Now & Then – Volker Eichenhofer’s exclusive editorial for FAULT Online

Jacket and Shorts – Maison Margiela

 

Shirt – You Must Create
Trousers – Jil Sander

 

Tank Top – Schiesser
Trousers – Comme des Garçons

 

Customized Jump Suit – Dickies

 

Whole look – Dior Homme

 

Trousers – Comme des Garçons

 

Photography and Styling by Volker Eichenhofer / www.studioVE.net
Model Azhar S. (Kult Models)

Rare photos of Salvador Dali and Pablo Picasso @ Zebra One Gallery, London

These fantastic, never-before-seen images of legendary artists Pablo Picasso and Salvador Dali are currently being exhibited at the Zebra One Gallery in Hampstead, London. The shots, on display until the end of September ’17, give a rare, intimate glimpse into the lives of two of the 20th century’s most influential artists.

Commenting on the shots, the gallery shared the thought that, “Throughout Salvador Dali’s career, a question that reoccurred time and time again was whether he would cut his iconic moustache – a point that is addressed in many of these shots, with him at the mirror with a razor and holding a sword against his moustache.”

Whether he actually cut it or not is still up for debate…

Salvador Dali Moustache Miroir by Paul Popper, 1964.

 

Portrait of Pablo Picasso by Gilles Ehrmann, 1952. This iconic portrait a favourite of Picasso’s wife, Jacqueline Roque, and is the only one which is hung in their house in Mougins.

 

Dali, a woman and his cane by Unknown Artist, 1967. The photo shows Dali standing next to a young woman brandishing his famous cane.

A legend in his lifetime by Edward Quinn, 1968. Here Picasso arranges two works for viewing: Figure carrying a stone, 1931 and Figures by the sea, 1931.

 

Salvador Dali and Captain Moore with an Ocelot by Unknown Artist, 1967. The photo shows Moore holding a pet Ocelot watched by Dali with the port holes of the ship behind them. This is a surrealistic scene which would have appealed to Dali.  The ocelot, named Babou, was Dali’s favourite pet.

 

Visit www.zebraonegallery.com for more information.

Paved Paradise – exclusive editorial by Bonnie Nichoalds

Shoes: Marques’Almeida Jumpsuit: Vintage Escada from The Way We Wore https://thewaywewore.com/ Belt- Saint Laurent

 

Top- Vintage Ralph Lauren Shoes- Shoes Marques’Almeida Bottoms- Monki www.monki.com

 

Denim Dress: Eklektik www.eklektikonline.com/ Shear Top & Leggings:  39vii http://www.39vii.bigcartel.com/

 

Top- Astrid Andersen http://www.astridandersen.com Hoops- Melody Ensi https://melodyehsani.com

 

Top-Stylist own Pants: Ganni www.ganni.com/en

 

Top : Monki http://www.monki.com Bottoms: Weekday www.weekday.com Shoes: Marques’Almeida

 

Photographer: Bonnie Nichoalds
Model: Angelina | freedom models LA
Stylist: Hodo Vodo
Makeup: Britten Faith
Hair: Jesus Guerrero & Angel Gonzalez

FAULT Magazine Premiere: Joel Baker’s ‘Bag Of Dreams’

 

For many of us, our first experience of Joel Baker’s soulful funk music came from his breakout single ‘Story’ feat Abra Cadabra last month. Today, the Nottingham born singer is back with the release of the title track for his upcoming mixtape ‘Bag of Dreams’.

This time round, we’re introduced to a less animated but far more personal look into the life of Joel through his effortless heart-wrenching lyricism, vocal and production.

Written and produced by Joel, through lyrics “got about two people I can trust, rest of them they don’t know enough” we’re given the closest look into the man behind the music as he reveals the stories from a time of his life filled with anguish and self-deprecation

Speaking about ‘Bag of Dreams’, Joel says: “Bag of Dreams was written at a very dark time. The big city sold me a fairy tale and I believed it. Occasionally a song will come around when it writes itself in minutes. You aren’t really writing it, you’re just coughing up your heart trying to capture what comes out. A few people tried to convince me to change lyrics because they said it made me sound ‘bitter’. But I was bitter. That’s how I knew the song worked.”

