In Celebration of Black History Month 2018 ‘Style in My DNA’ by Lorna Holder chronicles 70 years of Caribbean influence on British Fashion.  

 

In Celebration of Black History Month 2018 ‘Style in My DNA’ by Lorna Holder chronicles 70 years of Caribbean influence on British Fashion. 

Join Lorna Holder in-conversation with Paulette Simpson, director of The Voice Newspaper and contributors from her new book plus book reading & signing.

This October Black History Month UK celebrates the achievements and contributions, of the BME communities. Anyone seeking to understand the Caribbean migrant experience can learn a lot from striking images from the past.

This eye-catching and impressive book documents seventy years of Caribbean influence on British fashion. The book includes exclusive and never before seen fashion photography and illustrations of Caribbean people in Britain from the late forties and continues right up to the present day.

The book also includes the memoirs of Lorna Holder, a child of the Windrush generation, born in Jamaica, brought up in Nottingham. Graduating with a BA Honours in Fashion and Textiles in 1975, she was the first black graduate of fashion to qualify at Nottingham Trent University. She went on to be a very successful fashion designer, producer, writer, curator and an active figure within London’s Caribbean Community.

 “Style in My DNA is my journey as a black woman, wife, mother, fashion designer and businesswoman, ‘making it happen’ as a migrant in 20th and 21st century Britain.”Lorna Holder

For further information call Tuareg Productions 

tel: 02076922711

Gabriel Kane Day Lewis Photoshoot and Interview with FAULT Magazine Preview

 

 

 

 

Art Direction & Photography: Leonardo De Angelis & Eric Francis Silverberg 

Stylist: Marc Anthony George 

Groomer: Roberto Morelli

Stylist Assistant: Evan Grotevant

Location SplashLight Studios NYC

 

 

Words: Carolyn Okomo

 

While music appears to be the emerging pop crooner’s chosen love, the Day Lewis hasn’t cast off the idea of trading a microphone for a script, though he admits he still has much to learn about the artform.

 

“I have, and I do want to act. It just has to be right. The right director, the right cast, the right screenplay.  I want to be in something noteworthy” he says. “But before I just throw myself into acting I want to take classes and learn. I feel it’s important for all artists to go through a certain learning process, regardless of talent.”

 

Day Lewis recently spoke with FAULT about his influences, regret, bullies, and forging his own unique brand of celebrity.

 

How did you discover your passion for music?

 

I wouldn’t say that I discovered music. It was a gradual thing, and it’s definitely been ingrained in me for as far back as I can remember. I’ve just always loved everything about music, and as I got older I started showing a pretty natural interest in the hands on aspect of music, and picked up the piano and guitar.

 

The first song I wrote was for my babysitter Kelly. I was five,  I think. The song was called “Pretty”, and it was basically me singing the word “pretty” over and over again to the tune of “Twinkle twinkle little star”. Wrote my first “original” song when I was eleven or twelve. I’ve been writing songs since.

 

 

Who are some artist you’d like to work with?

 

It’s hard to pinpoint, the youth is crushing pop at the moment. So many new faces, and insane amounts of talent. Everyone’s doing their thing and it’s really cool. I’d like to work with James Bay, his vibe is really what I’m about at the moment. Ed Sheeran would obviously be a dream collaboration. He just writes the most incredible songs.

 

You’ve written off your hip hop-influenced video, ‘Green Aura,’ as a misrepresentation of you as an artist. Do you feel the same way about it? How do you think you’ve grown, and what do you feel you’ve learned, since making that video — good and bad?

 

Green Auras. I used to always avoid questions about the viral music video I made when I was eighteen because it was still somewhat of a fresh wound, if you will. But now that I’ve been able to distance myself and completely come to terms with all the shade the internet threw at me back then, and look on it with some perspective from life experiences I’ve had since then.

