FAULT Music

FAULT Focus: Marie Naffah returns with #Blindfold – a special collaboration to raise awareness of visual impairment

 

FAULT Favourite Marie Naffah, MTV’s Unsigned Artist for 2014 and a star of FAULT 18 (The RAW Issue), has returned with a special project.

In a not-for-profit project to raise awareness and understanding of the issues surrounding visual impairment and sight loss, Marie has teamed up with a group of six blind and visually-impaired musicians to record and release for free her song ‘Blindfold’: as a documentary-style video exploring the disability and the importance of music to those who suffer from it.

Photography: Constance Meath Baker

Photography: Constance Meath Baker

The song itself was written by Marie, who is 22, as a response to her grandmother’s experience with blindness and the implications it had had on her life and the lives around her. Having performed the song to senior BBC broadcast journalist Tony Shearman, who is also blind, Marie was invited to play and be interviewed on Insight Radio – the official radio station of the Royal National Institute of Blindness (RNIB).

Steve Plowman, a blind drummer living just outside of London, heard Marie on Insight Radio and impressed by the poignancy of the lyrics, as well as the tuneful song itself, he asked Marie whether there would be an opportunity for him to perform it with her.

With help from the RNIB, five more blind and partially sighted musicians expressed interest in the project, and so it was decided that a documentary/recording of the track would be made: to emphasise the importance of music in the lives of visually-impaired people and to show how, contrary to public opinion, a disability such as blindness does not automatically prevent a person from being able to perform music.

The 12 minute documentary, made by filmmaker Constance Meath Baker, consists of a series of interviews with the musicians followed by the track itself, recorded at a studio in High Wycombe with help from producer David Lane.

www.facebook.com/marienaffahmusic

www.twitter.com/marienaffah

FAULT Future: Freddie Dickson

 

We recently spent the afternoon with Freddie Dickson, the young voice setting music blogs ablaze with his dark ‘Doom Pop’ sound. Courting comparisons to Lana del Rey and the legendary Nick Cave, Dickson has just today released the video for his new single ‘Speculate‘,  which has already been played on Annie Mac’s show on Radio 1 and Jo Good’s on XFM.

It’s taken from an EP, of the same name, out April 13th on Columbia. Dickson has also announced an intimate headline show at The Waiting Room in Stoke Newington on 1st April, before heading out on the Communion New Faces tour on the 20th.
Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

What are your influences and how have you arrived at this current ‘Doom Pop’ sound?

In the early days it was Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Van Morrison, and all those guys I had grown up on. Then as I got older I became more into production- The XX, Lana del Rey, Florence + the Machine, Plan B. I wanted an all-encompassing style for my music.

When did you start writing?

I didn’t start singing until I was 18 at an open mic, but I had been writing since I was 15/16. It just got to a point where I realised I didn’t want anyone else to be singing my songs.

When you did start performing, was it something that came easily to you?

No, I was so shy! But I just drilled my way through endless open mics. I guess I ‘Ed Sheeran’d’ my way through it! (laughs)

Were people quick to take notice?

No, not until I changed my sound. To begin with, I was just too stuck in the past. I was trying to be Bob Dylan, and no-one should try that! I got bored myself, and I did a gig in East London when I was 21 and a friend was just like “that was really bad.” And I knew it.

But I went away, and got Logic on my laptop, and started developing the sound I have now. The artists I want to be like are the ones who constantly change- Plan B, Kanye, Bowie. I get bored so easily (laughs)

Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

It’s interesting, watching sessions and live performances that you’ve done, to see how you take that production-based sound and transfer it into the realm of the live experience. How do you find the music changes when you perform it live?
I think the live experience has to be so different from the record – if you just try to mimic the recorded version, there’s nothing worse. It’s almost like you have to do a cover of your own song, and put some twist on it.

The visuals seem very important to your music- is that something you’re closely involved with?
Yeah I think it’s so important. All the artists I like – Nick Cave, Patti Smith – they created all this powerful imagery. It would be weird, given how dark my sound is, if I was styled with bright neon clothing, right? (laughs) I think it all has to fit together; how you’re photographed, how you look, the live performance.