From Joel’s first two releases we’re very excited to hear his upcoming mixtape which will also feature guest appearances from Kojo Funds and Abra Cadabra.

That’s enough from us though! We’re very proud to officially premiere ‘Bag Of Dreams’ available today!

 

 

 

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Premiere: Ed Harcourt debuts new video for ‘The World is on Fire’

Ed Harcourt premieres new video for ‘The World is on Fire’ on FAULT Online. Photo: Steve Gullick

Former Mercury prize nominee Ed Harcourt has unleashed a new music video for ‘The World is on Fire’, the opening track from last year’s album ‘Furnaces’.

Harcourt’s seventh album was critically acclaimed, picking up an average 4/5 star rating from jaded critics and aficionados of deeply melodic, atmospheric pop alike.  If ‘The World is on Fire’ sets the tone for a richly immersive aural feast, the new video by Annick Wolfers matches its brooding intensity step for step:
 

 
Described as an apocalyptic painterly video, the short film was inspired by the mythology of Vulcan, the Roman god of fire, and was filmed in the Scottish Highlands. Taking a near-literal take on the song title, the video sees a statuesque warrior as the last woman standing in preparation for the end of the world as we know it.

The video continues a theme of exceptional art direction from Harcourt – the artwork for both this single and the ‘Furnaces’ album was designed by highly regarded British cartoonist Ralph Steadman:
 

To book tickets to Ed’s upcoming shows, visit:

FAULT speaks to Sharleen Spiteri of legendary Glaswegian band Texas

FAULT: Hey Sharleen, how are you?

SS: I’m very good, thank you.

 

FAULT: How is the campaign going for the new album?

SS: It’s going very well, we’ve been doing loads of promo; been here, there and everywhere. Doing some European and UK TV so it’s good, but it’s quite funny because when you release internationally you suddenly notice people want to cut you into little pieces and poke you.

 

FAULT: Your ninth studio album ‘Jump On Board’ came out a few months ago, have you had chance to showcase any of the songs to your fans yet?

SS: Yeah just as the album was released we played some pub gigs around the UK that were recorded for radio. Listeners could win tickets and that was really great and we literally played in manky, old pubs which were fantastic. Really sticky carpets and old beer aroma, you couldn’t step back on stage and it was all about the music and the audience. It was good to try out the new songs especially up against the old ones and the big hits, you can suddenly think “oh yeah, this is as good as we thought it was”.

 

FAULT: So from this strong combination of hits and new songs from’ Jump On Board’, what can fans expect from the setlist on the Winter tour?

SS: It will be the ‘Jump on Board Live Tour’ but it will be journey because when you’ve got a band that has had such a long career, there is a lot there to chose from. Some nights we change different songs in different places, but definitely mixing the big hits in with the new stuff.

 

FAULT: Is there a venue you’re looking forward to playing most? You’re playing your hometown for a few shows that must be special?

SS: Yeah we’ll be playing in Kelvingrove Park, which is funny because it’s the park that I grew up in. I used to go up on the bandstand and my Mum used to drag me off. It’s going to be strange being up there without getting shouted at to get down.

 

FAULT: You’ve had a long career; it must be special to experience that retrospective on stage?

SS: Yeah the nice thing is that doing interviews it reminds you that you’re not looking at that part of it, as you’re too busy moving forward and onto the next thing. It is nice to think that it has been long and it has been great, we feel really lucky to still be doing this at the level we are doing it.

 

FAULT: When did you begin writing the new material?

SS: In bits and pieces really, when we put out the last album we hadn’t produced an album in a long time, so you never know what to expect when you release a new record. The love that was shown to the band after we put out ‘The Conversation’ was great and it makes you think, “wow, we’re still relevant”. You’re doing it because you love it, and the truth is you don’t know how to do anything else. We love performing and making records, we’ve had the height of our careers and we’re doing it for the passion and the love of it. We really didn’t expect the reaction of, “it’s great to have you back” so it was so inspiring. It really does give you that boost to continue doing what you’re doing. Rather than by just re-packaging the greatest hits and adding some new songs, we thought that we’d give the fans something with all new songs written and packaged all together. Funnily enough, ‘Lets Work It Out’ was a song that was written probably about 8 to10 years ago but it was never finished, it was one of those songs where we’d try out ideas but we never quite got the melody sitting in it.

