KROST NEW YORK

(courtesy of KROST NEW YORK)

 

Words: Chaunielle Brown | Images: Jay Blum

A movement triggered from catastrophic echoes, a tragic repetition of a far too frequent headline, “School Shooting.” Parkland, Florida, February 14, 2018 tore at us all once again, and out of the broken, fallen and destructively destroyed rose a connected championed community, marching out of the madness, together, to march for our lives. In the desperately needed togetherness, a channeled understanding and respect for life came a stapled support, unwavering and bold. KROST NEW YORK found its place, tying in an ever burning determination to provide support for all; strangers pledged in a common belief, support for your friends, those past and present and those you have yet to meet. Together, as we march for lives, we march and vow to support. An inspired placement and nod to the transformational sixties and its engraved grit for fight, freedom and justice, support and love for all, we are bound together in a firmly rooted cornerstone. Rising to the surface we find a brand bonded in brotherhood with a gifted emboldened Pantone Autumn Glory Orange, unified, transitional no matter gender or preference. Founder Samuel Krost and Designer and Creative Director Scott Camaran lead us in a movement to be proudly worn. 

This First Semester, we found ourselves introduced and taken on an emergence of transcendent truth, #Support Your Friends. A camaraderie of banded souls, striving for principled authenticity, artistic and social change, KROST NEW YORK is lined with a school housed remembrance, outfitted by lockers, fresh fancied custom turfed golden green grass, varsity tracks and iridescent labels to remind us we are all the colors of the world, friends bound together in support.                                                                                                                                                         

(courtesy of KROST NEW YORK)

 

Following their well tailored motivational opening, we caught up with the two for some good loved chatter.

Tell me something about KROST that hasn’t been recorded or put down for all to read. 

SK: I think I got emotional yesterday for the first time on Instagram. For me personally, this entire concept started right after, unfortunately the mass shooting in Parkland, Florida. It kind of really hit a certain chord in me. I was determined to get involved with the youth. I think it was a week later, that March for Our Lives was put together and just watching the youth come together and supporting one other, whether they knew each other or not, they were supporting each other based on having the same beliefs. At that time I was determined to become involved in it, but at the same time, I wanted to pursue my passion and started to think about how I can combine the two. So this idea of Support Your Friends was created, and it has been a personal slogan for a long time. 

What Scott and I both will tell you, is that this brand wants to be known first for its message – for its story and for the community that we build around support your friends and and for us just being such fashion lovers, we are using apparel and accessories at the very beginning to try and tell that story. 

And that doesn’t go to take away from the attention to detail that we put into this clothing. We did not go to a warehouse and buy 500 t-shirts and write support your friends on them. We went through, 10 to 12 rounds of samples, really making sure that our fits and fabrics were of the utmost luxury and understanding where the fashion space is moving and were able to provide a luxury product, because we’re not wholesaling the brand right now. So we’re hitting good margins but were providing a luxury brand at one of the most accessible price points in the entire market right now. And that’s the exact feedback we’ve been getting about our price points, about our fits, about our fabrics, and of course the message finally is starting to come out. I think with trying to launch this company, there was so much that was happening that you know we were kinda just putting a fashion brand out there, but now the story is finally getting out there with the help of people like you and the press. With the backstory of how this actually happened.

And with March for Our Lives being the exact inspiration behind the brand, we wanted to take that and use it as the inspiration of how we were going to design this collection. And if we look when the last time something like this happened, we really just took it from the 1960s, which was the epitome of a decade when youth came together to forge a better today. Now whether it was about the sexual revolution, or whether it was anti-war, or anti-poverty, that was a decade that was filled with riots, protests, different movements, but what we take from there is it was the youth coming together to support one another. So that’s what we used as the inspiration behind the brand. And then we kind of took on the first collection and said hey let’s do this based on our modern take on the collegiate, university, varsity elements of the 1960s. That’s how we came to the aesthetic of our first collection. For us, this is called First Semester and Second Semester is really going to come down to what’s important in society, what’s currently happening and what needs more awareness, that needs more support, that needs a community to be built to bring people together to help actual create tangible change. Instead of just saying things, we want to show that through action. 

 

Were there roadblocks to this journey? 

SC: I don’t think Sam and I are quitters. We know how to divide and conquer.

SK: I think we both wear, I don’t want to use the word multiple, because it’s more than multiple, but we wear A LOT of different hats right now. I didn’t want to tiptoe our way into this. We wanted to come out and let people know we’re here. And I wanted to do it the right way. With that being said, like I said before, this wasn’t “Let’s go into a warehouse and buy 500 t-shirts.” We put a serious investment into this company in creating from scratch our patterns. And every time our pattern was wrong we had to go and pay to redo it and redo it and redo it. And we had to start from scratch and every dollar put in, before we raised money, I don’t want to say, went into the garbage, but technically it did. It was an educational experience and technically as a startup there’s going to be mistakes along the way. But we do know that we don’t allow mistakes to happen twice. There were so many roadblocks, so many days that were harder than others. To be honest, I had to make sure our product got to this pop-up for the opening. When I say everything came down to the last minute…EVERYTHING came down to the last minute.

