of love into it and I hope that people really get behind me and enjoy the music as much as I do.



What do you want people’s reaction to be?

I just want people to react to it as though it’s a breath of fresh air. It’s sort of old school meets new school. It’s got a lot of old school influences, old school funk, old school hip hop, sounds that people miss. Influences like Michael Jackson, Luther Vandross, proper good music that we all love.


Simon (Cowell) has said that with this album you ‘discovered who you wanted to be’, who is that?

I was fortunate enough that on the show, the songs that I was given represented the sort of direction that I wanted to go in. It’s basically really strong, sassy, full of attitude, really confident, vibrant and energetic.


What would you never apologise for?

I would never apologise for being myself and doing what I believe in. I think for years I was always like that. I was really shy. I’ve got to the point where I know, you’re not going to get anywhere if you think like that.




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Sofia Richie models for FAULT Magazine’s Beauty Cover



At a mere 16, Sofia Richie is arguably already in the famous lyrics of her father, Three Times A Lady. She’s not only following in his footsteps by starting to cultivate her singing career, but has also been making a real splash in the world of fashion and modeling. She chats to Fault about her recent signing and what it’s like to be a model, her love of fashion design and where it came from, and also what the future might hold. Full of life, this girl knows what she wants and has a pretty good idea about how she’s going to get it.

Take a peek inside FAULT Issue 21 where we chat to the rising model about her future, fears and favourite parts about the industry she is determined to crack.

FAULT: So, you’ve recently been signed to Select Model Management, are you enjoying being a model?

Sofia Richie: Yeah I love it, it’s definitely different to anything I’ve ever done in my life, but I really enjoy it and I’m so excited about what’s coming up.

Great, what would you say your favourite part about being a model is?

Honestly I just love wearing all the different clothes I’m put in, so mainly everything about the fashion part of the job.


It’s great that you say you want to be taken seriously in the fashion industry – does it ever upset you if other people, even your colleagues, say that people who come from a place within the public eye have it much easier as a model?

It doesn’t really upset me because it’s obviously their problem if people think we’re not working to get where we are today. It honestly just makes me want to work even harder and be more successful, because at the end of the day we are certainly working hard whether people realise or not.

What’s your dream for 10 years time? Where do you want to be?

I want to work towards my own fashion line and doing collaborations with fashion lines; I’m really focused on my fashion and modeling right now.


Is fashion design something you’ve always been interested in?

Yeah, I’ve always been super interested. When I was younger my parents bought me this little sketch book with blank girls in it so you can draw clothes on them. That’s something I started out doing a long time ago, and it’s how I think I became seriously interested in fashion by just being creative with it.

Finally, what is your FAULT?

I’m very harsh on myself. I’m critical and judgmental of myself when it comes to everything I do.



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Don Broco – Exclusive Photoshoot + Interview with FAULT Magazine Online


Photography MILES HOLDER


You’re just about to release your second album, Automatic. What can you tell me about it?

Well, it’s the album that we’ve been working towards for a year and a bit now and it’s the longest time that we’ve ever actually spent away from touring and being a band. I think for us, life in the studio was quite a change of pace.  We wrote our first album in about 2 months, recorded it like boom bosh and out. After that, we went on tour and then suddenly it was the right time to start writing the second album, so we just pulled ourselves out of the game for a year and wrote it. It was definitely an interesting period of self-discovery for us. Working out exactly who we wanted to be as a band and experimenting with different sounds to create the album. But now we’ve got it and it’s all done and it feels really good.

How did the writing process go this time?

It was the first time we ever wrote with our new bass player, Tom, so that was quite exciting, like finding out each others taste and boundaries and pushing each other and seeing how far we’d go. But once we got into a flow, we found it was a very collaborative process. We’re very much a band, we’re not one person calling the shots -with us, all four of us are very deeply involved in every process of the song. It’s all about the teamwork.


What effect do you think it’s gonna have on people? Do you expect a different reaction as opposed to your first album? 

