R&B artist Jhyve breathes new life to Toronto’s burgeoning music scene in his “Conversations” EP

Hailing from the creative hub of Toronto that was minted by Drake, R&B singer-songwriter-producer Jhyve gives us another reason to pay attention to the Canadian metropolitan powerhouse.
With guitar in hand, Jhyve is the latest star emerging from Toronto’s musical firmament thanks to his singular soul-focused sound.

Born Jamaal Desmond Bowry, Jhyve comes by his genre blend honestly. His mother sings in a gospel choir and his father is a former DJ who bumped soca and calypso at community parties with his own “big ass” soundsystem. Jhyve took those influences from his parents, immigrants from the Caribbean island of St. Kits, mixed them with the late-90s R&B he grew up on and added alt-rock picked up from his university dorm-mates who played guitar and got high all day. Everything filtered in.

“I wouldn’t have the sound I have today if i didn’t have all these honest prolonged exposures to different types of music coming up,” he says. But while his music is influenced by the the past, it stil sounds cutting-edge. “People confuse paying homage to duplication. There has to be reinvention. Don’t be brothers, be cousins.”

The jack of all trades performer falls in line with other boundary-pushing artists like Miguel and SZA, and his latest EP is Conversations, a five-song cycle about relationships that displays an introspection and vulnerability rarely seen in modern R&B, at least from the guys.

“Men hardly get out of a position of strength and nobility in love songs,” Jhyve says. “We always come at it from receiving the best love ever or being hurt by an ex. It’s very rare that you get more range of emotion. Conversations covers that range.”

The title track is about how men aren’t just about one thing, but actually enjoy conversation, too, while “Feel Something” is about romantic disconnection and “Convince Me” is about insecurity. The dark and moody “Human,” with a cinematic video to match, stems from a messy breakup in Jhyve’s past that inspired lines like: “you got problems like the rest of us / fighting demons like the best of us.” While “Keep Doing You” is about catharsis and closure, set after a relationship and offering redemption and emotional release as it ties in with his own experience chasing his dreams.

Jhyve Socials:

Gundelach Exclusive FAULT Magazine Interview


Interview: Kee Chang
Photography: Simen Skari 


Norway’s Gundelach, a.k.a. Kai Gundelach, released his self-titled debut EP in 2017, which secured him a Pop Album nomination at Spellemannprisen (the Norwegian equivalent to the Grammys). Last week, the DJ-turned-solo artist unveiled his debut LP, Baltus, a thoughtful and inspired collection of tracks that continues to showcase his Nordic-noir sensibilities and haunting, falsetto vocals. It’s infused with undeniable feeling that’s sincere and melodies that are unshakably catchy. And while deeply introspective lyrics set to gloom-tinged, dreamy synth-pop is nothing new, most other artists use blunt chisels on big slabs—Gundelach is working in scrimshaw. Among the LP’s stable of uncommonly spectacular tracks, “Duck Hunting” and “Past the Building” are sonic checkpoints that seem to do this still-infant artist on the rise most justice. Just don’t expect confetti canons. Baltus is a porcelain sorrow.


FAULT: Is Gundelach a common surname in Norway? How often do you get asked about your moniker?

Gundelach: It’s not common at all, actually. Even Norwegian journalists ask me that same question. It’s a German/Danish name. I don’t come from a German family, but I guess there were some ancestors.


FAULT: Maybe we can start with your most recent single off Baltus: “Past the Building” featuring ARY.

Gundelach: That track means a lot to me. It came together quite quickly. ARY and I had just gotten to know each other in the studio. I helped her with some of her tracks and she helped me with some of mine. I feel like we make a pretty good team writing the lyrics and the melodies. The track is about relationships that are a bit toxic. I think it’s the only track that I listen to pretty regularly after finishing the album.

FAULT: So “Past the Building” came together pretty fast. Is that usually the case?

Gundelach: It’s really different for every track. When you write with another person like that, you don’t sit for a long time and wonder whether what you wrote is good or not because you get confirmation right away, you know? If you sit with someone that you respect musically and that person says, “That’s a really good melody,” you don’t have to listen to it over and over again for days, which can happen if I write alone.


FAULT: Going way back now, your first-ever single in Scandinavia was “Alone in the Night.” It’s another “melancholic daydream” as you’ve describe your sound in your own words. What inspired that cut?

