Jess Glynne Stuns on FAULT Magazine’s Online Cover

 

 

Dress: Julien Macdonald Earrings, rings, bracelet: Terry Schiefer Xinxin TSXX Shoes: Vivienne Westwood

Dress: Julien Macdonald
Earrings, rings, bracelet: Terry Schiefer Xinxin TSXX
Shoes: Vivienne Westwood

With a number 1 single in her pocket, Jess Glynne is no longer just ‘the girl who sings Rather Be”. After hitting all the awards shows from the Brits to the Grammy’s, fast forward to 2015 and she’s topping the charts with ‘Hold My Hand’. Apparently, taking the world by storm doesn’t take up all your free time as Jess chatted to us this week about all things music, her forthcoming album and how having a one hit wonder doesn’t necessarily mean that you’re gonna disappear.

Dress: Julien Macdonald Earrings, rings, bracelet: Terry Schiefer Xinxin TSXX Shoes: Vivienne Westwood

Dress: Julien Macdonald
Earrings, rings, bracelet: Terry Schiefer Xinxin TSXX
Shoes: Vivienne Westwood

FAULT: You’ve started out by working with Clean Bandit and now you’ve got a number one as a solo artist. How does it feel? What was your first reaction when you heard the news? 

Jess: It was probably one of the most emotional and overwhelming moments in my career so far. I mean, having a number 1 with someone else is one thing, but having a number 1 on your own name is something completely different. It was so amazing to have all these people supporting me, buying the single and making it reach the top of the chart.

We’ve seen before that some artists will shoot to the top and then for a number of different reasons they can’t maintain that peak and fall off into obscurity. In the digital age when people have less of an attention span, does falling off ever worry you, and if so how do you combat it?

You know what, it’s a worry in any industry, especially in music right now when you’ve got so many artists out. I’ve been working on this project for a long time and the one thing that I’ve always focused on is making sure that it’s honest. It’s really easy to have a one hit wonder and then just disappear.  If your plan is longevity and to build an empire, you have to work hard. A lot of people think that if you’ve had one hit then that’s it, but you can’t think like that in this industry. You have to completely put your whole soul into it.  So no, it doesn’t really worry me, I work hard, but obviously there’s always a part of me that has a tiny fear of losing it.

Dress: Julien Macdonald Earrings, rings, bracelet: Terry Schiefer Xinxin TSXX Shoes: Vivienne Westwood

Dress: Julien Macdonald
Earrings, rings, bracelet: Terry Schiefer Xinxin TSXX
Shoes: Vivienne Westwood

Now that you’re breaking into your own, how do you plan on differentiating yourself from being “the girl who sings Rather Be” and just being “Jess Glynne”? 

I think that the more music I release, the more stuff I do, the more people hear of me will eventually just speak for itself. I’m in this industry to make music and to be an artist. Eventually people will be able to differentiate me by hearing more of my music and seeing more of what I’m about.

You’ve been nominated at the Brits against yourself. Was that an odd position to be in?

It was really really strange actually. It was amazingly strange though. The first two songs I’ve ever released into the world were both nominated for a Brit award and it was probably one of the most amazing achievements really. I mean a lot of artists never get nominated to any awards.

Speaking of awards shows, congratulations on your Grammy. How was the whole experience for you? 

Absolutely insane. To be nominated is one thing, but to actually be there and win is like totally shit. I’ve never been so overwhelmed and shocked and excited and everything at the same time. Whenever someone mentions it to me I’m still in shock.

 Jacket & Skirt: Thierry Mugler All Jewellery: Terry Schiefer Xinxin TSXX


Jacket & Skirt: Thierry Mugler at BOB Vintage 
All Jewellery: Terry Schiefer Xinxin TSXX

When you close your eyes and envision 10 years down the road, what dreams/projects/milestones would you like to hit that’ll just make this whole journey worth it? 

If I were to look 10 years into the future I’d like to see that I have multiple albums out, touring the world, having a house and a family. All those things, hopes and dreams.

At least you ticked one thing off your wish list with the Grammy. 

As much as amazing as the Grammy is, I’d love to win a Grammy in my own name as well. So that’s still in there.

You’re just about to release your album. What can we expect from it?

You can expect to hear what I’m about. A lot of people don’t know what to expect from me cause they’ve heard so much other stuff. Everyone’s like “is it gonna be a dance album, is it gonna be this and that”, but I just can’t wait for people to hear what I’ve been inspired by, what I’ve created from all the stuff that’s influenced me over the years. It’s got a lot of soul influence, but it’s not a heartbreak album.

Does it come from a very personal place? 

It does come from a personal place cause it’s kinda about my journey over the past few years leading up to now. It’s personal in the sense that it’s me giving you the art that I’ve created, art that’s very close to home and that someone there has a personal meaning to me. It’s not a heartbreak album, but I hope it touches people in the sense that it will make them smile and feel amazing at any given time. When I listen to some albums chronologically from someone that I love, it makes me, you know, feel. With an album, you really wanna experience that and really get into it. Hopefully it will do the job.