FAULT: How has the reaction been to your latest single ‘Tell That Girl’?

SS: That is one of those new era Texas songs; lyrics mean something different to everybody and when I see the people that I’m singing it to; it sort of becomes everybody else’s song in that moment.

 

FAULT: The video itself for ‘Tell That Girl’ focuses on you guys up close and personal, how was it filming that?

SS: Yes, up close and personal; just plain. Sometimes you’ve got switch it up a lot and you know, when you get on stage it changes completely. There is normally so many elements to consider and you get a bit fed up of the lenses you know?

 

FAULT: After years of making music videos, the camera lenses drive you mad?

SS: Yeah on certain videos, the 2 videos from this album have been really fun I’ve got to say, the ‘Lets Work It Out’ one especially. We’re just having a laugh and hanging out, its not just you and there is someone else to shoot it with, it’s completely different with a band. It’s not like “oh here we go again” you know?

 

FAULT: You’ve had your solo campaign and little projects in-between, do you think that fans want to pick up on this success during the Texas shows?

SS: We played a couple of tracks from my solo stuff on the last tour actually, so we kind of mix it up. The thing about why I went solo was that I needed to say something and get it out there as it’s not Texas. The band were heavily involved in it and as a band we kind of like each other you know? We see each other outside of Texas as we’ve known each other since we were 17. We’ve grown up together, had kids, marriages, divorces and all we have been through a lot of stuff together. These people are my life and my friends; it’s weird because Texas was never a job for us, it’s never become a job, but when each one of us is doing something separate from Texas, we all go along and support them. We all support each other.

 

FAULT: Is it the lyrics or the music that comes first when writing a new song?

SS: It comes when it comes; there are no rules when we write. Sometimes it can be a melody, sometimes a lyric or an old melody or a set of bridges, or sometimes completely new. Sometimes you’re lying in bed and link the two instantly; I don’t really know how it works even though that’s what I do. [Laughs] Everybody wants to analyse things nowadays, that’s how you do it etc. I think anyone who has created things in the moment find it hard to describe how they did it. I think if you look to closely at it then it becomes a path, and that path can soon become boring.

 

FAULT: What is your FAULT?

SS: You’ve got your strengths and you’ve got your faults, I think the strength is to be able to show your faults and identify that they’re there. Your fault is what sometimes makes magical things happen. Everybody has faults and do things that are seen as annoying, mine is probably that I never shut up. [Laughs]

Texas are on tour later this year from August until December and includes 3 huge homecoming shows in Glasgow, a large UK and European tour with some special shows in South Africa just added. You can view all their tour dates on their site here. Texas’ ninth studio album ‘Jump On Board’ is out now on Sony BMG. You can purchase the album here, and check out their latest single ‘Tell That Girl’ here.

 

Words Stuart Williams

FAULT Focus: Khadija Saye: Remembering The Artist Through Her Photography

 

Early Thursday morning, the reality of London’s Grenfell Tower blaze hit home for myself and my fellow UCA alumni as we read the final Facebook update from our once classmate, Khadija Saye. Trapped within the burning building, Khadija reached out for prayers from her loved ones, and they rushed to the streets and social media in hopes of finding her. Sadly, the next day Khadija’s family would confirm that what we feared the most had come to fruition, Khadija had tragically perished in the blaze.

While we did share a class throughout university, myself and Khadija were not close friends. Remembering my panic as I scrolled Google and social media desperately looking for an update on her condition, I feel compelled to help ensure that her captivating body of work and not the tragedy of her passing, form her lasting legacy.

As an artist, her work cast a light on Gambian culture, the collective unity within “the other” and her journey into self. In memorial of Khadija and the conclusion of her photographic portfolio, FAULT takes a dive into the work of the late great artist – Khadija Saye.

 

‘Crowned’

In 2013, Khadija took her seat at the proverbial table and unveiled her centrepiece in the form of her photographic project entitled, ‘Crowned’. This series of photographs is one of the projects that our class was able to observe as it developed from inception to completion as Khadija’s final degree show series. ‘Crowned’ is made up of eight portraits showcasing the different ways in which black woman close to Khadija styled their hair. From woven braids, extensions, dreaded and natural afro, the viewer is given a glimpse into the diverse range of hair styling possibilities open to black women.