We know our systems now, we have our patterns. We’ve developed them. So we’re hoping and praying that based on an incredible seven, eight month educational experience, that we know how to do this the right way moving forward. And we have an incredibly huge team. A digital marketing team. We’re a digitally focused brand that wants to continuously have physical retail concept stores. The vision for the future is bring other brands into our retail to make those experiential retail spaces and falling into this idea of “Support Your Friends;” bring other brands in that follow our message, that help us broaden that message. Anyone or anything, any vehicle that we could create, whether that’s through video, photography, art, other apparel, whatever it may be, that’s the future for the brand. Getting into those spaces to help us push this message. 

How did you two meet?

SC: Sam and I knew each other for about a year before we started the company. Back when I was working at ACNE STUDIOS, he was my client. I think it was last December when I met his mom, they were shopping for the holidays. I was helping him shop for his Aspen trip. His mom had mentioned to me, “Sammy, you’ve always wanted to have a clothing line.” And I said, “You know, I’m a designer. and then I showed them my designs on my phone and pretty much after a bit, we finally got together to talk about it, talk about some ideas and concepts and next thing you know, eight months later, we’re launching our concept retail space in Soho. 

 

Why Autumn Glory Orange?

SC: It’s the color of friendship. The thing about orange in general is it’s a mixture between yellow and red. When you google the meanings behind colors, friendship is one of the names that pops up as the definition for it. But also Autumn Glory, I think, what it was, was kind of random. Sam in his apartment had a coffee table book that was orange, similar orange to the one we chose for the collection and THEN (laughter) we googled it and then it all ended up working out. 

Will there be other colors introduced?

SC: We want to develop these accent colors. For next season we have a couple Pantones in mind. If you look at our tags and our stickers, they’re iridescent so the iridescent we kind of want to touch upon every color, every person, it’s supposed to show that lack of conformity to one thing. I think what’s so cool about iridescent is that it changes color depending on what angle you look at it. So I think that’s how I perceived the design aspect to each collection. It’s really the same message at a different angle. So I think we represent a new color Pantone every time there’s a new season, but still maintain that same thread, that same message cohesively throughout the brand. 

(left, Samuel Krost)

What is next for KROST, any special collections, community relations?

SK: We’re working on a capsule collection special for March for Our Lives, where proceeds will be donated directly back to March for Our Lives. I think one thing that’s super interesting is we’re continuously trying to find unique angles to make this brand different and to stand out. And with that I’ve been working with a developer integrating a platform onto our website. Our vision is to white label it and pass it through the entire non-profit sector. Unfortunately in the non-profit space, it’s also one of the most corrupt spaces. As a brand you say “I’m donating this.” You don’t believe it anymore, it doesn’t really sound credible anymore. I’m trying to think, how am I going to not just be another brand that says, “Hey we partner with March for Our Lives and we’re giving them money” so we’re creating a block chain software, where basically if you buy a hoodie for $100 Chaunielle and I donate 10% of that, that $10 that you bought that hoodie on November 16 goes into an escrow account, when March for Our Lives wants to take that $10, what happens is we basically own this digital ledger that keeps track of all the donations and when March For Our Lives goes into that escrow account and takes your $10, Chaunielle is going to get a message, an email, a notification, that says, “Hey it’s Jan 1, March for Our Lives just took the $10 that you donated, based on the sweatshirt you bought on November 16 for $100, that we got $10 from, oh and also, we’re using this $10 to buy Tommy a box of cereal.

(courtesy of KROST NEW YORK)

So basically were bringing credibility back into the non-profit space, that money is not being released until the organization actually needs it and for the brand, we’re reengaging with our consumers and giving you the ability to feel good about what you just did. We’re bringing transparency and we’re bringing credibility. And most importantly we are making our customers feel good about that they did. And again it’s about putting this product on, that you were able to buy because it’s an accessible price point and now you’re wearing a brand thats bigger than the clothing, our goal is to make you feel like you’re part of the community when you were something from the brand. 

Also for Second Semester, we’re going to be tackling other issues that stem from the same concepts, of community and unity but also this idea of loving yourself. Because in the past year, we all know how much suicide has affected the world. Young people, successful people, people who have the facade of living a happy life and non-problematic lifestyles and are still suffering and still don’t know how to love themselves. So i think that’s one message, when designing I have in mind for next season. We’re all about designing with purpose. Because I really think it’s important to do that.

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR FAVORITE PART?

SK: For example if you look at our campaign video, there’s a side by side in the campaign where we have a few of our models, one on the shoulders of another, you know, peaceful protest celebrating and then there’s a side by side of the EXACT, identical replica video that was shot in 1960s in black and white and it’s just like, this is exactly what we envisioned and like Scott said, to see it, to just come to life, I still haven’t been able to sit down and like, give ourselves a pat on the back and I don’t think I ever will, because I’m difficult to be satisfied. I think we can always do better. And I think that’s what’s going to keep us alive. Scott and I both have that same drive. Definitely just seeing this come to live when we met in a Le Pain on Grand Street and literally sketched out on a napkin, and now we’re sitting in our first concept retail store with our product hanging, with our team around us and it’s just a blessing. It’s been our dream. All my friends and family know I’ve always dreamt about having a brand. Scott’s the most talented person, across the board. From design to photography to film, whatever needs to be done, Scott can get that done. I think we’re an incredible team that we divide and conquer. And we are getting to live our dream. That’s something we’ll never take for granted and always look at as a blessing. And if we’re able to create some real change and put a positive message out there, that’s the just going to be the absolute cherry on top. 