Dress: E?thologie by Jasper Garvida Earrings & Necklace: Mawi Shoes: United Nude

Dress: Ethologie by Jasper Garvida
Earrings & Necklace: Mawi
Shoes: United Nude

From Coachella to the red carpet, you are always dressed to perfection. How would you describe your style?

I think my style is quite diverse. I’m very picky in what I wear, I won’t ever just wear anything. I like to mix things a lot as well and have something a little edgy to it. I can’t quite describe it.

Who would you say were your style icons?

It’s a really difficult question cause I’m usually inspired by what I love seeing here and there. One day I’d see something Rihanna’s wearing and love it and the next I’ll be walking down the street and see someone wearing something that I like. I don’t really have style icons in fashion I just love fashion.

Dress: Natasha Zinko Earrings, necklace, rings & bracelet: Terry Schiefer Xinxin TSXX Shoes: Moda in Pelle

Dress: Natasha Zinko
Earrings, necklace, rings & bracelet: Terry Schiefer Xinxin TSXX
Shoes: Moda in Pelle

Lastly, what’s your FAULT? 

I think being indecisive is my biggest fault in the world. I can never make up my mind.

Words: Adina Ilie 

Photographer: Diana Gomez www.dianagomez.com

Fashion Editor: Kristine Kilty @ Lovely Management

Makeup Artist: Amy Brandon @ Lovely Management

Hair: Dave Nobel

Photography Assistants: Niklas Ruffer & Luis Antonio Gallo

Fashion Assistant: Shannon McGrath

Shot exclusively for FAULT at West Thirty Six, Notting Hill www.w36.co.uk

Jim Sturgess – Exclusive Shoot For FAULT Issue 20 Front Cover

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Words: Charlotte MCManus
Photography: Sarah Dunn
Fashion editor: Kristine Kilty @Lovely Management
Fashion assistant: Sheryl Kelly
Grooming: Johnnie Biles @ stella Creative artists

 

FAULT’s exclusive shoot with Jim runs over 10 pages inside the issue (in addition to the reverse cover) and also includes the issue’s Men section cover.

Jim was shot in the luxury Cheval Three Quays apartments overlooking London’s Tower Bridge. Photographed by Sarah Dunn and styled by Fashion Editor and Celebrity stylist Kristine Kilty, the shoot showcases Jim’s brooding yet playful style as he channels James Dean for this striking spread.

In his interview Jim opens up to FAULT on how he coped with the big-budget box office flop Cloud Atlas, an excitingly ambitious yet commercially disappointing multi-role epic which he starred in along-side Tom Hanks and Halle Berry. Jim also let’s us know what it’s like working on his upcoming blockbuster movie ‘Geostorm’ also starring Gerard Butler out later next year.

 

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I catch up with Jim on an icy February Friday, each of us shivering over the phone at our respective North London abodes. He’s not long gotten back from sunnier climes, having spent three months filming in New Orleans for upcoming 2016 blockbuster, Geostorm.

“It was fun – a big Hollywood splash. I was honoured that they asked me to do it,” says Jim, in his laid back, to-the-point manner. After recounting with warmth his off-set experiences in the lively southern American jazz scene, he describes the high-concept film has having “almost two stories, about two brothers – I played Max, a young politician on Earth, while Gerry [Gerard Butler] plays my older brother Jake, who gets sent up into space.”

“It was cool – a big piece of entertainment, although it does have a backbone in the world of global warming and geoengineering,” Jim says, musing on the idea of sci-fi flagging present-day issues rather than future ones. “Sometimes you reach more people with entertainment than some heavy-browed documentary. You can weave thoughts into their subconscious whilst making them laugh and showing them a good time… but I don’t want to make out that we’ve made a really important environmental movie!” he adds, ever-quick to see the humour in a situation.


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Another one to watch hits cinemas this year in the form of London Fields, an adaptation of Martin Amis’ darkly comic murder mystery Jim plays Keith Talent, the thug, philanderer and darts-player extraordinaire who becomes embroiled with Nicola Six (Amber Heard), Guy Clinch (Theo James) and Samson Young (Billy Bob Thornton [FAULT 13’s Cover Star] in a twisted love affair.

“It was such a bonkers movie – testing to make, and to dare to be involved in,” says Jim, alluding to the narrative’s brooding apocalyptic undertones and increasingly sinister sequence of events. “The nice thing about it, for me, was getting to travel around London and shoot in areas I hadn’t been to in years, like Brixton Market. It almost felt like I was seeing the city through new eyes. With a lot of Americans involved, it was good to be the host for a change – normally I travel to other parts of the world, being a guest in someone else’s town.”

 

So how does he deal with the disappointment? Along with smaller-production titles like The Lion’s Share, Jim recently starred in big-budget box office flop Cloud Atlas, an excitingly ambitious yet commercially disappointing multi-role epic with a story that spanned five centuries.