Gundelach: I was pretty heartbroken at the time. The premise of that song is about the feeling you have when you’re in love with someone, but you don’t know if the feeling is mutual anymore. It’s that place where you kind of know it isn’t, but you’re too afraid to ask so you go around thinking all these dark thoughts. I had this studio just outside of Oslo at the time. I was just sitting in the studio by myself and I had just figured out how I wanted to make music, which I had been trying to figure out for three to four years.


FAULT: In every relationship, there’s one person who loves the other person more. It’s devastating, isn’t it?

Gundelach: I’ve thought about this a bunch of times. It’s not always a bad thing, though, because it can turn from one side to the other. But it is always one person that loves the other person at least a little bit more.


FAULT: On the second-ever track you released called “Spiders,” I know you started with long chords, improvised vocal melody, and then wrote the lyrics. Is that a natural progression for you with songs?

Gundelach: Yeah, that’s kind of my go-to method for writing because I tend to improvise in gibberish. I almost always start with the arrangement of instruments to have two bars or something and then improvise over that in gibberish English. I think that’s pretty cool because, when you sing in gibberish like that, subconsciously, you always say some words that are really good. If you let yourself improvise, you don’t have time to overthink stuff. Then I build the lyrics around those words. I really like working like that.


FAULT: When something big unexpectedly happens—when Pharrell plays “Spiders” on Beats 1–does that feel like a seismic event? Does it ripple out into other opportunities in a way that’s very cause and effect?

Gundelach: Of course it’s always cool when stuff like that happens and I remember that particular instance really well. I was in Berlin. I had been clubbing the night before. My phone rang and it was my manager saying that I had to turn on the radio because Pharrell is playing my song. Of course that’s huge. But I don’t know how much it did for me. I got exposed to new listeners, I guess. For me, and for many other artists also, when stuff like that happens—when you get confirmed for a really cool festival—it’s always cool, but you’re also thinking about the next thing. I wish it wasn’t always like that. I wish you could just appreciate the cool things that happen in your life, instead of thinking about what your next goal is. It’s like buying a Porsche and then sitting in that Porsche thinking about wanting a Ferrari or something.


FAULT: What do you remember from your earliest days performing live and transitioning out of DJing?

Gundelach: That was pretty intense because, even though I had been making music for quite a few years, I shared it with almost no one. I was in the Oslo club community and culture through DJing and knew a lot of music people that knew I made music, but they hadn’t heard it. I was just so nervous. You couldn’t talk to me at all for two hours before I would play. I just remember being super uncomfortable. Now it’s something I can control. And I guess I say that but yesterday I performed on live radio and chocked up on the first line of a song. It’s weird when you have to sit down to do an interview and talk in a low voice like I am now and then have only ten seconds before you have to perform. Your voice isn’t warmed up at all. It went fine, though. I didn’t stop the song or anything. I just came in wrong, I guess.


FAULT: If anything, I think that makes you more relatable to people listening in. It’s disarming and human.

Gundelach: They told me that same thing after the show. It’s true. I guess if you choke up and you’re unable to perform at all, that’s not very good, but if you have a bad start and you get really into it by the end, you’re golden. As you say, it’s a human thing. People see that you’re just a dude trying to sing a song.


FAULT: I know there was a tragedy in your personal life when you flew to New York City to record the EP in 2015. [Editor’s Note: Kai learned upon arriving in the city that his friend back home committed suicide.) Did you find that colouring the material you had already been working on in a different way?

Gundelach: It’s crazy. I had worked out the songs before I got there. When that happened, the only thing that felt right was to be in that studio and just record. It was so weird and scary and everything. Suddenly, all those songs had a different meaning to them. It definitely coloured the whole thing. When you’re emotional, that affects your singing—you hear it in the voice. That was an intense experience.

FAULT: Music entered your life early it seems. You were making music for six years by the time you went public. You sang in children’s theatre at age nine. You learned guitar at ten. As you said, you were nervous to share your work, so what opened up that possibility? Did it become a necessity for you?

Gundelach: The thing is, it wasn’t necessarily that I was nervous. It was just that I wanted to be good enough before I put anything out there. I think a lot of artists I know maybe jumped into it a bit too quickly because they had some demos and a manager reached out to them or a record label reached out. I just wanted to be good enough at the craft before I released anything so I could have control in both the production and the way it’s presented to the public. I wanted to have creative control so I waited until I felt I was ready. But then I guess I wasn’t because you’re never ready. You have to jump into it at some point.


