FAULT Future: Flo Morrissey

 

Flo Morrissey is a chanteuse who sits somewhere between a Lana Del Rey penchant for romantic nostalgia, the bohemian power of Florence & the Machine, the whispered and mystical vocals of early Björk, and the effortless charm of Jane Birkin or Stevie Nicks.

At only 20, her sound and lyrics are incredibly well-honed, born of influences her contemporaries haven’t heard of and a detachment from pop culture that has made her incredibly unique both to listen to, and to look at.

Having just released her debut single ‘Pages of Gold‘, and just finished her first tour in the UK supporting The Staves, we sat down with Flo to talk cinematic sounds, the world around the artist, and the power of not always saying yes…

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

How are you finding the tour so far?

I’m loving it – it’s my first one so it was quite daunting to start with, doing something new every night for people who haven’t necessarily come to see you! But it’s great to be playing with The Staves because the audience is there to really listen.

In terms of your biggest performances so far – SXSW, Green Man, etc. – it seems like you are really selective when it comes where to play. Is that the case?

Yeah, it’s just the way my path has gone. I think it’s down to the Internet- I started putting up my demos at 14 and never really did shows in pubs or clubs like other acts. I was just lucky that my manager found me online. I think people say yes to too many things nowadays, and it takes away the special nature of actually doing a show.

Is the live aspect something you enjoy, or is it something you find daunting?

I enjoy it more and more because I’m still new to it – but you never know how you’re going to feel after a show. One thing could change and you wish you had done it differently. But I want to perform more and I’m excited to do more shows. It’s just hard in the beginning! When I go on the road, I’ll hopefully have a multi-instrumentalist to play with me so it will be a little less daunting and lonely.

Beyond the live show, is sharing the actual music something that makes you feel vulnerable?

I don’t really think about it until after, when I realise how weird it can be to speak about the songs. I’d rather people had their own interpretation of it. It’s nice to think that someone else might get something from it as well.

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

The individualism of your music and vision is clearly close to your heart. As you grow as an artist- being signed and managed and touring in the UK and beyond- is it harder to retain that sense of self?

I picked my label because they completely let me do what I want to, and I don’t have to compromise. People have this idea of the music industry as this place where you always have to say yes, but you really don’t. I still do my own Facebook and Instagram, and I wouldn’t want that to ever change.

How did you start writing music?

I started putting stuff on Myspace when I was about 14. I used to sing more classical music at school, but I started playing guitar and it was just more fun! So I made my own recordings, and my own videos, and put covers online. I was this 15 year-old girl acting as my own manager, sending my music out to blogs and it just felt really natural.

In that vein of being your own manager, it seems that your vision is really all-encompassing? Is it important to you that all the elements are cohesive in that way?

I think it is really important to have a kind of world around the artist, but then you can’t think about it in that way. I just try to be natural about it.

How do you see yourself going forward? Pages of Gold, (the upcoming single), marks a shift towards a much bigger sound.

I am really open to experimentation and a lot of the songs on the album have big string sections. I’d love to bring a live band on tour because a lot of the songs are quite cinematic and I’m glad it went that way. It could have been a real folk record but I always wanted to have this more cinematic sound.

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

How was the process of recording your album in LA over the summer?

It was quite lonely at time because LA is just such a huge place. It was the longest I’ve ever been away from home but my manager lives there which was great, and I get along so well with Noah, the producer.

You are quite a quintessentially British artist- what do you see as the differences between making music in the US and the UK?

It was quite inspiring to be there because they won’t say no- they had this kind of “you go girl!” mentality (laughs) and it was actually really good for me! They strive for a lot and it’s so easy, and English, to be self-deprecating but it helped in music terms to have that empowerment on hand.

Do you feel the music industry has been really supportive so far?

I’ve been so lucky but I try not to think about it too much! I sometimes feel like my music is maybe not that accessible, especially with just me and a guitar because it’s so vulnerable and raw. It won’t appeal to everyone but I strangely like that. Usually the best things are the ones that have flaws.

On that note, what is your FAULT?

I worry too much!

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

https://www.facebook.com/FloMorrissey

All photographs by Kurtiss Lloyd

FAULT Focus: Ewa Wilczynski’s ‘THROES’, The Royal Academy of Arts

 

Stood amidst an enchanted crowd and the dramatic grandeur of the Senate Rooms at the Royal Academy of Arts, with her large-scale paintings on the walls and metallic couture by Inbar Spector cascading around her, FAULT Favourite Ewa Wilczynski made a creative declaration that she is truly one to watch.