Yeah, I think it’s definitely going to take a few people by surprise.  But at the same time, if you’re a fan of the band already, you’re gonna really enjoy it.  It might open you up to new music and hopefully question what you’re listening to and make you think like “okay, this isn’t a band that sound like anyone else.” We’re hoping to make our mark on the world of music and stand out as a band, stand out as a group. You know, bring in all our interests and joys, make up a musical landscape and refine that into one sound. We’re hoping it’s gonna get people talking.


For you, in what way is your second album different to your first? What have you done differently now, if anything at all?

We’ve written better songs that really work together and take you on a bit of a journey, rather than just a random collection of ideas. There are ideas that are developed and messed about with in our heads. From a listener’s perspective, I think you’re gonna leave feeling like you’ve actually listened to a more well rounded bunch of songs and a better album. Musically, we experimented with a lot more instruments on this album. We got to play in a pop studio to begin with, as opposed to the usual recording on a computer that we did on our first album. On this one, we went to a proper studio where we really embraced the live band sound and made sure that everything sounded as real as possible. If we had to play things a couple of times to get them right, we did that, without being perfectly accurate in everything.  The perks of being in a studio is that we’ve got all these instruments, we got to play around with a lot of keyboard sounds, old school organs. We managed to do a couple of songs with string arrangements, so for us it was fun, like discovering instruments that take you out of that basic guitar, bass, drums. So I think that’s probably the main difference, from a songwriting perspective, the use of electronics and instrumentation.

Tell me a bit about the video for Automatic. Did you have any input on the visuals?  

Yeah we did. The basic idea was born out of our artwork. We wanted to create something strong, visually striking for our album and we spoke to various designers and photographers about trying to achieve what we wanted. The easiest idea to get it done and make it look good was to fly out to the location in Malibu. We were talking about either Miami or Malibu, somewhere where you have sea and the weather and the palm trees and create something that wasn’t pastiche but still gain reference to that sort of bygone era where exciting music was coming out in the 80s where a band still sounded like a band. You know, once we had the collection of songs that really reflected the sound of the album, we wanted the visuals to represent that. So yeah, we went out to Malibu and then to LA and came across this incredible villa in Malibu where we shot the album artwork. The video for Automatic was kind of born from the idea of that. Our director really wanted to play on this visual reference of static motion and things kind of reflecting. I guess that’s cause the song is called Automatic. His idea was to show people having a good time and show this kind of high society that you associate with that Miami aesthetic. A lot of the references were guided towards our artwork.


Will you be doing a headlining tour after the album release? 

Yeah, we’ve got an album release launch show on the 7th, then we’ve got a week tour and we’re going back to some of the venues where we first started playing a couple of years ago. That’s gonna be the first time we get to play a lot of the new songs on the album. We’re really excited about that, it’s gonna be the first time in 3 years that we’re actually gonna get to play those venues that made us into the band that we are today. We’re extra excited.

It sounds like you really miss touring.

We do! Touring is our favourite part about being in a band and we did enjoy the studio, but at the same time, touring is what it’s all about for us. When you’re on the road, it feels like you’re actually achieving what you’re set out to do. It gives you that sense of “okay, we’re making the right call being a band.”


A lot of bands aim to break America. Is that something that’s been on your mind or something that you’d potentially like to achieve at some point in the future? 

Yeah, I think definitely. I think for us it’s not specifically America, it’s everywhere really. I mean, the more we get to tour and the more we get to explore the world and see new and exciting places, the more driven we are about being in a band. We’re hoping to get out to America next year; it will be the first time we go out there and play, which should be fun. But there’s so many other countries we haven’t been to, we only scratched the surface. So yeah, I think this album, if things go well, will give us the opportunity to travel and explore the world.

What’s your FAULT? 

I think it’s probably being too caught up and not looking at the bigger picture. I mean for us that’s what Automatic was all about actually. Staying into the moment and not worrying.

FAULT Magazine Issue 21 back on newsstands August 10th!