Part of that process is collaboration, which seems to underpin so much of today’s music industry. Is that something that comes easily to you?
When I was first signed I had so many co-writing sessions set up for me, and none of them really worked. But  I eventually hit it off with someone and now I have this great team of musicians and producers who help me reach the exact thing I want. I’m not an accomplished musician, and I don’t even try to aspire to greatness because the singing is really my thing.

Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

Freddie Dickson (2015), photographed by Constance Meath Baker

Does the writing process come easily to you?
No not at all! And I think that annoys so many of the people I work with (laughs) I like to make sure every word is perfect, and that every syllable comes out of my mouth easily. I could never be one of these people who writes three songs a week, they’d all sound the same!

It’s interesting to hear you talk in terms of before and after being signed. How has the process changed since being signed- are there new pressures that come with having a label?
Not really- my label has been really nice. We still do it in the same way, writing away in my bedroom, and they give me my own recording space with good speakers which is great. It’s like having a little office (laughs)

As you’re writing music, are you constantly listening to new material by other artists, or do you try to cut yourself from other people’s work?
No, I follow a lot of blogs and love just diving into new music. I’d love to work with a hip-hop band, or a dream collaborator like Nas or Sia! I think she’s amazing because it’s so much about the songs and the voice.

Are you excited to be going on the Communion New Faces tour at the end of April?
Yeah I can’t wait  – it’s such incredible exposure! At the moment I can see how the fans are spread out and there are so many in places like Russia and Eastern Europe, but not enough in England yet (laughs)

Finally, what is your FAULT?
Scotch Eggs. And not being able to write songs very quickly.

 

All photography by Constance Meath Baker

FAULT Future: Flo Morrissey

 

Flo Morrissey is a chanteuse who sits somewhere between a Lana Del Rey penchant for romantic nostalgia, the bohemian power of Florence & the Machine, the whispered and mystical vocals of early Björk, and the effortless charm of Jane Birkin or Stevie Nicks.

At only 20, her sound and lyrics are incredibly well-honed, born of influences her contemporaries haven’t heard of and a detachment from pop culture that has made her incredibly unique both to listen to, and to look at.

Having just released her debut single ‘Pages of Gold‘, and just finished her first tour in the UK supporting The Staves, we sat down with Flo to talk cinematic sounds, the world around the artist, and the power of not always saying yes…

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

How are you finding the tour so far?

I’m loving it – it’s my first one so it was quite daunting to start with, doing something new every night for people who haven’t necessarily come to see you! But it’s great to be playing with The Staves because the audience is there to really listen.

In terms of your biggest performances so far – SXSW, Green Man, etc. – it seems like you are really selective when it comes where to play. Is that the case?

Yeah, it’s just the way my path has gone. I think it’s down to the Internet- I started putting up my demos at 14 and never really did shows in pubs or clubs like other acts. I was just lucky that my manager found me online. I think people say yes to too many things nowadays, and it takes away the special nature of actually doing a show.

Is the live aspect something you enjoy, or is it something you find daunting?

I enjoy it more and more because I’m still new to it – but you never know how you’re going to feel after a show. One thing could change and you wish you had done it differently. But I want to perform more and I’m excited to do more shows. It’s just hard in the beginning! When I go on the road, I’ll hopefully have a multi-instrumentalist to play with me so it will be a little less daunting and lonely.

Beyond the live show, is sharing the actual music something that makes you feel vulnerable?

I don’t really think about it until after, when I realise how weird it can be to speak about the songs. I’d rather people had their own interpretation of it. It’s nice to think that someone else might get something from it as well.

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

The individualism of your music and vision is clearly close to your heart. As you grow as an artist- being signed and managed and touring in the UK and beyond- is it harder to retain that sense of self?

I picked my label because they completely let me do what I want to, and I don’t have to compromise. People have this idea of the music industry as this place where you always have to say yes, but you really don’t. I still do my own Facebook and Instagram, and I wouldn’t want that to ever change.

How did you start writing music?

I started putting stuff on Myspace when I was about 14. I used to sing more classical music at school, but I started playing guitar and it was just more fun! So I made my own recordings, and my own videos, and put covers online. I was this 15 year-old girl acting as my own manager, sending my music out to blogs and it just felt really natural.

In that vein of being your own manager, it seems that your vision is really all-encompassing? Is it important to you that all the elements are cohesive in that way?

I think it is really important to have a kind of world around the artist, but then you can’t think about it in that way. I just try to be natural about it.

