FAULT Magazine Issue 21 back on newsstands August 10th!

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Nick Jonas Photographed by Matt Holyoak and styled by Kristine Kilty
Adam Lambert Photographed by Giuliano Bekor and styled by Avo Yermagyan

We know our FAULT readers have been dying to get hold of issue 21 following the initial rushes to order! We can now confirm that the printers are once again rolling and will hit the newsstands on August 10th for those still looking to get their hands on the issue. We’re excited for all to see and dates on digital copies via Zinio will be release very soon.

FAULT Magazine  – The POP Issue

Adam Lambert

Nick Jonas

Pete Wentz

Sofia Richie

Leona Lewis 

Bleachers

Conor Maynard 

Lion Babe 

Prides 

Chloe Howl

Janoskians 

Billie Piper 

and many more…

Plus a FAULTless selection of Film, Fashion, Music & Photography encompassing what it means to be “Pop”. From popular music to  pop art to popular figures who have amassed  large followings throughout the years. Also included in this double cover issue are the two artists that gained great popularity among  FAULT readers.

Nick Jonas first appeared on FAULT #16 as part of The Jonas Brothers and Adam Lambert appeared on the cover of FAULT #10. A lot has changed for these two cover stars since their respective features in FAULT but still our readers lusted to see them both return to our pages and so we listened. We are very proud to present FAULT Issue 21 – The POP Issue.

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 21 – IS AVAILABLE NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40 in the coming week

The Janoskians For FAULT Issue 21 – What it takes to be POPular in the Digital age

 

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Photography: Leigh Keily
Styling: Vesa Perakyla
Grooming: Daniel Rymer Robinson

We are now well and truly settled into the era of “Online Stars.” Since it’s inception in 2004 and subsequent mass following in the years that followed, YouTube has helped launch the careers for many of today’s notable public figures and celebrities. Enter Janoskians, (Just Another Name Of Silly Kids In Another Nation) were five teenagers from Melbourne who shot to the ever elusive “internet fame” in 2011. After amassing over 1.8  million subscribers, their international following is arguably reminiscent of the 1960’s Beatlesmania.

We chat with one of the first teen sensations of the digital age about what it means to be POPular and how sustainable that popularity can be…

 

FAULT: Do you have a close connection to your fans when you’re performing live?

Janoskians: Yeah. I think it’s because of social media, that’s a way for us to connect with our fans on a personal level. It’s a really cool to connect through Twitter, Instagram, that sort of stuff. It’s a way for us to connect on a personal level. It’s not in your inbox anymore, it’s not checking your mail, you just have to check your phone and start replying to fans. It’s really cool that we’ve managed to do that through social media.

 You released ‘Would you love me’ earlier this year, do you prefer recording? What’s your recording experience like?

Janoskians: I really love getting into the studio and being creative and just having a chill out moment with the boys, sorting out whatever’s on our minds and getting that onto the tracks. I really enjoy that process as well. Getting funny in the studio as well and letting everything out.

When you started on YouTube, did you ever forsee that it would lead into an album and you performing live in front of all your adoring fans worldwide? And not just in your home, but selling out shows in England?

I’d never even imagined us performing a gig at a club in Melbourne. Touring the whole world and performing to all these people is really crazy.

Read and see more images from this shoot exclusively in FAULT Magazine issue 21! 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 21 – IS AVAILABLE NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40 in the coming week

Conor Maynard poses for an Exclusive Photoshoot for FAULT Online

Miles Holder

Jacket:Scotch and Soda
Tshirt: Penfield
Jeans: Waven
Boots: Redwing

 

 

 

At just 21 years old Conor Maynard has already scored five top ten singles and a number one album, with massive hits such as ‘Can’t Say No’, ‘Turn Around’ and ‘R U Crazy’ to his name. Since his debut in 2012, which featured the likes of Ne-Yo, Frank Ocean, and Pharrell Williams, Conor has toured with will.i,am and Jason Derulo, all whilst working on his second album, which is due for release this year. Recently he released Talking About, the first track from his sophomore release, featuring Craig David.