Nick Jonas Photographed by Matt Holyoak and styled by Kristine Kilty
Adam Lambert Photographed by Giuliano Bekor and styled by Avo Yermagyan

We know our FAULT readers have been dying to get hold of issue 21 following the initial rushes to order! We can now confirm that the printers are once again rolling and will hit the newsstands on August 10th for those still looking to get their hands on the issue. We’re excited for all to see and dates on digital copies via Zinio will be release very soon.

FAULT Magazine  – The POP Issue

Adam Lambert

Nick Jonas

Pete Wentz

Sofia Richie

Leona Lewis 


Conor Maynard 

Lion Babe 


Chloe Howl


Billie Piper 

and many more…

Plus a FAULTless selection of Film, Fashion, Music & Photography encompassing what it means to be “Pop”. From popular music to  pop art to popular figures who have amassed  large followings throughout the years. Also included in this double cover issue are the two artists that gained great popularity among  FAULT readers.

Nick Jonas first appeared on FAULT #16 as part of The Jonas Brothers and Adam Lambert appeared on the cover of FAULT #10. A lot has changed for these two cover stars since their respective features in FAULT but still our readers lusted to see them both return to our pages and so we listened. We are very proud to present FAULT Issue 21 – The POP Issue.



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The Janoskians For FAULT Issue 21 – What it takes to be POPular in the Digital age



Photography: Leigh Keily
Styling: Vesa Perakyla
Grooming: Daniel Rymer Robinson

We are now well and truly settled into the era of “Online Stars.” Since it’s inception in 2004 and subsequent mass following in the years that followed, YouTube has helped launch the careers for many of today’s notable public figures and celebrities. Enter Janoskians, (Just Another Name Of Silly Kids In Another Nation) were five teenagers from Melbourne who shot to the ever elusive “internet fame” in 2011. After amassing over 1.8  million subscribers, their international following is arguably reminiscent of the 1960’s Beatlesmania.

We chat with one of the first teen sensations of the digital age about what it means to be POPular and how sustainable that popularity can be…


FAULT: Do you have a close connection to your fans when you’re performing live?

Janoskians: Yeah. I think it’s because of social media, that’s a way for us to connect with our fans on a personal level. It’s a really cool to connect through Twitter, Instagram, that sort of stuff. It’s a way for us to connect on a personal level. It’s not in your inbox anymore, it’s not checking your mail, you just have to check your phone and start replying to fans. It’s really cool that we’ve managed to do that through social media.

 You released ‘Would you love me’ earlier this year, do you prefer recording? What’s your recording experience like?

Janoskians: I really love getting into the studio and being creative and just having a chill out moment with the boys, sorting out whatever’s on our minds and getting that onto the tracks. I really enjoy that process as well. Getting funny in the studio as well and letting everything out.

When you started on YouTube, did you ever forsee that it would lead into an album and you performing live in front of all your adoring fans worldwide? And not just in your home, but selling out shows in England?

I’d never even imagined us performing a gig at a club in Melbourne. Touring the whole world and performing to all these people is really crazy.

Read and see more images from this shoot exclusively in FAULT Magazine issue 21! 



…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40 in the coming week

Conor Maynard poses for an Exclusive Photoshoot for FAULT Online

Miles Holder

Jacket:Scotch and Soda
Tshirt: Penfield
Jeans: Waven
Boots: Redwing




At just 21 years old Conor Maynard has already scored five top ten singles and a number one album, with massive hits such as ‘Can’t Say No’, ‘Turn Around’ and ‘R U Crazy’ to his name. Since his debut in 2012, which featured the likes of Ne-Yo, Frank Ocean, and Pharrell Williams, Conor has toured with will.i,am and Jason Derulo, all whilst working on his second album, which is due for release this year. Recently he released Talking About, the first track from his sophomore release, featuring Craig David.

We sat down with Conor to discuss childhood icons, changing his sound, break-ups and breaking the mould.

Sweater: Ben Sherman Tshirt: Element Jeans:Waven Boots: Conor’s own

Sweater: Ben Sherman
Tshirt: Element
Boots: Conor’s own

Do you feel that this time you’re writing with a lot more life experience under your belt?

