‘OCHSENKNECHT’ Exclusive Fashion Editorial Chris Haimerl’s FAULT

 

Photo: Chris Haimerl 

Styling: Birgit Anja 

H&M: Klara Stark 

Model: Cheyenne Ochsenknecht 

Clothing: ONIMOS 

Taylor Bennett open and honest interview and photoshoot for FAULT Magazine 29

Photography Dalong Yang
Fashion Editor Chaunielle Brown
Grooming Brittan White @kate ryan
Photo assist’ Maya Lou
Fashion assist’ Carina Camacho, Francis Harris and Jennifer Laurantius
Words: Will Soer
Have you ever talked to someone you’ve just met about your sexuality? It’s a scary thing to do at 2pm. Despite the global reach of his music, Taylor Bennett talks to me alone, without intervention from his record label (whose staff includes only his father and his best friend). His older brother – Chance the Rapper – has Chicago on his shoulders, and his father worked as an aide to Obama, but Taylor is carrying a mass of inestimable size. The 22-year-old rapper represents those who resist the repression of categorisation. In 2014 Donald Glover praised Macklemore‘s on-record advocation of gay rights, whilst noting that he was able to do this because of being white. Like its home country, Hip Hop still has many barriers to break.
The title track of your new EP Be Yourself explicitly states ‘I’m an outstanding Afro-American bisexual’? Do you remember where you first performed it?
Nashville Tennessee, at a pride festival. I had never even practiced it, but I knew this project was coming out, I knew what I wanted it to stand for. As much as I love the track and you can bounce around to it, it’s a statement, and it’s often easy to leave a show on a turn-up note and forget the one thing you wanted to have said. I always get the show-tracks (which strip the main vocal) made as soon as I get songs, in case I have a moment like that. I remember performing it and it not sounding that good, with the voice control.
Aside from the sound, physically how did it feel?
Physically it felt great. Like you can go onto the stage and fucking kill it for thirty minutes, and hit everything on the right punch, but sometimes it’s those two minutes where you cut off all the music and talk about what’s going on in your life, why you want to portray this, and then your fans come back and understand it… It’s a crazy feeling, getting an energy that’s reciprocated and sent back to you.
This interview is about you not me, but I want to share where I’m coming from. The first person to play me your music was my brother, he’s three years younger and really benefited from that-
That’s what my brother tells me all the time, we went to the same school, he’d always say to my parents that I know what I shouldn’t do because I’ve seen what he’s done.
I envy you for that! We moved to England when I was eleven, and I was bullied because I sounded gay. I got more confidant, got into music, my brother and best friend both came out, and hip hop has been a big thing between us in a lot of ways. So alongside your music, I really want to explore this stuff, what’s it like to be bisexual within hip hop.
Everybody asks me that question, but that really hit me what you just said. Because in America, I’m black, and we’re all very limited, but to hear about somebody that lives overseas that’s white, that has a younger brother and a best friend that’s gay, and something that keeps you together is hip hop, like man… I won’t say that that’s not something that happens all the time in America, but I’ll tell you that that’s something you won’t hear someone say.
It’s not out in the open.
You’ve gotta ask yourself why people don’t talk about it, and that’s a big part of why I’m doing this, I believe there are people that don’t want us to explore ourselves, who want African Americans to be oppressed based off communication. There are a lot of people who have the same stories as you, but they won’t share them, because it’s not familiar. We all listen to Kanye West, but we don’t talk about how he got bullied and called a gay fish on South Park, and the whole world hated Kanye West. Same with Lil Wayne, he wore skinny jeans and everybody called him gay.
You know I’ve never thought about that aspect of Kanye’s story, it happened before I got into hip hop, when I thought rock bands were where it’s at. Before I saw how clearly human idiosyncrasies are presented in hip hop, where you’ve got all that intensity focussed into one person.
I talk about Young Thug [a cross-dressing rapper who is also featured on Be Yourself] a lot, he’s one of those people that have had to be sacrifices for education. Every time something like that happens in main hip hop culture, the whole world gets affected, and that’s the power of not just music, but like you said, hip hop, having one person who carries the weight. It is hard to be a black artist and not be a rapper, even if the aesthetics of what you do are nowhere near that. It forces people to feel as if they can’t be original, because even their personality has to be what the listener wants it to be. And that’s when things start to be regurgitated.
You recently said that, after coming out on twitter to everyone [including friends and family] on the night you turned 21, there were ten minutes when you could have backed out and claimed you’d been hacked. Did you seriously consider it? Are there certain responses that could have made it very difficult not to back out?
Yeah man. Like yes, yes, yes. I’m not superman. All artists do read their comments, some things that people say do really affect it, there’s a lot of artists that are trying to live with this perception of who people think they are. My whole thing with this project is I’m gonna do the exact opposite, I’m gonna stand up for what I believe in and bring attention to something in the world that is a major topic. Like why, when I talk about this situation, am I always combatting with the fact that hip hop doesn’t identify with gay people?
That’s the funny thing about Young Thug, I know gay people identify with him, my best friend has literally been told ‘you are to Young Thug as Jesus is to God’. We’ve had nights where we get back from a club and put on his track Safe, and we’ve jumped and screamed along to it, and it doesn’t matter that we can’t go through every lyric and say ‘yeah we agree with that’, what matters is the expressive exuberance of his voice and image.
And he’s Young Thug. His name, that’s how America… we are all products of our environment, and that’s how America is made to be. And it’s nothing shy of that. I feel a certain way when I walk down the street, when I have my hoodie on, I don’t feel safe going a lot of places, there’s a lot of things I can’t do. I was talking about cars to one of my friends, and the fact that maybe I shouldn’t get the Porsche that I could afford, because it’s dangerous.
Damn.
There’s a prison-to-school pipeline, based on the standardised testing we take and what bubbles we fill in when about our ethnicity, that’s how many prisons they build in the next 15 years. Private owned companies own and buy prisons for the government, and most of these people who get locked up, they don’t just fucking make license plates, these guys make big brand clothing, all sorts of things in America, for private owned companies.
It’s difficult to remember with this stuff going on that you can do something, rather than just focussing on achieving the chilliest form of existence possible.
I mean I was raised in a Christian household, I believe I have a relationship with God. I believe that God is just like the internet, he sends little bits of pieces of information to everybody, and that’s why we need to have conversations, because you have a piece of information that I need, and I need to transfer to you. Religion puzzles so many people because it is an unknown power, it has variables of people way older than you claiming to have seen things you haven’t seen.
That’s also a defence for hip hop, that you can’t judge the lyrics if you haven’t walked in those shoes. It’s impressive that you have embraced both Christianity and Hip Hop.
Because I’ve seen the greatness that they can bring in my life, the happiness, and I can’t shy that from my listeners, I just want you to be yourself. I don’t wanna be a leader in this thing, I can feel that’s not my purpose. The biggest thing right now that I believe on the world, something that is my purpose, is to start conversation. I’m not supposed to tell you when and where to have it, I’m just supposed to put out an opportunity to kick the door open and talk.