We sat down with Conor to discuss childhood icons, changing his sound, break-ups and breaking the mould.

Sweater: Ben Sherman Tshirt: Element Jeans:Waven Boots: Conor’s own

Sweater: Ben Sherman
Tshirt: Element
Jeans:Waven
Boots: Conor’s own

Do you feel that this time you’re writing with a lot more life experience under your belt?

Yeah definitely! First time around, I had only just moved out of my parents’ house, moved to London and it was all happening. This time around, I’ve been through a lot more- I’ve had girlfriends, break-ups, and I think that comes across in the music.

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Jacket: Scotch & Soda
Top: Our Legacy
Jeans: Waven
Boots: Redwing

Whilst you have been working on this record, you’ve been touring the world. Is the live experience something you really enjoy? 

I always say my favourite aspects of being an artist are a) writing in the studio, and b) performing live. On the one hand, you’re writing this music and you’re the only one who can hear it, sometimes without realising you’re actually writing the next hit single. Then on the other hand, you’re performing a track to a crowd, hearing them sing back lyrics you wrote six months, maybe even a year, ago. It’s a really cool feeling.

What else can we expect from this album?

It’s a very versatile album. Some fans love the upbeat, up-tempo records, but some fans love the stripped-back, acoustic tracks. I think I just want my fans to realise that there will be a real range on this album. I’ve tried to make sure there’s a track for everyone [laughs]

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Shirt: Our Legacy
Jeans: Waven
Shoes: Conor’s own

Your latest single from the album, Talking About, features Craig David. How did that come about?

I’ve always been a big Craig David fan. Whilst working on this album, there was one day when my manager and I were sitting in the studio and we were almost a bit down because we had all these tracks ready to go, but just didn’t have that one song to really kick things off. Then this song came through and it was just the one!

It was risky because it’s a bit different – it’s house-influenced, it has the drop in it– but we went ahead, I recorded it, and a few days later we heard that he had listened to it and loved it.

Are there any dream collaborators you have in mind for the future?

I’d love to work with John Mayer; it’s quite random I know, but I think his Continuum album is one of the best out there. He comes across as a really cool, down to earth guy so I keep dropping his name in interviews, hoping to make it happen [laughs]

AA

Jacket: Musee Noir
Sweater: Ben Sherman
Jeans: Waven
Boots: Redwing

Finally, what is your FAULT?

Where to begin? [laughs] I guess I can be a bit lazy – I will make excuses to leave the studio early, just because I want to go home and get to bed!

Words: Will Ballantyne-Reid

Photographer: Miles Holder

Fashion Editor: Kristine Kilty @ Lovely Management

Grooming: Amy Brandon @ Lovely Management

Fashion Assistant: Shannon McGrath

McBusted go suave for FAULT Issue 21 – The POP issue

 

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Mcbusted were shot in the The Cuckoo Club, London Photographed by David Titlow and styled by Fashion Editor Kristine Kilty.
Words: Olivia Pinnock

 

FAULT Magazine Issue 21- The POP Issue features supergroup Mcbusted! Starting out as just an idea to go on tour together, the response from fans old and new alike has led them to go on to produce an album, have a top 20 hit, tour with One Direction around the world and have a hell of a lot of fun while doing it. FAULT sat down with band member Matt Willis to get the 411!

At that stage did you think your pop star days were behind you?

Yeah, totally. Me and James talked about going on tour again but we didn’t really see any avenues to do it. It just didn’t seem possible because Charlie wasn’t interested. I felt like we were stepping back already because we were already starting with less of a band than we were. I think if you’re coming back, you’ve gotta come back with something strong and something positive. Then this came along and I thought ‘well this will be fun!’ and it just seemed like an obvious thing to do to go on tour with our mates and play some songs.