“As long as I feel I’ve made a good film, I can feel good about it. That’s what’s so frustrating about acting, because once you’ve done your bit, you kind have to hand it over… there’s so little you can do.” He pauses, contemplative. “You want a film to do well, but that’s not always going to be the case. With Cloud Atlas, I was hopeful that people would be excited to see something different, which was a bit hard to watch. So much work went into it; all it took was the distribution companies to give it some love and support, but they didn’t. But you know, we got such positive feedback from the people who did watch it – it connected with them, and that’s the most important thing.”

 

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 20 – THE FACES ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE NOW

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Simon Helberg & Jocelyn Towne interviewed for FAULT Magazine Online

 

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We’ll Never Have Paris is a surprising, honest and enjoyable romantic comedy, with an all-star cast, dark subtle humour, great physical bits, and lots of cringe moments to have you peeking at the screen through your fingers. It is surprising as it’s made by the guy most people know as, ‘the guy from the Big Bang Theory,’ and even more surprising as it is as far away from the broad gags fans of the popular sitcom love. Simon Helberg and wife Jocelyn Towne co-directed the movie penned by Simon about the time before they got married and after they broke up. In it, Simon gives a strong, heart-felt performance, which left me wondering if it was the same guy from that show on E4.

 

I was tenth in line at the press-junket set up during Simon’s and Jocelyn’s breakfast. They seemed to be on autopilot at first, so I let them continue…

 

Simon: The movie is based on our real life break up before I proposed. It’s a disastrous and clumsy break up, followed by an even more embarrassingly horrific proposal, but at its core it’s about a quarter-life crisis.

Jocelyn: The next question is, what was it like working together, since you’re both directing the film.

Fault: Go ahead, this is great.

Simon: Thank you.

Jocelyn: It was challenging working together and also a great experience. We developed a shorthand during pre-production of what we were looking for and then when we got on set we went about trying to execute that. It wasn’t always the smoothest sailing, but we got better and better at communicating and working together.

 

Fault: Not the smoothest sailing, cause ‘someone’ is a diva?

Jocelyn: He’s so demanding.

Simon: I had a Bentley take me to work every day.

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Fault: I’ve found that working together and living together can be a nightmare.

Jocelyn: We’re both really passionate and obsessive about our work so while it is a little bit complicated to take it home every night, as it shoves parts of the relationship out the window, it worked out really well. We were able to turn to each other at the end of each day and discuss the same thing, and I think it helped make the film better because we were able to keep discussing it at all hours.

 

Fault: Simon, who did you complain to when you got home at night?

Simon: Well I made the mistake of complaining to Jocelyn about herself. I told her that the director is driving me crazy!

Jocelyn: It was the most stressful thing we’ve ever done.

Simon: We lived in a little bubble, just the two of us, unfortunately reliving a lot of those tragic mistakes that I had made in the past. I don’t know if it was therapeutic or just pure…

Jocelyn: Narcissistic.

 

Fault: Simon, as opposed to being a part of an ensemble cast like with the Big Bang Theory, you are a writer of this film, the co-director, this is you, this is your story. Did that add to the pressure of making the film?

Simon: It feels like it is mostly on my shoulders, which is hard. I had nobody else to blame if a joke didn’t work, if the craft service was bad, if the lighting got messed up, I felt essentially it’s all me. Of course Jocelyn and I were collaborating, but I definitely felt like, ‘oh my god, I’ve brought everybody here to tell this story about a very self-indulgent time in my life and in some ways and here I am indulging in it again.’ But I think the terror of being vulnerable and honest and depicting myself in what wasn’t the best light or, weren’t the best times of my life, was something that excited me, and scared me.

 

Fault: Simon, you are from a very successful long running show. One would assume that you could just do that character forever and make a lot of money doing it.

Simon: I could just do that, but my interest goes beyond playing one character or doing one kind of thing.

Jocelyn: There’s always going to be something else that you want to do. Art is sort of this black hole. It’s insatiable because you do one thing, and you think that’s the one thing I always wanted to do, and then there’s a new desire that pops up from that.

Simon: I think it’s an easy defence mechanism to just stay with the one thing and keep yourself safe. It’s very scary to put yourself out there in any way at all, whether it’s walking up to somebody and saying hello, or making a movie, or confronting whatever it may be. When you’re in any vulnerable situation I think it’s easy to shut down or get angry and say, ‘I don’t really care anyway,’ and I do a lot of that. I’m trying more to enjoy this part of it because it’s rare. I’m getting to watch our movie in a theatre with people, and it’s…

Jocelyn: Really cool.

Simon: Really. I try to hold on to that moment, and not for validation or praise, but because nothing is more honest that a collective group of people experiencing something together and having a visceral reaction sitting in a room. It tells us all that we need to know.

 

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Fault: Can the show be limiting?

Simon: The show can be limiting. I don’t think that’s taboo to say. I don’t even mean it negatively. I’m playing one character and even though it’s gotten this incredible long run and will continue to run, hopefully, and you’ll get to see more colours of this guy, it’s still one character so it’s as limiting. It’s a hot button topic. ‘Do you get to pigeon holed?’ ‘Is it limiting?’ I think about those things too. Do I get to…

Jocelyn: Will people always see me in one way?