Yeah definitely! First time around, I had only just moved out of my parents’ house, moved to London and it was all happening. This time around, I’ve been through a lot more- I’ve had girlfriends, break-ups, and I think that comes across in the music.


Jacket: Scotch & Soda
Top: Our Legacy
Jeans: Waven
Boots: Redwing

Whilst you have been working on this record, you’ve been touring the world. Is the live experience something you really enjoy? 

I always say my favourite aspects of being an artist are a) writing in the studio, and b) performing live. On the one hand, you’re writing this music and you’re the only one who can hear it, sometimes without realising you’re actually writing the next hit single. Then on the other hand, you’re performing a track to a crowd, hearing them sing back lyrics you wrote six months, maybe even a year, ago. It’s a really cool feeling.

What else can we expect from this album?

It’s a very versatile album. Some fans love the upbeat, up-tempo records, but some fans love the stripped-back, acoustic tracks. I think I just want my fans to realise that there will be a real range on this album. I’ve tried to make sure there’s a track for everyone [laughs]


Shirt: Our Legacy
Jeans: Waven
Shoes: Conor’s own

Your latest single from the album, Talking About, features Craig David. How did that come about?

I’ve always been a big Craig David fan. Whilst working on this album, there was one day when my manager and I were sitting in the studio and we were almost a bit down because we had all these tracks ready to go, but just didn’t have that one song to really kick things off. Then this song came through and it was just the one!

It was risky because it’s a bit different – it’s house-influenced, it has the drop in it– but we went ahead, I recorded it, and a few days later we heard that he had listened to it and loved it.

Are there any dream collaborators you have in mind for the future?

I’d love to work with John Mayer; it’s quite random I know, but I think his Continuum album is one of the best out there. He comes across as a really cool, down to earth guy so I keep dropping his name in interviews, hoping to make it happen [laughs]


Jacket: Musee Noir
Sweater: Ben Sherman
Jeans: Waven
Boots: Redwing

Finally, what is your FAULT?

Where to begin? [laughs] I guess I can be a bit lazy – I will make excuses to leave the studio early, just because I want to go home and get to bed!

Words: Will Ballantyne-Reid

Photographer: Miles Holder

Fashion Editor: Kristine Kilty @ Lovely Management

Grooming: Amy Brandon @ Lovely Management

Fashion Assistant: Shannon McGrath

McBusted go suave for FAULT Issue 21 – The POP issue



Mcbusted were shot in the The Cuckoo Club, London Photographed by David Titlow and styled by Fashion Editor Kristine Kilty.
Words: Olivia Pinnock


FAULT Magazine Issue 21- The POP Issue features supergroup Mcbusted! Starting out as just an idea to go on tour together, the response from fans old and new alike has led them to go on to produce an album, have a top 20 hit, tour with One Direction around the world and have a hell of a lot of fun while doing it. FAULT sat down with band member Matt Willis to get the 411!

At that stage did you think your pop star days were behind you?

Yeah, totally. Me and James talked about going on tour again but we didn’t really see any avenues to do it. It just didn’t seem possible because Charlie wasn’t interested. I felt like we were stepping back already because we were already starting with less of a band than we were. I think if you’re coming back, you’ve gotta come back with something strong and something positive. Then this came along and I thought ‘well this will be fun!’ and it just seemed like an obvious thing to do to go on tour with our mates and play some songs.



Matt Shirt, waistcoat: Sean Christopher Bow Tie: Gucci Watch: Matt’s own
Jacket: McQ by Alexander McQueen Shirt: Brutus Tie: Saint Laurent
Shirt & Jacket: Sean Christopher Tie: Dolce & Gabbana


What do you think is the formula for great pop music?

I think there’s got to be a story. With Busted songs and McFly songs they all start from a main concept. The only time when we can’t finish a song or we write a song that’s not very good, is because the concept is wrong or the idea behind the song is wrong.