 

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Matt Shirt, waistcoat: Sean Christopher Bow Tie: Gucci Watch: Matt’s own
James
Jacket: McQ by Alexander McQueen Shirt: Brutus Tie: Saint Laurent
Harry
Shirt & Jacket: Sean Christopher Tie: Dolce & Gabbana

 

What do you think is the formula for great pop music?

I think there’s got to be a story. With Busted songs and McFly songs they all start from a main concept. The only time when we can’t finish a song or we write a song that’s not very good, is because the concept is wrong or the idea behind the song is wrong.

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Danny
Shirt, waistcoat, suit: Sean Christopher Bow Tie: Valentino Rings: The Great Frog London Watch: Danny’s own
Tom
Shirt: Ben Sherman Jacket: McQ by Alexander McQueen Bow Tie: Tom’s own Jeans: Topman

 

Do you ever feel frustrated that pop music doesn’t get as much credibility as other genres?

Not anymore. I used to when I was younger. I used to care what people who read Kerrang! Magazine thought of me when I was 16, but that’s because I was one of those people who read Kerrang! Magazine. I soon grew out of that. I wanna produce stuff that I think is cool and I have fun with and I think other people will enjoy.

MCBUSTED

Waistcoat, shirt & Scarf: Sean Christopher Belt & Jewellery: Dougie’s own

Who is the Queen of Pop?

I think Taylor Swift is the Queen of Pop right now.

McBusted‘s Most Excellent Adventure Tour is out on DVD from 22 June

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 21 – THE POP ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE FOR PRE-ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

*Lead image fashion credits:

Dougie

Tshirt: Sandro
Jacket: Ben Sherman
Waistcoat & Scarf: Sean Christopher Jeans & jewellery: Dougie’s own

Matt

Shirt, waistcoat and trousers: Sean Christopher Bow Tie: Gucci
Watch: Matt’s own

Harry

Shirt & suit: Sean Christopher Tie: Dolce & Gabbana

James

Jacket: McQ by Alexander McQueen Shirt: Brutus
Tie: Saint Laurent
Jeans: Evisu

Tom

Shirt: Ben Sherman
Jacket: McQ by Alexander McQueen Bow Tie: Tom’s own
Jeans: Topman

Danny

Shirt, waistcoat, suit: Sean Christopher Bow Tie: Valentino
Watch: Danny’s own

Jack Antonoff of ‘Bleachers’ interview with FAULT Magazine Online

 

 

 

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Jack Antonoff of Bleachers, fun. & Steel Train fame is a different kind of juggler. With more than 15 years of touring and writing music under his belt, he’s now releasing his own debut album with Bleachers. You’ve most likely heard their wildly popular tune ‘I wanna get better’ but there’s so much more to Bleachers than you could possibly wrap your mind around. They’re vivid, they’re genuine and they’re all the things you’ve ever wanted to please your ears with. We caught up with Jack and he’s most definitely a refreshingly special kind of special.

FAULT: Now that it’s been a bit more than a year since you first started releasing music as Bleachers, can you tell me how 2014 was for you? You kinda had a lot going on as a band.

Jack Antonoff: It’s been absolutely amazing.  It was really exciting, a bit terrifying as well. But then again, the best times in your life are when you’ve got different feelings happening all at once.

You’ve basically been in bands your entire life. Started out with Steel Train, then fun. and now Bleachers. Is there something specific that you took from each and encompassed musically in Bleachers?

I think I’ve been touring for like 15 years now with different bands, so it was more like going on a journey that keeps shifting, changing and redefining what you do. It’s constantly about challenging yourself, taking what you know and making it vastly different. Somehow.

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You also started to write the album for Bleacher while on tour with fun. How did you manage both? It sounds both physically and mentally challenging.

I don’t know, it was weird, I was never able to do that before. Anytime I’ve been on tour, that part of my brain shuts off, but for some reason, with this process I was able to do it. I’d wake up and be like in Japan, Malaysia, Europe or something, I’d  just open my computer and start writing. Then I’d be on the bus or on a plane and start working on a beat instead of watching a movie. It would just happen like that.