 

I don’t really have anything I regret. If anything it was a valuable lesson and I learned it early on. The internet us a playground for bullies. In the track for that video, I made my biggest mistake by opening up about some real personal issues I hadn’t addressed back then, and people were just flat out mean about it. I was young and didn’t think the video would ever get the attention it did. I don’t care anymore, it blew over and it’s in the past now.

 

 

How did growing up in NYC influence you as an artist?

 

NYC has been just as good for my creativity, as its been stifling. What I love about the city is it’s constant flow of energy, the diversity. There’s always something to do and people to meet.  It feels so familiar to me. There’s something about the city that makes me feel on top of the world. That feeling of being unstoppable with infinite possibilities. It becomes energy that can be processed creatively. But I had to take a break from New York, it was wearing me out. I’ll be back soon.

 

What is your FAULT?

 

Hopeless romance.

 

‘OCHSENKNECHT’ Exclusive Fashion Editorial Chris Haimerl’s FAULT

 

Photo: Chris Haimerl 

Styling: Birgit Anja 

H&M: Klara Stark 

Model: Cheyenne Ochsenknecht 

Clothing: ONIMOS 

Cars & Fashion LAFW Runway Event feat. Escada and Porsche Design

The glitterati of California’s City of Angels recently appeared in droves to witness the intersection of high-fashion and high-octane automobiles at Los Angeles Fashion Week’s Cars & Fashion runway event on Aug. 3: a prelude to the highly-anticipated, five-day LAFW 2019 event this coming fall.

Appropriately hosted at the Petersen Automotive Museum, Cars & Fashion featured presentations from two of the world’s most iconic luxury brands, Escada and Porche Design.

German-bred powerhouses Escada and Porche Designs audaciously emerged in the 1970s as innovators in apparel and industrial design. Escada’s 1978 debut collection, Escada & Sporty Elegance, helped to define the glamorous-yet-bold and wholly feminine aesthetic of the Escada woman through four decades. Just six years prior in 1972, Ferdinand Alexander Porche founded his namesake brand with an ethos that emphasized an uncompromised commitment to sleek, high-quality luxury goods with little regard to costs of production, and shifted Porche design focus beyond automobiles.

FAULT Magazine was on location at Cars & Fashion for a sneak peak of what sartorial devotees of both fashion houses can expect at LAFW SS19 this October: an event that will showcase the latest frocks by designers and brands from around the world.

ESCADA SS19

ESCADA SS19

ESCADA SS19

ESCADA SS19

ESCADA SS19

Porche Design SS19

Porche Design SS19

Porche Design SS19

LAFW’s Cars & Fashion 2018

LAFW’s Cars & Fashion 2018

SYLVIAN HYDE : NYFW INTERVIEW

 

Sylvian Hyde is the newly favorable and elevated neoclassical menswear brand to crave and desire. Birthed just last year of October 2017, Belize born Sylvian Hyde has introduced a new conversation to menswear titled with unswerving fearless confidence. A striking debut in summer’s heat, making everyone melt at every thread, much is to be expected from this evolving brand. An exuberant color palette seasoned with spark and spice and just to our explorative delights. We caught up for a little bit of chatter to learn some more about this engaging enterprise. 

FAULT: Who is Sylvian Hyde? As you are a very young brand, born just last year yes? How did it come about?

Sylvian Hyde: So yeah, I’m Sylvian Hyde, 25 years old, originally from Belize, migrated to the states in 2014. Yes, so I’ve lived there the majority of my life but I relocated here in December 2014 for political asylum. Um yea, so the brand started, like you said, last year in October. Really I just had a bunch of sketches and I always said one day I want to have my own line and then being friends with Jabari; I knew his interest in fashion, the administrative business side, and he had also interned for fashion week twice; so he shared stories with me. So one day we’re like let’s just stop talking about it – he has the business side, I have the design side, so we just started and once the ball started to roll and we saw our samples being made, and were like “Woah this really is a reality” and then every day it just got more serious and more serious till where we are today. 