Shirt, waistcoat, suit: Sean Christopher Bow Tie: Valentino Rings: The Great Frog London Watch: Danny’s own
Shirt: Ben Sherman Jacket: McQ by Alexander McQueen Bow Tie: Tom’s own Jeans: Topman


Do you ever feel frustrated that pop music doesn’t get as much credibility as other genres?

Not anymore. I used to when I was younger. I used to care what people who read Kerrang! Magazine thought of me when I was 16, but that’s because I was one of those people who read Kerrang! Magazine. I soon grew out of that. I wanna produce stuff that I think is cool and I have fun with and I think other people will enjoy.


Waistcoat, shirt & Scarf: Sean Christopher Belt & Jewellery: Dougie’s own

Who is the Queen of Pop?

I think Taylor Swift is the Queen of Pop right now.

McBusted‘s Most Excellent Adventure Tour is out on DVD from 22 June




…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

*Lead image fashion credits:


Tshirt: Sandro
Jacket: Ben Sherman
Waistcoat & Scarf: Sean Christopher Jeans & jewellery: Dougie’s own


Shirt, waistcoat and trousers: Sean Christopher Bow Tie: Gucci
Watch: Matt’s own


Shirt & suit: Sean Christopher Tie: Dolce & Gabbana


Jacket: McQ by Alexander McQueen Shirt: Brutus
Tie: Saint Laurent
Jeans: Evisu


Shirt: Ben Sherman
Jacket: McQ by Alexander McQueen Bow Tie: Tom’s own
Jeans: Topman


Shirt, waistcoat, suit: Sean Christopher Bow Tie: Valentino
Watch: Danny’s own

Jack Antonoff of ‘Bleachers’ interview with FAULT Magazine Online







Jack Antonoff of Bleachers, fun. & Steel Train fame is a different kind of juggler. With more than 15 years of touring and writing music under his belt, he’s now releasing his own debut album with Bleachers. You’ve most likely heard their wildly popular tune ‘I wanna get better’ but there’s so much more to Bleachers than you could possibly wrap your mind around. They’re vivid, they’re genuine and they’re all the things you’ve ever wanted to please your ears with. We caught up with Jack and he’s most definitely a refreshingly special kind of special.

FAULT: Now that it’s been a bit more than a year since you first started releasing music as Bleachers, can you tell me how 2014 was for you? You kinda had a lot going on as a band.

Jack Antonoff: It’s been absolutely amazing.  It was really exciting, a bit terrifying as well. But then again, the best times in your life are when you’ve got different feelings happening all at once.

You’ve basically been in bands your entire life. Started out with Steel Train, then fun. and now Bleachers. Is there something specific that you took from each and encompassed musically in Bleachers?

I think I’ve been touring for like 15 years now with different bands, so it was more like going on a journey that keeps shifting, changing and redefining what you do. It’s constantly about challenging yourself, taking what you know and making it vastly different. Somehow.


You also started to write the album for Bleacher while on tour with fun. How did you manage both? It sounds both physically and mentally challenging.

I don’t know, it was weird, I was never able to do that before. Anytime I’ve been on tour, that part of my brain shuts off, but for some reason, with this process I was able to do it. I’d wake up and be like in Japan, Malaysia, Europe or something, I’d  just open my computer and start writing. Then I’d be on the bus or on a plane and start working on a beat instead of watching a movie. It would just happen like that.

I’ve noticed that you’ve got two drummers, as opposed to the usual one you’ve had so far. Did you always wanna go for a louder sound?

Well, the two drummer thing is always very literal because, when I made the album, I desperately wanted to find a bridge between synthetic and organic. So I would create a beat on my pc using all these synthetic sounds and then I’d want it feeling different so I’d play live drums on top of it. The album is made with very much these two elements, even like synthesizers and then guitars. So the drums are literally like these two guys and they switch off. One guy will do more like pads and one guy will play more live. They kind of complement each other in that way. So a lot of what happens live is a very literal translation of the album.

So it helped you not lose bits and pieces from the album while playing live basically.