FAULT: Do you think a lot of DJs have the desire—sometimes the secret desire—to make original music?

Gundelach: I do think a lot of DJs have the desire. But most of them want to make club music because they’re in that scene. That’s what was different with me, I guess. I didn’t want to make club music necessarily. I wanted to make music that’s quieter than what I’m putting out now honestly. In the beginning, my songs were just acoustic guitar and maybe one synth. It was really mellow. Then I started adding drum machines. I got more interested in analog gear and hardware. It was a natural progression to introduce that into the music. I guess I had a really different dream for myself when I was DJing because I didn’t want to be playing clubs. I wanted to play stages and nice rooms, and to have a live thing with a band. It’s different.


FAULT: Can you tell me about this unique work experience from your past where you, from what I understand, sang to old people as a sort of therapy? It really underscores music’s capacity to heal.

Gundelach: I felt a bit underqualified for the job. But I felt like I got enough from it on a personal level because it was really important work. I had a great time with those people. They were mostly demented people. You would be sitting there having a normal conversation with one of them and they would start over and over again. They’re just living in a loop, you know? It’s a bit scary. Music has this function where it allows the brain to remember. They suddenly “wake up” when they hear music from their past. I couldn’t play everything on the piano. I had to learn all these old songs and it took up too much time for me to continue so I didn’t have the job for that long. But it was really meaningful to me at the time.

FAULT: Do you still have ambitions to act? I know that’s been a part of your narrative as well.

I do, yeah. My synth player’s girlfriend is actually a renowned director here in Norway and she asked me a couple of times to come and try out stuff with acting. I haven’t gotten any parts yet, but I’m not really working to get them either. If the right project is there for me in the future, I would love to. It’s also a bit scary to jump back on the horse after not having done it in such a long time, I guess.


FAULT: Where do you find yourself pulling a lot of inspiration from, apart from music?

Gundelach: I’m not reading so much right now, but I tend to read a lot. There’s this Norwegian author that you should check out named Kjell Askildsen. He’s the master of short stories in Norway, but he’s also pretty acclaimed worldwide. I have all of his stories. I sometimes read to get into the headspace that I want to be in—not the authors’ necessarily, but into the headspace of the literature. The same goes for Oscar Wilde and Hemingway. That’s a good way to get into the right mood to write music, for me at least.

FAULT: What new challenges did you face while working on Baltus? Did it feel very different in the studio?

Gundelach: It did because this was the first time where I was the main producer and it’s my first album. I had a technician who also co-produced some stuff, but mainly, I worked as the one producer and that was really different. We also had a kind of deadline that was long so it was really intense. It was every day, all day type of thing in a room with no windows in this huge building. We had to go up to the roof at least every third hour to get some light so you could feel that it was daytime. And since this is an album, I really wanted to make it a cool listening experience from beginning to end. I worked super hard on the tracklist. There’s one song called “Control” that we worked on for a week, but all the other songs were a lot quicker and I liked that. I hate it when you can’t figure out one section of a song and you end up changing it like 12 times. You get so sick of the song and end up hating it, you know? Sometimes it feels good to start on the right path and then you can just finish it pretty quickly. I’m happy with the result.


FAULT: Deadlines can be good, too, right? With anything creative, you could conceivably work on it forever.

Gundelach: That’s true. Deadlines are really important. It’s a really good thing.


FAULT: Are you excited to go back on tour soon?

Gundelach: I’m really excited, but I’m a bit terrified as well because we’re going to some European cities that I’ve never played before. I just hope that people come to the shows. I’m trying to have a bit of a different set-up to make stuff even more organic and depend less on backing tracks by bringing more hardware onstage. It’s an overwhelming project right now, but I think It’s going to be really nice in the end.


FAULT: I found a YouTube clip of you performing in the cabin of a plane. That had to be a weird experience.

Gundelach: I think that’s one of the weirdest things I’ve done in my life. If I got asked again, I would say no because it was super awkward. Those people hadn’t signed up for any concert. You’re just standing up there with really shitty speakers. But it was kind of cool as well, I guess. They paid pretty well so that was nice.


FAULT: And lastly, what is your FAULT?

Gundelach: Oh, shit—my fault… It’s my fault that I play too much computer games right now. I’m really into that stuff nowadays. It tends to eat a lot of my time, which should be spent on planning this tour.


FAULT: Which games are you playing?