How do you see yourself going forward? Pages of Gold, (the upcoming single), marks a shift towards a much bigger sound.

I am really open to experimentation and a lot of the songs on the album have big string sections. I’d love to bring a live band on tour because a lot of the songs are quite cinematic and I’m glad it went that way. It could have been a real folk record but I always wanted to have this more cinematic sound.

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

How was the process of recording your album in LA over the summer?

It was quite lonely at time because LA is just such a huge place. It was the longest I’ve ever been away from home but my manager lives there which was great, and I get along so well with Noah, the producer.

You are quite a quintessentially British artist- what do you see as the differences between making music in the US and the UK?

It was quite inspiring to be there because they won’t say no- they had this kind of “you go girl!” mentality (laughs) and it was actually really good for me! They strive for a lot and it’s so easy, and English, to be self-deprecating but it helped in music terms to have that empowerment on hand.

Do you feel the music industry has been really supportive so far?

I’ve been so lucky but I try not to think about it too much! I sometimes feel like my music is maybe not that accessible, especially with just me and a guitar because it’s so vulnerable and raw. It won’t appeal to everyone but I strangely like that. Usually the best things are the ones that have flaws.

On that note, what is your FAULT?

I worry too much!

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

https://www.facebook.com/FloMorrissey

All photographs by Kurtiss Lloyd

Noel Gallagher, Portishead and Alt-J to headline Latitude Festival’s 10th birthday

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Latitude Festival’s 10th birthday celebrations in 2015 will see some huge headline acts and bands that have thrilled Henham Park in the past.

Apart from the huge headliners, The Vaccines, James Blake, Manic Street Preachers, Caribou, Wild Beasts, SBTRKT, Sun Kil Moon and La Roux are also on the bill.

The festival also announced an array of comedy acts. It’s also a chance to see the acts destined to make waves in Edinburgh later in the summer. Headlining this special 10th Edition year will be national treasure Alan Davies, along with Jason Manford to headline the Comedy Arena.

“Every year I challenge myself to build on previous summers and make each festival even better than the one before. With the start of a new decade for Latitude, I wanted to bring something really fresh and new to Henham and I think we’ve done just that.” festival organiser Melvin Benn added. “We’ve added a whole new spa area, Solas, offering massages and treatments alongside hot tubs and installations, which will all turn into a late night party area for festival-goers to discover after sunset.”

Speaking of his upcoming performance, Noel Gallagher said: “Well not only have I never played at Latitude before, but I’ve never even been there, ever. So yes, I’m really looking forward to headlining the Festival on July 19th”

The festival will take place Thursday 16th to Sunday 19th July 2015 with a weekend of camping costing £200.50

For full details head to www.latitudefestival.co.uk.

FAULT Issue 20 – The Faces Issue – is now available to pre-order

 

We are pleased to announce that FAULT Issue 20 – The Faces Issue – is available to pre-order NOW.

Official release: 20/03/15

FAULT Issue 20 front cover star Kylie Kenner was shot by Lionel Deluy and styled by Monica Rose.
Issue 20 will also feature Jim Sturgess as its reversible cover star – with preview imagery set to be unveiled very soon!
Click here to pre-order your copy of this issue!

 –

FAULT Magazine – the Faces Issue – proudly presents exclusive shoots and interviews with:

Kylie Jenner

Jim Sturgess

Iwan Rheon

Michelle Monaghan

Audrey Kitching

To celebrate a landmark edition, FAULT Issue 20 includes very special ‘Faces of FAULT’ section, showcasing some Behind the Scenes insight from a selection of our favourite features from our 19 issues so far, including the likes of:

Rupert Grint (Issue 5)

Tom Felton (Issue 8)

Ali Lohan (Issue 9)

Adam Lambert (Issue 10)

Kelly Osbourne, Shay Mitchell, Logan Lerman, 2NE1 (Issue 12)

 Richard Armitage & Billy Bob Thornton (Issue 13)

Zach Braff & Daisy Lowe (Issue 14)

Ben Barnes, Big Sean, Tyra Banks, Ellie Goulding (Issue 15)

The Jonas Brothers (Issue 16)

Little Mix (Issue 17)

Demi Lovato, Usher, Debby Ryan (Issue 19)

Plus our usual, FAULTless selection of the finest editorial and feature content from both sides of the Atlantic and beyond – featuring some of the most internationally recognisable Faces in the world today.

