Off the Rails: London Menswear steps it up a notch (30th Oct – 2nd Nov)

OTR logo

Team FAULT are excited to be attending yet another showcase event in London’s ever-growing menswear calendar: Off the Rails London. Taking place in the trendy-yet-relaxed setting of the Old Truman Brewery on London’s Brick Lane, the emphasis of this sartorial pop-up bonanza is one of inclusivity and affordability without compromising on quality. In fact, the standard of men’s style on display represents the pinnacle of contemporary London-based design, with trailblazers such as tailors Markus Lupfer and Richard Anderson, shoemakers Oliver Sweeney and Barkers and the immortal Christy’s Hats - among many others (70 in total) - all holding court at this year’s debut.

With additional incentives including special discounts on many current lines, a pop-up ‘old school’ barber shop in the form of Shoreditch’s own Murdock London, personal styling sessions by Topman and booze and grub supplied by the Mr Hyde Bar and Patty and Bun Burger Store respectively, there seems to be few reasons for any self-respecting man about town in London NOT to attend – especially as tickets are available from just £6 each if bought as a pair (or more).

The event runs from today, Thursday 30th October – Sunday 2nd November at:

The Old Truman Brewery, 91 Brick Lane
London, E1 6QL

For event times and more information, visit www.offtherailsldn.com

FAULT Favourite Jacob Perlmutter’s debut album FREE DOWNLOAD + new music video premiere

album

Our Twitter followers might remember our Summer love-in with globe-trotting renaissance man Jacob Perlmutter. After coming to our attention many moons hence as a gifted filmmaker, Jacob announced the impending release of his debut album, Meanwhile, in Rio, earlier this year in late July.

The album was recorded with Brazilian producer Diogo Strausz in March this year. Now considered one of Brazil’s top music producers, Diogo’s most recent album soared to number 2 in the iTunes charts in Brazil. ‘Kicking Back’, track 5 on Meanwhile, in Rio, also features Castello Branco, a Brazilian songwriter whose album Strausz also produced and has had over 150,000 downloads.

Not convinced? Well, luckily for you cynics, we’ve managed to secure an exclusive premiere for Jacob’s brand new music video for track #4 from Meanwhile, in Rio, ‘We Share a Cloud’. Check it out here:

After what one can only hope has been a brief respite following a hectic 18 months attracting support for, writing, recording and promoting Meanwhile, in Rio, Jacob has recently announced his intention to start working on a new multimedia project, starting with around 40 new tracks which will eventually be boiled down into a sophomore album.

In the meantime, however – perhaps that should be ‘Meanwhile, at FAULT‘ – we’ve been lucky enough to secure an exclusive opportunity for our readers to download Jacob’s entire debut completely free of charge.

To get your free copy, simply head over to www.meanwhileinrio.com and click the download link for around 76MB (or, more conventionally speaking, 10 tracks) of FAULT-approved, Rio-recorded musical whimsy.

Jacob Perlmutter by Eduardo Magalha_es 1 (Medium)

Photography by Eduardo Magalhaes

Video footage from one of Jacob’s early gigs in London’s Portobello Road reveals his ability to capture the imagination, not only with his recorded material but also by sheer force of personality in a live context:

For more information on Jacob, please visit:

www.meanwhileinrio.com
www.twitter.com/jacobperlmutter
www.facebook.com/jacobperlmutterartist
www.jacobperlmutter.com

It’s a Man’s World – new editorial by Tré & Elmaz

Coat by Sorapol Bra by Mimi Holliday by Damaris

Coat by Sorapol
Bra by Mimi Holliday by Damaris

He wears all clothes and shoes vintage from Rokit She wears stockings by Wolford

He wears all clothes and shoes vintage
from Rokit
She wears stockings by Wolford

Knickers and Suspender Belt by Mimi Holliday by Damaris Stockings by What Katie Did Headpice by Fumbalinas

Knickers and Suspender Belt by
Mimi Holliday by Damaris
Stockings by What Katie Did
Headpice by Fumbalinas

He wears vintage jacket and trousers from Rokit She wears body from I. D. Sarrieri

He wears vintage jacket and
trousers from Rokit
She wears body from I. D. Sarrieri

He wears vintage jacket from Rokit

He wears vintage jacket from Rokit

He wears bra by Mimi Holliday by Damaris Coat by Sorapol Vintage trousers from Rokit She wears dress and harness by Manuel Diaz

He wears bra by Mimi Holliday by
Damaris
Coat by Sorapol
Vintage trousers from Rokit
She wears dress and harness by
Manuel Diaz

He wears bra by Mimi Holliday by Damaris Coat by Sorapol Mask by Elliot Joseph Rentz She wears dress by Manuel Diaz

He wears bra by Mimi Holliday by
Damaris
Coat by Sorapol
Mask by Elliot Joseph Rentz
She wears dress by Manuel Diaz

He wears vintage trousers from Rokit Shoes by Charkviani She wear knickers by Mimi Holliday by Damaris Veil (worn over body) by Jay Briggs

He wears vintage trousers from Rokit
Shoes by Charkviani
She wear knickers by Mimi Holliday by
Damaris
Veil (worn over body) by Jay Briggs

He wears glove by Sorapol Bra by Mimi Holliday by Damaris Vintage trousers from Rokit

He wears glove by Sorapol
Bra by Mimi Holliday by Damaris
Vintage trousers from Rokit

Veil by Jay Briggs Knickers by Mimi Holliday by Damaris

Veil by Jay Briggs
Knickers by Mimi Holliday by Damaris

itsamansworld_14

Trousers vintage from Rokit Coat by Sorapol Shoes by Dora Teymur

Photography by Tré & Elmaz
Talent: Caroline Rausch & Erin Fee @ Storm Models
Styling: Victoria Gregory
Make Up: Lara Brewster
Hair: Stefanie Bacelic
Assistant: Sylvia Pam
Location: Simon Drake’s House of Magic

FAULT Focus: Screenwriter and novelist Kelly Oxford for FAULT Issue 19

Kelly Oxford inside 1

Kelly Oxford was shot at her LA office by Brian Ziff. Interview by Chris Purnell.
Click here to order your copy of this issue!

Most of us had heard of her back around 2010 when the number of followers one had became a big deal. Twitter personalities where starting to break into the mainstream, and she was one of the first. But we didn’t know her name. We were told that she was the Canadian housewife with a million Twitter followers who parleyed that into a screenwriting career, had a glamorous life in LA and pissed off a million writers that wondered how she got so lucky.

But the truth was less sensational. It involved hard work, practice and years of writing for little to no money. It wasn’t the American dream I had imagined. Or even cared to.

Now Kelly Oxford is famous, despite what she tells us. She is a New York Times bestselling author, she has a TV deal, a movie deal, she gets to talk to FAULT, and still finds time to annoy the Kardashians and their legions on Twitter: “If you can name 5 Kardashians but can’t name 5 countries in Asia, stick a knife in an electrical socket.”

Kelly Oxford inside 2

Get the full shoot and interview – only in FAULT Issue 19.
Click here to order your copy for delivery worldwide!

FAULT: Do you know how the story of you coming out of nowhere came about?

Kelly: The first time I got picked up by the media was a charity event in Los Angeles called ‘Night of 140 Tweets’ at the very beginning of 2010. That was a celebrity event where people would read a Tweet was to raise money for disaster relief in Haiti. I was the only one out of 140 people that wasn’t a celebrity. I was just a writer from Canada. I was a housewife. I was somebody who nobody really knew and I was only invited because people that were involved with this – actors and writers – liked me on Twitter and thought, “if we put her on this it’ll make sense because she’s very popular on Twitter and this is a night of tweeting.” All of a sudden I was part of a group of people when I really wasn’t one of them.

How did it [really] begin for you?

If I had been born in the United States, I’m 100% sure that when I graduated high school I would have moved to Los Angeles and started a normal writing career by becoming an assistant and working my way up the ranks. But I was Canadian. That sort of thing wasn’t an option for me. I could have moved down here and done all that stuff, lots of Canadians have, but I wasn’t ambitious about getting a career. I’d rather have a family and stay at home and pursue my passion. So I just did what I did, which was to just take some writing classes and write things on my Geocity page and just wonder if anybody would read it.

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 19 – The Millions Issue – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

‘She’s Not There’ – Ricardo La Valle’s FAULT

1

light blue dress: lucy baxter
white shirt: filippo dispertati
boots: premiata

2

(as above)

3

4

6

7

(left) pants: max&co
top + cardigan: Tvscia
sandals: dries van noten

8

(as above)

9

light blue dress: lucy baxter

10

pants: max&co
top + cardigan: Tvscia
sandals: dries van noten

11

(as above)

13

15

16

17

Riccardo La Valle – photographer
Roberto Anselmo Calcaterra – video maker
Ilaria Medaglini – stylist
Elena Gentile – make up artist
Marco Steri – hair stylist
Christian Panarelli – hair stylist assistant
Gabriele & Elinor – models ( agency: ICE MODELS)

Debby Ryan – our Style section cover for FAULT Issue 19

debby ryan - fault issue 19 style cover

FAULT Issue 19’s Style section cover star Debby Ryan was shot by Brian Ziff and styled by Avo Yermagyan.
Click here to order your copy of this issue!

Debby Ryan‘s staggering diversity as an artist sits nicely with a very healthy dose of natural talent and her near-zealous work ethic. It is the combination of these factors that marks Debby out as an anomaly in an age when so many of her peers seem content to reach a certain point before resting on their laurels. For Debby, it seems, her work has only just begun.

Ryan’s big break came in 2008 when she landed the role of Bailey on the Disney Channel’s original series ‘The Suite Life on Deck’. She now not only stars in Disney’s smash hit show ‘Jessie’, but has also produced, directed and written for the series.

This Summer the actress released a long-awaited debut album, One, with her band, The Never Ending. Featuring crystal clear vocals from Ryan, the simple, straightforward style with which she has launched her music career away from Disney has seen her gain widespread acclaim from critics and fans alike.

FAULT had the pleasure of spending the day with Debby on our exclusive shoot for Issue 19. We took the opportunity to pinpoint her various inspirations for tracks on her album, her direct involvement with changes to her character on ‘Jessie’ and what lies ahead for the star in the near future.

debby ryan - fault issue 19 (inside 1)

Production by Zizi Zarkadas + Leah Blewitt

FAULT: You recently released your album One with your band, The Never Ending. How did you came up with your group’s name and how did you and your bandmates meet?

Debby: I was actually working on another music project and started writing a lot of songs with friends. Throughout the process these lyrics and melodies really started to develop as part of the collaboration, all of which really felt like “me” – not to sound cliché [laughs]!

It was definitely a passion project, bringing my songs, words and sounds all together and telling a story. Music to me is something that lasts longer than ourselves. The idea of being a successful musician or artist is really never-ending because you’re always growing and being inspired- so that is how the band name came about.

What’s it been like for you to basically grow up in the public eye? Do you ever get used to fame and to your fans being interested in what you do both on and off the screen?

Well, due to social media, things have changed a lot since I first started. There is definitely way more access to peoples lives. I’m inherently a private person – believe it or not. It’s funny to me what the media focuses on and things that make “the news” – like hair color changes [laughs]! Don’t get me wrong: I am truly blessed and I love my fans – it’s just [that] sometimes the assumptions people, [and] media make about you or [when they think] that they truly know you on a personal level….

debby ryan - fault issue 19 (inside 2)

Interview by Leah Blewitt

How would you describe you own personal style?

I wear a a lot of black on black and I LOVE vintage. Definitely a laid back, comfortable style but always with a feminine touch. I love mixing and matching, taking basic black jeans and pairing a more casual piece from Topshop with a designer like Balenciaga.

What is your FAULT?

Well, if you asked my friends they will tell you [that] I’m the mom – or act like a mom! So hmm… I’d say taking in strays. I really love animals and just adopted another kitten recently.

I also take in drummers – my dummer is living with us as well [laughs]!

debby ryan - fault issue 19 (inside 3)

Get the full shoot and interview – only in FAULT Issue 19.
Click here to order your copy for delivery worldwide!

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 19 – The Millions Issue – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

FAULT Focus: AMBEREBMA Designer Noriko Yoshii

Japanese-born, Netherlands-based idealist Noriko Yoshii is the designer behind cutting-edge handbag label AMBEREBMA. Made from real leather in traditional tanneries in Italy, AMEREBMA products can be distinguished by their dedication to quality, precise attention to detail and an overall brand aesthetic that draws heavily on elements of the occult and dualist philosophies. Noriko’s monochromatic, palindromic approach immediately marks AMBEREBMA out as a uniquely positioned brand – one with a clearly defined identity that is underpinned by a firm commitment to keeping their products individually unique and faultlessly durable and long-lasting.

FAULT Focus had the pleasure of speaking to her about her approach to her business so far:

AMBEREBMA JJ5

AMBEREBMA JJ5
Photographer: Zak Andrea Zaccone

FAULT: What was it that first spurred you to launch your label? Was there a specific event that helped you to make the decision or was it a process that took a long time before you made the big fist step into production?

Noriko: I used to live in Italy, and over there I was a designer for a fashion label. At that time, I thought to myself strongly that I would never start my own brand. That was because, throughout my career as a designer, I had learned that in order to create and sustain a brand it costs a lot of money and also a lot of work.

However, after I moved to Netherlands I was able to meet a lot of artists. Not just designers, but painters, musicians and people with a lot of new thoughts, ideas and energy. Coming into contact with them allowed me to think that I was able to do something too. Many people told me that I should start design bags once again.

The words of the owner of the factory where I make my bags now have also affected me greatly. He had been producing bags for couple of big designers, but for the past few years he constantly declined offers from small brands. Despite that, he told me that, if I were to start a brand, he would like to work with me.

I decided to start my brand from the support of all these people around me.

 

We love the name of your brand – AMBEREBMA – and the values it stands for: longevity and timelessness bound up in hopes for the future. On that note, you have mentioned how people are moving away from the idea of using a high quality statement pieces for a long time – presumably in favour of cheaper, ‘disposable’ items. Why do you think that is?

10 years ago, with the flow of different identities and hobbies, there was fashion. But now, we are flooded with information whether you are out on the streets or you are in front of the computer. The economic decline that we are going through has now lead people to seek cheap products. They tend to pick similar products to the people around them in order to feel like they are also ‘on-trend’ – just like everyone else.

I am also just a normal woman in her thirties who likes fashion. Feeling that ‘flow’ [trend] myself, I wanted to stop and think: “Is this what I want or now?” As much as the world has become accessible and convenient, there is also the other part of the world which is suffering from all of that: whether that is people, products, or the environment. I wanted to focus my eyes and energy on those things.

AMBEREBMA JJ2

AMBEREBMA JJ2
Photographer: Max Botticelli

How do you intend to change that trend with AMBEREBMA?

I don’t intend to change the way people think. I believe that people do not change from being told. They change by realizing it themselves. With AMBEREBMA, changing something is not my intention – it is more that I intend to make my statement through it. If there are people who agree with it and with whom I can share that thought then I’ll be very happy.

Living in this world now, with massive amount of information, we tend to forget what’s really important. We forget that there are traditional crafts within different countries which we must protect.

In Italy, there are tanners and leather craft factories that have been making these products for a long time. I use real leather (animal skin) to make my products, therefore I want to make a statement of respect for those industries and put across other important messages through the label.

 

How do people buy your products?! We can’t do that through your website yet, it seems…What are your plans to make the line more widely available?

Right now we have 6 shops around the world which carry AMBEREBMA. There are shops which already have an online store and there are also ones that are planning on starting one. Unfortunately, at this point I’m not thinking of making an online store myself.

Right now I do a pop up store/exhibition twice a year in Tokyo, and a couple of times in Amsterdam and Milan. Actually talking and coming into contact with the clients is the method that I think suits me most.

AMBEREBMA JJ4

AMBEREBMA JJ4
Photographer: Zak Andera Zaccone

We were intrigued to see so much diversity between your products in terms of their individual designs and inspirations. There are unifying themes, of course, but why it is it (do you think) that so many of your pieces showcase such a wide range of influences?

The core of my philosophy has always been the same. I like the phrase “nothing is good or bad: thinking makes it so”.
The world exists from two core aspects; however, it all depends on how you perceive things. That is the reason why I make unisex products and why black and white is emphasized. That dualist philosophy is always present when I design the bags and when we shoot the products. I focus on portraying the image of AMBEREBMA when I design: “It looks simple from the outside but there is an inner strength that lies within”.

I like the thought of this, and I would like to be like that as well. I believe this comes across quite strongly in my designs.

 

Is there a particular process you follow when designing?

In the process of designing, image research and material research is important but, even more than that, I find importance in communication and coming into contact with people. At the exhibition, I talk to clients and I listen to their feedback. When we shoot the campaign imagery, I talk to the photographer. When I work on collaborations, I talk to the artist.

The smallest things can turn into a big idea for me. I draw my designs by hand and I make the paper patterns myself.

AMBEREBMA MM1

AMBEREBMA MM1
Photography: Jim Plasman

Do you have a favourite piece from your current collection?

[Laughs] That’s a hard one!

To me, each item is like my child. I use the SS1 (the card case), SS2 (coin case), and MM1 (multi-case) daily. I also use JJ2 bag frequently and, since I travel a lot for work, I use the SS4 (passport case).

I try to use all the items in order to see the good and bad sides of the product.

AMBEREBMA JJ3

AMBEREBMA JJ3
Photographer: Zak Andrea Zaccone

Describe your ideal customer: what type of person would most appreciate the AMEREBMA label?

The target for this [sort of high quality] brand. I use high quality materials and the products are long-lasting. So I’m not focusing on age or gender. I guess you can say that anyone who agrees with and shares my mission statement is my target.

 

What are you currently working on?

I’m working on a joint exhibition with the artist Alice Morishita in Tokyo. We’ve recently done some collaboration pieces together and the exhibition is on Oct 17th, 18th, and 19th.

Afterwards, I am going to show at an Open Atelier in Amsterdam with the Dutch jewelry artist, Jacomijn van der Donk. It will be on November 22nd and 23rd.

I will also be having a pop up store/ exhibition in Milan in December. Please check my Facebook page for details:  www.facebook.com/amberebmabag

AMBEREBMA MM2

AMBEREBMA MM2
Photography: Jim Plasman

What is your FAULT?

[Laughs] I’m stubborn and I tend to focus too much into my own world. That’s why, maybe I’m a little weak on the sales aspect.

 

For more information on Noriko or AMBEREBMA, please visit www.amberebma.com

Between Space – the new editorial by Kailas exclusive to FAULT Online!

1 (Medium)

Jacket (Georgine) Shirtdress (Lie Sang Bong) Earring, worn as pendant (Erickson Beamon)

2 (Medium)

Coat (Kelly Wearstler) Dress (Victoria Andreyanova) Belt (Cheap Monday) Shoes (Marissa Webb) Ring (Alexis Bittar)

3 (Medium)

Blouse (Suno) Sweater (Dr. Martins) Skirt and belt (Bibhu Mohapatra) Shoes (Marissa Webb) Necklace (Alexis Bittar)

5 (Medium)

Blouse (Rachel Zoe) Jumper (Novis) Shoes (Walter Steiger) Necklace (Erickson Beamon) Purse (Osklen)

6 (Medium)

Jacket (Katie Ermilio) Dress, worn as blouse (BCBG MaxAzria) Skirt (Novis) Shoes (John Fluevog) – NOT PICTURED Earrings (Erickson Beamon)

7 (Medium)

Jacket (Lie Sang Bong) Fur stole (Adrienne Landau) Sweater (Suno) Skirt (Cheap Monday) Shoes (John Fluevog) Bangles (Circa Sixty Three)

8 (Medium)

Mesh top (Stijlus) Collared top (Katie Ermilio) Ring (Erickson Beamon)

Photographer: Kailas (http://www.kailasphotography.com/)
Photo assistant: Nick Ducot
Fashion Stylist: Emily Bess (http://www.emilybess.com/)
Hair: Jeanie Syfu (http://artmixbeauty.com/jeanie-syfu)
Makeup: Anastasia Durasova (http://artmixbeauty.com/anastasia-durasova)
Fashion Stylist Assistant: Brandon Garr
Model: Kristy Kaurova