Gundelach: I’m playing this game called PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds. I play Counter-Strike as well.


Baltus is out now. For more information on Gundalech, visit www.gundelachmusic.com

Get to know Liza Anne with FAULT

The Beast from the East is in full swing when we meet with Liza Anne in East London, just days before she heads back to the States to embark on a Spring tour, including a stop in her hometown of Nashville: ‘I haven’t played there in like three years, so that will be fun’.


The buzz surrounding Liza Anne and her music is growing within the US and beyond, and it isn’t hard to see why; her deep and genuine lyrics, brought to life with haunting authenticity by her outstanding vocals, resonate with people on a level that is perhaps unexpected, given the vibrant pop energy of her latest album, Fine But Dying. Speaking with as much passion about her music as she does about dairy-free cheese, Liza is refreshingly open as we talk about everything from her family and future, to her own relationship with mental health, and a surprising admission to being something of a Hilary Duff fangirl…


So, you were performing at Kings Cross last night, how are you enjoying things in London?

I love it! I lived in Clapham Junction for six months one summer, and I’ve been here so many times it’s as if I was at home. All the clothes and record shops I like to go to are near here, so it’s a great place to be. And there’s so much good food too!


Last night was so fun, although I was worried because I woke up and couldn’t speak a word, so all day I just watched Princess Diaries and drank ginger tea! I did an interview with Radio X too, which was amazing – they played four songs from the new record, two of which are actually my favourites.


There were some great reactions on social media following that, about how your songs spoke to people’s own struggles with anxiety and mental health. Do you find people relate to your music in that way quite often?

I think that people are just waiting for someone to give them permission, in a way, which was the same for me for so long; I was just waiting for someone to give me a space to be fully myself or to feel whatever emotion I was feeling, so it’s interesting how people react when you create that space for them to exist in. More often than not people are just beyond kind and generous about how much the songs have helped them, which is really sweet to hear.


What’s been your journey through music, to get to where you are now?


When I try and think of what I wanted to be when I was a kid, I can’t remember anything except the moment that I wanted to start doing this. I started writing poetry when I was 8 years old, and started putting my poems to music when I was about 14. I think Taylor Swift was pretty big then, and I was like ‘Oh my gosh, I could totally do this!’


Interesting! So, was Taylor the sort of music you were into back then?

I definitely did not listen to a lot of Taylor Swift! I didn’t really listen to much country music, even though I grew up where that was very dominant. I listened to a lot of The Cranberries and Joni Mitchell, but I grew up in a really religious household, so I wasn’t allowed to listen to much ‘secular’ music.


My first concert was Hilary Duff – August 11th2004! I genuinely, to this day, am obsessed with her. She’s incredible! My aunt, who’s kind of my muse, gave me a mix tape when I was about 13, which had Joni Mitchell and The Cranberries on it, and I was like ‘Oh my God, I could sound like this!’


That’s really interesting about your aunt, what is it about her that makes her your muse?


She’s a visual artist, and she’s just one of the most raw, real and kind human beings I have ever met. I think she just looks at life in this very specific way, which gave me permission to look at life as I needed it to be and as I wanted it to be. As well as her giving me records when I was a kid, her husband was the one who loaned me a guitar for the summer when I went to camp, and I learned how to play it there.


Are there any artists that you’re into at the moment you think we should keep an ear out for?


So many! I mean St Vincent isn’t exactly up and coming but, my gosh, I cannot get over her! It is just the most refreshing thing to see a woman do something so unapologetically. There’s so much intent behind what she creates. As far as new things I’m loving, there’s this one girl, Caroline Rose, who is unbelievable. I came across her on Spotify last week and I have listened to her record maybe 10 times since then. She’s incredible – her lyrics, her voice, everything about her.


It’s not that I only listen to female artists, because there are a lot of male artists that I really do enjoy, but I think it’s so important, as a woman, to support other women who are carving out a space for themselves. I think I naturally gravitate towards those sorts of acts.


Your songs address some rather dark and melancholy emotions, but still manage to be very ‘pop’ in style – how do you go about balancing that sound with the subject matter?


I think you have to sometimes trick people in a way; like, people might avoid [the music] if it felt heavy, but if you lure people in with a poppier sound, they accidentally end up finding more of themselves.


I think I realised early on that what I wanted to do was appeal to the person who, perhaps, wouldn’t necessarily enjoy or choose a sad song, but they’re the ones who are usually suppressing those emotions the most. I wanted to give even the most unlikely person a door to more of their emotions. That’s not to say that I haven’t written a slew of sad songs too!