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 29 – THE MOVEMENT ISSUE –  IS AVAILABLE TO PRE-ORDER NOW

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Paxton Ingram photoshoot and interview for FAULT Magazine 29

 

Photography: Dalong Yang

Fashion Editor: Chaunielle Brown

Hair Isaac Davidson using Oribe

Make-up: Soo Park Using Bioderma & Nars Cosmetics

Photo Assist: Maya Lous

Fashion Assist: Ariane Velluire/ amah Dong

 

An earnest soul with an infectiously inviting smile, Paxton Ingram’s echoing laughter is enough to make you see him as a kindred spirit. If you’re not an avid viewer of The Voice, you may not be familiar with this gifted, rising spark. Paxton’s presence is always filled with excitement, home cooked with a welcoming charm.

Despite being east-to-west dial tones away, Paxton’s bubbling enthusiasm carried well – and we were able to unravel a lot more about the endearing and delightful singer-songwriter.

What was the first thing that came to your mind when you opened your eyes this morning?

The first thing that came to my mind was, “I have to pray.” [chuckles]

Since I’ve been here, I’ve really been trying to devote a moment to myself in the morning – to have that moment with me and God, you know? Just so I can just align myself in the day. And to help set my attention and get everything set up so I can go into the studio or whatever meeting that I have that day with a clear head. Like I know what I want to say and be comfortable in myself, you know? And that definitely kind of helps me just to stay clear, stay focused and stay like…ready. For whatever.
 
Absolutely. Do you have any particular word or scripture that comes to your mind or that you keep on repeat?
You know it typically changes like sometimes it could be… uh man… Deuteronomy… uhhh…

Oh my gosh! I’ve been reading Deuteronomy too! So funny you said that!Yes, girl, Deuteronomy! He is… he has gone before me and… oh man, I gotta go find it! [laughs]


I got it! Deuteronomy 31:8!  “The Lord himself goes before you and will be with you; he will never leave you nor forsake you. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged.”
Yes, that’s the one, girl! Gets me through it!

I love your name, it’s so strong, so bold, so badass, so cool – what’s the story behind it?
So, I got my name from my Mamma, for starters [laughs]. She says she wanted a stand out name. I think it was from a book she was reading, a character who was named Paxton, and I think she just fell in love with it and just rolled with it.
You know, when I was a kind I didn’t like it. I wish my name was Kevin or Kyle or…Or Derek or Tim, Why can’t I have a normal name, mom [laughs]?!
Where did music begin for you? Can you tell us a little bit about your childhood? Any distinct memories that had a factor or influence on your where you are now?Music started for me very early. When I was a kid, I remembered my older brothers would be around the speakers freestyling. That’s my very first memory of music. And thinking, what are they doing? Creative, that whole thing, whoa how cool! And I would just get up and try and do what they were doing and, you know, just say something stupid – random nonsense. But I guess my brothers didn’t light me up because I was doing it. I was just a kid trying to be like them. My brother was a musician too so there was always music around the house.