(courtesy of KROST NEW YORK)

WHAT IS YOUR FAULT?

SK: Patience, becoming good leaders. Making sure we’re doing everything by the books. Having patience with people. Having patience with each other. Scott and I have screamed at each other along the way, but just knowing that it’s in good faith and it’s all love. 

SC: Ya, Sam is my brother. Our moms were literally hanging out at the opening. I think patience and I hate the word, “expectations and being realistic.” But along those lines just understanding who we are and where we are and what we’re doing. I know I have HUGE expectations. When I say, I want what I want, I mean it. Sam and I are both stubborn which is why I think we were able to get to where we are. We’re so set in our ways and know what we want that we actually have to get it. But I think it’s just working with other people to understand. We’re also working with people who are professionals and have done this before and we have to come from their perspective and understand what it takes for them to do their job. I think gaining that sort of perception will help and that’s just a startup fault: expectations. 

(courtesy of KROST NEW YORK)

KROST NEW YORK concept retail pop-up store in Soho at 357 CANAL STREET will tentatively be open till November 26th 2018 and “hopefully if everything goes well, we’ll have it till the end of the year.”

Nan Goldin at Frieze 2018: ‘Full Speed Into The World’

Nan Goldin at Frieze 2018: “If I want to take a picture, I take it no matter what.

Nan Goldin at Frieze 2018

Words: Will Ballantyne-Reid
All images courtesy of Nan Goldin and Matthew Marks Gallery

Amidst the hyper-capitalist spectacle of Frieze 2018, the political turmoil of the last year, and on the day before Brett Kavanaughs controversial and much-contested confirmation, legendary photographer Nan Goldin took to the stage with veteran arts writer Linda Yablonsky to discuss her career.

Goldin is famously one of the most fearless photographers of her generation – with work that examines the deeply nuanced relations between couplingof all degrees. From relationships that veer between fear and obsession, to individuals in a complex relationship with their own self-presentation, Goldins work has always delved into the rich tapestry of our own humanity. Her appearance forced a re-consideration of her landmark practice, in the context of a modern world that though plagued with political unrest has at least made leaps and bounds in the context of queer representation – of which Goldin was a torch-bearer, realising the vast array of aesthetic and emotional identities that could be caught on camera under the focus of her lens.

Nan Goldin at Frieze 2018

The instance of photographing, instead of creating a distance, is a moment of clarity and emotional connection for me.

This was clear in each moment of her conversation with Yablonsky, who carefully guided the conversation through a cast of characters – many of whom are now historically renowned; Robert Mapplethorpe, David Wojnarowicz, Cookie Mueller, and other luminaries of New York on the cusp the AIDS epidemic, which would cut short so many of their brilliant lives. Writing on the iconography and rhetoric of the AIDS epidemic — and the epidemic of significationthat occurred as result — Susan Sontag assessed that the catastrophe of AIDS suggests the immediate necessity of limitation.This accompanied, in part, the observation of multiple socio-cultural breakdowns; the conflation of medical fact and social fiction, the sensationalising impact of moral panic upon the media, the effect of hysteria upon imaging the disease — and how these were fuelled careless reporting, pre-existing homophobia, and governmental complacency. In a time of cultural confusion, fake news, and the breakdown of public discourse over multiple crises of socio-political injustice, Goldins work remains as relevant today as it has ever been.

The talk began with Nan Goldin at Frieze 2018 highlighting to the audience the presence of a striking series of medicinal bottles on the table, one for each life that would be lost to the American Opioid crisis during the course of her one-hour talk. This is her latest cri de coeur, and one through which she has suffered directly (as has always been the case with her work.) Writing of her own struggle with opioid addiction, Goldin acknowledges she narrowly escaped […] I went from the darkness and ran full speed into the world.

Nan Goldin at Frieze 2018

“I was isolated, but I realised I wasnt alone. When I got out of treatment I became absorbed in reports of addicts dropping dead from my drug, OxyContin. I decided to make the private public […] my first action is to publish personal photographs from my own history.

As such, she has led an international campaign against the Sackler family – prescription drug dynasty and noted patrons of the arts – described by the New York Times as the family that built an empire of pain.In again tying her work to an epidemic of physical injustice and its emotional consequence, Goldin continues to forge ahead with a photographic practice that is deeply entrenched in her own personal politics – and in the bravery it takes to make the personal public in the name of political progression. We should all be grateful for her fearlessness, and the humility and honesty with which she rages on.

Nan Goldin at Frieze 2018

 

To see more by Nan Goldin at Frieze 2018, visit Matthew Marks Gallery

 

Cars & Fashion LAFW Runway Event feat. Escada and Porsche Design

The glitterati of California’s City of Angels recently appeared in droves to witness the intersection of high-fashion and high-octane automobiles at Los Angeles Fashion Week’s Cars & Fashion runway event on Aug. 3: a prelude to the highly-anticipated, five-day LAFW 2019 event this coming fall.