How do you think your sound has progressed over the years?


I think from playing live shows, I started to want to feel louder, to have more of a full, cinematic sort of show; I was just by myself with an electric guitar, so there was only a certain level I could really reach. I started listening to St Vincent when I was already quite far into writing this album, as well as Lady Lamb, Broadcast and The Cranberries – and all of those things that I was naturally pulling from before felt like they finally had a place in the art I was creating. So more than just being something I enjoyed, I realised I could channel those things in my own music.


Your new album, Fine But Dying, is out this month, which is pretty exciting! How have you found writing this latest record?


It’s crazy, I wrote the first song on this record three and a half years ago! It’s always therapeutic. I think that writing, or art in general, has the ability to save whoever is experiencing it, as much as they let it. I went into this record wanting to be on different terms with my panic disorder than I had been before; I wanted to have a healthy relationship with it, and I wanted to have a healthier relationship with myself and with my partner. I think the intention behind making the record was for it to be a cathartic experience.


And what sort vibe do you want people to get from it, is there something in particular you’re wanting to communicate?


Like with any of my music, I just want people to have this space to completely be themselves, to feel their emotions and feel free and validated. I want to create a portal for people to explore themselves, just like I want the shows to feel like this wave of emotion – with high energy moments and real introspective moments. I just want it to feel natural and alive.


What’s next for you? Is there anything on your bucket list you want to tick off soon?

I don’t know, play Jools Holland probably! I just want to keep outdoing every last thing I did. I don’t like setting crazy goals, I feel like it removes you from the present moment in a way. It’s like, thinking ahead to the biggest thing that I might do when I’m in my thirties sort of takes away from the fact that I’m 24 now, and I get to record and tour this record that I wrote, you know? I think I just want to try to be as present as I can over this whole journey.


And lastly, Liza, what is your FAULT?


Oh no, so many things! I guess with the job that I have, you can get a little bit self-reliant and self-centred in a way. I mean, I don’t feel like I’m an egotistical person but sometimes I’m just like, damn, Liza, you should really consider people outside of yourself. Absolutely that.


Fine But Dying is available to buy now. For more information visit www.lizaannemusic.com

Words: Jennifer Parkes

FAULT Magazine Photoshoot and Interview with YUNGBLUD


Photography: Miles Holder

Words: Sammie Caine

With a stark sense of honesty to his music and a clear talent for songwriting, YUNGBLUD has emerged on the music scene and is certainly one to watch. Not only does YUNGBLUD offer music sure to get stuck in your head (including ‘I Love You, Will You Marry Me’), but he also delivers a message with his lyrics and an energy set to get you dancing along at a gig.

Following the release of his self-titled EP, FAULT had the chance to catch up with YUNGBLUD ahead of the exciting year he has before him.


So, the YUNGBLUD EP is finally out! How does it feel getting to release it to the world?

It’s pretty amazing. I think it’s kind of the first body of work that I’ve got to put out that represents what’s been going on in my head. Right now the world is such a confusing place for young people – I think we are such a clever, clued up generation and see a future and world that we want to live in, but it’s been held back by a generation that aren’t necessarily ready for the world to go there yet or just don’t understand us.

I didn’t agree with that; do you know what I mean? Me and a lot of my friends were angry and it’s just been so amazing to kind of use my music as an outlet to talk about shit like that, because I think everything right now is so safe and it’s amazing to have [the EP] out and to kind of allow people to go to it and just know exactly who I am as an artist. Yeah man, it’s exciting as fuck.


What’s one place you can’t wait to go play on tour?

Probably New York, man. I love New York. I can’t wait to play there in March again. I played a showcase there but I can’t wait to play a proper gig there. I love that city, it just blows my mind.


What would you say is your favourite song to play at gigs, and why?

I think probably ‘Tin Pan Boy’ because it just goes off every night and I can just get it out. As soon as I walk on the stage I can be undeniably, completely myself and I can just get everything out and it’s just sick. It’s the last song, so everybody’s going mental together and it’s kind of just uncensored.

I don’t know, I feel like I can just let everything out without people looking at me like I’m completely mental.

You’ve definitely made an impact with your music already – especially with the likes of ‘Polygraph Eyes’, which touches on the issue of sexual assault. Do you think it’s important to make a statement with your music?