I’ve noticed that you’ve got two drummers, as opposed to the usual one you’ve had so far. Did you always wanna go for a louder sound?

Well, the two drummer thing is always very literal because, when I made the album, I desperately wanted to find a bridge between synthetic and organic. So I would create a beat on my pc using all these synthetic sounds and then I’d want it feeling different so I’d play live drums on top of it. The album is made with very much these two elements, even like synthesizers and then guitars. So the drums are literally like these two guys and they switch off. One guy will do more like pads and one guy will play more live. They kind of complement each other in that way. So a lot of what happens live is a very literal translation of the album.

So it helped you not lose bits and pieces from the album while playing live basically.

Yeah, because I think when you create a live show, you do the best that you can to represent the album, knowing that’s it’s just going to go in a fucking different place anyway.  Which it ends up doing no matter what.

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Now that you mention it, the whole creative process that lies underneath releasing an album is quite challenging. You go from complete control to no control what so ever.

Yeah, it’s very weird. It’s what’s exciting, it’s what’s scary but it’s also what makes you feel very alive. To be in that sort of really exciting place of knowing that you’re handing it over and it’s gonna be redefined by people emotionally.   

You’ve worked with synth-pop pioneer Vince Clarke of Erasure and Depeche Mode fame on your album. How did you come across him and why did you feel that he was the right person to reach out to? 

I love him, he’s an idol of mine, he inspired a lot of my music and what he did with Erasure and Depeche Mode sonically is just incredible. I wanted those elements in the album, I wanted those pieces of nostalgia mixed with the future. I met him one day for a drink and I told him how brilliant he was for like an hour and we were never in the same room after that. Everything we did, I’d send him a song and he would send back ideas and I would cherry pick them and put them in. It was all very remote.

“I wanna get better” is currently one of your most popular songs. I’ve noticed that there’s a lot going on musically in it. Could you tell me a bit about your production process? 

It’s very layered. I recorded some piano on my phone in Germany and then I started sort of pitching it and then I put these like big kind of drums behind it and it almost felt like a hip-hop beat.  I thought I might give it to a rapper or something. But then, I put that low bass in the chorus and I was like nope, this is my song. And I had this idea in my head for I wanna get better and I was desperately trying to find the right song to put it in.  And the verses, it all was sort of weird, frantic and choppy. Then it got even weirder when I started adding voices of people, just like people in my life, friends and family and thrown them all over the song.  I did that a lot in the album.  And it just started to turn into this thing that sounded like a sound I had in my head that I hadn’t really heard yet out loud. It just built and built and built and built.  Took a long time. It kept slowly combating. Anytime something felt choppy I’d just add a guitar or when something felt too organic, I’d add some fucking synthesizer on top of it. I was just like constantly fighting with it.

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Your album opens with Wild Heart and you’ve worked with Yoko Ono on the track. But you’ve done it both with and without her.

Yeah, two reprise. So she ends up on the later version.

What was the experience like, in both cases? 

Well, the first version is one of the first songs we wrote for the album. I always knew it would open it cause it introduces the whole thing, it guides you in slowly and then smashes you in the face when the drums hit. And lyrically, the song means a lot to me, the concept of finding the best in the people around and not being concerned about death everywhere you go.  But I had this idea that the album would just descend into this digital place, so the reprise of Wild Heart fully crumbles into all synthesizers and I kept hearing this spoken song type of thing in my head that sounded like Yoko. So finally, I asked my manager if he’d call Yoko and see if she’d come to the studio and do it. So she came in, I remember it was Christmas cause she was eating Christmas cookies. She went into the booth and just started screaming and talking and singing and making noises, like all these crazy stuff. I took home the file that night and found all these moments where she’d be yelling and then she’d be singing something really beautiful like “I’m ready to move on” and then keep yelling. So I just grabbed these pieces and kind of created the song out of her organic expression.

You’ve mentioned earlier that lyrically, Wild Heart means a lot to you. You seem to have this tendency in your songwriting to write something extremely depressing and then sprinkle some upbeat pop on top of them. Sometimes, I don’t even know whether to dance or start weeping. Was that your intent?