Appropriately hosted at the Petersen Automotive Museum, Cars & Fashion featured presentations from two of the world’s most iconic luxury brands, Escada and Porche Design.

German-bred powerhouses Escada and Porche Designs audaciously emerged in the 1970s as innovators in apparel and industrial design. Escada’s 1978 debut collection, Escada & Sporty Elegance, helped to define the glamorous-yet-bold and wholly feminine aesthetic of the Escada woman through four decades. Just six years prior in 1972, Ferdinand Alexander Porche founded his namesake brand with an ethos that emphasized an uncompromised commitment to sleek, high-quality luxury goods with little regard to costs of production, and shifted Porche design focus beyond automobiles.

FAULT Magazine was on location at Cars & Fashion for a sneak peak of what sartorial devotees of both fashion houses can expect at LAFW SS19 this October: an event that will showcase the latest frocks by designers and brands from around the world.

ESCADA SS19

ESCADA SS19

ESCADA SS19

ESCADA SS19

ESCADA SS19

Porche Design SS19

Porche Design SS19

Porche Design SS19

LAFW’s Cars & Fashion 2018

LAFW’s Cars & Fashion 2018

COSMO’S MIDNIGHT FAULT MAGAZINE INTERVIEW

Let’s get this out into the open straightaway: Cosmo’s Midnight is a banger addict’s dream come true. With their full-length debut, What Comes Next, producer twins Cosmo and Patrick Liney are here to enable you.

Once scrappy upstarts in Australia’s beat-making scene, Cosmo’s Midnight has since become one of its finest electronic exports. The duo’s newly-released 12-track effort is dreamy, intoxicating, and complex—with the brotherly duo enlisting both local and international features to help bring their insatiable project to life, from L.A. rapper Buddy to Swedish wunderkind Tove Styrke, and Melbourne vocalist Woodes to Sydney’s six-piece Winston Surfshirt. Libidinal R&B (“Lowkey”), heartbreak disco (“Talk To Me”), cloud rap (“Where You Been”), near-instrumentals (“Polarised”), and sultry come-ons (“History”)—their tightly curated, summery, feel-good songs are all here for the taking.

The album dropped ahead of their Australia/New Zealand tour, which kicked off in July, and the fellas are now on the Asian leg of their tour before heading off to Europe next month. FAULT caught up with Cos and Pat at their show last week in Seoul, South Korea to discuss the music, the inspirations, and their journey to her.

Interview: Kee Chang

Photography: Jordan Kirk.

What Comes Next is incredibly addictive. Did it exceed your personal, creative expectations?

Patrick Liney: I think it definitely exceeded our expectations. At the very start of the process, we just couldn’t see the end and we were finding along the way what we really wanted to do with it. Looking back now, I’m really glad we ended up where we did. Three years ago, when we were writing the first demos for the album, I don’t think we—

Cosmo Liney: It was stabbing in the dark.

Patrick: With a lot of the album, it wasn’t like we went in like, “This is exactly what we’re gonna make.” We were figuring it out over three years and piecing together all these bits. So it wasn’t an album like, “This is the concept and we’re gonna smash it out in two months.” When we finished it and looked back, it sort of made sense that it was a combination of all these different things that influenced us growing up, up until the point that we became producers and musicians.

Cosmo: We feel really lucky to have had it work out, especially with a lot of the things that happened in the process. It was very fortunate because they may not have happened. For example, when we sampled N.E.R.D./Pharrell, that could’ve not happened.

Patrick: Yeah, they might not have cleared it.

Cosmo: A lot of the features were very difficult to get and hard to maintain contacts for.

Patrick: For example, we’d get a sick verse from a rapper and you just wouldn’t hear from them for like six months. You’re like, “This demo is so sick. Let’s finish it off,” and then they hit you back like, “Here’s a finished song.”

Cosmo: We’re very used to writing songs in the studio with the person and getting the songs made that way. A lot of this album was done over the Internet.

Patrick: Yeah, just emailing back and forth with ideas and stuff.

Cosmo: We’re just really glad it came together and that it’s something we can be proud of for our first album.

Patrick: Again, with a lot of the songs, we never met who wrote on them so a lot of it feels like we have this connection with the people we haven’t met yet. We wrote that song with Jay Prince and Buddy as well.

Those guys worked independently from each other as well, right?

Patrick:  Yeah, yeah. Then there’s Boogie, Winston Surfshirt, and Tove Styrke. Panama is from Sydney so and that was good for the process. I feel like we write our best music like that.

Cosmo: It’s easier to write like that.

Patrick: It’s definitely a challenge to work over emails. You can’t be like, “Change that take,” and stuff like that because it just takes too long, whereas in the studio you can change so much in a minute.

What was it like curating what ultimately ended up on the album? Are there a lot of unused demos?

Patrick: So, so, so much. The album has 12 tracks including the interlude, but I think we had somewhere around 50-ish demos.