Entitled ‘Crowned’, Saye references the physical and the symbolic idea that black hair is something to be prized and adorned and not ashamed of. The words of Ingrid Banks taken from her book entitled ‘Hair Matters: Beauty, Power, and Black Women’s Consciousness’ echoes in my mind when I reflect upon Khadija’s title choice. In the book, Banks writes:

“Crown suggests a source of power, excellence or beauty…Therefore, a notion of power is embedded in the idea of hair as a black woman’s crowning glory. Hair has the ability to become a foundation for understanding how black woman view power and its relationship to self-esteem” –  Ingrid Banks 2000.

More contemporary references to black hair as something of brilliance can also be seen in Solange Knowles’ critically acclaimed 2016 release ‘Don’t Touch My Hair’, where within the opening verse Solange exclaims:

“Don’t touch my crown, They say the vision I’ve found”

“They don’t understand, What it means to me”.

One does wonder what significance Khadija’s perception of her own afro hair and its beauty played in her choosing to embark on the project and if I were to guess, producing ‘Crowned’ was a labour of love and presentation of self-pride. Indeed in March 2017, four years after the release of the series, Khadija reminisced on the making of the project in joy tweeting:

 

In the image, her young assistants observe possibly unaware of the importance their participation played in the construction of ‘Crowned’ or how it might affect their perceptions towards their afro hair and ideas of self in years to come; truly the impact of ‘Crowned’ will stretch on far further than even Khadija would have imagined.

As the only black male on our course, I once attempted to play up my “wokeness” and asked Khadija if she had seen “the Chris Brown documentary called ‘Good Hair’”, (misquoting Chris Rock’s 2009 documentary that focussed on the perception of natural hair within the African-American community.) Emblematic of her kind-hearted and gentle attitude, Khadija, of course, corrected my mistake letting out a light giggle; dropping my façade I listened to her thoughts on the documentary.

Earlier I referenced Solange Knowles’ ‘Don’t Touch My Hair’, a fiery anthem that highlights the resentment caused by patronising actions which decrease afro hair to a thing of play but observing ‘Crowned’, the same frustrated narrative does not confront me. My interpretation of ‘Crowned’ isn’t, “don’t touch my hair!” It is an inviting, “Don’t touch but do see. Bear witness to the beautiful ways black women can choose to style their crowns.” The viewer is invited to marvel at the intricacies of the different twists, curls and over-locking structures of the sitter’s hair and when printed and framed in a gallery, we’re disarmed and hypnotised by their sophisticated beauty.

It’s important we recognise the personal connection Saye shared with the women she photographed. The trust the sitters have placed in Khadija is unique; formed not just from a shared experience of blackness but through the confidence these women placed in Khadija’s skill as an artist to capture so much more than just hair. It is thanks to her affable character that Khadija was trusted to capture up-close the art within her subject and through her artistry and presentation nous, she allowed the viewer to appreciate black women’s hairstyles up close as something of splendour.

Khadija’s ‘Crowned’ might end here, but the project as a form of inspiration to a new generation of artists will continue. The eight sitters included on Saye’s website are but a drop in the ocean of the many different ways black woman can choose to style their hair; making ‘Crowned’ a gleaming seed from which the mightiest body of work can still grow.

 

Home.Coming

For her series entitled ‘Home.Coming’, Khadija travelled to The Gambia and documented her exploration of self through a series of portrait and landscape photographs.

Something I notice through all of Khadija’s work is her ability to find familiarity and gain trust within cultures sometimes seen as ‘the other’. ‘Home.Coming‘, ‘Crowned‘, ‘Eid‘, ‘Madame Jojo’s‘, all focus on different categories of the human experience yet notice how she has never been kept at arm’s length from her subject. I don’t feel the presence of a white tape that Saye is forced to photograph from behind when I observe her work. When capturing her subjects, for a time at least, Khadija is one with their environment and through her lens’ eye, the viewer is too.