That’s how I see music. It should be both. I think that the greatest songs make you cry in your bed if you want or dance with your friends if you want. It’s the same feeling. Being super emotionally attached to a song that you cry or so excited by a song that you want to move. It’s the same thing. All my favourite songs do that. Springsteen does that too, it should exist everywhere.

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Apart from making people feel confused when listening to your music (I’m absolutely joking), what’s your FAULT? 

I can focus too much on stressful or anxious things.  Also, I get really stressed out when people are sick. And I make them feel bad.

Photography: Miles Holder

Interview: Adina Ilie

ANNINA ROESCHEISEN : A MULTIMEDIA ARTIST TO WATCH

What are you fishing for - videoart Annina Roescheisen  2014

Credit to Annina Roescheisen

Annina Roescheisen is a half German half Slovenian multimedia artist based in Paris since 2009 ; she is specialized in Medieval art and she used to work for a little while for Sotheby’s in Munich before being full time dedicated to photography, films, sculptures, drawings, writings and human causes, especially to children. I met her last Saturday at her Parisian studio in 17th arrondissement and we naturally started talking about our common friend and visual artist Fawad Khan who used to sublet his Brooklyn apartment to her when she visited the big apple for work from times to times… At the moment, she is living between Paris and NYC ; NYC is the place where she is creating and writing whereas Paris is where she produces her artwork.  She is exhibiting her last video piece “What are you fishing for?” at the 56th International Venice Biennale in a few days and she is very excited about it : “It will be my first time attending the official opening as a featured artist so I will be going with the flow, it’s a big step for me! I hope I will be meeting up there with some friends : Xavier Veilhan and his studio team, some NY friends and my friend the galerist Imane Fares. I still don’t realize I am part of this international exhibition. It’s completely surrealistic…”. She added : “Having good supportive friends is very important when you enroll yourself in an artistic venture as you can easily feel lonely… It is essential to open yourself to what life is for real, accept failures and be patient, and of course, stop judging and labelling as good and bad things which are around you.” If you closely look at her website, you will notice she has a tab entitled “HUMANITY” where she features all of her actions towards human causes. She was recently selected by a French charity, L’Assiette Gourm’Hand, to take part in the jury process, under the patronage of the President of the Republic François Hollande, of a food experience designed by several groups of developmentally disabled people alongside big French Chefs next November. This human creature is a bottomless pit of generosity and creativity ; it is hauntingly beautiful. At the end of our talk from German painters to autism, she invited me to watch her selected video for the Venice Biennale in a darker and smaller space. The setting was perfect ; she built a TV frame made of birchwood to add a little something to her eight-minute narrative story. The music created by The Shoes’s band member Benjamin Lebeau as a background noise fits it so well. It helps you plunge in the water with this young pale girl all in white -played by the artist herself-, clean yourself from fears and thoughts and make peace with all around you for a bit. It feels so good to be stranded in the present time at this space full of good vibrations and energy. When going back to the main space, she handed me a little rainbow-colored book entitled LILLIE recommending me to read it on the train whenever I feel like it (Of course I read it right after leaving her). LILLIE is her first published book and I believe she is telling her own story through a little girl who is searching for peace of mind, facing both interior and exterior barriers… Welcome home, Annina! And thank you for being true to yourself.

Nick Jonas – FIRST LOOK AT OUR EXCLUSIVE SHOOT FOR FAULT ISSUE 21’S FRONT COVER

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FAULT Fashion Editor Kristine Kilty @ Lovely Management, Photographer: Matt Holyoak, Grooming: Daniel Rymer @ Lovely Management Shot on location at The Unit Gallery

 

We are very proud to announce that Nick Jonas is our Cover star for FAULT Issue 21!  As one of the Jonas Brothers, Nick Jonas was at the heart of a global phenomenon that spanned nine tours, four albums, and over 20 million in record sales- all before he had turned eighteen. It seems that Jonas is about to embark on a second wave of global phenomenon, and this time in his own right. See what he had to say about satisfaction, creative control, and finally calling the shots.