Simon: ‘…I’d love to play other parts, but do they see me only as that guy?’ It’s something that is scary. I understand it too, because I’ve seen certain people say things, and they clearly have a hard time separating me from the show, and I’m guilty of the same prejudice in a lot of ways. There’s a lot of people who do one thing, or are known for one thing, and then I see them do something else and my immediate knee jerk reaction is, ‘WOW!’ and I didn’t realise that I had limited the person in my own head.

 

Words: Chris Purnell 

Kylie Jenner – exclusive shoot for FAULT Issue 20 front cover

FAULT Issue 20 front cover star Kylie Kenner was shot by Lionel Deluy and styled by Monica Rose.
Click here to pre-order your copy of this issue!

 

FAULT Magazine Issue 20 – the Faces Issue will feature reality TV star and global style phenomenon Kylie Jenner as its front cover feature this Spring. As one of the most widely followed personalities on social media today, Kylie is already a bone fide tastemaker at the tender age of just 17.

FAULT’s exclusive shoot with Kylie runs over 12 pages inside the issue (in addition to the front cover) and also includes the issue’s Style section cover – which is available as a special edition front cover edition in its own right.

Shot in LA to meet the ‘Faces’ theme of FAULT’s landmark 20th issue, renowned celebrity photographer Lionel Deluy captures the ‘real’ Kylie Jenner. Elegantly and simply styled by Monica Rose, the shoot showcases a side to Kylie that she herself admits in her interview is something “…that people don’t see” in her usual social media output or TV appearances.

In her interview, Kylie discusses her thoughts on ‘significant others’, the pressures of fame, how her public persona only shows one side to herself, her views on materialism versus spiritualism and how she deals with criticism of herself and her family.

FAULT Issue 20 - Kylie Jenner inside 1 (web)

Interview by Heather Seidler, Production by Zizi Zarkadas, Editorial Direction by Leah Blewitt, Make up by Rob Scheppy for Cloutier Remix, Hair by Castillo using JOICO at TMG-LA.com, stylist’s assistant: Jill Jacobs

FAULT: At just 17, you’re already one of the best known personalities in the media today – and one of the most followed on social media. Do you feel that people look up to you in that respect? Is there any pressure or obligation that comes with that, do you think?

Kylie: I never feel pressure to be a good role model. I always try to do my best to inspire people to be good and do the right thing, but I just can’t live my life always trying to be a good role model. I try to be the best I can be, but it’s hard sometimes. We’re all human. I just like to live each day and just be me and be real.

I definitely always feel pressure to act a certain way, but I try my best not to let it affect me – although there are times where I’m not totally myself because of that. Even at the mall I feel like I can’t totally be myself. When I’m not in public, I try to always be with my friends, so I can totally be myself and not have to worry about people judging or watching.

Is there a difference between the person you are on social media as opposed to the ‘real Kylie’, that is,the person you are when you’re with your friends and family?

People are going to judge you no matter what you do. So now I feel like I haven’t been open as much as I used to be. I haven’t really been letting my fans get to know me a lot; I closed down a little. I love to connect with people, but it became just a bigger door for people to judge me. I feel like, growing up, I haven’t had a lot of room for error – I don’t have room to make mistakes. You need to make mistakes to grow and learn, but I’m just a little different because the whole world is watching me, every single thing I do. So I closed my door a little, just until I get a bit older and then I’ll probably get back into it. On Instagram I’m like a different person almost, I just show people what I want people see.

 

So what are you like behind closed doors then? What really makes you happy?

I have to feel like I’m OK with everyone I love in my life. I never want to have bad beef with anybody. I always want everyone to be happy. Also balancing work life and personal life so I never lose myself. Lastly, I don’t think I need a significant other to be happy because I always like to find that for myself, but I think that it makes me a lot happier when I’m sharing my life with somebody.

FAULT Issue 20 front cover - Kylie Jenner (Medium)

Get the full shoot and interview – only in FAULT Issue 19.
Click here to order your copy for delivery worldwide!
Two different cover versions available – click HERE to get this cover version

On growing a thick skin:

“Being in my family, under scrutiny all the time… it affects the other people around me. My friends can get freaked out when they come into my world. It’s sad when you really think about it. There have been so many people that come into my family’s life that can’t handle it. And we handle a lot. The more people love you ,the more there’s going to be people who hate you. So I just feel like the girl who is an easy target to talk about. It’s definitely been crazy, but I feel like we all have trust that we’re in it together and we try to focus on the positive.”

On what people would be surprised to find out about her:

“There’s definitely a spiritual side to me and I honestly want the best for everyone. I’m not materialistic, I love clothes and all that stuff, but I don’t need it to live. I feel like, not that I’ve had everything, but once you feel you’ve had everything at a young age, you can either go down a path of being spoiled and self-centered, or you see it isn’t everything. I’ve found ways to really enjoy life. But people may get the wrong idea. Having a reality TV show, everyone feels like they know you, but that’s only 10% of my life. There’s a whole other side of me that people don’t see.”