How old were you?

I was a kid, so probably like five or six. You know when you first start getting memories – around that age. One of my very first first musical moments: I remember being in my living room, watching a Michael Jackson concert –  live in Bucharest. I’ll never forget it because I went out and found it years later. 1992 – you know when he just stands up and the crowd just goes wild for five minutes and he’s not even moving? That shook me as a kid, and I knew that was something I wanted: I wanted to make people feel that. You know, he was such a symbol – he was THE pop star. That was so monumental for me.I always go back to Michael when it comes to anything that I do. Especially when it comes to performance because he was the greatest.

‘The Voice’ was certainly a clocking point along the journey for you. What did you take away from that and would you have done anything differently?

Hmmm…Knowing what I know I now, I would have definitely done some things differently. Just having some skin now, but if I still had the same innocence that I did, I think what I did was perfect. Everything went the way it was supposed to. I had an amazing experience. I grew a lot. I learned a lot. I learned how to handle myself in situations like that because you’re on live, prime time television and the whole world’s watching you. Are you going to go home or are you going to stay? You know you’ve got to have that muscle in you, and so it definitely grew me faster than I thought. It gave me a little bit of thick skin. That whole experience was something like a boot camp. And they give you the tools to really go out there and to make some noise and to do it. And that’s what I think is awesome about that show.

What do you hope your music will do for the people? You’ve said how much you love what you do and that you definitely want to make a statement. So what is it that you’re hoping to achieve?

I’m hoping to make people feel something. I think that we go to music for therapy. It’s a form of medication, the purpose of which is to make us feel something. It’s an escape – just like any kind of drug. I feel like if I make someone feel empowered, if I make someone feel great, if I make someone feel better than they’re feeling at that moment, I think that’s the purpose of music. I think that’s the bigger picture – music has the power to go beyond your own achievements and become bigger than you. It belongs to people in general – a shared experience.

So if music is about sharing and communicating with people then what do you think about the role of technology in youth culture – specifically the undeniable increase in our use of technology to communicate? Where are we headed?

I think music and technology have always been the same thing. They’re like cousins or brothers. We wouldn’t have music today without technology. It’s always about  the newest, latest, tech thing that can make the sound even better, or make you work faster or get your ideas down from A to B.

I think the future of music…[pauses] I think all music will be free one day. On some cool device, some cool way, all music will be free. Because when I think about it, I feel like music was never meant to be for sale. I think music was always meant to be enjoyed. Like when you walk into a store or a restaurant, you just hear random music: you’re not paying for it. When you turn on the car radio, you’re not paying for that, you’re just hearing it. You just bump into music. Music is meant to be shared. Back when it was folklore and the village and jungle – they were just singing it. And eventually we will go back to a place where it’s just shared and free.

Aside from singing and writing new music, what are the other things you’re looking to do in the future?

I definitely want to showcase my dance more. I’m a trained dancer and I trained for years and years. We had this conversation, me and my team, not too long ago. They are saying, like, “Hey, I think it’s a hidden secret that you can dance!” I’m like, “I think you’re right, we need to showcase that way more!”

I’m also thinking about starting a podcast to talk more about different things and express my personality a bit more outside of my music.

 

And wrapping it up, tell us, what is your FAULT?

Sometimes I feel like I don’t enjoy the moment long enough. I’m anxious-slash-impatient and I want everything to happen now – or yesterday! I keep asking myself, “why am I not there now?”
And that’s why I said trusting the process has become such a big thing in my life – because things don’t just happen immediately like that. It’s a waiting game – you hurry up, put the work in and then you wait. So I definitely have to tell myself ever day: “Yo Pax: chill!”

Anything you would like to add?

Thank you for doing this for me – talking to me, having me on set. Doing the gorgeous photoshoot. That was the best experience of my life, I swear I’m not just saying that. The energy and everything was just incredible. I haven’t experienced anything like that so it was just really beautiful to do it. And I thank you guys for trusting me to kill it!

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 29 – THE MOVEMENT ISSUE –  IS AVAILABLE TO PRE-ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

Bebe Rexha Exclusive Covershoot and Interview with FAULT Magazine

Bebe Rexha X FAULT Magazine

Bebe Rexha for FAULT Magazine Issue 29

Photography: David Yeo | Fashion Editor – Rachel Holland | Make-Up: Brittany Lambert Paige | Hair: Rio Sreedharan | Nails: Diane Drummond | Fashion Assistant: Ana Carnu & Lupe Baeyens | Words: Aimee Phillips

 

FAULT Magazine speaks to Bebe Rexha about her debut album, Expectations, the importance of retaining creative control and still having those pinch-me moments in this exclusive FAULT Magazine issue 29 reverse cover shoot.