Photographed by Matt Holyoak and Styled by Fashion Editor Kristine Kilty at Soho’s The Unit Gallery (also featured within the issue) the ‘POP Issue’ will celebrate everything and everyone pop-music, popular- culture, pop-art and more!

We caught up with Nick days before Jealous took over the airwaves and racked up 60 million views on Youtube! With an album out June 30th, we’re truly excited to share these special preview images!

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With track titles like ‘Chains’, ‘Jealous’, and ‘Warning’, there’s a definite edge to the record. Did you feel like you were trying to get something off your chest in writing this album?

I felt like I was able to have total control over the music, and able to really open myself up creatively- ‘Jealous’ was actually the first song I wrote. I think there are definitely topics that I’m more comfortable to speak about at this point in my life than I was a couple of years ago, and naturally there are darker tones to the music.

Do you feel more vulnerable releasing as a solo artist, as opposed to when you were part of The Jonas Brothers? Are there certain difficulties that you find yourself facing this time around?

It’s very different. The biggest thing is in the promotion of it all; before, I had my two best friends with me all the time, but now it’s just me. I’m thrilled to see the reaction to the music, but that’s the one thing I miss.

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Looking forward, are there any dream collaborators you’d love to work with?

Prince. I would love to collaborate with Prince! And The Weeknd would be a fun collaboration, if it was the right thing.

Finally, what is your FAULT?

I’d have to say my level of stress. I push myself pretty hard, and I don’t think you can be as free as you need to be creatively when you have that.

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 21 – THE POP ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE FOR PRE-ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

 

Iwan Rheon: Game Of Thrones & Vicious Star in Exclusive Photoshoot For FAULT #20

iwan-1

Words: Olivia Pinnock
Photography: Leigh Keily @ lovely Management
Fashion Editor: Kristine Kilty
Grooming: Amy Brandon @ lovely ManageMent

 

FAULT 20 has hit the shelves and we can now preview shots from our interview with Iwan Rheon!  We’re half expecting him to slither up to the table and eyeball us with a disjointed grin on his face. Instead, Welsh actor Iwan Rheon, the man behind Ramsay Snow, swaggers up in a leather jacket and sunglasses and flashes a ‘cheeky chappy’ .

Ian McKellen’s ‘Vicious’ co-star is developing a dark streak in his work. FAULT digs deeper with Iwan Rheon on the unusual inspiration behind ‘Game of Thrones’ most twisted villain and a strange fairy tale film coming soon.

 

Ramsay Snow is a really nasty piece of work. How do you get into the mind-set of someone like that?

You have to try and figure out why he is like he is, and figure out the reasons for him being like that. Things like: he loves inflicting pain, why is that? The key to it is that it really is the joy of it all. He just loves it. So you have to find that joy in it which is a bit dark.

Do you have any inspiration points for him?

I was thinking The Joker from The Dark Knight meets Dennis the Menace. That was my initial thoughts. He’s an evil Dennis the Menace.

iwan-2

 

What’s your dream role?

I would have said Bilbo Baggins but that’s already been done… bastards.

Do you like playing a villain?

I do, yeah! [Chuckles]. It’s good fun. I’ve played lots of characters who are really introverted and hold everything inside so it’s nice not to have all that. It’s all extrovert and it’s really good fun.

 

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Vicious is filmed in front of a live audience, how does that change the dynamic?
It’s actually quite helpful I think because they’re having such a wonderful time. The first time I remember thinking, ‘What’s this going to be like?’ I was standing backstage ready to go on and then I could hear the warm reception that Derek [Jacobi] and Ian [McKellen] were getting so I thought, ‘Oh this is going to be fine.’ You go out and everything falls into place. The audience love it because they never get to see great actors like Ian and Derek and Frances [de la Tour] mess up. They absolutely love it and that gives you that warm feeling that you’

 

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 20 – THE FACES ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40