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 20 – The Faces Issue – IS AVAILABLE TO PRE-ORDER NOW

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INTRODUCING FAULT FUTURE – ‘LANY’

 

 

 

While it might seem that FAULT exclusively feature already long-time established artists; we actually are always on the look out for new talent. We call them FAULT Futures and for trio LANY, the future looks very bright! However while the band only formally released music on Soundcloud on April of last year, they have already reached a fanbase of nearly 4 million. LANY released new track Bad, Bad, Bad on January 20th so we’ve caught up with the band to find out where the hell they’ve been all our lives (!) and what else they have in store for us in 2015!

 

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Photography: Zedek Chan

 

 

FAULT: Firstly Introduce yourselves!

Lany: Hi! We’re LANY aka Jake Goss, Les Priest, and Paul Klein.

 

 

Can you briefly explain how the band formed?

We all met in Nashville a few years ago and became really good friends. We were all working on music independently at the time. I (Paul) was trying to do the solo artist thing in Los Angeles and – to be really honest – was failing pretty miserably. I was ready to walk away from music all together. I knew Jake and Les had started making music together on a computer in their bedroom for fun back in Nashville. I called Jake and asked if I could fly to Nashville, write with them, and see what we could come up. In those four days, we wrote and recorded “Hot Lights” and “Walk Away.” We put them on the internet April 22, 2014, and the rest is history.

 

 

We’ve been told you intentionally remained anonymous for the past year – how come? 

Well, it wasn’t intentional at first. Initially, we had a photo of Michael Jordan and Magic Johnson as our profile image on Soundcloud, just because we loved the photo and thought it was cool. We also had no idea anyone was ever going to listen to our songs. I mean, we hoped people would, but we didn’t think it was going to take off like this. All of a sudden, we started getting plays. People became interested, and their interest turned into curiosity. I think bloggers and listeners started trying to figure out who we were, and it turned into this beautiful mystery. So, we just went along with it!

 

How did you come up with the name LANY? (It sounded cool is a more than acceptable answer)

HAHA! Thanks! We knew we wanted a 4-letter word for design/aesthetic purposes. But, as you can imagine, just about every 4-letter word is already taken. So, we moved to acronyms. In the very beginning stages, we thought we would go with “TTYL.” Then, we decided we didn’t want to be 13 forever. We were driving one day and thinking about the span of the country… from LA to NY. So, we put the letters together and sounded it out.

 

Musically, was there a clear path you all wanted the band to go down when you formed? Regardless of the writing process etc, was it always going to be synth-infused “Dream Pop meets R&&B”?

 

I’m not sure we really set out with a specific sound in mind. We do write every song together as a band. So, we’re working with three different sets of backgrounds, influences, and experiences. I think the greatest thing about us is that we don’t really sound like anyone or anything else! We kind of take a lot of pride in that.

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Do you all have quite a similar music background?

Not necessarily.  The one thing we all have in common is that we studied music in some capacity at Belmont University.

 

How would you describe your latest track  ‘Bad,Bad,Bad’ to a new audience?

 

Musically or stylistically, it might take the slightest journey from our previous tunes. But, we think it’s pretty “LANY” through and through. It has a playful, young, rebellious vibe to it, which is reinforced with strong song structure and singable, almost impossible-to-forget melodies

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What’s in store for LANY for 2015?

 

Shows! Tours! New music. 2015, so far, has already been pretty massive for us. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram @thisislany and like us on facebook atwww.facebook.com/thisislany for tour dates and exciting updates.

 

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With electronic music such as yours, is it easy to transfer that into the live setting?

 

We don’t think “easy” is the right word, but it hasn’t presented too much of a challenge.

 

How important is the live process to you – is it something you really enjoy?

 

Playing live and delivering is literally EVERYTHING to us. It’s of utmost importance to us to perform our songs excellently, often, and in front of as many people as possible. The personal interaction and connection that playing live offers is irreplaceable and undeniable.

 

Finally, what is your FAULT? 

 

Oh man… I’m (Paul) a little obsessive and a bit of a perfectionist. if I’m stuck on something or trying to figure something out or feel unsettled, it’s nearly impossible to stop me until I get to the bottom of it. That can probably be a little aggravating when it comes to working with me on creative projects i.e. music, album art, photos, videos, website design, etc.

 

 Photography: Zedek Chan

LANY on the web

Soundcloud

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

 

 

 

Charlie Simpson Exclusive Photo-shoot and Interview with FAULT Magazine Online

 

 

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Leather Jacket: BLK DNM
Collar shirt: Karl Lagerfeld
Knit: Karl Lagerfeld

Charlie Simpson rose to fame as a member of multi-BRIT Award-winning boyband Busted, with sales of over 3 million records, and a win for Record of The Year in 2004. Prior to the band’s split in 2005, Charlie began as the lead vocalist, guitarist and co-lyricist of Fightstar, releasing 3 albums and an EP. His debut solo album Young Pilgrim was released in 2011, and followed up in Summer 2014 by Long Road Home, which entered the UK Independent Albums chart at number one. Charlie sat down with FAULT to discuss writer’s block, Warped Tour and life as a newly married man.