'Ewa' (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd for FAULT Magazine

‘Ewa’ (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd for FAULT Magazine

As Wilczynski’s debut solo exhibition, THROES marks only three years since the artist graduated in Fine Art from Central Saint Martins (by way of the Académie des Beaux-Arts in Paris.) As a document of how her artistic practice has taken shape, the idea of transition was central to the exhibition. The title itself – taken from one of the most striking works in the show – conjures ideas of being in-between emotional and physical states, with an undercurrent of violent intensity that permeates the dramatic power of the paintings. Rendered in thick oil, and in shades of violet, red, black and blue, Wilczynski’s works depict phantasmagorical landscapes where disembodied figures turn in circles around each other, recognisable as self-portraits but with a Surrealist gesture that dislocates them from the real world.

“I think of it as a collaboration; I paint my personal myth and you, the spectator, fuse your own personal world to it. The paintings become this thin place in between where the two worlds collide and internal polarity comes to the surface.

 

The paintings are a membrane-that skin between my world and your world.”

'Ewa' (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd for FAULT Magazine

‘Ewa’ (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd for FAULT Magazine

The real world is something that Wilczynski shows little interest in, and her work speaks to a mysticism and personal mythology that she frames in terms of philosophy and psychoanalysis. The work in THROES was influenced by Jacques Derrida’s ‘Hymen’ theory; centred on the interplay of inside/outside, the work becomes an intersection and membrane between the artist and spectator, with the painting (the hymen) as a sort of skin.

This blurring of boundaries in the work lends a certain vulnerability to its exhibition and existence in the gallery space. The scale and intensity of the paintings is almost overwhelming, not only for the viewer but for the diminutive physical stature of Wilczynski herself. Standing against her own canvases, the collisions of figures and thunderous elements tower above her, looming over her shoulders. At THROES, the high-ceilinged rooms of the Royal Academy were heavily scented with lavender, making reference to historical exhibitions of the Sublime, and one display cabinet consciously echoed the format of the Wunderkammer in Renaissance Europe. Combined with the grandeur and decorative interior of the Senate Rooms, and the chanting beat of an electronic paean devised and DJ’d by Alexander Price, the exhibition again challenged our modern standard for white-walled exhibition display.

“all of us have our own little worlds and our personal myths … within my work, the painting is almost a way to encapsulate that, and close that gap.”

'Ewa' (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd for FAULT Magazine

‘Ewa’ (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd for FAULT Magazine

Ewa has said that her next body of paintings will be different in aesthetic, and THROES is the supreme example of just how quickly styles and motifs emerge across her work. She has shown that her creativity and imagination are remarkably intense, matching her determination and work ethic (in recent months she has also collaborated on projects with Lulu Guinness and spent time with David LaChapelle in Los Angeles.) Having drawn so much attention and praise for THROES, we know we are not the only ones waiting with bated breath for her next offering.

 

www.ewawilczynski.co.uk

All photographs by Kurtiss Lloyd

Kylie Jenner – exclusive shoot for FAULT Issue 20 front cover

FAULT Issue 20 front cover star Kylie Kenner was shot by Lionel Deluy and styled by Monica Rose.
Click here to pre-order your copy of this issue!

 

FAULT Magazine Issue 20 – the Faces Issue will feature reality TV star and global style phenomenon Kylie Jenner as its front cover feature this Spring. As one of the most widely followed personalities on social media today, Kylie is already a bone fide tastemaker at the tender age of just 17.

FAULT’s exclusive shoot with Kylie runs over 12 pages inside the issue (in addition to the front cover) and also includes the issue’s Style section cover – which is available as a special edition front cover edition in its own right.

Shot in LA to meet the ‘Faces’ theme of FAULT’s landmark 20th issue, renowned celebrity photographer Lionel Deluy captures the ‘real’ Kylie Jenner. Elegantly and simply styled by Monica Rose, the shoot showcases a side to Kylie that she herself admits in her interview is something “…that people don’t see” in her usual social media output or TV appearances.

In her interview, Kylie discusses her thoughts on ‘significant others’, the pressures of fame, how her public persona only shows one side to herself, her views on materialism versus spiritualism and how she deals with criticism of herself and her family.

FAULT Issue 20 - Kylie Jenner inside 1 (web)

Interview by Heather Seidler, Production by Zizi Zarkadas, Editorial Direction by Leah Blewitt, Make up by Rob Scheppy for Cloutier Remix, Hair by Castillo using JOICO at TMG-LA.com, stylist’s assistant: Jill Jacobs

FAULT: At just 17, you’re already one of the best known personalities in the media today – and one of the most followed on social media. Do you feel that people look up to you in that respect? Is there any pressure or obligation that comes with that, do you think?