This is your FAULT

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 20 – The Faces Issue – IS AVAILABLE TO PRE-ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

Billy Lockett is picked as our latest FAULT Future Artist

billy-lockett-cover

 

What was your experience touring with Nina Nesbitt late last year like?

Really great. I’ve known Nina for about two and a half years, and back then we were really different people. It was exciting to play to some of those fans who were 14 back then, we’ve kind of grown up together in a way.

 

The industry has seen a real renaissance of the singer-songwriter genre in recent years, do you feel that it’s a type of music that fans really respond to?

Yeah definitely. Kids are really receptive and they love to be the first person to discover something new, that’s what I love.

 

The crowd responds to your live set with a real intensity and this is surely down to the passion you show whilst performing. Have you always been conscious of this interaction?

Not really. To be honest, until recently I would just mess around and get a bit drunk. Now it’s all at the piano, and I really want to get across all that I’m feeling- not in a self-indulgent way! But the live shows are the best thing about the job.

 

Is performing live something that has always come naturally?

I’ve spent years and years perfecting what I do on stage, with my manager constantly tweaking. Everything from the set order to the jokes I make and when I ask people to clap along; it’s very crafted. I’m a real perfectionist that way.

billy-locket-2-

Has songwriting always been a natural process for you or was that also something you had to develop?

I always used to write alone but recently I’ve actually been working with a lot of co-writers, just because it’s a lot more fun. To be in the room and be able to bash ideas off each other. But I love writing- I’ve written about 6 or 7 songs just in the last week.

 

How was that transition from writing by yourself – and being an artist under the radar- to now having a following and all these collaborators?

It was where it had to go- you have to follow the path. You could be the best musician in the world but if you don’t have any fans you’re not really anything. I didn’t want to just be stuck in my bedroom. You have to see it like an actual job.

 

From what age did you know this was what you wanted?

When I was 16 I did a talent show at school. I was a bit of a loser- in fact, I wasn’t even a loser because I didn’t even have enough friends to be a loser I just didn’t really exist- and I’d never sang but I wrote a song for this talent show and I ended up winning it. Suddenly, I felt like I knew what I needed to do and from that day on, I got management and an indie label, radio support, tours … and now I’m here.

 

You make it sound easy but at your show at The Tabernacle in Notting Hill you thanked your Mum for standing by you. Has it been all that you’d hoped for?

It’s been a nightmare [laughs] There are so many times when you wait around, and so much worry, and you put so much into the music and sometimes it doesn’t click. And it’s not like other jobs- with music, you’re so aware of everyone who is doing better than you. They stand out on posters, on the radio, on the tube – everywhere you go! You have to stick to your sound and be confident that what you’re doing is right, and at some point the world will know. Nothing worth having is easy.

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In a digital age, with such an over-saturation of artists and sounds and potential influences on your music, is it hard to ‘stick to your sound’?

It’s hard to find it! [laughs] You always find that you lean towards whatever is doing well at the moment. But you have to look for where you fit in the scene, and I’m confident that I do fit somewhere. You don’t want to be another Ed Sheeran, or another Tom Odell. I feel like I know my own space now.

 

One way you seem keen to differentiate yourself is with your visuals- your video for Old Man uses really striking animation. Is this something you’ve pushed for, or is it something that’s come from the team around you?

That’s pretty much all me. I like it to be real. A lot of people say it’s maybe too personal but that’s something I like. I love that my fans feel my songs tell them secrets about me. People really relate to it because it’s real and it’s honest. People want honesty from art.

 

As you get more famous, do you think that level of honesty is sustainable?

I hope I don’t change. I want to always be honest with my music but you make the music to be heard, so the more people hear it, the better. But when someone comes up to me and tells me my song about cancer helped them with a family member’s illness, that means so much more than 1,000 drunk people dancing to a catchy chorus. Though my manager sometimes wants the latter! [laughs]

 

What is your FAULT?

I worry too much. Constantly. I ring my manager every week and even when everything’s going great, I worry. It’s pointless but it’s just in my nature!