Cosmo: And a lot of them were good. It was about finding—

Patrick: What works. There were songs that we really liked that we kind of put on hold. They just wouldn’t have worked for the album. We’re saving them for something later, further down the line. We sort of curated the album four months out of release like, “This is the final ones,” and then we went out and finished all the tracks after that. You always have the “What if?” in your head like, “What if we did this song instead? What if I tweaked this song forever?” which is why it’s good we didn’t mix it ourselves. This is the first project we’ve not mixed ourselves. I mixed all of our previous singles up until “Get to Know.” We brought in this incredible mixing engineer, George Nicholas, on board. He’s from this band called Seekae. Sometimes when you’ve been working on a song so closely for so long, you get tunnel vision. You need someone who’s objectively looking at it like, “I know what’s best for this song.” When I mix my own stuff, I don’t know what to change: “Am I making it worse or am I making it better?”

Cosmo: You just don’t know. You kind of lose track of the entire thing.

Patrick: We often come up with ideas really quickly and take a long time to finish it because all the details take a long time.

Is there any validity to artists who say that the songs that come together fast are usually the best cuts?

Cosmo: There’s no really right or wrong way to do it, but I think you can’t argue that when you write something that quickly and something that feels so right, you’ve kind of hit a nerve in some way.

Patrick: And you can only hit it every now and then. A lot of the times, you’re banging your head like, “Come on! Come out, song!” Then sometimes it happens without you even doing much and it sort of writes itself. It’s super weird. It feels really good when it’s effortless.

You guys came to play a show in South Korea just around this time last year, right?

Patrick: We did.

You were just in Singapore and headed to Thailand tomorrow. Are the vibes glaringly different?

Patrick: Oh, it’s so vast.

Cosmo: Even in Australia, it’s so different between cities. I don’t know what that comes down to at all.

Patrick: Cultural differences and like—

Cosmo: Just how much it’s different, though.

Patrick: Yeah, it’s insane. Playing in Singapore yesterday was kind of a shock. I couldn’t believe that people came to see us play in Singapore. It was really cool. Then you have the different crowd vibes. The crowd here in Seoul—at Soap anyways—they go crazy. [Laughs] At least at our last show, it was so much fun. We’ve played in China and other places where they’re more reserved.

Cosmos: They’ll politely enjoy the show and come up to you afterwards like, “That was amazing! I had so much fun!” and you’re like, “Really?” But they really did. They just didn’t show it.

What do you prefer?

Patrick: Obviously, the instant gratification of everyone sort of jumping around is really fun. But a lot of the times, we also go and talk to people after the show to see what they thought or just to say “Hi.” Hearing what they thought of the show is where you feel good. Some people just don’t like dancing and drinking or whatever—it’s not necessarily their vibe. There are different flavors. As long as they enjoyed it, that’s all that matters to me. At the end of the day, if they have a good time, then we have a good time. If someone’s not having a good time, me and Cosmo will not have a good time and it would just spiral. If everyone’s having a good time, it spirals in the reverse way.

Cosmos: Upwards.

One of the things that seems to come up a lot when you’re asked about your early influences is your older brother Nik who really turned you onto music, as older siblings tend to do. Is he shocked by how much you took to music and how far you’ve come?

Patrick: I think so.

Cosmo: None of us were prepared for what would happen. None of us really knew that we’d be touring and playing around the world and stuff. To him, being our brother, I think it’s just more shocking because he knows us so well. To see it happening is really surprising for him.

Patrick: It’s weird. And he lives in London so he has this outsider’s perspective. Even though he’s our brother, he sees a lot of stuff through—

Cosmo: He won’t be at the shows, but he’ll see recaps or photos or something.

Patrick: We’re gonna go over to Europe next month so we’re gonna hang out and he’ll come to some of the shows. I don’t think he’s seen us play in a super long time—it’ll be cool to hang out. We’re really close, even though we don’t see each other that much. He’s only two years older than us so we’re pretty close in years as well.

What Comes Next is an interesting title for your debut album because it sounds prophetic. It seems to really set you up for what’s to come after this work.

Patrick: Yeah, it’s kind of cool because it’s acknowledging that it’s our debut effort—a launchpad for all the things that can come afterward. It’s prophetic in like a hopeful sense. It’s a prediction. At the same time, it acknowledges all the stuff that built up to this point as well. When we’re talking about our album and our process, we’re referring back to when we were kids. On the album cover, the artwork is based off a collage of all these photos of us from when we were little. We’ll be sitting in different rooms in our family house and my dad would be playing vinyls to us. They’re basically three things: Switch-On Bach, which is like a Minimoog version of all these Bach songs. Then he’d play us Jim Hall’s Undercurrent, which is this jazz-guitar album that I heard a million times. Also, a lot of disco as well. At the time, we were like, “Ugh—I hate this so much.” But then, you know, as you start getting into music, you come to appreciate it. My mom and dad would email us all this music like, “You listened to this when you were little! Don’t you remember it?” It’s like, “Holy shit. We’re really just a product of our parents.” They totally put us into this shit without us knowing. Then you’re like, “Cool.” [Laughs] I’m happy for it. That’s sort of what the album is about. It’s all these things that have coalesced and shaped us into musicians and just as people in general. We’re sort of filtering that through our experiences into a musical format. So a lot of the inspirations behind the album is super far and wide. There’s a lot of the disco stuff like Chic and Nile Rodgers. There’s some jazzy elements as well on a few tracks. Then there’s like 2000s R&B and Hip-Hop that we listen to a lot. Recently, we came back to Pharrell’s stuff and Timbaland and N.E.R.D. and The Neptunes and stuff. Then there are new inspirations—we listen to so much stuff. Lately, we’ve been listening to BadBadNotGood, The Internet, Blood Orange…

Cosmo: It’s obviously a big one. I just love Kaytranada for the fact that he can still sound like he’s got enough going on, even though he has such a specific sound.

Patrick: It’s just what’s really minimal about it that’s really full. We learned a lesson listening to all these artists we like where they do a lot with little. A lot of people will try to—us included—fill in the album’s gaps and stuff by adding more layers and details, but often, you just have to get rid of that and just make the initial sound bigger. You can write a really good, incredibly dense song with just 10 layers, whereas when we were starting out we’d do like 100+ tracks and it would just get super dense and get to be a nightmare to mix. This album was about paring back from that and going back to the fundamentals—just really focusing on the core things that make a song great to us. It’s about what we really like about the song and not over embellishing it and trying to keep it to “This is what works.” If it gets overdone, when we finally know that we’ve worked a song too hard, we can stop and pull back a bit and then send it off to George so he can just mix it. It’s good—we finally figured it out. The funnest part of writing a song is like the first day and the rest is hard, meticulous work where you’re concentrated but not necessarily creative. You’re just working at that point and it doesn’t feel fun.

What is your FAULT?

Patrick: Maybe I’m too meticulous—to a fault. I’m too overanalyzed and too self-critical and detailed.

Cosmo: My fault is that I’m the opposite of that. I don’t bring enough control to what I do. It’s too off-kilter to what we’re trying to do.

Patrick: So it kind of works out.

The yin and yang.

Cosmo: It’s totally feng shui.

Patrick: Cosmo brings the vibe and I bring the technicality to it.

For more information on COSMO’S MIDNIGHT, including tour dates, head over to www.cosmos-Midnight.com.

A special thanks to Astral People and SOAP Seoul.

Olivia Holt cover shoot for FAULT Issue 29 Screen section

Olivia Holt X FAULT Magazine

Olivia Holt - FAULT Magazine Issue 29 - Screen section cover

Photography: Benjo Arwas | Styling: Courtnee Scully @lalaluxe | Make-up: Tonya Brewer | Hair: David Stanwell @thewallgroup | Post-production: Nadia Selander | Director of Photography: Scott Smith | Editor: The Pioneers | Production: Kiley Coleman | Thank You to Saksfifthavenue.com

By most standards, actress and musical performer Olivia Holt appears to be on the precipice of a career breakthrough.  With her new role as Dagger in Marvel’s latest superhero incarnation, Cloak and Dagger, alongside co-star Aubrey Joseph, the 20-year old, Mississippi-bred talent is very quickly establishing herself as an on-screen force with the talent and fortitude to portray characters substantially more complex than audiences have previously seen from her.

In addition to her new show, Holt has been working daily on writing and recording her brand of music, which she describes as pop that pays homage to her soulful, Southern roots. The success of her recent single, ‘Generous’, which gained one million views in just five days after its release in late 2017, should serve as teaser to fans of what to expect.

Holt recently took the time to talk with FAULT about the new show and her unguarded approach to her career and to life.

FAULT: Can you remember the very first performance you ever put on for an audience?
Olivia Holt: It was an audience of four as a kid: my mom, my dad, my brother, my sister. That lasted for a very long time until they were totally over me forcing them to sit down and watch me perform. But, I’d say for like a legit audience the first thing I ever did was ‘Annie,’ I think. I played an orphan and I loved every second of it.

Olivia Holt for FAULT Magazine Issue 29

Full shoot and interview available exclusively in FAULT Magazine Issue 29 – available to pre-order now!

How did you prepare for the role of Tandy?
Olivia Holt: Tandy has a lot of layers. She’s not just one note. She is a cynical human being. A lot has happened to her and she experienced something very traumatic as a child and is sort of living in survival mode and with that a comes lot of responsibility. She’s sort of the parent in her mother-daughter relationship. She’s having to take care of everything and everyone around her and I think that’s a lot for a teenager to deal with. So she have a lot on her plate.

I would remember being a physically and emotionally exhausted at the end of some of the days just because of some of the stuff that Tandy is dealing with, whether that be her relationship with her mother, or addiction, or sexual assault. So, preparing was not an easy thing, and I think I’m still preparing. But, I think she was learning and so I was learning too. We were sort of finding where we fit in our lives. That was that was an interesting journey to go on.

How was it like working with your co-star Aubrey Joseph?
Olivia Holt: He is a gem of a human being. He is just so down to earth, talented — a great scene partner but an even better friend and I feel so grateful to work with somebody who has this insane work ethic and who is genuinely nice and so passionate, not just about his character but  about the story that his character and my character share. I just think we have an awesome, special connection and the fact that both of us get to tell that story is so surreal, and I think we’re both forever grateful for it. But, I love working with him.

What can we expect from you musically later this year?
Holt: I’ve been in the studio almost every single day writing and recording this year. I actually feel like I’ve been able to prioritize music rather than bouncing around and trying to balance both acting and music. This year has really been focused on honing in on the music and making sure that I’m involved in putting in the work to find my sound and, lyrically, what I want to do. And, it’s been an incredible journey just exploring all of that. I have a few things coming up this year that I’m really excited for people to hear.

Olivia Holt for FAULT Magazine Issue 29

How would you describe your overall sound and what are some of your influences, musically?
Holt: I’m making pop records but I grew up in the South so I’m very drawn to organic instruments. So there’s a little bit of soul, a little bit of alternative — it’s artistic and cool and it just really showcases my energy and my personality and the way I talk. They are all stories coming from my real life experiences or things that I want to experience. So it’s all very personal and vulnerable and that’s my creative outlet for my specific headspace, in hopes that people are going to be able to relate and feel things when they hear my music.

Olivia Holt for FAULT Magazine Issue 29

What is your FAULT?
Olivia Holt: Acting and music are my creative outlets. It’s a way for me to escape and a way for me to be vulnerable and have that space to connect with people. But I want the projects that I work on and the music that I make to move people and make them feel alive and to keep curious and to thrive and to live so fiercely… I want to change people for the better and I want them to live a fulfilled life and hopefully I can do that through what I love to do. I want to create an environment for people to feel wanted and loved. I think that’s my fault.

~

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 29 – THE MOVEMENT ISSUE –  IS AVAILABLE TO PRE-ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

Picnic at Hanging Rock

Self Portrait (@mrselfportrait) lace dress via The Real Real (@therealreal)
Asos (@asos) black patent leather buckled flats

 

Self Portrait (@mrselfportrait) lace dress via The Real Real (@therealreal)
Asos (@asos) black patent leather buckled flats

 

Self Portrait (@mrselfportrait) lace dress via The Real Real (@therealreal)
Asos (@asos) black patent leather buckled flats

 

Asos (@asos) white satin dress
Asos (@asos) black patent leather buckled flats
Hat is stylist’s own

 

Asos (@asos) white satin dress
Asos (@asos) black patent leather buckled flats
Hat is stylist’s own

 

Asos (@asos) white satin dress
Asos (@asos) black patent leather buckled flats
Hat is stylist’s own

 

Asos (@asos) white satin dress
Asos (@asos) black patent leather buckled flats
Hat is stylist’s own

 

Elliatt (@elliatt) floral embroidered dress via Asos (@asos)
Jeffrey Campbell (@jeffreycampbell) boots
Asos (@asos) black wasit belt

 

Elliatt (@elliatt) floral embroidered dress via Asos (@asos)
Jeffrey Campbell (@jeffreycampbell) boots
Asos (@asos) black wasit belt

 

Elliatt (@elliatt) floral embroidered dress via Asos (@asos)
Jeffrey Campbell (@jeffreycampbell) boots
Asos (@asos) black wasit belt

 

Roksanda (@roksandailincic) dress via The Real Real (@therealreal)
Jeffrey Campbell (@jeffreycampbell) boots

 

Roksanda (@roksandailincic) dress via The Real Real (@therealreal)
Jeffrey Campbell (@jeffreycampbell) boots

 

Roksanda (@roksandailincic) dress via The Real Real (@therealreal)
Jeffrey Campbell (@jeffreycampbell) boots

Photographer: Caroline Lawlesswww.carolinelawless.com
Model: Lucy Rexrode
Stylist: Melissa de Leon

Our Lady Underground editorial – Caroline Lawless

Johanna Ortiz (@johannaoritzofficial) silk organza dress with slip (@matchesfashion)
Sole Society (@solesociety) patent leather and lucite heel (@nordstromrack)

 

Johanna Ortiz (@johannaoritzofficial) silk organza dress with slip (@matchesfashion),
Sole Society (@solesociety) patent leather and lucite heel (@nordstromrack)

 

Rejina Pyo ruffled organza blouse (@netaporter)
DKNY (@dkny) pleated vegan leather skirt (stylist’s own)
Rodarte (@rodarte) gold-plated mismatched heart earrings (@matchesfashion)
Forever 21 (@forever21) black sheer socks

 

Sequin Hearts mermaid gown (@nordstrom)
Prada (@prada) metallic brocade crop top (@netaporter)
Jennifer Behr (@jenniferbehr) gold-plated earrings (@netaporter)
Forever 21 (@forever21) black sheer socks
Sam Edelman (@sam_edelman) gold glitter heel (@nordstromrack)

 

Sequin Hearts mermaid gown (@nordstrom)
Prada (@prada) metallic brocade crop top (@netaporter)
Jennifer Behr (@jenniferbehr) gold-plated earrings (@netaporter)
Forever 21 (@forever21) black sheer socks
Sam Edelman (@sam_edelman) gold glitter heel (@nordstromrack)

 

Topshop (@topshop) satin midi dress (@nordstrom)
Elle Macpherson bralette (stylist’s own)
Forever 21 (@forever21) pink tulle skirt
Vintage crinoline (stylist’s own)
Topshop (@topshop) metallic trench coat (@nordstrom)
Forever 21 (@forever21) black sheer socks
Jessica Simpson patent leather and lucite booties (@nordstromrack)

 

Rejina Pyo ruffled organza blouse (@netaporter)
DKNY (@dkny) pleated vegan leather skirt (stylist’s own)
Rodarte (@rodarte) gold-plated mismatched heart earrings (@matchesfashion)
Forever 21 (@forever21) black sheer socks

 

Photographer & MUA: Caroline Lawless www.carolinelawless.com
Model: Rachael Pope with ANTImanagement
Hairstylist: Alli Carter
Stylist: Melissa de Leon

Daniel Bruhl covers our Film section inside FAULT Issue 28

Daniel Bruhl – FAULT Issue 28

 

Daniel Bruhl for FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Photographer – Udo Spreitzenbarth
Stylist – Ty-Ron Mayes
Groomer – Nate Rosenkranz
Imaging – Lorraine Baker
Photo Assistants – Daniel Stauch & Nate DeCarlo

Words: Alex Bee

You might call Brühl an Actor-demic: his performances as an actor are always backed up by extensive, academic-level research. For his role in American period drama ‘The Alienist’, Brühl studied. Hard. The intelligent star, known for his credits in Good Bye Lenin!, Rush and Inglorious Basterds, embodies pioneering criminal psychologist Dr. Laszlo Kreizler in the eight-part series.

FAULT: How did you prepare for your role in ‘The Alienist’?
Daniel Bruhl: I didn’t know the book before but it’s one of those that you cannot put away. I felt like a 12 year old with a book and a torch under the blanket. I read it very quickly and was immediately fascinated by the world that Caleb Carr [the author] created, about each of the characters and the fact that it’s the beginning of so many things at the time that are so important now. My wife [psychologist Felicitas Rombold] put me in touch with criminal psychologists and I’d read a lot about these famous psychologists at the time the story is set. I also read books about New York in the late 1800s just to get an idea of how that place was back in the day.

What do you think makes the series so successful in telling the story of the time?
Daniel Bruhl: What helped tremendously was the passion that was put into that show in recreating the time because its so real and so authentic. When we were working on it we didn’t feel that it was fake, which sometimes can happen if there’s not enough energy and money and passion on a project. I come from movies, and when I was young when I would read a script for a period film and it would say there will be 500 extras and 50 characters and on the day you have one carriage, an old donkey and three extras and then you are supposed to recreate the magic – it just doesn’t work! What was very nice was the chemistry and the friendship we had. Dakota, Luke and I even spent most of our downtime together. Almost every weekend we met and I think that chemistry is something you cannot take for granted.

Daniel Bruhl for FAULT Magazine Issue 28

What series have you been watching at the moment?
Daniel Bruhl: ‘Mindhunter’ [a Netflix series that explores similar developments in criminal psychology] is amazing. I was absolutely blown away by ‘The Handsmaid’s Tale’, it’s a masterpiece! I was very pleased to meet Elizabeth Moss at The SAG Awards, who I think is one of the best actresses around, and I was happy to be able to tell her how magnificent she is. I also spent some time with Matt Smith who is such a great guy and interesting in ‘The Crown’ portraying Phillip – I’m hooked on that show!

How do you find the time to keep up to date with the latest programmes?
Daniel Bruhl: I always find the time! I have a couple of days where I can watch shows in my downtime or I’ll watch them when I’m travelling on the plane.

What was it like working on the third installment in the ‘Cloverfield’ series, which unexpectedly hit devices all over the world after a surprise announcement during a Superbowl ad break?
Daniel Bruhl: It was such a great ensemble. It was interesting because you have astronauts from all over the world and they managed to get all these wonderful actors from different countries, so the opportunity to work with them all was really great. Also, it was something really different for me as I am usually always travelling back in time and this was the first time that I’d actually explored the future.

Daniel Bruhl for FAULT Magazine Issue 28

How does working on an – equally cinematic – series compare to a film?
Daniel Bruhl: It’s the luxury of time that you have. You don’t feel so restricted as you do when working on a movie when sometimes you feel that pressure. To have that privilege of 10 hours a day and 100 shooting days with one character and the ability to explore the character to the core is very rewarding.

As a pacifist, how do you find taking on roles that are often borne from a conflict?
Daniel Bruhl: That’s whats fascinating about our job as actors: to try and get into the skin and the head of somebody who is different.

What bands or artists are you listening to at the moment?
Daniel Bruhl: There’s a band called War on Drugs that I’m listening to lately and someone from the US called Francis and The Lights. Also Roosevelt, Sigur Ros and Alt-J. There is a lot of great music here in Berlin too with artists and DJs like Frank Wiedemann, Henrik Schwarz and David August – I can highly recommend coming to Berlin for clubbing.

Daniel Bruhl for FAULT Magazine Issue 28

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 28 – THE STRUCTURAL ISSUE –  IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40