How long have you been sketching? When did it start?

Sylvian Hyde: I’ve been drawing from when I was a kid. It’s like architecture, automotive design, it’s fashion. It wasn’t until I came to the states, that I really chose fashion. I really thought, growing up I would have done architecture, because where I was in Belize, a career in fashion or starting your own brand there, it’s like, “Ya you can do it but you’re not going to have the success rate to make a living off of it.” So it wasn’t until I got here I was like, “Wow, I’m living here in New York City, the fashion capital of the world. It’s possible.”

Where does your name come from? It’s so interesting and regal. Is there a backstory to it?

Sylvian Hyde: It’s the name my mom had. Interesting back story, so I changed my first name recently to Sylvian. My first name originally is Terrell which is the name my dad gave me from his best friend, and I changed it because I – it’s a whole long back story into my family background, but when I relocated here, starting over, a fresh start, I decided to take the name my mom wanted for me. I was the first child for both parents, so normally the guy gets to name his son. 

What would you say are your greatest influences for your designs and your day to day? Does Belize have an influence?

Sylvian Hyde: I feel the biggest influence coming from Belize is the depravation – the lack of opportunity. Now that I have the opportunity, it makes me want to work harder and appreciate the opportunity. In terms of influences for me my biggest is when I watch the red carpet events. When I see these distinguished men, looking like the help, I just wish men would make more fashion statements. That is my angle to make great fashion statements with men on the red carpet. Starting where I am at now, it’s to try to have guys evolve their style on a day to day basis. 

What sets Sylvian Hyde apart from other menswear designers?

Sylvian Hyde: I definitely say more use of untraditional menswear fabrics, and just doing things out of the box. For example, recently we just did some tailored suits out of athletic mesh. From the onset of designing I just really try to put my mind into the mind-frame to try to do something original. So I don’t pay attention to trends. I just do what I feel comes to me natural and is original. 

Does Sylvian Hyde function as a unisex brand?

Sylvian Hyde: When we started we didn’t think of ourselves or aspire to be a unisex brand, but however the women who have attended our shows and have seen our clothes have expressed interest and said, “Oh I would wear that.” So that definitely opened up our eyes to that possibility and it’s one that we are happy to entertain and foster. 

When and will you start thinking about venturing into a womenswear or swimwear brand?

Sylvian Hyde: I’d like to have my first womenswear collection by 2020. That’s kind of the goal. 

Aside from womenswear and considering how far and fast you have come, what other directions do you see the brand going? What else would you like to branch into with Sylvian Hyde?

Sylvian Hyde: 10 years plus I really see us becoming a real lifestyle brand. As I said I have interest in architecture, all different facets of design. I mean going way farther than interior design I mean actual architecture itself. Having a real designer home. With just details, details, details. If I could collaborate with an automator that way Victoria Beckham did with Landrover; she designed the interior for the Land Rover Range Rover Evoque. That type of stuff I would love to see the brand to do in the future. 

In another year, where are you looking to be, considering how fast you have moved in less than one year?

Sylvian Hyde: I think headed in the direction where I hope for it to go, which is guys just being a little more free and expressive with their style and not as limiting. For me I hope my influence is – I admire that the industry allows women to have clothing that flatters their body. I want guys to be able to have that same opportunity without it having any type of labels or stereotype. I’d like to see menswear make that jump. And society also to make that jump. 

If you could live in any other time, period and place, where would that be and why?

Sylvian Hyde: I would like to live in the future. Because hopefully in the future, I would be that much closer to realizing my vision and just enjoying the progression of society. 

What is your FAULT?

Sylvian Hyde: My fault is I could learn to be a little more patient. To just trust the process of things. But I also feel, let me try to clarify…I feel that with my impatience, I don’t like hearing no and I don’t like limitations and I see how that has helped us to achieve so much in such a short space of time. But I need to work on knowing and identifying, the little things that you  know, some things you are supposed to put some brakes on or just let it go. I guess choose battles better I guess. Choose projects better I guess and just let it get wrought out. 