 

FAULT: Let’s talk about your single ‘Meant To Be’ ft. Florida Georgia Line. The country vibe is quite different from your usual style – what made you switch things up?

Bebe Rexha: It was quite unexpected but I kinda think all the best things in life are unexpected. That’s why I called my album Expectations, because you never know what’s gonna happen. It’s been an incredible journey and I’m so grateful for it. I’d never done country before so didn’t really know what to expect, and I think that was the beauty of it.

Bebe Rexha for FAULT Magazine Issue 29

FAULT Magazine Issue 29 is available to order for delivery worldwide

 

Where was your head at when you were creating the album? What were the circumstances and emotions that inspired it?

Bebe Rexha: I was thinking a lot about life and how I’ve always expected it to go a certain way but it took me on a different path. Life is better when you just go with the flow. For me, this album has been all about me trying to figure things out.

 

You’ve co-written or co-produced every song on the album – that’s quite rare. It must be extremely important to you to retain creative control?

Bebe Rexha: Yeah definitely. There were some songs that were sent to me and I was like, oh gosh, I need to have this record, it just speaks to me in such an incredible way. I would go in and make it my own, working with the producer to tweak it. Throughout the process, I’ve been involved in the production of various songs. I couldn’t see any other way. For me, writing music has been like therapy. I couldn’t imagine putting out an album or song without being

 Bebe Rexha for FAULT Magazine Issue 29

On writing “Monster” for Eminem

Bebe Rexha:  That really changed the game for me. It changed everyone’s perspective of who I was and really shone a spotlight on my songwriting, so when I transitioned into an artist, I never once had people tell me what to do. When you write the song yourself, people really connect with it on a different level.

 

You started off writing songs for other people. What journey did you have to go on in order to get where you are today?

Bebe Rexha:  I was signed to my first record deal when I was 18 or 19 but I was mainly writing pop songs for other people. Then I got into a band with Pete Wentz called Black Cards. We travelled the world for a few years and then got dropped, so that spurred me into really focusing on my songwriting and my craft. It was a blessing in disguise because it taught me a lot about the industry and perfecting what I can do. That’s when I wrote ‘The Monster’. No one really understood the song because they thought it was a little creepy or too weird, so when Eminem got it I was thrilled. That really changed the game for me. It changed everyone’s perspective of who I was and really shone a spotlight on my songwriting, so when I transitioned into an artist, I never once had people tell me what to do. When you write the song yourself, people really connect with it on a different level.

Bebe Rexha for FAULT Magazine Issue 29

Do you think you’ve gotten used to all then – the success and fame?

Bebe Rexha: Not at all, I still feel like I don’t belong. It was never handed to me on a silver platter, like, here you go, you’re a star! I was always the underdog. I was a little quirky, a little different, I would write my own songs. But I’m so supportive of other females and other artists

 

What is your FAULT?

Bebe Rexha: It’s hard for me to enjoy being in the moment, I’m always thinking about the next thing.

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 29 – THE MOVEMENT ISSUE –  IS AVAILABLE TO PRE-ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

FAULT Magazine Exclusive Interview With The Real Bhad Bhabie

Bhad Bhabie X FAULT Magazine

Photography – Jack Alexander

Styling – Thomas George Wulbern

Make-Up – Sophie Moore @ERA Management Using Mac

Hair – Brady Lea @ Stella Creative Artists

 

Words: Aimee Philips

Bhad Bhabie (real name Danielle Bregoli) is one of those people that you think you know all about, and it’s hard not to have presumptions. Two years ago, Bregoli became an internet sensation after appearing on an episode of Dr. Phil titled, ‘I Want To Give Up My Car-Stealing, Knife-Wielding, Twerking 13-Year-Old Daughter Who Tried To Frame Me For A Crime’. Her volatile attitude and amusing catchphrase “Cash Me Outside, Howbow Dah?” (loose translation: fight me) turned her into an internet meme.

Since then, Bregoli has, rather impressively, taken her infamy and used it to chase her dream of becoming a rapper. It seems like a natural move given her badass attitude and gift for rapid, superfluous speech. Her first single, ‘These Heaux’ was released in August 2017 and reached #77 on the Billboard Hot 100, making her the youngest female rap artist ever to debut on the music chart. She’s collaborated with Lil Yachty and Ty Dolla $ign, racks up tens of millions of views on her YouTube videos, has a net worth of $2m and a following of 14.4m on Instagram alone.

The Bregoli that FAULT meets, however, is a world away from the cocky, potty-mouthed teen that she’s portrayed as. In fact, Bregoli is docile, polite, and quite mature for her 15 years… but we wouldn’t want to ruin her reputation.

FAULT: You’ve been touring recently – how’s that been going?

Bhad Bhabie : I’ve done my whole US tour and I’m in the middle of my European tour right now. I’ve been to Belgium, France, Barcelona, Germany, now I’m here [London] and I’m going to Amsterdam next. I’m going to New York for press then I’m going home [Bregoli lives in Florida]!