 

Words: Will Ballentyne Reid 

 

Jamie T Reveals New EP Magnolia Melancholia Out April 6TH

 

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There’s no slowing down Jamie T right now. After two sold out Alexandra Palace performances, 2015 sees the artist with the release of a brand new EP entitled “Magnolia Melancholia“.

After the incredible success of his third album, “Carry on the Grunge”, The EP will be released on April 6 via Virgin EMI, and will include the track ‘Don’t You Find’, which was released in July, as well as new songs ‘Magnolia Melancholia’, ‘Marilyn Monroe’ and ‘Riverbed’.

There’s also covers of “Mama don’t smoke” by 90’s cult-heroes Bran Van 3000 and a poignant, stripped-back version of The Replacements classic anthem to misspent youth, “Bastards of Young”.

Jamie was one of the most nominated at this year’s NME awards, he scooped up three awards, winning Music Moment of The Year for his 2014 comeback, as well as Best Track and Best Video for Zombie.

Fault’s Fave track, “Don’t you Find”,  has reached over 1 million views on youtube and showcases Jamie’s emotive song writing. Moody and captivating, it encapsulates the very essence of his new EP.

Jamie T is currently on tour in Europe and is confirmed to headline BBC 6 Muisc’s Festival in February, alongside prolific festival slots throughout the summer, this is set to be a landmark year.

Check out the track list for his new EP below:

Don’t You Find

Marilyn Monroe

Mama Don’t Smoke

Magnolia Melancholia

Riverbed

Bastards of Young

Words: Adina Ilie

Dominique Young Unique: Breaks silence with an exclusive shoot + interview with FAULT Magazine

 

Coat: Roberto Cavalli Top: Shade London,  Trousers: KTZ Belt: MAWII

Coat: Roberto Cavalli
Top: Shade London,
Trousers: KTZ
Belt: MAWII

Let’s start by talking about your musical background: your influences, your career beginnings, and how you started out.

Were you always a natural performer?

Yes I’ve loved music since I was about 7 years old and I was in the church with my Grama singing. I remember doing my first performance- I was a little nervous but it was fun. After I got off the stage, I wanted to do more.

 

Is the live performance something that is really important to you, or do you prefer the studio?

Well I prefer both because I have to get in the studio to make music and then get on stage to perform. I will say that every time I perform for my fans it’s like a connection; we connect in a very strong way.

 

How did growing up in Tampa shape your music – you’ve talked about the violence and aggression of growing up there, do you see that mirrored in the ferocity of your music?

Yes, growing up in Tampa was very rough- especially where I grew up. It seemed like it was so hard to find a way out. People used to always say I would be pregnant at the age of 15, even though I wasn’t even having sex then. It was very tough but I put all that into my music.

Hat: Shade London  Dress: Ashish

Hat: Shade London
Dress: Ashish


Your song ‘Motherquake’ is on the Kick Ass 2 soundtrack – does film have a big influence on your music? If so, what films inspire you?

I know, I was so excited when I found out my track was included. I love that movie!


In regards to film and music videos, how do you go about shaping the visuals that accompany your music?

I just go along with the flow!


What do you want to say with your music videos?

I like to tell a story in my music videos, in the same way I’m doing it in my music. I want to describe it in my song, and show the action in my video.

Hat: Shade London  Dress: Ashish

Hat: Shade London
Dress: Ashish


Speaking of visuals, you have a really eye-catching look and have modelled for American Vogue alongside Cara Delevingne. Is fashion really important to your music?

No not really!


Female rappers seem to be having a real moment – from Nicki  and Iggy, to Azealia Banks and Angel Haze. Is there a pressure or expectation that comes with being a female rapper in 2014?

Yes you get a lot of hate and people are always comparing you to other female rappers. Female rappers like to beef- it’s nothing new.

How would you best describe the difference between you and these other rappers?

I’m very Unique. I have a different look, sound, taste etc. I stand out.

Hat: Shade London  Dress: Ashish

Hat: Shade London
Dress: Ashish

What’s coming up for Dominique Young Unique in 2015?

I will be dropping my new single and also working on my new album. I’m looking forward to signing a record deal after I got released from SonyUK and I’m also touring again!

 

Photography: Miles Holder

Styling: a+c Studios

Hair: Lisa Farrall@wigbyl using beauty works and fudge

MUA: Natalie Viner

Words: Will Ballantyne Reid