Words + Interview: Chaunielle Brown | Images: Jennifer Laurantius 

SWONNE : MFW SS19 HIGHLIGHTS

Katie Golinczak is the new menswear talent to watch. After having solid exposure working for Ralph Lauren, John Varvatos, Levi’s, to name a few, Katie launched her debut collection for Swonne at NYFW Men S/S 2019. Her first collection is inspired by Mod Rockers of the 60s, and consisted of a seasonless denim collection, t-shirts, biker jackets, parkas with tailoring details. Her SW1 parka, which is one of her (and our) favorite piece, is designed, constructed and hand painted in Brooklyn, NY. Swonne’s debut collection definitely lived up to our expectations and we look forward to see what it has to offer next season!

Katie Golinczak, Designer of SWONNE

Words + Images: Jennifer Laurantius Art Design/Layout: Chaunielle Brown

 

Feeric Fashion Week 2018 in Romania

Feeric Fashion Week 2018 in Romania is the biggest fashion week in Eastern Europe. This year saw the launch of the fiercely contested Feeric33 competition for 33 breakthrough designers to win various opportunities to help launch their label to the international market. The judging panel included the likes of Diane Pernet, (founder of ASVOFF), Liana Satenstein (Senior Fashion Writer at Vogue US), Adriana di Lello (Fashion Features Director at Elle Italia) Raoul Keil (founder of Schon Magazine), Patricia Lerat (founder of PLC Consulting and curator of Designers Apartment in collaboration with Fédération de la Haute Couture et de la Mode), Riccardo Terzo (Fashion Stylist and Contributor to VOGUE Talent), Tania Cursano (founder of IT-ELITE Showroom) and Carolina Molossi (founder of Get Book A Look Digital Showroom).

FAULT was in attendance to see Polish designer Kalina Kocemba win the grand prize: a 3 year management contract with The Secret Code of Fashion Agency and Feeric Fashion Week, worth €30,000. Other prizes for the talented finalists included a cover feature in 33 Magazine, a collaboration with V for VINTAGE trade fair platform, and a Summer Course scholarship with IED – Istituto Europeo di Design in 2019. Romanian model and Vice-President of Feeric Fashion Week Landiana also chose 3 lucky contestants and wore their looks throughout Feeric Fashion Week 2018.

Kalina Kocemba, the winner of Feeric33 @ Feeric Fashion Week 2018

Kalina Kocemba, the winner of Feeric33

Winning designer Kalina Kocemba declared nature to be the inspiration behind her first collection, one dominated by white fabric which tightly surrounds the body and gives the sensation of wearing a second skin.

Other shortlisted and noteworthy participating designers at Feeric Fashion Week 2018 included Zeta, Eliza Dobai, Lili Eva Bartha, Tara Lalic, Ariana Spin, Aigerim Kairat – along with many others.

 

 

 

 

 

For more about Feeric Fashion Week 2018 & Feeric33, please visit:

www.feeric.ro
@F33ric

Photography by Ancira Adeon

ALESSANDRO TRINCONE | MFW SS19 | HIGHLIGHTS

A modern day set whimsical romance orchestrated for pleasures play. Menswear reimagined for a possible futuristic walking strut of design, fantasy and exploration. A carefree confidence floating on air with ruffles, waves, tiers of tulle and femme delights. With imagination and disco discovery we’re presented with stapled stamped pieces of a light plush blush palette and marshmallow. Recollections of Viktor & Rolf echoed with ease; alas a fearless collection with no boundaries or limits. Ingenious strolling works of art and visionary obsessions. Tinsel streams of silver, metallics, glitters, gloves and knee highs, leaving mouths ajar for the elements of surprise. Alessandro Trincone has us kept in an excess of life’s secret garden.

Words by: Chaunielle Brown | Photographer: Jay Blum