You were cast into the spotlight when you just 13 and became a viral meme. How did you cope with that at such a young age?

Bhad Bhabie: I’ve always been real old for my age. I just thought, OK, this is life, just do it or don’t. There’s nothing you can really do. You either wanna be famous or you don’t. I had that choice and I decided to make it.

Was rapping always your goal? You said on Dr Phil that you wanted to become a nurse…

Bhad Bhabie: Yeah, I did, then this really started pulling up and I was told, you can do anything you want. I was like, I wanna do music.

How did you make that dream into a reality?

Bhad Bhabie: I went to a studio session with a couple of people from the head of Atlantic [Records] and they said they had this song that they thought I would sound good on, called ‘Hi Bich’. I put my own shit on it. They heard it and were like, we wanna sign her.

Tell me about the album. Are you going to be putting some rumours to rest?

Bhad Bhabie: Yes, some rumours are put some rest. There are some features on there. Asian Doll…maybe some other artists. I’m not sure yet.

Who would you absolutely love to work with?

Bhad Bhabie: I really wanna work with Drake. I’m not gonna lie. After his album came out, I started listening to more of his shit. I was a really big Drake fan when I was younger and then I kinda fell off, and then I started listening to his new stuff lately and was like, this is why I listened to Drake before [laughs].

Tell me about your stage name, Bhad Bhabie. Was that a nickname you always had or did you just come up with it?

Bhad Bhabie: I’m tiny and I’ve always been the youngest out of all the people I hang out with, so I’ve always been called the baby anyway, and ‘bhad’ means ‘bin haters and doubters’ so I was like… Bhad Bhabie. Alright, cool.

You do a lot of live streams on Instagram. Is that because you love showing your fans more of your life?

Bhad Bhabie: It really just proves to people that this is really what happens. I’m doing the same shit, I just turn on the camera.

Your tracks ‘Mama Don’t Worry’ and ‘Both of Em’ reflect on your past. Did you hope that they would help people understand you better and what you’d been through?

Bhad Bhabie: Yeah, I wanted to make tracks that tell people what’s really happened and what’s really been going on, and that I’m not just some squirrel-ass girl who beats her mom and gets money. No, this is what is it and that’s not what it is.

Your music career has really has taken off. Did your success surprise you?

Bhad Bhabie: At first, I was like, oh shit, people really like me? Whaaat? Then I thought, OK, this is what I’m doing now, let’s give it my best.

What do your friends and family think of your success?

Bhad Bhabie: My friends – or the people who I thought were my friends – got really jealous and mad. They thought that they should be owed something, so I was like, you gotta go, goodbye! My family loves it; they think it’s hilarious. They love it so much [laughs].

What have you learnt since becoming famous and a rapper?

Bhad Bhabie: I’ve learnt that this industry is really shady! I just wanna be the biggest. I wanna be on top.

Who are some of the artists that inspire you?

Bhad Bhabie: I don’t really admire anyone. I wouldn’t call anyone an inspiration. In terms of people I listen to, Travis Scott, Cardi B, Tyga… people like that.

What would you say to the people who have doubted you?

Bhad Bhabie: Umm… that’s your problem!

What is your FAULT?

Bhad Bhabie: One of the things that I really don’t like is when I meet little kids and they start cursing cos they think it’s cool. It’s like… no…. please don’t do that. I grew up a certain way, you’re lucky to have someone there to tell you what’s good and what’s not good. Take that, use that, don’t be like me, I’m a different story.

So you want to set an example for younger people?

Bhad Bhabie: Yeah, I feel like it’s kinda bad but kinda good at the same time.

BST Hyde Park FESTIVAL SPECIAL – THE WELL-KNOWN, THE NEW, THE LEGENDARY

Photography: Jack Alexander

 

Words: Adina Ilie

This weekend, British Summer Time showcased an array of exceptional talent ranging from the well-established to the ones-to-watch. As ever, BST Hyde Park is a celebration of music in all of its splendour, where genres intertwine, and people gather to immerse themselves in pure talent. This year, Bruno Mars, this year’s most acclaimed headline act completely sold out the festival on Saturday. He gathered support from acts such as Charlie Wilson, Naomi Scott, Liv Dawson along with the likes of DNCE, Khalid, Yungen and many others. As an impromptu moment, Joe Jonas of DNCE also announced that both of his siblings were supporting the band side-stage, making the crowd go wild in ecstasy and nostalgia altogether.

 

British Summer Time is now left behind with a heavy heart as the sight of a deserted Hyde Park is imminent, but there is no doubt that 2019 will bring even greater things for the most emblematic event in London’s festival history. For the time being, we look fondly at the acts that graced the stage in splendour this weekend.

 

LIV DAWSON

What’s your most exciting festival moment to date?

The best part has to be meeting people that I admire. Also, last year I played Wildlife festival on the main stage, which was absolutely amazing. I also remember meeting Lucy Rose, who is an incredible singer and I was absolutely freaked out.

 

What are you most looking forward to at BST?

I am so excited to play my set and also be surrounded by so many amazing talents. I’m looking forward to seeing Tom Walker, Bruno Mars, Khalid. It’s going to be a good day.

 

What is your festival FAULT?

I played The Great Escape quite recently and I had some technical difficulties on stage. I started one of my songs wrong and I had to start it all over again. It always happens, but that just makes the set funnier.

YUNGEN

 

What’s your favourite part about playing music festivals?

They bring an entirely different vibe. I was doing a lot of club gigs and there’s only a certain set that you can do in a club. At festivals you can get really creative.

 

How will your set today differ from the sets you usually play?

At club gigs, I like to quickly go through the songs to keep the energy up. I feel like at festivals, they come to see – you – so there’s more space to be creative.

 

What’s your festival FAULT?

I was at a festival and some kids climbed up on the fence and started shouting ‘Hey Yungen!’ And I was like ‘hey man, are you alright?’ and they thought that was an indication to jump over the fence. Security was looking at me like ‘what have you done?!’ because they had to chase those kids all around the festival!

 

DNCE

 

You’ve recently released a new EP People to People which has an entirely different sound to your previous material. What made you change direction?

Joe: For any person, you look at yourself a year back and realise how much you’ve grown ever since. For us, as musicians, we definitely have grown together, separately, emotionally and even physically *laughs*. We finally tapped into something new and it’s exciting to share the journey this very moment, instead of waiting a few more months for putting an entire album together. We just wanted to release this EP and get it out there.

 

You’ve got a more serious note on the EP. How did you tap into that particular part of song writing?

Cole: What we did is that we took away a few layers and stripped it down to what instruments we’re playing and where we are emotionally. It might be a little more sophisticated, but it’s also a bit more indie rock. We wanted to focus on that. Because we couldn’t do a 180 – we’re DNCE – funk meets rock’n’roll meets pop. So, we twisted the knobs a little bit and we have a good idea what’s next. We hope to release more music soon.

 

How are festivals different to you as opposed to your own personal shows?

Joe: Festivals are always more fun. You get to meet a lot of new artists and hang out in really elaborate tents. But it’s not just festivals – this is Hyde Park. Playing Hyde Park is the dream. It’s definitely a bucket list one for us.

 

Do you have any festival anecdotes that you’d like to share?

Joe: We’ve had moments when we’ve lost each other and then found each other in the most bizarre situations. We’ll disperse and then hours and hours later I’d be waiting in line for the urinal and Cole pops right out.

Cole: We were at a festival and we were watching Average White Band play and we were literally having the time of our lives. Dancing, singing, it was great. But somehow, all the pictures that our fans took of us then – we literally looked mortally depressed.

 

What’s your festival FAULT?

All: Fried food, that’s for sure.

NAOMI SCOTT

 

You’ve got a stellar Hollywood career and now you’ve gone into music too. What spurred your love for music?

I grew up in church, so I grew up listening to gospel music. I remember going through my dad’s iTunes and stumbling upon Kate Bush. She’s fantastic, weird and whacky and I loved it! I also love Enya (probably because I’m a big Lord of the Rings fan) – but clearly my influences are very mixed!

 

Who would you most like to collaborate with – out of all of the artists that you’ve pointed out just now?

Honestly – I really love Chance The Rapper. I’d love to do something with him. Collaboratively, he would be ideal in terms of what he actually brings to the table. I also love J. Cole – and what I love about him is his storytelling. There’s always a message with his music.

 

We all know of your Hollywood highlight moments – but what are your musical highlights?

For me, the highlight has just been able to grow and stay independent. But the biggest moment was a month ago when I ended my UK tour in London. I’ve been putting out music sporadically for a long time and people knew the whole back catalogue. Stuff that I’ve released years and years ago.

 

What stood out the most?

I was in Cardiff, in Wales and there was a girl right at the front who literally knew all of the words to every single song. For me – that was the best moment.

 

What do you want your fans to take from your music?

I honestly just want people to have a good time. I want them to have fun, I’m completely myself on stage and I want people to feel escapism when they come to my shows. Kind of like movies – in a way. And I want it to be a memorable experience.

 

What’s your festival FAULT?

Well, this is my first festival, so I’ll just say that it’s very hot outside and I’m very disorganised!

 

CHARLIE WILSON

 

What’s your most fond memory of BST Hyde Park?

I was here a couple of years ago on one of the smaller stages when Stevie Wonder and Pharrell were playing. I said that one day I’ll play the main stage and here I am today.

 

Do you have a memorable moment from playing live that you would like to share?

I played a show with The Rolling Stones when I was in my 20s. We opened the show in Kansas City. Back in that day, we had no hits. We were making up songs to sound like rock songs basically. So, I went into a song – except that I didn’t know it was already a Rolling Stones song! And I started singing Jumpin’ Jack Flash and everyone kept signalling me to stop doing it. And afterwards I went to my manager and asked him how many shows we had left with The Stones and he said that he was pretty sure that that was our last one.

 

What’s your festival FAULT?

I don’t have one now, but back in the day it used to be drugs and alcohol. I’m sober now, been sober for a long time, but I wish I hadn’t wasted all the time.

 

Picnic at Hanging Rock

Self Portrait (@mrselfportrait) lace dress via The Real Real (@therealreal)
Asos (@asos) black patent leather buckled flats

 

Self Portrait (@mrselfportrait) lace dress via The Real Real (@therealreal)
Asos (@asos) black patent leather buckled flats

 

Self Portrait (@mrselfportrait) lace dress via The Real Real (@therealreal)
Asos (@asos) black patent leather buckled flats

 

Asos (@asos) white satin dress
Asos (@asos) black patent leather buckled flats
Hat is stylist’s own

 

Asos (@asos) white satin dress
Asos (@asos) black patent leather buckled flats
Hat is stylist’s own

 

Asos (@asos) white satin dress
Asos (@asos) black patent leather buckled flats
Hat is stylist’s own

 

Asos (@asos) white satin dress
Asos (@asos) black patent leather buckled flats
Hat is stylist’s own

 

Elliatt (@elliatt) floral embroidered dress via Asos (@asos)
Jeffrey Campbell (@jeffreycampbell) boots
Asos (@asos) black wasit belt

 

Elliatt (@elliatt) floral embroidered dress via Asos (@asos)
Jeffrey Campbell (@jeffreycampbell) boots
Asos (@asos) black wasit belt

 

Elliatt (@elliatt) floral embroidered dress via Asos (@asos)
Jeffrey Campbell (@jeffreycampbell) boots
Asos (@asos) black wasit belt

 

Roksanda (@roksandailincic) dress via The Real Real (@therealreal)
Jeffrey Campbell (@jeffreycampbell) boots

 

Roksanda (@roksandailincic) dress via The Real Real (@therealreal)
Jeffrey Campbell (@jeffreycampbell) boots

 

Roksanda (@roksandailincic) dress via The Real Real (@therealreal)
Jeffrey Campbell (@jeffreycampbell) boots

Photographer: Caroline Lawlesswww.carolinelawless.com
Model: Lucy Rexrode
Stylist: Melissa de Leon

Brendon Urie FAULT Magazine Online Covershoot

Words: Courtney Farrell

Photography: Miles Holder

Styling: Edith Walker Millwood

Grooming: Oliver Woods

 

This weekend,  Panic! at the Disco’s ‘Pray for the Wicked’ debuted at No.1 spot on the Billboard 200 Album Charts and we couldn’t be more excited. We’re proud to present our latest FAULT Magazine Online cover star is non-other than band frontman, Brendon Urie! You can also find more images and exclusive photographs within our next print issue but for now, enjoy our very special cover feature below!

 

“Hey Look Ma, I Made It”, one of the songs from your new album, Pray For The Wicked, opens with the lines “All my life been hustling and tonight is my appraisal / because I’m a hooker selling songs and my pimp’s a record label,”  Do you often find yourself torn between celebrating your successes and battling the evils of your industry?

Brendon Urie: It’s not too far from the truth, I am a hooker that sells songs. I’m a glorified t-shirt salesman. I go out on the road and I play songs to make people happy, and to interact with them and so that we can all celebrate, but at the end of the night I’m really trying to sell clothes, right? I’m like, “buy my merch please so that I can have a great life as well and we can all support each other.” It’s a weird contradiction the way the music industry is. Luckily I do this because I have a passion for it, and the byproducts of things I get to talk about ironically a little more tongue-in-cheek, like yeah, I’m a whore that sells my own music, and my record label is a pimp that pushes me to everybody, distributes me, talks me up, and gets as much mileage as they can out of me. It’s a dark realization, it’s a dark truth, it’s a very real thing, but I wouldn’t change it for the world. This is something that I’m so passionate about that I would never want to give up, so it’s bittersweet really.

 

You reference your childhood dreams coming true, but you probably didn’t expect to become somewhat of an LGBTQ icon for your fans. Between the success of Girls/Girls/Boys and your cameo in Love, Simon, it seems that LGBTQ positivity has become a big part of your brand. How do you feel about that?

BU: It makes me so happy. Growing up and having friends who weren’t accepted in certain circles, whether they were gay, not a certain religion or creed, or whatever, it’s nice to know that now I feel a part of a family that maybe I didn’t feel an affinity to in the past.

What’s even cooler than that, is that I write songs for myself about things that I’m feeling personally about my own life, and fans can take a song and completely give it a new meaning, which makes me so happy. I wrote the song “Girls/Girls/Boys” about my first threesome, and kids grabbed onto that and took it as a universal language for like, it doesn’t matter who you are, we can all love whoever we want to. That’s a way cooler idea, and the fact that fans have the mentality and the mobility to do that just inspires me to move forward in a more generous light and try to give as much as they’ve given me.

 

That song really has taken on a life of its own, when you play it live you’re handed rainbow flags and fans light up rainbow hearts. That must be amazing.

BU: It’s my favorite. When I look out into the crowd and I see how happy they are and how liberated they seem to be, that makes it all worthwhile. That’s better than any drug, that’s better than any other experience. That right there, that interaction, I get to see the immediate happiness that they receive from that. It makes me so proud to be a part of whatever this is.

Jacket – Ben Sherman | T- shirt – Brendon’s own

Pray For The Wicked is your sixth studio album, and you’ve managed to stay active and successful for the 13 years since your first album. Do you ever consciously think about staying relevant or is it not important to you?

 

BU: Honestly, I don’t really care about that shit. It’s not that I don’t want to do things, I only do things if I have a passion for it and I can see a greater outcome, not just for me. We get offered things all the time, whether that be endorsements or shows or whatever, and I say no most of the time. My manager will send me some stuff and he’ll ask what I think, and the majority of the time I’m saying no because it doesn’t feel right to do something just for a company because they’re looking for a handout or whatever it may be. I only do things if it feels right, if it makes me proud to have done that. I never used to think that way until the last year or two, so that has changed a lot of what I do for the better. I think it’s much better to do it that way, I just want to do better all the time.

 

That ties in with a line from “Say Amen (Saturday Night)”, which is “I can’t change into a person I don’t want to be.” It’s about honesty, is staying true to yourself important for you?

 

BU: Absolutely. That’s one of the most key things I think for any human as a trait. Honesty is one of the most important qualities to have as a human being. Other people say that politeness is key, and that’s fine. It’s good to be kind and polite to other people, but at the same time don’t change change your views. Have courage behind your convictions, know who you are. You’ve got to be you. You have to be unapologetic about who you are, don’t ever apologize for that. If people get offended, they’re just looking for something to be offended by, and if not they’re just offended by it and they have a more delicate sensibility and I couldn’t give a shit, you know what I mean? That’s not to say I don’t care, but I want to make sure that honesty and directness come across as more important.

 

You almost named this album “fame is the thirst of youth,” a quote by Lord Byron, which reminded me of “Dying in LA”. Is that a direct correlation, that as time goes on the less fame means?

BU: Yeah to a certain extent, that is a pretty fair summation. When I was younger, I thought it was going to be so cool to be famous, but I didn’t think about it a lot. I was still focused on the things that I loved, like just making music, performing, making music videos, doing records, wearing funny clothes, putting on makeup. All this stuff was so fun for me to do, so I wasn’t really thinking about what I’d do when we get big. There were a couple instances over a couple years that I maybe didn’t handle fame that well. I realized that I was never searching for it. I think my goal is never to be famous. I’m never trying to not be able to leave my house because I’d be noticed all the time, that would suck.

 

When you released “High Hopes”, you tweeted that you’d “worried about how it felt to fail,” and “had to aim high and fail, fail, fail in order to keep growing.” Have there been any moments throughout the years that felt like failures you wouldn’t be able to overcome?

 

BU: For me, failure in the moment always feels like I’ll never overcome it. I have to push past a certain point and almost have faith that I’m going to get through it because it’s happened every single time fear hits me. I just have to hit a certain point and trust myself that as long as I show up and as long as I’m doing what I’m passionate about it’s going to work out in the way that I saw fit because I tried and I did the things I was passionate about, rather than hoping that people like me, hoping that I get notoriety, hoping that I get a number one album. That’s all byproduct. It’s cool if it happens, but it’s not what I’m after. I’m after making something that I’m so proud of that I can share with however many fans. That’s something better than drugs, it’s better than most things in my life. Being able to be on a stage, connect with fans, meet them and hear their stories, see their tweets, read their amazing poems, and hear their covers of our songs. They inspire me and it’s really cool to know that as long as you’re doing what you love, how can you be wrong?

 

You’ll be headlining Reading and Leeds Festival later this summer, are you looking forward to it?

BU: I’m losing my mind! I’m losing my mind because it was billed as a co-headline show with Kendrick Lamar, but I’m not treating it that way. I’m treating it the same way that I treated the Weezer tour, like we are opening for Weezer. We are the warm up band for Kendrick Lamar, and that’s how I’m going to treat it because I have such a love and respect for Kendrick Lamar as an artist and a human being. His seems like his head is in the right place, he’s so wise beyond his years, and I’m just a fan of the music. I’m going to have to stay away, they’re going to have to get extra security. He just seems like the coolest person ever so it’s an honor to be on the same bill as him, I can’t wait to watch him live.

 

What is your FAULT?

BU: I feel like everything is my fault. This whole album is my fault. I didn’t expect to have an album out, but I’m so glad that I did. I’m so glad that I felt inspired, because I was not expecting it and it was the biggest, most pleasant surprise I could have asked for.