Oh absolutely, that’s the fundamental core of Yungblud and what I am. I just believe that music’s been so lost and I think mainstream music’s not representing anything. I think it’s just quite sad because the stuff I grew up on represented a way of thinking or a way of feeling.

I don’t know, I just think the world is such a crazy place right now and politics is an issue. There’s stuff at the forefront of everyone’s mind right now and I just can’t believe that nobody’s talking about it in popular music. So, I just thought I need to do that.

And I’m not trying to preach to anyone or anything because if I get preached to I just switch off. I’m just saying what I think and all I want to do is empower people to say what they think because then that’s how we can change shit.

Who, or what, inspired you to get into writing and performing music?

I think music was just the only thing that encaptured my soul when I was young. I know that sounds really cliché and weird, but I was just brought up in a very musical family and it was always on in the background no matter what, it was just always on.

It was the thing that could kind of make me feel happy or make me feel sad instantly and that just encaptured me. But then I found out I was shit at it – all my mates could play ‘Sweet Child O’ Mine’ better than me and I didn’t like that, so I kind of sat there and approached it from a different way and started writing. That got my interest because the way I could tell a story through music was just so much better to me than just playing the guitar, so it kind of started from there. I started writing my first songs at probably like 11.

You’ve been compared to artists such as Arctic Monkeys’ Alex Turn and Sex Pistols’ John Lydon. how does it feel knowing that you’re already getting that kind of attention as a musician?

It’s amazing. Of course, it’s incredible because Alex is such a big influence of mine and I want to be that. I always said I wanted to be that.

I fundamentally love artists, real artists, who represent something. To me, man, if you’re not representing something or you’re not talking about something real, you’re not an artist you’re a singer. And I don’t want to be a fucking singer, do you know what I’m saying?

So to be compared to people like Alex Turner is just amazing because he was one of the only people that got me growing up and it’s down to him that I’m in to writing music. It’s amazing that I’m kind of placed in that calibre and that category because that’s all I wanted to be. That’s all I want to be. I just want to be an artist, I mean a proper artist like that.

What’s next on the cards for YUNGBLUD?

A lot. I’m getting tired looking at my travel schedule. I can’t wait though – so much touring. I don’t even think I come home ’til September already. I literally gave up my flat in London because I’m not going to be home before September.

And just releasing so much music, there’s so much music in the bag and I can’t wait to just release it all and get it out there. It’s weird, man, as soon as I write a song I just want to put it out. I know you’ve got to do the whole fucking games and shit, but I just can’t wait to put all the music out, it’s gonna be sick.


What is your FAULT?

Ooh, what is my fault? I pick my nose.

The self-titled ‘YUNGBLUD’ EP is out now, and YUNGBLUD is playing shows across Europe and the US throughout 2018.

FAULT Magazine Attends The Brit Awards 2018


Last night, we attended The Brit Awards 2018 to cheer on what seemed to be a FAULT Magazine reunion with so many of our previously featured artists up for awards. Little Mix, Dua Lipa, Paloma Faith, Alicia Keys and Liam Gallagher were all nominated this year alongside FAULT favourites Loyle Carner, Rag ‘N’ Bone Man, Ed Sheeran and many more. We’ve said it many times, but 2017 was indeed the year of the British breakthrough acts, in 2016 not many newcomers could achieve 100k sales but won’t you just look at what can happen when studios invest in young talent…!

Loyle Carner, Stormzy, Sampha, Dua Lipa, J Hus, all unknowns two years ago but fast forward to today and all can carry their headline tours and are billed as headliners at numerous festivals this year…And of course, made the nominee list at this year’s Brit Awards.

Justin Timberlake was the opening act inviting Chris Stapleton on stage for a heart-wrenching performance of their hit “Say Something”. Other highlight performances of the night included Sam Smith’s emotional rendition of ‘Too Good At Goodbyes’, Dua Lipa’s ‘New Rules”, Kendrick’s car smashing ‘“FEEL.,” “HUMBLE.” and “New Freezer” and Rag’n’Bone Man and Jorja Smith performing ‘Skin’.

Issue 27 cover star Liam Gallagher gave a touching tribute to the victims of the Manchester Arena bombing which shook the music world back in May of 2017. Performing Oasis’ ‘Live Forever’, it was hard not to get emotional. While Liam might have missed out on picking up the award for British male solo artist, his performance will live on as a talking point whenever people refer to Brit’s 2018 for many years to come.