For me, the unseen friendship-building and conversations Saye would have had with each person to earn their trust before the photo session conjures much intrigue. The above portraits arrest your gaze; the men’s eyes tell countless yet frustratingly unattainable stories. Khadija has stopped time but for a moment yet opened the door for myriads of questions – made sorrowfully more perplexing now they’ll go unanswered.

In another photograph from the series, a young girl smiles as she watches something out of the frame and in the below photograph a man leans on his prized Volkswagen, both beg a mountain of questions yet if we take a step back, we’ll find Khadija’s story told throughout the series.

Any second generation migrant knows all too well the conflicted notion of “home”, and from what I can only guess, Khadija travelled to The Gambia to find, explore and reflect on life in a home in which she did not live. While the content of Khadija’s photographs doesn’t answer the question of “did Khadija find self and the comfort of home while in The Gambia” but we need only look at her sitters to find our answer. As referenced previously, her subjects are unperturbed in front of the camera and this is likely because they were relaxed with their photographer. Any artist can tell you the anguish of requesting a portrait of a stranger only to watch their sudden discomfort when faced with the intrusive camera lenses flung in their face but notice the air of calm in Khadija’s work.

Yes, each photograph in the series contains countless untold stories, yet one is clear, and it’s the sitter’s tale of Khadija. As a photographer, she wasn’t a stranger in their midst nor a second generation displaced entity forcibly taking up shop in their domain; for that time if only for a moment, Khadija Saye was one with them – truly at home.

 

Dwelling: In This Space We Breathe

Khadija’s last exhibited work ‘Dwelling: In This Space We Breathe’ made with the help of artist, Almudena Romero, saw her once more exploring her heritage by investigating traditional Gambian spiritual practices and the comfort practitioners found in the arms of a higher power.

There is something remarkably poignant about her final project immortalised on such a physically existent format such as the tintype. By using tintypes, Khadija transformed her amorphous visual being, memory and legacy from a temporary state and gave it physical form. Unlike a digital file, memory or spoken recollection, her tintype image has weight, texture, smell and uniqueness the very same way our physical forms do; yet unlike us, her tintypes do not have an expiration date and will always remain.

The very idea of legacy and the pursuit of artists to leave a token in this world for after we pass, itself is a practice of spirituality. For all we know, there is no telling of what significance our life actions will play after our lives come to an end, yet we attempt to leave proofs of our existence to tell the future world “I was here and I existed.”

In the tintype images, Khadija is depicted in a ritual using sacred Gambian artefacts meant for the purpose of connecting with the spiritual world from the physical plane. Now with her passing, there is a spiritual awakening of ideas and ways of reflecting within the viewer. Now as we gaze upon the imagery, it is us the viewer who are being connected with Khadija and in turn, linked spiritually to the “once was”.It is through Khadija’s immortalisation of Gambian ritual that we now look upon her from this physical plane despite what would be considered by many religions as her soul ascending to a higher state of being.

I’ll admit that the above sounds somewhat of a stretch and likely not what the project was intended to symbolise, but it did cast a light on my scepticism towards schools of beliefs that I do not understand. In reflecting on the work, my own westernised perception of spiritual ritual has come into question. For myself at least, the actions depicted by Khadija provides a brand new outlook and way of seeing such ceremony.

For some of those raised in the UK, the idea of spirituality and non-conventional western religion is sometimes considered as something of myth or fantasy, not necessarily through conscious choice but through our conditioned view of pre-evangelised spirituality.

In Sir Edward Burnett Tylor’s 1887 book (now somewhat offensively entitled) ‘Primitive Culture’, he gave the broad belief that spirituality can be attributed to ritual and inanimate objects the name ‘Animisim’.

Note: ‘Animisim’ does not exclusively describe the Gambian ritual Khadija explored in her project but broadly refers to the school of similar beliefs held by people throughout Africa, Europe, Asia and Australia throughout history. Hopefully an anthropologist or practitioner of the specific belief Khadija explored can provide a more suitable title for us to use in this essay.

While coining the English term for the phrase, Tylor knew he was generalising a large number of people, but he did so out of frustration with writers of his day who saw such displays and dismissed them as illegitimate forms of spirituality.

“Short of the organised and established theology of the higher races as being a religion at all. They attribute irreligion to tribes whose doctrines are unlike theirs”. – Taylor 1887

The link between the photographic process and spirituality is also drawn upon in the accompanying text for ‘Diaspora Pavilion 2017’ where the works are currently held on display.

“The process of submerging the collodion covered plate into a tank of silver nitrate ignites memories of baptisms.” – Disapora Pavilion 2017

It is clear Khadija found a spiritual link at every step of this project even choosing herself as the subject when producing the tintypes but rather than theorising or projecting, it’s only right to let the words that accompany the project have the final word:

“This work is based on the search for what gives meaning to our lives and what we hold onto in times of despair and life changing challenges. We exist in the marriage of physical and spiritual remembrance. It is in these spaces that we identify with our physical and imagined bodies. Using herself as the subject, Saye felt it was necessary to physically explore how trauma is embodied in the black experience.” – Disapora Pavilion 2017

 

Notice how throughout Khadija’s entire body of work, there’s a level of thinking that transcends just the art of seeing. All three projects spoken about above are unique individual displays of artistry and wonderous displays of photography worth that of an artist far beyond Khadija’s years.

‘Crowned’, ‘Home.Coming’ and ‘Dwelling: In This Space We Breathe’, are all linked only by the artist of origin and much like Khadija, they mean and will continue to mean so much to so many different people. Reminiscent of the Khadija that I knew from across the lecture theatre, not a lot is shouted nor is it displayed with over-the-top performance – because work and artists with true substance donesn’t require such theatrics.

This week we sadly lost Khadija, but not her contribution to the artistic world.

 

See more from Khadija’s portfolio on www.sayephotography.co.uk

 

 

 

SONNY curates FAULT Magazine Playlist of the week

Despite not legally allowed to drink in the UK until last week, Sonny’s voice is filled with the rich tones of the jazz singer whose spent years perfecting his craft in smoky jazz dens. His debut single entitled ‘Princess’ oozes with soul whilst containing elements of folk and jazz all rolled up in a modern pop ballad for contemporary audiences.

“My first release ‘Princess’ is a very personal song about a challenging relationship. It’s a little tongue in cheek but I’ve tried to be as honest as possible and I hope that shows throughout the lyrics in this song.”

Produced by Rum And Bug, Princess is taken from Sonny’s upcoming EP, ‘Hopeless Romance’ that drops on the March 24th. (Preorder available HERE)

We wanted to find out how a young performer could be imbued with such old-school soul and what better way to find out than to have Sonny curate this weeks FAULT Playlist below!

 

Stevie Wonder – He’s misstra know it all 

This song has always been a big part of my life, it’s one of my Mums favourite songs and artist. I’ve been influenced by Stevie Wonder from such a young age but out of all of his songs, this one really stands out for me. It’s quite a serious song until he lets loose at the end and adds in some really fun and jokey vocals. Only Stevie could do this! It’s really iconic.

 

Drake – Hold on we’re going home 

This song was when I first discovered Drake, and it’s the song I’ll always remember him for. It’s quite different to what he usually does but the melodies are so catchy and powerful. He is always very understated yet powerful at the same time. This song makes me want to get up and dance.

 

Paolo Nutini – Loving you.

 

Paolo has such a distinctive voice and I love it! So I had to buy the album. After a few car journeys I stumbled across this tune and never looked back. It was so relevant at the time because I was in a really happy place.

 

Penny and the Quarters – You and Me

 

This song featured in a movie called ‘Blue Valentine’. I fell in love with it instantly, it’s so old school and soulful. Right up my street!! With one female vocal accompanied by several males, I found it really unique. I love the story behind this song and how it was discovered. 

 

John Martyn – May you never.

I was introduced to John Martyn by my Dad who is also an acoustic guitar player/ singer. He would teach me how to play it and then I added it into my set list! Its really folk and a different type of songwriting which I liked. 

 

Coldplay – Everything’s not lost

Coldplay have always been one of my favourite bands. This song is typical Coldplay! A slow build up throughout the whole song and then a big finish. It helped me out through a tough time, I would just sit and listen to it on repeat. It’s from the album ‘Parachutes’ which I feel really defined Coldplay and is kind of my favourite albums. 

 

 

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