 

FAULT: You have spoken about the process of writing Long Road Home, in terms of going back to the drawing board and the obstacles that come along with that. Was the process of putting it together an enjoyable one?

 

Charlie: A bit of both- I always love working on a record but this was the first time I had experienced a bit of writer’s block. I just wasn’t in the right frame of mind and needed a break from writing. Luckily, it matched with me going off on the Vans Warped Tour in the US- I played 28 shows in a month and it was just a nice way to separate myself from the situation. I think I wrote some of the best stuff on the record after that happened. It feels like a record I had to fight for, which made it all the more sweet to finish working on. I’m really proud of it.

 

It’s interesting that you have referred to the ‘journey’ of writing Long Way Home, and it came out of your time on the road with the Vans Warped Tour. Do you find that being on tour helps the writing process?

Yeah definitely. When you’re writing at home the environment can become quite stale; being on the road adds fuel to your creativity. The album felt like a journey from one point to another where I sort of found myself again.

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Leather Jacket: BLK DNM
Sleeveless Shirt: BLK DNM

 

 

Since releasing the album this summer, are you now able to identify certain undercurrents and themes, or do you go into the process wanting to say something specific?

It’s strange because my last record was a lot more melancholy and I always find it easier to write sad songs, but when I started on Long Road Home I had just got engaged and so I was feeling pretty good about everything! I had to tailor the writing around that kind of mood, which was actually a great challenge as I’d never done it before. It was really good to express that kind of emotion on the record.

 

In terms of ‘tailoring the writing process’, what are the distinctions between writing as a solo artist and writing as a group?

As a solo artist I get complete creative freedom. In a band, it has to be majority rules; if you write something you really like and one other member doesn’t like it, it really makes you question things. With this album I was able to take it in any direction, which is why I think it took me longer to write. With that creative freedom comes more responsibility because it’s all resting on your shoulders.

 

When you are struggling with writer’s block, is it a case of producing a lot and then throwing a lot away, or is it just hard to produce anything?

It wasn’t so much that I couldn’t come up with anything, just that I wasn’t writing anything I loved! I’m my own worst critic and I have actually ended up with about 20 unfinished songs I didn’t use. It’s cool because maybe I will revisit them at another time, but it’s a really strange process.

Returning to your time on the Vans Warped Tour, how does the live experience and performing impact your songwriting?

When I’m songwriting in a solitary environment, the lyrics are a lot better. But musically, I can be anywhere- on the Warped Tour I had my guitar on me the whole time. I tend to write the music first, and then I go into my little hole and write the lyrics, but I’ve always been a melody man first.

 

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Coat: Phillip Lim
Collar Shirt: Mohsin

 

Do you start with a vision for songs, or do they evolve with time?

Yeah sometimes I’ll literally have a vision of a song in my head, and I’ll go to my studio and just make it happen. I like for there to not be a formula to the songwriting- when it comes, it comes. I always equate it to fishing; sometimes you go and nothing comes, and sometimes you catch a big one!

 

You’ve worked with a lot of different set-ups and sounds. Are your influences quite varied?

It’s completely varied but it’s always been centred around heavier, Rock-ier sounds. I love Deftones and Metallica, but my Dad also put me onto artists like Jackson Brown and those West Coast bands from the 1970s like The Eagles and The Beach Boys. Whatever form of music it is, I have always just loved vocal harmonies and making big sounds with voices.

 

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Overcoat: Dent De Man
Sleevelss shirt: BLK DNM
Bracelets: Hermes Jeans, Shoes and Watch: Charlie’s Own

It’s interesting talking about your childhood influences and you mentioned music has been in your family for over 200 years, from composers and musicians to a former head of the Royal College of Music. Now you are married, is it fair to say family is an important focus for you?

It’s actually the most important! One of the themes of the record is how you can be in a dark place, and be unsure of what is going on, but the one constant is family. I’m really blessed to have a loving family, and that will never change. I’ll always have my family, my wife, and (hopefully) my kids.

 

Is that easily compatible with the music industry?

When I was younger I loved just getting out on the road, and I still do. I love making music, but I love getting out and playing it just as much. But that’s getting harder as I get older. Family life and being a musician aren’t that compatible, there has to be a balance.

 

You scored the British film Everyone Is Going To Die, which debuted at the SXSW Film Festival in March 2013, and you’ve mentioned this as something you’d like to pursue more extensively later in your career. Can you talk more about the relationship between the music and the visuals in your work? 

It’s huge! I love film as much as I love music and the marriage of visuals and music is such a wonderful thing. With scoring a film, someone else tells a story and it’s your responsibility to bring out the emotion in it. When you’re writing your own music, you constantly feel that it’s not just music but somehow a representation of your entire make-up. It’s nice to take that pressure off a bit!