Moments after collecting his award for British male solo artist of the year, Stormzy took to the stage to show just why he was deserving of such a prestigious award. We’ve reported on Stormzy’s performances at ‘The Mobos’, ‘The Mercury Awards’ and Reading Festival and while all were great, nothing solidified him as an artist of the people as much as this one. Opening to a familiar “Gang Signs and Prayers’ backdrop, his performance began with a never before heard verse aimed directly at Theresa May and her poor handling of the Grenfell Tower fire which affected so many. His words “What you thought we forgot about Grenfell” still echo in our ears, and we only wish he could have sworn on national television to fully commit to the “Tell the Dailymail they can suck my…” for full impact. Stormzy transitioned into an emotional as always rendition of “Blinded by your grace” before ending the show with an energetic and crowd-pleasing ‘Big for your boots.”

Our primary takeaway emotion from this year’s Brit Awards is a strong feeling of pride. Looking down the list of nominees, it’s great to see just such a diverse range of talents. This isn’t just pandering or tokenism either, as Gorillaz mentioned in their winner’s speech “we are a small island” but look at just how far and wide the voices of British talent has travelled this year. In short, another great year for British music, British artists and The Brit Awards.


Find the full list of winners below!


British Female Solo Artist – Dua Lipa (presented by Millie Bobbie Brown and Kylie)

British Male Solo Artist – Stormzy (presented by Little Mix)

International Group – Foo Fighters (presented by Anna Friel and Damian Lewis)

British Single – Rag‘n’Bone Man ‘Human’ (presented by Dermot O’Leary and Emma Willis)

International Male Solo Artist – Kendrick Lamar (presented by Camila Cabello and Harry Kane)

British Breakthrough Act (Top 5 selected by Voting Academy. Winner identified by public vote promoted by brits.co.uk and BBC Radio 1) –  Dua Lipa (presented by Clara Amfo and Alice Levine)

International Female Solo Artist – Lorde (on tape) (presented by Ellie Goulding and Adowa Aboah)

British Group – Gorillaz (presented by Hailey Baldwin and Luke Evans)

BRITs Global Success Award – Ed Sheeran (presented by Ronnie Wood, with a VT from Sir Elton John)

British Artist Video Award (Live Vote by Twitter) – Harry Styles – Sign of the Times (presented by Sir Tom Jones, Jennifer Hudson, Olly Murs)

Mastercard British Album of The Year – Stormzy – Gang Signs & Prayer (presented by Nile Rodgers)

FAULT Magazine Weekly Playlist by L Devine

L Devine first caught our eye with her EP with her full EP video ‘Growing Pains’. Despite her young age, L Devine opening narration speaks of an artist far beyond her years as she speaks about inspiring women and all the inspiring women in her life who gave her the courage to release the EP. You can watch the full video by Emil Nava HERE.

Today we’re very proud to present L Devine’s FAULT Magazine Playlist of all her personal favourite songs and just why she loves them. Sit back, relax and enjoy!


Miss You: Cashmere Cat, Major Lazer & Tory Lanez
This is my favourite song right now. I’ve had it on repeat since it came out. The chorus is a flip of another song and it works so well but I just love how simple the whole song feels, it’s like they did one pass on the mic for melodies while writing and they just went with it. I’m really into Tory’s vocals on it too, sounds so soft and lazy. This song is such a vibe!!

Imperfections: Starrah & Diplo
I’m totally obsessed with Starrah. She’s definitely my favourite artist right now. Every one of her tracks is so hooky but still really understated and cool. She’s written hits like Havana for Camila and Fake Love for Drake and more but her own stuff rocks my fkn world!! And it’s so inspiring seeing a young female completely dominate the songwriting game. She’s written the biggest songs of the past couple of years – it’s so motivating.

Mango: Siba
Siba is my favourite collaborator and my best friend! He produced and co-wrote my song Like You Like That with me, and many more yet to be released songs of mine. When he’s not writing pop gold, he works on his artist project, which is all written, recorded and produced by him. This is my favourite of his, it’s such a head nodder!!

Don’t Worry Baby: The Beach Boys
The Beach Boys are probably my favourite band of all time. Brian Wilson is my ultimate songwriting idol, I think he’s truly a genius. I saw him live a few years ago and I was sat right in the front row. I think Brian and his band loved the fact there was someone under 50 years old there so they passed me their setlist, guitar picks and drumsticks at the end. Pretty cool!!  I don’t know if this is my favourite song by The Beach Boys because there’s too many to choose from, but I love it, it’s so sweet.