Kylie: I never feel pressure to be a good role model. I always try to do my best to inspire people to be good and do the right thing, but I just can’t live my life always trying to be a good role model. I try to be the best I can be, but it’s hard sometimes. We’re all human. I just like to live each day and just be me and be real.

I definitely always feel pressure to act a certain way, but I try my best not to let it affect me – although there are times where I’m not totally myself because of that. Even at the mall I feel like I can’t totally be myself. When I’m not in public, I try to always be with my friends, so I can totally be myself and not have to worry about people judging or watching.

Is there a difference between the person you are on social media as opposed to the ‘real Kylie’, that is,the person you are when you’re with your friends and family?

People are going to judge you no matter what you do. So now I feel like I haven’t been open as much as I used to be. I haven’t really been letting my fans get to know me a lot; I closed down a little. I love to connect with people, but it became just a bigger door for people to judge me. I feel like, growing up, I haven’t had a lot of room for error – I don’t have room to make mistakes. You need to make mistakes to grow and learn, but I’m just a little different because the whole world is watching me, every single thing I do. So I closed my door a little, just until I get a bit older and then I’ll probably get back into it. On Instagram I’m like a different person almost, I just show people what I want people see.

 

So what are you like behind closed doors then? What really makes you happy?

I have to feel like I’m OK with everyone I love in my life. I never want to have bad beef with anybody. I always want everyone to be happy. Also balancing work life and personal life so I never lose myself. Lastly, I don’t think I need a significant other to be happy because I always like to find that for myself, but I think that it makes me a lot happier when I’m sharing my life with somebody.

FAULT Issue 20 front cover - Kylie Jenner (Medium)

Get the full shoot and interview – only in FAULT Issue 19.
Click here to order your copy for delivery worldwide!
Two different cover versions available – click HERE to get this cover version

On growing a thick skin:

“Being in my family, under scrutiny all the time… it affects the other people around me. My friends can get freaked out when they come into my world. It’s sad when you really think about it. There have been so many people that come into my family’s life that can’t handle it. And we handle a lot. The more people love you ,the more there’s going to be people who hate you. So I just feel like the girl who is an easy target to talk about. It’s definitely been crazy, but I feel like we all have trust that we’re in it together and we try to focus on the positive.”

On what people would be surprised to find out about her:

“There’s definitely a spiritual side to me and I honestly want the best for everyone. I’m not materialistic, I love clothes and all that stuff, but I don’t need it to live. I feel like, not that I’ve had everything, but once you feel you’ve had everything at a young age, you can either go down a path of being spoiled and self-centered, or you see it isn’t everything. I’ve found ways to really enjoy life. But people may get the wrong idea. Having a reality TV show, everyone feels like they know you, but that’s only 10% of my life. There’s a whole other side of me that people don’t see.”

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 20 – The Faces Issue – IS AVAILABLE TO PRE-ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

FAULT Issue 20 – The Faces Issue – is now available to pre-order

 

We are pleased to announce that FAULT Issue 20 – The Faces Issue – is available to pre-order NOW.

Official release: 20/03/15

FAULT Issue 20 front cover star Kylie Kenner was shot by Lionel Deluy and styled by Monica Rose.
Issue 20 will also feature Jim Sturgess as its reversible cover star – with preview imagery set to be unveiled very soon!
Click here to pre-order your copy of this issue!

 –

FAULT Magazine – the Faces Issue – proudly presents exclusive shoots and interviews with:

Kylie Jenner

Jim Sturgess

Iwan Rheon

Michelle Monaghan

Audrey Kitching

To celebrate a landmark edition, FAULT Issue 20 includes very special ‘Faces of FAULT’ section, showcasing some Behind the Scenes insight from a selection of our favourite features from our 19 issues so far, including the likes of:

Rupert Grint (Issue 5)

Tom Felton (Issue 8)

Ali Lohan (Issue 9)

Adam Lambert (Issue 10)

Kelly Osbourne, Shay Mitchell, Logan Lerman, 2NE1 (Issue 12)

 Richard Armitage & Billy Bob Thornton (Issue 13)

Zach Braff & Daisy Lowe (Issue 14)

Ben Barnes, Big Sean, Tyra Banks, Ellie Goulding (Issue 15)

The Jonas Brothers (Issue 16)

Little Mix (Issue 17)

Demi Lovato, Usher, Debby Ryan (Issue 19)

Plus our usual, FAULTless selection of the finest editorial and feature content from both sides of the Atlantic and beyond – featuring some of the most internationally recognisable Faces in the world today.