 

You’ve now been a touring musician for over 10 years. What changes have you seen in the music industry?

The industry is almost unrecognisable. Facebook, YouTube, Spotify – none of these things existed! The landscape of the industry has changed so much, you’ve just got to go with it. Whether streaming or downloading, as long as people are still consuming music (legally!) it’s a good thing.

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Overcoat: Dent De Man
Sleevelss shirt: BLK DNM
Bracelets: Hermes Jeans, Shoes and Watch: Charlie’s Own

 

What is your FAULT?

You should ask my wife! (laughs) I would say I’m pretty impatient, which can be a good thing. I get quite frantic and when you’re in the studio that can be a good thing, but in other situations it can be a nightmare.

 

Photography: Miles Holder

Writer: Will Ballantyne-Reid

Stylist: Vesa Perakyla

Grooming: Stefano Mazzoleni @ Emma Davies Agency

Little Dragon discuss new album, Nabuma Rubberband, at Way Out West Festival, Gothenburg

FAULT spoke to the Swedish quartet earlier this year at Way Out West, a local festival for the Gothenburg residents. We’re delighted to unveil our exclusive interview and photos from their inevitably effervescent performance on the eve of the latest single release. ‘Underbart’, the fourth single from the group’s fourth album Nabuma Rubberband,  is out in the UK and internationally on 15th December:

It’s not often that I get excited about a festival. Long gone are the days where I want to spend a night in a tent, not seeing a proper hot shower in what feels like an age, and having to deal with tripping over mountains of mud face-first. By contrast, however, my invitation to Way Out West 2014 brought a breath of fresh air. A Swedish city festival in a league of its own, it prides itself in being fully vegetarian with a 30,000 strong crowd. Set in the ‘oh-so-pretty-it-hurts’ city of Gothenburg, the line up was one of the most exciting I have seen since the release of the Coachella lineup in 2012 (albeit post 2pac performing ‘live’ by hologram!). Le’s set the scene: Little Dragon, playing in their hometown, Neneh Cherry playing her first Swedish festival in over a decade. Not forgetting dynamic duo Icona Pop and electro heartbreak queen Robyn, performing with Röyksopp. It’s not hard to believe that so many of the incredible women who currently dominate the pop scene are Swedish, given Sweden has voted a feminist political party into European Parliament. And let’s not forget who gave us ABBA (for better or worse…).

Getting into the festival I rush to make sure that I don’t miss a thing . As I handed in my ID to get my pass sorted, I was greeted by a gigantic portal, beyond which lay the lair of Way Out West.

little dragon @ way out west for FAULT 2

 

The first time we interviewed Little Dragon their second album had just been released, they had just toured with Gorillaz, and the world had not entered their Kaleidoscopic universe. This time we met them before they went on stage. Collaborations with SBTKT and Outkast’s Big Boi, who are also headlining the festival, have followed since that album, as well as everything from Boiler Room sets, to playing at a Givenchy Show in Paris. They count Drake and Damon Albarn as fans – after all, it was the latter who personally asked them to join Gorrilaz on tour after being introduced to them by his partner. Nabuma Rubberband, the group’s fourth studio album sees them collaborate with Dave from iconic hip-hop trio De la Soul.

There is something quite special about listening to Yukimi[ Nagano, lead singer]’s voice as it gently caresses the algorithms of synth-infused pop. A focused and unashamed parallel reality Little Dragon simply just make life all that much more fun, colorful and bouncy. It hard not to get dancing feet at the idea of seeing them play in front of a home crowd. But first there was the small matter of our interview to which to attend…

 

FAULT: This is your biggest home crowd, how do you feel?

Little Dragon: It’s our hardest crowd, we have all our friends and family, and they are always the hardest to impress. They’ve seen it all before! It’s like having the end of year school concert, like a Christmas gift to your parents.

You’ve managed to break out internationally, before breaking out in your home country, you’ve collaborated with some pretty big international names. Who’s been your favourite collaborator?

Håkan Wirenstrand: Hahaha! No favorite! I mean he is my favorite collaborator. (Hakan points at Erik) And that point about us breaking out internationally, we never really pushed it here in Sweden. And it was through this organic flow of distribution. It was actually Damons wife who first heard our record and then played it to him. Next thing we know we are being asked to collaborate and go on tour. That was a great collaboration. It was much more than just a song we did left on an MP3. It was a full tour, life long friendships.

How long have you guys known each other?

Erik Bodin: Oh! Quite some time! Hahaha!

little dragon @ way out west for FAULT

How do Swedish people even make friends? They seem so much more reserved!

H.W: We are a little afraid of strangers. We are pretty closed up in the winter, and a little crazy in the summer. You know we talk to whoever on the bus stop!

Could you see yourself living outside of Sweden?

H.W: Impossible!

E.B: Or we could just dismantle the Swedish Border so that we are still in Sweden, but just not staying here anymore.

H.W: I wouldn’t mind a Mediterranean climate though.

Where do you go to unleash your creativity? How do you embrace your creativity?

