BAFTA Announces Breakthrough Brits 2017 in partnership with Burberry

Last night FAULT attended The British Academy of Film and Television Arts, commonly known as BAFTA announced their twenty standout talents in film, games and television. Revealed in partnership with fashion mega-house Burberry and hosted by FAULT Magazine Issue 24 star Maya Jama, the evening saw industry veterans gather to celebrate and impart their wisdom on the twenty budding talents. This year’s initiative is also supported by The Langham London and Audi UK.

To be named a Breakthrough Brit is an accolade to take seriously; since the launch of the initiative in partnership with Burberry back in 2013, winners have gone on to do great things some even collected their very own coveted BAFTA awards.

2016 winner Malachi Kirby (see his interview with FAULT here) career has gone from strength to strength as we’ve seen him ear the coveted part of Kunta Kinte in 2016’s retelling of Roots, a role previously played by Emmy nominated actor LeVar Burton.

The initiative doesn’t just cater to those within the film industry as is commonly thought, Games artist Anna Hollinrake appears on the list for her artwork featured on mobile VR game Lola and the Giant.

Similarly, Creative Director Henry Hoffman whose game Mush has already earned him both a Dare to be Digital competition and a BAFTA Cymru award and now he takes his place as a breakthrough brit as he continues to blur the lines between developer and creative.

Selected by a jury of industry experts including FAULT Magazine Issue 9 star Will Poulter and FAULT 27 star Reggie Yates – the diversity of the expertise speaks volumes for just how much talent there is and at such an early in their careers.

See the highlights from the night in the video below!  

Actors Jenna Coleman, Joe Dempsi, Suranne Jones and Vicky McClure revealed the names on the shortlist on the night and allow us to do the same below.

· Adam Vian and Thomas Vian – Game Directors
· Anna Hollinrake – Games Artist
· Charlie Cooper and Daisy Cooper – Writers/Actors
· Chloë Thomson – Cinematographer
· Daniel Fountain – Game Designer
· Francis Lee – Writer/Director
· Henry Hoffman – Creative Director (Games)
· Hope Dickson Leach – Writer/Director
· Jessie Buckley – Actress
· Josh O’Connor – Actor
· Kit Fraser – Cinematographer
· Lydia Hampson – Producer
· Mahalia Belo – Director
· Molly Windsor – Actress
· Olivia Wood – Games Writer & Editor
· Sarah Quintrell – Writer
· Segun Akinola – Composer
· Susan Wokoma – Actress

Amanda Berry OBE, Chief Executive of BAFTA, said: “Breakthrough Brits, in partnership with Burberry, identifies the very best emerging talent in film, games and television. As it reaches its fifth year, I am so proud of what the initiative has achieved, and the talented people it is has honoured. Over the next year, the Breakthrough Brits will be supported by BAFTA and mentored by some of the industry’s most established professionals. This year’s Breakthrough Brits truly represent the diverse range of talents that make up our industries. We’re thrilled to be recognising these individuals this evening.”

Click here for more information about BAFTA Breakthrough Brits, in partnership with Burberry,

FAULT Magazine In Conversation With Reggie Yates PT.1

Photography Joseph Sinclair | Styling Rachel Gold @ Red Represents | Lauren Alice @MandyCoakleyRepresents using Medik8 and La Roche Posay

Words: Miles Holder

 

For those who grew up watching 1990s terrestrial television, Reggie Yates has always been a household name – the recognisable young face who young POC across the country grew up with as their pillar of cultural representation on children’s television. Programs have come and gone since he made his debut on the Desmond’s in 1993, but still to this day, Reggie is still a mainstay on our television screens.

In 2013, we were introduced to a new side of Reggie through his documentary ‘Reggie Yates’s Extreme South Africa’, I say this was a “new side” of Reggie, but for many of us it was the first time we’d ever gotten to know Reggie Yates the person as opposed to the Saturday morning television presenter. Lying alone in his tent and discussing how South Africa’s race issues were affecting his own perception of self, it was a million miles away from the Reggie I remembered interviewing Atomic Kitten on ‘Smile’ or from his seldom spoken about appearance on Celebrity Fame Academy in 2005. A real Reggie; down to earth, an undeniably, unashamedly “black” Reggie Yates.

As more projects have released, the idea of Reggie Yates as a documentary maker has gone from career pivot to career-defining; critics and viewers alike now hold his work in the same esteem as one might the documentaries of Louis Theroux or Andrew Marr – a merit not many young British stars achieve.

 

FAULT: All those years of presenting children’s television, was the plan always to move into documentary making?

Reggie: No, and to be honest, there has never been a plan until now. It’s only in the last decade that the focus has been on doing projects which I genuinely care for. I know where I’d like to be at forty years of age in my personal and professional life and at the age of twelve I just wanted to have fun and as I’ve matured my desires for my career changed.

FAULT: Your career is an anomaly; it prompted The NewStatesman to run a story entitled ‘Does Reggie Yates Have The Weirdest Career In Television?’ – do you feel as though it’s been weird?

I don’t think I do have the weirdest career on television, I would replace “weird” with “authentic”. When I was eighteen, the BBC were telling me that I was going to be a ‘Blue Peter’ presenter and I was like, “no I’m not.” I never watched ‘Blue Peter’ growing up, and it never spoke to me, and quite frankly, I didn’t care for it. For those reasons, I didn’t do it and they just couldn’t understand and didn’t get it.

FAULT: Blue Peter is a big gig to pass up, what did you do instead?

What I went on to do was doing children shows where it felt like I was allowed to be me in, I helped create ‘The Crust’ a sitcom we did in a tower block, and it had a predominately black cast and I was twenty-one at that point. I always did things that feel right at the time, and that’s why there’s been this crazy flow but if you study my career, it’s always moved me forward, and now, everything aligns. The book makes sense next to the documentaries, the documentaries make sense with the photography, and that’s what I’m spending my life doing. All about empathy and learning, growth, sharing and I’m not just taking pictures for the sake of it like I used to do, I’ve just shot an exhibition for amnesty international on refugees, and their stories are as important as the imagery, and that’s where I am in my career.

The night before our interview I had watched ‘Reggie Yates In A Refugee Camp’ which saw him enter the largest refugee camp in Iraq alongside 30,000 Syrian refugees. A news report played on the television showing the death of an Iraqi journalist only twenty miles from the cafe where Reggie sat. This now deceased journalist, much like Reggie, placed herself in the line of danger to get her story. One does wonder if that journalist was possibly the Iraqi counterpart of Reggie Yates, one whose career mirrors his own  and what it must be like to watch someone with such a shared experience, meet such a tragic end.

 

FAULT: What was it like to sit and hear the news on a journalist, possibly one whose careers closely mirrored your own killed so close by?

I can see why you can make the comparison, but I think I disengaged from the similarities because I’m not a war journalist, and in situations where bombs are going off, that’s the last place I’ll be. I put myself in situations which are difficult, yes, but it’s human interest stories which drive me. I look to find the heart of the issue through the people that I meet, and I don’t feel like I’m in a similar level of danger. It did sadden me though; her life was cut short because she was trying to do the right thing and open conversations and that’s wrong.

 

Throughout the documentary, we’re shown all the damning emotions one might expect from the people now forced to seek shelter within the refugee camp, but through all of this, Reggie reminds us of the power of friendship, love and compassion can make the worst of circumstances, that little bit easier. In the later episode ‘A Week in a Toxic Waste Dump’ we’re introduced to the Burner Boys, a group of young men working in dangerous conditions in the largest electronic waste dumps in the world – Accra’s Agbogbloshie. Much like the formerly discussed episode, we also end with the Burner Boys a little closer to happiness from when the documentary opened.

This isn’t the case with all of Reggie’s documentaries. In the previous series, we’ve seen him come face-to-face with the far-right, misogynists, racists and projects do inevitably end with his subjects no happier or less angry at the world than when the documentaries started.

 

FAULT: Has there has ever been a particular person who he wished he could have steered into seeing a happier way of living?

Every film there’s someone I meet that I wish I could steer to a happier future, but I think I have to be realistic about my capabilities. I can’t fix everybody that I meet in a documentary or the real world. My job is to connect with people and tell their story, but it’s not to change the world, and it’d be irresponsible and unfair for me to promise a relationship with everyone. A lot of people had said to me, “please tell me you stayed in touch with the Burner Boys and did more” but it’s hard because two weeks earlier I was in Iraq, and a month before that I was in jail in North Carolina and what about staying in touch with those guys?

I don’t do these films as a one-off project; I’m not some kid on a gap year building a house in Africa and pissing off forever. I have plans where there is legacy, and I return; for instance in Kenya and Iberia, I’ve been back several times. In Awal, I was affected by being there and my connection to the land from being of Ghanian decent I’ve started the ball rolling on a campaign to bring about change. It’s not something I feel the need to shout about here because I’m not doing it for promotion, I’m doing it out of personal responsibility as a Ghanaian the position that I’m in.

 

FAULT: You touched on a point saying that you’re not a student on your gap year going in and fucking off. How do you respond when people counter with the argument that you’ve gone into Iraq, made your documentary and then like you say, fucked off?

It’s a very easy answer; the difference is I’ve made a film about it which you and many people have seen across the country. It’s started a conversation which wasn’t there before, and we don’t know what the legacy of that documentary will be – it could sell internationally, and it explains displacement in a way I’ve never seen before. I’ve done something different and original, and it will effect change even if it’s just in the attitude of the audience watching it.

 

FAULT: Do you have any career regrets?

I don’t have any. There are things I could have done better, things go wrong all the time, there are documentaries which I’ve made which have been a bit rubbish, but I’ve learnt from all of them, and it’s cheesy textbook crap, it reigns true. It’s essential that I celebrate my failures as much as my successes because of nothing is a better teacher than failure.

 

 

In Pt2 – we’ll discuss Reggie’s new book, future projects, race and above all else – FAULTS.

Coming Soon…

 

Unseen: My Journey by Reggie Yates published by BBC Books, price £18.99 | THE INSIDER S2 is available on BBC3

Now & Then – Volker Eichenhofer’s exclusive editorial for FAULT Online

Jacket and Shorts – Maison Margiela

 

Shirt – You Must Create
Trousers – Jil Sander

 

Tank Top – Schiesser
Trousers – Comme des Garçons

 

Customized Jump Suit – Dickies

 

Whole look – Dior Homme

 

Trousers – Comme des Garçons

 

Photography and Styling by Volker Eichenhofer / www.studioVE.net
Model Azhar S. (Kult Models)

Rare photos of Salvador Dali and Pablo Picasso @ Zebra One Gallery, London

These fantastic, never-before-seen images of legendary artists Pablo Picasso and Salvador Dali are currently being exhibited at the Zebra One Gallery in Hampstead, London. The shots, on display until the end of September ’17, give a rare, intimate glimpse into the lives of two of the 20th century’s most influential artists.

Commenting on the shots, the gallery shared the thought that, “Throughout Salvador Dali’s career, a question that reoccurred time and time again was whether he would cut his iconic moustache – a point that is addressed in many of these shots, with him at the mirror with a razor and holding a sword against his moustache.”

Whether he actually cut it or not is still up for debate…

Salvador Dali Moustache Miroir by Paul Popper, 1964.

 

Portrait of Pablo Picasso by Gilles Ehrmann, 1952. This iconic portrait a favourite of Picasso’s wife, Jacqueline Roque, and is the only one which is hung in their house in Mougins.

 

Dali, a woman and his cane by Unknown Artist, 1967. The photo shows Dali standing next to a young woman brandishing his famous cane.

A legend in his lifetime by Edward Quinn, 1968. Here Picasso arranges two works for viewing: Figure carrying a stone, 1931 and Figures by the sea, 1931.

 

Salvador Dali and Captain Moore with an Ocelot by Unknown Artist, 1967. The photo shows Moore holding a pet Ocelot watched by Dali with the port holes of the ship behind them. This is a surrealistic scene which would have appealed to Dali.  The ocelot, named Babou, was Dali’s favourite pet.

 

Visit www.zebraonegallery.com for more information.

Paved Paradise – exclusive editorial by Bonnie Nichoalds

Shoes: Marques’Almeida Jumpsuit: Vintage Escada from The Way We Wore https://thewaywewore.com/ Belt- Saint Laurent

 

Top- Vintage Ralph Lauren Shoes- Shoes Marques’Almeida Bottoms- Monki www.monki.com

 

Denim Dress: Eklektik www.eklektikonline.com/ Shear Top & Leggings:  39vii http://www.39vii.bigcartel.com/

 

Top- Astrid Andersen http://www.astridandersen.com Hoops- Melody Ensi https://melodyehsani.com

 

Top-Stylist own Pants: Ganni www.ganni.com/en

 

Top : Monki http://www.monki.com Bottoms: Weekday www.weekday.com Shoes: Marques’Almeida

 

Photographer: Bonnie Nichoalds
Model: Angelina | freedom models LA
Stylist: Hodo Vodo
Makeup: Britten Faith
Hair: Jesus Guerrero & Angel Gonzalez

FAULT Magazine Premiere: Joel Baker’s ‘Bag Of Dreams’

 

For many of us, our first experience of Joel Baker’s soulful funk music came from his breakout single ‘Story’ feat Abra Cadabra last month. Today, the Nottingham born singer is back with the release of the title track for his upcoming mixtape ‘Bag of Dreams’.

This time round, we’re introduced to a less animated but far more personal look into the life of Joel through his effortless heart-wrenching lyricism, vocal and production.

Written and produced by Joel, through lyrics “got about two people I can trust, rest of them they don’t know enough” we’re given the closest look into the man behind the music as he reveals the stories from a time of his life filled with anguish and self-deprecation

Speaking about ‘Bag of Dreams’, Joel says: “Bag of Dreams was written at a very dark time. The big city sold me a fairy tale and I believed it. Occasionally a song will come around when it writes itself in minutes. You aren’t really writing it, you’re just coughing up your heart trying to capture what comes out. A few people tried to convince me to change lyrics because they said it made me sound ‘bitter’. But I was bitter. That’s how I knew the song worked.”

From Joel’s first two releases we’re very excited to hear his upcoming mixtape which will also feature guest appearances from Kojo Funds and Abra Cadabra.

That’s enough from us though! We’re very proud to officially premiere ‘Bag Of Dreams’ available today!

 

 

 

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Premiere: Ed Harcourt debuts new video for ‘The World is on Fire’

Ed Harcourt premieres new video for ‘The World is on Fire’ on FAULT Online. Photo: Steve Gullick

Former Mercury prize nominee Ed Harcourt has unleashed a new music video for ‘The World is on Fire’, the opening track from last year’s album ‘Furnaces’.

Harcourt’s seventh album was critically acclaimed, picking up an average 4/5 star rating from jaded critics and aficionados of deeply melodic, atmospheric pop alike.  If ‘The World is on Fire’ sets the tone for a richly immersive aural feast, the new video by Annick Wolfers matches its brooding intensity step for step:
 

 
Described as an apocalyptic painterly video, the short film was inspired by the mythology of Vulcan, the Roman god of fire, and was filmed in the Scottish Highlands. Taking a near-literal take on the song title, the video sees a statuesque warrior as the last woman standing in preparation for the end of the world as we know it.

The video continues a theme of exceptional art direction from Harcourt – the artwork for both this single and the ‘Furnaces’ album was designed by highly regarded British cartoonist Ralph Steadman:
 

To book tickets to Ed’s upcoming shows, visit:

FAULT speaks to Sharleen Spiteri of legendary Glaswegian band Texas

FAULT: Hey Sharleen, how are you?

SS: I’m very good, thank you.

 

FAULT: How is the campaign going for the new album?

SS: It’s going very well, we’ve been doing loads of promo; been here, there and everywhere. Doing some European and UK TV so it’s good, but it’s quite funny because when you release internationally you suddenly notice people want to cut you into little pieces and poke you.

 

FAULT: Your ninth studio album ‘Jump On Board’ came out a few months ago, have you had chance to showcase any of the songs to your fans yet?

SS: Yeah just as the album was released we played some pub gigs around the UK that were recorded for radio. Listeners could win tickets and that was really great and we literally played in manky, old pubs which were fantastic. Really sticky carpets and old beer aroma, you couldn’t step back on stage and it was all about the music and the audience. It was good to try out the new songs especially up against the old ones and the big hits, you can suddenly think “oh yeah, this is as good as we thought it was”.

 

FAULT: So from this strong combination of hits and new songs from’ Jump On Board’, what can fans expect from the setlist on the Winter tour?

SS: It will be the ‘Jump on Board Live Tour’ but it will be journey because when you’ve got a band that has had such a long career, there is a lot there to chose from. Some nights we change different songs in different places, but definitely mixing the big hits in with the new stuff.

 

FAULT: Is there a venue you’re looking forward to playing most? You’re playing your hometown for a few shows that must be special?

SS: Yeah we’ll be playing in Kelvingrove Park, which is funny because it’s the park that I grew up in. I used to go up on the bandstand and my Mum used to drag me off. It’s going to be strange being up there without getting shouted at to get down.

 

FAULT: You’ve had a long career; it must be special to experience that retrospective on stage?

SS: Yeah the nice thing is that doing interviews it reminds you that you’re not looking at that part of it, as you’re too busy moving forward and onto the next thing. It is nice to think that it has been long and it has been great, we feel really lucky to still be doing this at the level we are doing it.

 

FAULT: When did you begin writing the new material?

SS: In bits and pieces really, when we put out the last album we hadn’t produced an album in a long time, so you never know what to expect when you release a new record. The love that was shown to the band after we put out ‘The Conversation’ was great and it makes you think, “wow, we’re still relevant”. You’re doing it because you love it, and the truth is you don’t know how to do anything else. We love performing and making records, we’ve had the height of our careers and we’re doing it for the passion and the love of it. We really didn’t expect the reaction of, “it’s great to have you back” so it was so inspiring. It really does give you that boost to continue doing what you’re doing. Rather than by just re-packaging the greatest hits and adding some new songs, we thought that we’d give the fans something with all new songs written and packaged all together. Funnily enough, ‘Lets Work It Out’ was a song that was written probably about 8 to10 years ago but it was never finished, it was one of those songs where we’d try out ideas but we never quite got the melody sitting in it.

FAULT: How has the reaction been to your latest single ‘Tell That Girl’?

SS: That is one of those new era Texas songs; lyrics mean something different to everybody and when I see the people that I’m singing it to; it sort of becomes everybody else’s song in that moment.

 

FAULT: The video itself for ‘Tell That Girl’ focuses on you guys up close and personal, how was it filming that?

SS: Yes, up close and personal; just plain. Sometimes you’ve got switch it up a lot and you know, when you get on stage it changes completely. There is normally so many elements to consider and you get a bit fed up of the lenses you know?

 

FAULT: After years of making music videos, the camera lenses drive you mad?

SS: Yeah on certain videos, the 2 videos from this album have been really fun I’ve got to say, the ‘Lets Work It Out’ one especially. We’re just having a laugh and hanging out, its not just you and there is someone else to shoot it with, it’s completely different with a band. It’s not like “oh here we go again” you know?

 

FAULT: You’ve had your solo campaign and little projects in-between, do you think that fans want to pick up on this success during the Texas shows?

SS: We played a couple of tracks from my solo stuff on the last tour actually, so we kind of mix it up. The thing about why I went solo was that I needed to say something and get it out there as it’s not Texas. The band were heavily involved in it and as a band we kind of like each other you know? We see each other outside of Texas as we’ve known each other since we were 17. We’ve grown up together, had kids, marriages, divorces and all we have been through a lot of stuff together. These people are my life and my friends; it’s weird because Texas was never a job for us, it’s never become a job, but when each one of us is doing something separate from Texas, we all go along and support them. We all support each other.

 

FAULT: Is it the lyrics or the music that comes first when writing a new song?

SS: It comes when it comes; there are no rules when we write. Sometimes it can be a melody, sometimes a lyric or an old melody or a set of bridges, or sometimes completely new. Sometimes you’re lying in bed and link the two instantly; I don’t really know how it works even though that’s what I do. [Laughs] Everybody wants to analyse things nowadays, that’s how you do it etc. I think anyone who has created things in the moment find it hard to describe how they did it. I think if you look to closely at it then it becomes a path, and that path can soon become boring.

 

FAULT: What is your FAULT?

SS: You’ve got your strengths and you’ve got your faults, I think the strength is to be able to show your faults and identify that they’re there. Your fault is what sometimes makes magical things happen. Everybody has faults and do things that are seen as annoying, mine is probably that I never shut up. [Laughs]

Texas are on tour later this year from August until December and includes 3 huge homecoming shows in Glasgow, a large UK and European tour with some special shows in South Africa just added. You can view all their tour dates on their site here. Texas’ ninth studio album ‘Jump On Board’ is out now on Sony BMG. You can purchase the album here, and check out their latest single ‘Tell That Girl’ here.

 

Words Stuart Williams