Yeah, because I think when you create a live show, you do the best that you can to represent the album, knowing that’s it’s just going to go in a fucking different place anyway.  Which it ends up doing no matter what.


Now that you mention it, the whole creative process that lies underneath releasing an album is quite challenging. You go from complete control to no control what so ever.

Yeah, it’s very weird. It’s what’s exciting, it’s what’s scary but it’s also what makes you feel very alive. To be in that sort of really exciting place of knowing that you’re handing it over and it’s gonna be redefined by people emotionally.   

You’ve worked with synth-pop pioneer Vince Clarke of Erasure and Depeche Mode fame on your album. How did you come across him and why did you feel that he was the right person to reach out to? 

I love him, he’s an idol of mine, he inspired a lot of my music and what he did with Erasure and Depeche Mode sonically is just incredible. I wanted those elements in the album, I wanted those pieces of nostalgia mixed with the future. I met him one day for a drink and I told him how brilliant he was for like an hour and we were never in the same room after that. Everything we did, I’d send him a song and he would send back ideas and I would cherry pick them and put them in. It was all very remote.

“I wanna get better” is currently one of your most popular songs. I’ve noticed that there’s a lot going on musically in it. Could you tell me a bit about your production process? 

It’s very layered. I recorded some piano on my phone in Germany and then I started sort of pitching it and then I put these like big kind of drums behind it and it almost felt like a hip-hop beat.  I thought I might give it to a rapper or something. But then, I put that low bass in the chorus and I was like nope, this is my song. And I had this idea in my head for I wanna get better and I was desperately trying to find the right song to put it in.  And the verses, it all was sort of weird, frantic and choppy. Then it got even weirder when I started adding voices of people, just like people in my life, friends and family and thrown them all over the song.  I did that a lot in the album.  And it just started to turn into this thing that sounded like a sound I had in my head that I hadn’t really heard yet out loud. It just built and built and built and built.  Took a long time. It kept slowly combating. Anytime something felt choppy I’d just add a guitar or when something felt too organic, I’d add some fucking synthesizer on top of it. I was just like constantly fighting with it.


Your album opens with Wild Heart and you’ve worked with Yoko Ono on the track. But you’ve done it both with and without her.

Yeah, two reprise. So she ends up on the later version.

What was the experience like, in both cases? 

Well, the first version is one of the first songs we wrote for the album. I always knew it would open it cause it introduces the whole thing, it guides you in slowly and then smashes you in the face when the drums hit. And lyrically, the song means a lot to me, the concept of finding the best in the people around and not being concerned about death everywhere you go.  But I had this idea that the album would just descend into this digital place, so the reprise of Wild Heart fully crumbles into all synthesizers and I kept hearing this spoken song type of thing in my head that sounded like Yoko. So finally, I asked my manager if he’d call Yoko and see if she’d come to the studio and do it. So she came in, I remember it was Christmas cause she was eating Christmas cookies. She went into the booth and just started screaming and talking and singing and making noises, like all these crazy stuff. I took home the file that night and found all these moments where she’d be yelling and then she’d be singing something really beautiful like “I’m ready to move on” and then keep yelling. So I just grabbed these pieces and kind of created the song out of her organic expression.

You’ve mentioned earlier that lyrically, Wild Heart means a lot to you. You seem to have this tendency in your songwriting to write something extremely depressing and then sprinkle some upbeat pop on top of them. Sometimes, I don’t even know whether to dance or start weeping. Was that your intent?

That’s how I see music. It should be both. I think that the greatest songs make you cry in your bed if you want or dance with your friends if you want. It’s the same feeling. Being super emotionally attached to a song that you cry or so excited by a song that you want to move. It’s the same thing. All my favourite songs do that. Springsteen does that too, it should exist everywhere.


Apart from making people feel confused when listening to your music (I’m absolutely joking), what’s your FAULT? 

I can focus too much on stressful or anxious things.  Also, I get really stressed out when people are sick. And I make them feel bad.

Photography: Miles Holder

Interview: Adina Ilie