Hands To Myself: Selena Gomez
I’ll never ever get sick of hearing this song. I think the chorus is the most satisfying thing I’ve ever heard and I just love Selena’s tone – it’s so delicate and intimate. Plus, it was written by Julia Michaels, another one of my songwriting idols!

Overload – Sugababes 
Nothing can beat old Sugababes. This song in particular. The melodies feel kinda weird and eerie. And I love how the vocals don’t have any tuning on them and feel really dry…it fits with the eerie vibe!!

When I See U: Fantasia
This song really makes me feel something. The lyrics are just so good. It just takes me back to anytime I’ve ever had a crush on someone and was too scared to tell them…which is pretty much all the time haha.

With Every Heartbeat: Robyn
Robyn is such a big inspiration of mine, I love that she makes sad songs you can dance to! She definitely inspired my song Like You Like That. This song in particular was the start of my obsession with arpeggiators and the whole Scandi-pop sound.

You’re Not Good Enough: Blood Orange 
I’ve got really into Dev Hynes while I’ve been writing my next EP. I first heard about him through the beautiful Solange song Losing You and then became obsessed with his Blood Orange stuff. I really like the whole sombre 80s vibe, it’s so funky but so melancholy.

Pink: Julia Michaels
I completely rinsed this track from Julia’s debut mini-album. I really wasn’t expecting the album to be so left and quirky, but I’m so glad it is! She writes pop smashes like Sorry for Justin Bieber and her own Issues and then also makes these really weird and interesting tracks with so much of her personality in them. It feels like I’m having a conversation with her in every track.


Listen To The Playlist on the go HERE

Seal adds New London Show to his ‘Standards’ Tour

We’ve spoken openly about our love for Seal and his ‘Standards’ album, in fact, we loved it so much we made Seal our FAULT Magazine issue 26 Menswear Coverstar! Backed by a big band, Seal will be returning to London on 22nd and 23rd of February to perform songs from his tenth (yes tenth!) studio album ‘Standards’ and all-time crowd-pleasing favourite hits ‘Killer’ and Kiss from a Rose’. 
While the 22nd is sadly sold out, you now have the chance to grab tickets to his new Friday 23rd February date! Check out the link below – trust us, you won’t want to miss it!

FAULT Weekly Playlist: MORILLA

Australian artist MORILLA is off to ripping start in 2018 with “Love Me,” a track that blends elements of R&B, trap, and electronica. Produced by fellow Aussie cln, “Love Me” channels the intricate beat stylings of Flume with The Weeknd-esque vocals.

We asked MORILLA to put together a playlist of what he’s currently listening to, including cuts from Khalid and Bryson Tiller.

Bryson Tiller – Don’t

This song is one of the songs that re-ignited my interest in wanting to write R&B music again. Bryson himself as an artist, and history of how he got to where he is now is inspirational.

Khalid – Coaster

I first heard this song in the car when I was going through a break up and I cried… no body knows this haha. The lyrics, the melody and his voice just hit home for me.

Banks – Fuck Em Only We Know

I love this song because it oozes romance and rebellion all at the same time. It makes me feel young and in love everytime i listen to it.

Drake – Take Care (feat Rhianna)

This song and the whole Take Care album is probably my all time favourite of Drakes work. I remember thinking at the time that this choices of producers and samples were just different for hip hop and R&B at the time and it really stood out.

SZA – The Weekend

I love everything she does, but this song lyrically is controversial and sexy. I love her flow with her melodies.

Rhianna – Needed Me

Yeh she’s mainstream but I love her, and she is a badass and her attitude oozes through her vocals over this production.

Golden Vessel – Daylight

Ive been a huge fan of GV since the beginning, and he gets better and better with every release. The intricacy with his beats and his production is insane.

Aaliyah – One In A Million

To me, this song is timeless. Aaliyah’s music was ahead of its time. There are so many R&B/Hip Hop tracks that are moulded from her style.

Goldliink – Crew

The chorus right from the beginning is just so catchy and it continues to get cooler the more you listen through.

Frank Ocean – Thinking ‘Bout You

Still the best and most iconic Frank song. Love that he jumps from his low register straight to falsetto between the verses and choruses. And lyrically its so goddamn emotional!

MORILLA Socials: