Macklemore covershoot and interview for FAULT Magazine 28

Macklemore X FAULT Magazine

Macklemore FAULT MAgazine Miles Holder.jpg

Photography: Miles Holder | Stylist: Rachel Gold | Groomer: Lauren Griffin using MAC Cosmetics | Photography Assistant: Chloe Ackers | Fashion Assistant: Alexx Dougherty | Grooming Assistant: Bethany London

 

Words: Miles Holder

Macklemore’s road to success hasn’t been a smooth one, despite the runaway success of 2012 album ‘The Heist’ with then collaborator Ryan Lewis – behind the scenes the pressure caused the artist to slip from his addiction recovery and withdraw within himself.

In 2017, Macklemore released album ‘Gemini’, his first solo album in twelve years and for many, the first time they’d seen him without his longtime companion Ryan by his side. With a brand new track ‘These Days’ currently sitting at number one in the UK charts and the announcement on daughter number two ringing in our ears, we sat down with Macklemore to learn more about his solo journey, fatherhood and the ever present elephant in the room, white privilege.

 

Around 2012 with the release Can’t Hold Us and Thrift Shop many journalists referred to you as “new kid on the block” and as a “runaway newcomer” despite you already having a decade of music releases under your belt. Did that label annoy you?

Macklemore: It didn’t annoy me, I think that in a lot of ways I was an underground rapper and then six months later I was this international Pop Star, so it was a very different role very quickly, so I understood why they said it. People don’t see the work that goes into this stuff. I think mainly with the internet and social media; kids get famous quickly now, and for a good bulk of my career the internet wasn’t a thing that was accessible to a lot of people as it is today. It happened extremely quickly when it did, but it was a good decade before that that I was honing my craft.

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You’ve been active in trying to explain your white privilege, even releasing a song of the same title onto your 2005 album ‘The Language of My World’. While commendable, why do you feel it’s essential for you to get the message across (possibly to the detriment of your fan base)?

Macklemore: To me, it’s the truth, and I want to acknowledge the systems in which we operate under in America. We are all under the system of white supremacy, and I do benefit from the colour of my skin in numerous ways, and that plays a factor in how I have an advantage regarding my art and concerning my career. To take from specific cultures and not acknowledge what’s going on is disingenuous. If I know the truth about it, it’s crucial for me to speak on the subject matter.

 

In that vein, why aren’t more artists doing it?

Macklemore: I think in a lot of ways some artists find it easier to stay quiet and think it’s easier for them not to say the wrong thing if they’re ignorant of the matter. There’s a lot of unpacking to do, and it’s not a subject where artists can say “oh I get it now” you’ve got to have conversations and do your research first. You’ve got to go back to the origin of America to see how this isn’t a philosophy or an ideology but that white supremacy has a history and has impacted the laws and systems in place today. For some, it’s easier just not to educate themselves.

Musicians and other media personalities often get called out for taking a political stance or are told to “shut up and dribble”, why is it essential for you as an artist to make your political opinion known?

Macklemore: I think that we as artists have platforms and we have the opportunity to engage with our fan base. I also don’t believe that it’s essential that all artists do that. Often people ask me “do you think that more people should be speaking up?” I feel that if you’re compelled to, and it comes from a real place, and it’s in your heart then that’s amazing. Music has always been a weapon of resistance for the people. There are songs that I wrote for Gemini which are much heavier but ended up not making the album because I didn’t feel like I was hitting it from the right angle. The songs weren’t saying what I wanted them to say and I don’t think that anybody should ever think that “ok now we have to have a political song to hit that quota”. These songs should always come organically should not feel contrived, or like you’re pandering. If it feels like I’m pandering, then I stay away.

 

What has been the hardest moment of your musical journey so far?

Macklemore: Adjusting to the fame in a condensed period and not staying sober has been the worst. There was a rapid transition and to have the world’s eye on me all at once with back- to-back number ones, and all the accolades that came with it – I didn’t know how to deal with it. I didn’t know how to adjust, so I escaped. I think a lot of that peak season when I was around a bunch of people, doing sold out Arenas across the world was me isolating and using drugs. I used drugs to cope it and to get out of my head. Dealing with the love, criticism and outside public perceptions is a balancing act. Over the years I figured out how to deal with it, and it’s by not giving a fuck. People always say, “I don’t care what people think of me” but we all care! We are all insecure, and it’s a human fault that ties us all together, but when you can acknowledge that, you can work consistently in a spiritual practice that lessens how much you care. When you realise who you sincerely are, and not through somebody else’s eyes but through your soul and your spirit, all of a sudden there’s inner peace. It takes work and maintenance, and if you’re paying attention to the media and you’re on social media all the time to look for validation, it’ll never come. There will always be somebody that’s disagreeing with what you’re saying; you have to be at peace with yourself.

Is it a lot of pressure to have a newborn child and suddenly having to leave to be on tour?

Macklemore: I don’t know if pressure is the right word, but it’s strange to spend eight days with my newborn and then to leave and go on tour. It’s tough to look at pictures, and O feel like I’m missing something, and in a way, I don’t even know my baby yet. I’ve been away from her more than I’ve been there and it’s hard, but FaceTime is a beautiful thing in the meantime. My baby wasn’t planned so we’re adjusting, and people have been doing this forever so I am looking forward to eventually slowing down and just honing in on family life and being a dad for a good while.

 

What is your FAULT?

Macklemore: Addiction. I think that’s the thing that always reminds me that I could lose all of this at any minute. If I stop prioritising the daily recovery program that I do to maintain sobriety – I will lose it all. It’s bigger than my career and more significant than record sales – it’s my family. It’s my happiness, my life. A lot people at the beginning of the recovery wish they were normal and asked, “why can’t I just drink and do recreational drugs like other people?” I don’t think like that anymore; I think my program has been a way for me to get closer to god and for me to figure out who I am. Recovery helped me discover my character defects and my shortcomings and how I can progress to become a better version of myself. It’s there to remind me that this life isn’t permanent and I can lose it if I don’t work to maintain that sobriety on a daily basis.

Janelle Monae Covers FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Janelle Monae X FAULT Magazine

janelle Monae FAULT Magazine dirty computer

Fashion Editor: Rachel Holland | Photographer: David Yeo | Make Up Artist: Jessica Smalls | Hair Stylist: Nikki Elms | Nail Artist: Diana Drummond | Photographer’s Assistant: Anna Forbes | Stylist’s Assistant: Anna Cirnu | Photographed at Handel & Hendrix in London handelhendrix.org

 

Words: Miles Holder

Special Thanks: Handel & Hendrix

In 2007, Janelle Monae released her EP entitled ‘Metropolis: Suite I (The Chase), the first in a seven-part conceptual series set in the year 2719’s civilisation of Metropolis and told through the eyes of a sentient android, Cindi Mayweather.

The story continued through her 2010 album ‘The ArchAndroid’ and 2013’s ‘The Electric Lady’ and fans followed Cindi Mayweather as she fell in love with a human and travelled back in time to warn of the imminent threat posed by the secret organisation, ‘The Great Divide’.

For her 2018 Album entitled ‘Dirty Computer’, Janelle will be leaving Cindi behind and telling a new story, the story of Janelle Monae. The first two releases from the record ‘Django Jane’ and ‘Make Me Feel’ are still filled with Janelle’s signature style, Afrofuturism and punk soul swag. While a departure from the narrative fans are accustomed, it nevertheless provides what so many have a craved – a glimpse into Janelle’s personal life.

Could it be that as our reality begins to mimic that of the fictitious dystopian future of Metropolis, as too has Janelle been forced to follow in the footsteps of Cindi Mayweather and save the present day from its own “great divide”? Only time will tell. For Janelle at least, it’s all about being present, and at long last, finding the confidence to tell her own story.

 

janelle Monae FAULT Magazine dirty computer

 

FAULT Magazine: You’ve always included social commentary within your music but it was vailed within the narrative of Metropolis. On Dirty Computer, the message is a lot more in your face – why?

Janelle Monae: I knew I was supposed to make Dirty Computer before my first album came out and I always wanted to speak out, but I put it off because I needed to understand where my anger was coming from and how best to channel it.

I am such an honest person and speak very candidly when I’m with friends and family, and that’s what you’ll hear on this album. I sing about politics, race, sexuality, gender on the record but to release the album, I needed to make sure I had the confidence to not self-edit. I needed to be vulnerable, honest and open.

This project is about my freedom and challenging myself to live in the present and not in 2719 through Cindi. I feel like I can contribute to the present day and that I should contribute. I’m choosing to live in the now and to celebrate the people that are not celebrated in the present day. I want to honour those living on the outskirts of society due to their sexuality or gender identity. These are people who I love, and that love me but waking up as an American who cares deeply about the American dream and the rights of all people to it, I feel there is too much at stake to be quiet and to mince my words on specific issues.

 

Despite the social commentary, it doesn’t feel like a sad or hope lost album. There are many songs about self-love and sexual discovery that it ends up as quite an empowering record, was this the intention?

I’m happy you said that because it’s not meant as a sad album, it’s intended as a celebration for the “dirty computers” of the world who get told that they’re dirty and that they have viruses making them different which they need to have taken away. Dirty Computers should see their uniqueness and their so-called viruses as positive attributes which make them valuable to society.

 

What’s given you the confidence to say “Right, it’s time to tell the world who Janelle is and tell my story”?

Janelle Monae: There is power in vulnerability, and I think that it needed to start with me. I was inspired by many movies, some of which I’ve been a part of and the stories I read and people I’ve met; when people shared their stories with me so honestly, it resonated.

I’ve been talking about it, but I feel I wasn’t entirely embracing the things that made me unique. I was telling others to as part of my music, but I wasn’t living it, and I think that I was afraid I would lose supporters for doing so.

I had a lot of conversation with myself about who was going to be the subject of the album myself or Cindi, but I’m here now, and I think it’s right that I stay in the present and share my story and walk in my truth as fearlessly as possible.

janelle Monae FAULT Magazine dirty computer
And how does one live fearlessly?

Janelle Monae: It’s not that I don’t experience fear, but in those moments, I choose freedom and freedom is not free. Freedom always comes with great sacrifice, and there will be people who say hurtful things and not support me because I’m living my truth.

 

Does it scare you to put yourself out there for scrutiny when people won’t just discuss your music, they’ll twist your music and message and start discussions on you as a person and your personal life?

Janelle Monae: No, I have soul searched, and this time around, I think being honest is most important. It’s about being able to say “hey I’m ok if people don’t like that I’m embracing this side of me”, it’s the side that my friends and family get to see and they still love me the same. I think that my evolution is more important than pleasing people and I may not say it right, I might get some things wrong, and I may stumble along the way but was I honest, was I sincere, was my heart in the right place? Yes, yes and yes.

What scares Janelle Monae?

Janelle Monae: That I won’t have a family within the time frame that I want to have a family. I want to have children, but I don’t want to miss that time because I was so focused on my career and because I didn’t plan accordingly. That scares me most now more than anything. I do want to usher in a new generation of babies that will be better than me and able to dream bigger than me and go out into this world and turn it upside down in a very positive way.

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What is your FAULT?

Janelle Monae: One of my FAULTs is that I’m a self-editor and perfectionist and I don’t enjoy my experiences when I’m so focused on being consistently perfect in every situation. It’s something that I’ve had to work on my entire life actively. It used to consume my experience, and I couldn’t enjoy things because I was so focused on how they were going to be presented. I was so concerned with what people thought, but now I’m just at this point in my life where I’m finding strength in my imperfections, and I realise that I connect more with myself and with other people when my FAULTs are being shared for all to see.

 

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 28 – THE STRUCTURAL ISSUE –  IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

 

‘Artificial Light’ by Frederick Wilkinson – Exclusive Fashion editorial for FAULT Online

Top- Minan Wong
Pants- Layana Aguilar
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- H&M

Blue pants- Chikimiki
Print blouse- Chikimiki
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- H&M

 

Blouse- behno
Earring- H&M

Long sleeve blouse- Behno
Dress- Layana Aguilar
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- H&M

Long sleeve knit top- Chikimiki
Sleeveless knit top- Chikimiki
Skirt- chikimiki
Shoes- ALDO
Earring- H&M

Coat- Layana Aguilar
Earring- H&M

Top- Chikimiki
Long sleeve blouse (worn around neck)- Vintage
Pants- Chikimiki
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- H&M

Top- Chikimiki
Bralette- KORAL
Pants- Chikimiki
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- MANGO

Dress- Layana Aguilar
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- H&M

Photographer: Frederick Wilkinson @fw_photo

Model: Asia, MSA Models NY @asiaprus @msamodels

Stylist: Lauren Walsh @laaurenwalsh

MUA: Elena Thomopoulos @elvendoe

Wig Stylist: Bamby @bambyofsuburbia

Photographer’s Assistant: Yanutzi Diaz @yanutzi

FAULT Magazine Brand Focus: 31st State

 

31st State – Style & An Abundance of Substance

 

Ah, the teenage years, oily skin, bad hair days and pimple breakouts galore, sadly all three of these can follow us into our adult lives, and for that reason, I decided to review 31st State, a skincare range explicitly produced for young men.

31st State skin, body and hair products combine active naturally derived ingredients such as Manuka and Witch Hazel. While there has been a recent surge in popularity, in truth, dermatologists have been recommending the ingredients above for centuries due to their restorative skincare properties. Despite this, you’ll often find products on the market are jam-packed with additives, over perfumed and packed with preservatives, not something you want to use on sensitive or any other skin type for that matter. Seeing all the unnaturally infused products on the shelves inspired the founder of 31st State, Stephanie Capuano to formulate her range of products for her teenage sons to use, and that’s what we’re testing out in today’s ‘FAULT Brand highlight’.

I started with the 2-in1 Hair and Body Wash, at the most basic of evaluations, it’s a pleasant body wash. The body wash doesn’t have an overpowering scent like the many other products aimed at young men on the market (or the chemical cyan hue). It’s a delicate product and doesn’t leave your face feeling like you’d been slapped by a cactus the way we’ve seen with other high-end cleansers. A look at the ingredients shows that it’s still able to fight off bacteria without the harsher chemicals too. Containing silver and zinc, the former works to fight spots and bacteria while the latter works to control body odour and soothe irritated skin; I find it’s great for an all-round body wash.

RRP £8.99

Moving on to the Foaming Face Wash, like I said the Hair and Body Wash was more of an all-rounder, but sometimes you want a more in-depth cleanse to start your day. For those times, I used their Foaming Face Wash, designed to cleanse the skin of dirt, oil and bacteria thoroughly. The face wash is excellent for anyone prone to oily skin (as most teenage boys are!). To combat redness and irritation tea tree releases into the skin slowly over the course of the day which is exceptional for soothing the skin post-shaving. Manuka works to cleanse and rid the skin of oils which could lead to spot. I’d recommend using this product once every couple of days, as I would for most cleansers as the trick is to remove excess oils which have built up over time and not to completely remove the skins naturally occurring oils all healthy skins has.

RRP £12.99

The Overnight Clearing Pads were a great addition to my nighttime routine, mainly because it was so easy to do – making them a small ask for any young man to add to his nighttime routine. The pads are rich in Lactic Acid Manuka and Tea Tree which helps to shrink pores and remove the surface dirt and oil from a tough long day. An excellent addition to the Christmas list, it’s low maintained and easy to use but will make such a big difference to anyone’s skin!

RRP £15.99

Of course, there’s more to appearance than only the face, so to combat those bad hair days, I reviewed the Easy Hold Styling Gel. Well I didn’t, my housemate did, my “having hair days” are far behind me! Filled not only with Tamanu but also shea gives a natural hold and definition to the hair without the clumps and stickiness of other products on the market. Now you’d of heard a lot about shea this year, with she butter being one of the beauty industries runaway ingredients, Tamanu oil adds hair shine and UV protection. My housemate mentioned that it has a great hold, he wasn’t having to reapply throughout the day, and it washes out exceptionally quickly compared to other products he had tried.

RRP £6.99

 

All in all, we’re highly impressed by 31st State! It goes without mentioning a lot of the time, but they have also carved out the perfect branding approach for a product such as theirs. It’s cool; a Californian surfer-dude aesthetic is so fitting for their user base. It’s the quintessential product for any young man’s Christmas list – a brand with both style and substance made for men who personify the very same qualities.

Shop the product – www.31st-state.com

BAFTA Announces Breakthrough Brits 2017 in partnership with Burberry

Last night FAULT attended The British Academy of Film and Television Arts, commonly known as BAFTA announced their twenty standout talents in film, games and television. Revealed in partnership with fashion mega-house Burberry and hosted by FAULT Magazine Issue 24 star Maya Jama, the evening saw industry veterans gather to celebrate and impart their wisdom on the twenty budding talents. This year’s initiative is also supported by The Langham London and Audi UK.

To be named a Breakthrough Brit is an accolade to take seriously; since the launch of the initiative in partnership with Burberry back in 2013, winners have gone on to do great things some even collected their very own coveted BAFTA awards.

2016 winner Malachi Kirby (see his interview with FAULT here) career has gone from strength to strength as we’ve seen him ear the coveted part of Kunta Kinte in 2016’s retelling of Roots, a role previously played by Emmy nominated actor LeVar Burton.

The initiative doesn’t just cater to those within the film industry as is commonly thought, Games artist Anna Hollinrake appears on the list for her artwork featured on mobile VR game Lola and the Giant.

Similarly, Creative Director Henry Hoffman whose game Mush has already earned him both a Dare to be Digital competition and a BAFTA Cymru award and now he takes his place as a breakthrough brit as he continues to blur the lines between developer and creative.

Selected by a jury of industry experts including FAULT Magazine Issue 9 star Will Poulter and FAULT 27 star Reggie Yates – the diversity of the expertise speaks volumes for just how much talent there is and at such an early in their careers.

See the highlights from the night in the video below!  

Actors Jenna Coleman, Joe Dempsi, Suranne Jones and Vicky McClure revealed the names on the shortlist on the night and allow us to do the same below.

· Adam Vian and Thomas Vian – Game Directors
· Anna Hollinrake – Games Artist
· Charlie Cooper and Daisy Cooper – Writers/Actors
· Chloë Thomson – Cinematographer
· Daniel Fountain – Game Designer
· Francis Lee – Writer/Director
· Henry Hoffman – Creative Director (Games)
· Hope Dickson Leach – Writer/Director
· Jessie Buckley – Actress
· Josh O’Connor – Actor
· Kit Fraser – Cinematographer
· Lydia Hampson – Producer
· Mahalia Belo – Director
· Molly Windsor – Actress
· Olivia Wood – Games Writer & Editor
· Sarah Quintrell – Writer
· Segun Akinola – Composer
· Susan Wokoma – Actress

Amanda Berry OBE, Chief Executive of BAFTA, said: “Breakthrough Brits, in partnership with Burberry, identifies the very best emerging talent in film, games and television. As it reaches its fifth year, I am so proud of what the initiative has achieved, and the talented people it is has honoured. Over the next year, the Breakthrough Brits will be supported by BAFTA and mentored by some of the industry’s most established professionals. This year’s Breakthrough Brits truly represent the diverse range of talents that make up our industries. We’re thrilled to be recognising these individuals this evening.”

Click here for more information about BAFTA Breakthrough Brits, in partnership with Burberry,

FAULT Magazine In Conversation With Reggie Yates PT.1

Photography Joseph Sinclair | Styling Rachel Gold @ Red Represents | Lauren Alice @MandyCoakleyRepresents using Medik8 and La Roche Posay

Words: Miles Holder

 

For those who grew up watching 1990s terrestrial television, Reggie Yates has always been a household name – the recognisable young face who young POC across the country grew up with as their pillar of cultural representation on children’s television. Programs have come and gone since he made his debut on the Desmond’s in 1993, but still to this day, Reggie is still a mainstay on our television screens.

In 2013, we were introduced to a new side of Reggie through his documentary ‘Reggie Yates’s Extreme South Africa’, I say this was a “new side” of Reggie, but for many of us it was the first time we’d ever gotten to know Reggie Yates the person as opposed to the Saturday morning television presenter. Lying alone in his tent and discussing how South Africa’s race issues were affecting his own perception of self, it was a million miles away from the Reggie I remembered interviewing Atomic Kitten on ‘Smile’ or from his seldom spoken about appearance on Celebrity Fame Academy in 2005. A real Reggie; down to earth, an undeniably, unashamedly “black” Reggie Yates.

As more projects have released, the idea of Reggie Yates as a documentary maker has gone from career pivot to career-defining; critics and viewers alike now hold his work in the same esteem as one might the documentaries of Louis Theroux or Andrew Marr – a merit not many young British stars achieve.

 

FAULT: All those years of presenting children’s television, was the plan always to move into documentary making?

Reggie: No, and to be honest, there has never been a plan until now. It’s only in the last decade that the focus has been on doing projects which I genuinely care for. I know where I’d like to be at forty years of age in my personal and professional life and at the age of twelve I just wanted to have fun and as I’ve matured my desires for my career changed.

FAULT: Your career is an anomaly; it prompted The NewStatesman to run a story entitled ‘Does Reggie Yates Have The Weirdest Career In Television?’ – do you feel as though it’s been weird?

I don’t think I do have the weirdest career on television, I would replace “weird” with “authentic”. When I was eighteen, the BBC were telling me that I was going to be a ‘Blue Peter’ presenter and I was like, “no I’m not.” I never watched ‘Blue Peter’ growing up, and it never spoke to me, and quite frankly, I didn’t care for it. For those reasons, I didn’t do it and they just couldn’t understand and didn’t get it.

FAULT: Blue Peter is a big gig to pass up, what did you do instead?

What I went on to do was doing children shows where it felt like I was allowed to be me in, I helped create ‘The Crust’ a sitcom we did in a tower block, and it had a predominately black cast and I was twenty-one at that point. I always did things that feel right at the time, and that’s why there’s been this crazy flow but if you study my career, it’s always moved me forward, and now, everything aligns. The book makes sense next to the documentaries, the documentaries make sense with the photography, and that’s what I’m spending my life doing. All about empathy and learning, growth, sharing and I’m not just taking pictures for the sake of it like I used to do, I’ve just shot an exhibition for amnesty international on refugees, and their stories are as important as the imagery, and that’s where I am in my career.

The night before our interview I had watched ‘Reggie Yates In A Refugee Camp’ which saw him enter the largest refugee camp in Iraq alongside 30,000 Syrian refugees. A news report played on the television showing the death of an Iraqi journalist only twenty miles from the cafe where Reggie sat. This now deceased journalist, much like Reggie, placed herself in the line of danger to get her story. One does wonder if that journalist was possibly the Iraqi counterpart of Reggie Yates, one whose career mirrors his own  and what it must be like to watch someone with such a shared experience, meet such a tragic end.

 

FAULT: What was it like to sit and hear the news on a journalist, possibly one whose careers closely mirrored your own killed so close by?

I can see why you can make the comparison, but I think I disengaged from the similarities because I’m not a war journalist, and in situations where bombs are going off, that’s the last place I’ll be. I put myself in situations which are difficult, yes, but it’s human interest stories which drive me. I look to find the heart of the issue through the people that I meet, and I don’t feel like I’m in a similar level of danger. It did sadden me though; her life was cut short because she was trying to do the right thing and open conversations and that’s wrong.

 

Throughout the documentary, we’re shown all the damning emotions one might expect from the people now forced to seek shelter within the refugee camp, but through all of this, Reggie reminds us of the power of friendship, love and compassion can make the worst of circumstances, that little bit easier. In the later episode ‘A Week in a Toxic Waste Dump’ we’re introduced to the Burner Boys, a group of young men working in dangerous conditions in the largest electronic waste dumps in the world – Accra’s Agbogbloshie. Much like the formerly discussed episode, we also end with the Burner Boys a little closer to happiness from when the documentary opened.

This isn’t the case with all of Reggie’s documentaries. In the previous series, we’ve seen him come face-to-face with the far-right, misogynists, racists and projects do inevitably end with his subjects no happier or less angry at the world than when the documentaries started.

 

FAULT: Has there has ever been a particular person who he wished he could have steered into seeing a happier way of living?

Every film there’s someone I meet that I wish I could steer to a happier future, but I think I have to be realistic about my capabilities. I can’t fix everybody that I meet in a documentary or the real world. My job is to connect with people and tell their story, but it’s not to change the world, and it’d be irresponsible and unfair for me to promise a relationship with everyone. A lot of people had said to me, “please tell me you stayed in touch with the Burner Boys and did more” but it’s hard because two weeks earlier I was in Iraq, and a month before that I was in jail in North Carolina and what about staying in touch with those guys?

I don’t do these films as a one-off project; I’m not some kid on a gap year building a house in Africa and pissing off forever. I have plans where there is legacy, and I return; for instance in Kenya and Iberia, I’ve been back several times. In Awal, I was affected by being there and my connection to the land from being of Ghanian decent I’ve started the ball rolling on a campaign to bring about change. It’s not something I feel the need to shout about here because I’m not doing it for promotion, I’m doing it out of personal responsibility as a Ghanaian the position that I’m in.

 

FAULT: You touched on a point saying that you’re not a student on your gap year going in and fucking off. How do you respond when people counter with the argument that you’ve gone into Iraq, made your documentary and then like you say, fucked off?

It’s a very easy answer; the difference is I’ve made a film about it which you and many people have seen across the country. It’s started a conversation which wasn’t there before, and we don’t know what the legacy of that documentary will be – it could sell internationally, and it explains displacement in a way I’ve never seen before. I’ve done something different and original, and it will effect change even if it’s just in the attitude of the audience watching it.

 

FAULT: Do you have any career regrets?

I don’t have any. There are things I could have done better, things go wrong all the time, there are documentaries which I’ve made which have been a bit rubbish, but I’ve learnt from all of them, and it’s cheesy textbook crap, it reigns true. It’s essential that I celebrate my failures as much as my successes because of nothing is a better teacher than failure.

 

 

In Pt2 – we’ll discuss Reggie’s new book, future projects, race and above all else – FAULTS.

Coming Soon…

 

Unseen: My Journey by Reggie Yates published by BBC Books, price £18.99 | THE INSIDER S2 is available on BBC3

Now & Then – Volker Eichenhofer’s exclusive editorial for FAULT Online

Jacket and Shorts – Maison Margiela

 

Shirt – You Must Create
Trousers – Jil Sander

 

Tank Top – Schiesser
Trousers – Comme des Garçons

 

Customized Jump Suit – Dickies

 

Whole look – Dior Homme

 

Trousers – Comme des Garçons

 

Photography and Styling by Volker Eichenhofer / www.studioVE.net
Model Azhar S. (Kult Models)

Rare photos of Salvador Dali and Pablo Picasso @ Zebra One Gallery, London

These fantastic, never-before-seen images of legendary artists Pablo Picasso and Salvador Dali are currently being exhibited at the Zebra One Gallery in Hampstead, London. The shots, on display until the end of September ’17, give a rare, intimate glimpse into the lives of two of the 20th century’s most influential artists.

Commenting on the shots, the gallery shared the thought that, “Throughout Salvador Dali’s career, a question that reoccurred time and time again was whether he would cut his iconic moustache – a point that is addressed in many of these shots, with him at the mirror with a razor and holding a sword against his moustache.”

Whether he actually cut it or not is still up for debate…

Salvador Dali Moustache Miroir by Paul Popper, 1964.

 

Portrait of Pablo Picasso by Gilles Ehrmann, 1952. This iconic portrait a favourite of Picasso’s wife, Jacqueline Roque, and is the only one which is hung in their house in Mougins.

 

Dali, a woman and his cane by Unknown Artist, 1967. The photo shows Dali standing next to a young woman brandishing his famous cane.

A legend in his lifetime by Edward Quinn, 1968. Here Picasso arranges two works for viewing: Figure carrying a stone, 1931 and Figures by the sea, 1931.

 

Salvador Dali and Captain Moore with an Ocelot by Unknown Artist, 1967. The photo shows Moore holding a pet Ocelot watched by Dali with the port holes of the ship behind them. This is a surrealistic scene which would have appealed to Dali.  The ocelot, named Babou, was Dali’s favourite pet.

 

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