E.B: In our brains somehow we carry the creavity inside us. We don’t really have to go anywhere specific to channel it out. It’s good to be very bored, and to stay away from it once in a while too. I like life here its simple, I have family I have here. You can make your creative lifestyle more of an everyday thing. You don’t need to travel to Hawaii or find yourself in India.

Who are you guys listening to right now?

E.B: I’m listening to Yung Lean. The rap and hip-hop thing seems to a good scene right now. I think its very healthy to break out and doing something different. Not just wear skinny jeans and do the whole indie rock thing.

H.W: We like Bob Hund.

little dragon @ way out west for FAULT 4

Apparently Gothenberg is the Indie Rock capital of Sweden…

E.B: I thought that would be Linköping…

H.W: Hahaha!!

E.B: And you know down south in Malmo, they have a few freaks that really like to push boundaries. You know, that break all the rules.

Listening to the album feels like walking through a little dream, an emo electric pop dream. You all must so different to eachtother. You can hear so many influences 

E.B: I think that it’s true we are all very different and have so many different influences. I think we like it that way too. We kind of started with just, you know, jamming. At a certain age we had a lot of time for jamming… For example, Hakan bought the whole synthy atmosphere into my life. You know? And it was very different for me. It was also very lucky that we were interesting in something that we didn’t already know.

H.W: I think it’s also a misunderstanding that I am the only one that plays the synth. It’s come to the point where all just explore eachothers instruments. And when we are trying to get an idea across. Sometimes we have to just head in and use whatever expresses the best. We end up influencing and inspiring each-other.

E.B: Everyone plays on his synths.

H.W: Maybe I have the biggest collection of synths. I’m building a little system, which I have been using on stage. That’s my most creative output. When you have to patch a synth. Its like opening your fridge, and trying to work out what you can put together and eat.

E.B: Like Kalles Caviar and keso [cottage cheese] on a banana…

H.W: Hahaha!

Gosh, that sounds awful. I’m going to try and un-hear that now…

little dragon @ way out west for FAULT 3

Little Dragon – full UK tour dates below:

Brighton – Corn Exchange – 17th November

Birmingham – The Institute – 18th November

Bristol – O2 Academy – 19th November

Leeds – Met – 21st November

Manchester – Albert Hall – 22nd November

Glasgow – O2 ABC – 23rd November

London – O2 Academy Brixton – 27th November

Oxford – O2 Academy – 29th November

General tickets available from:

www.gigsandtours.com | www.ticketweb.co.uk |www.gigsinscotland.com

‘Nabuma Rubberband’ available to download via iTunes: http://po.st/NabumaRubberband

All text and images by Silvana Lagos

FAULT Focus: Screenwriter and novelist Kelly Oxford for FAULT Issue 19

Kelly Oxford inside 1

Kelly Oxford was shot at her LA office by Brian Ziff. Interview by Chris Purnell.
Click here to order your copy of this issue!

Most of us had heard of her back around 2010 when the number of followers one had became a big deal. Twitter personalities where starting to break into the mainstream, and she was one of the first. But we didn’t know her name. We were told that she was the Canadian housewife with a million Twitter followers who parleyed that into a screenwriting career, had a glamorous life in LA and pissed off a million writers that wondered how she got so lucky.

But the truth was less sensational. It involved hard work, practice and years of writing for little to no money. It wasn’t the American dream I had imagined. Or even cared to.

Now Kelly Oxford is famous, despite what she tells us. She is a New York Times bestselling author, she has a TV deal, a movie deal, she gets to talk to FAULT, and still finds time to annoy the Kardashians and their legions on Twitter: “If you can name 5 Kardashians but can’t name 5 countries in Asia, stick a knife in an electrical socket.”

Kelly Oxford inside 2

Get the full shoot and interview – only in FAULT Issue 19.
Click here to order your copy for delivery worldwide!

FAULT: Do you know how the story of you coming out of nowhere came about?

Kelly: The first time I got picked up by the media was a charity event in Los Angeles called ‘Night of 140 Tweets’ at the very beginning of 2010. That was a celebrity event where people would read a Tweet was to raise money for disaster relief in Haiti. I was the only one out of 140 people that wasn’t a celebrity. I was just a writer from Canada. I was a housewife. I was somebody who nobody really knew and I was only invited because people that were involved with this – actors and writers – liked me on Twitter and thought, “if we put her on this it’ll make sense because she’s very popular on Twitter and this is a night of tweeting.” All of a sudden I was part of a group of people when I really wasn’t one of them.

How did it [really] begin for you?

If I had been born in the United States, I’m 100% sure that when I graduated high school I would have moved to Los Angeles and started a normal writing career by becoming an assistant and working my way up the ranks. But I was Canadian. That sort of thing wasn’t an option for me. I could have moved down here and done all that stuff, lots of Canadians have, but I wasn’t ambitious about getting a career. I’d rather have a family and stay at home and pursue my passion. So I just did what I did, which was to just take some writing classes and write things on my Geocity page and just wonder if anybody would read it.

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