This is your FAULT

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 20 – The Faces Issue – IS AVAILABLE TO PRE-ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

Under the Influence of Edward Munch – Dag Knudsen’s FAULT

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Photographer (pictured above): Dag Knudsen
Models: Johanne / Lea Petrine / Jeanett / Heartbreak Models
Makeup & hair: Lillian Aasebø
Design & Layout: Geir Lysbakken

The Cranleigh Boutique – visit whimsical Windermere for a wonderful UK Valentine’s Day retreat

cranleigh-boutique

The Cranleigh Boutique Hotel, Windermere, Cumbria (UK)

We’ve occasionally been accused of being too London-centric here at FAULT. But while it’s true that a lot of what we cover here in the UK happens in and around the capital, that doesn’t mean that we’re not interested in getting away from the big smoke every once in a while – or, more accurately, as often as we can! With Valentine’s Day just a few days away, we’re ready to jump at the chance to get out of town for a few days, and where better than one of the most naturally beautiful sites in the UK to do precisely that?

Although London on “V-Day” has its charms, anyone looking for the quintessential romantic retreat could do a lot worse than the rolling, rugged but simultaneously verdant backdrop of the Lake District. Cumbria’s Windermere cushions the famous lake of the same name and epitomises the idea of (hipsters look away now) quaint, English countryside in a way that few other destinations can manage.

cranleigh_boutique_hideaway_bedroom (Custom)

Th Cranleigh Boutique’s ‘Hideaway bedroom’

Tempted? If you’re not yet then you soon will be: Windermere manages to combine its idyllic setting with a plethora of outdoors activities and some truly spectacular hosptirality options – many of them at totally unspectacular prices. Right up there on our FAULT Favourite retreats list is the Cranleigh Boutique, perfectly located a short walk away from Lake Windermere itself and the village centre of Bowness-on-Windermere. The 5 star hideaway hotel is listed as the number 1 hotel in the area on Trip Advisor and the second best in the whole region of Cumbria (out of 175 in total) – and they are currently offering a fantastic ‘2 Night Winter Warmer’ deal that will be sure to keep the heat in your Valentine’s Day celebrations. Details below:

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2 Night Winter Warmer
January – March 31st

*
Enjoy a 2 Night Stay From £120 Per Night Including Champagne, Chocolates & Huggie

*

Treat yourself and your loved one to a fabulous offer of a 2 night luxury stay with a bottle of Champagne, Chocolates and a Huggie Bear waiting for you in one of our standard, superior or luxury rooms on arrival .

2 Nights in a Standard  Room     £240
2 Nights in a Superior Room       £280
2 Nights in a Luxury Room           £320
2 Nights in The Sanctuary           £640

*
Includes all of the following:

A bottle of champagne in your room on arrival
A Huggie Bear to adopt and take home with you
Handmade Cranleigh Chocolates
2 nights in a  standard,superior or luxury room of your choice
Free access to fantastic leisure facilities, 20m swimming pool, sauna and steam room (a two minute walk away)
Free access to our huge DVD library to fully relax in your room
Air spa baths with bathroom TV’s in all Luxury rooms
Enjoy our fantastic Cranleigh breakfast each morning
Located perfectly, only a two minute walk from dozens of fantastic places to eat and drink
Friendly genuine service that makes you feel cared for

*

This offer is valid from 1st January through to 31st March 2014. Excludes Bank Holidays, Christmas/ New Year & Valentines. Valid only Sunday – Friday. Cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer or existing bookings and is subject to availability.

 For more information, please visit:

www.thecranleigh.com
www.facebook.com/thecranleigh
www.twitter.com/thecranleigh

‘Homage’ – a tribute to the works of Guy Bourdin by Alice Luker

 

Jumpsuit Vintage Jacket Orion

Jumpsuit Vintage
Jacket Orion

Dress (worn as top) Rare London Trousers AQ/AQ

Dress (worn as top) Rare London
Trousers AQ/AQ

Blouse Topshop Pants Stylist's Own

Blouse Topshop
Pants Stylist’s Own

Dress Beyond Retro

Dress Beyond Retro

Photographer: Alice Luker
Stylist: Lauren Eva
MUA: Anna Priadka using NARS 
Hair Stylist: Cristian Pignatta using TECNI ART products from L’ORÉAL
 
Retoucher: Paul Snyder

The Night Before – Oriana Layendecker’s FAULT

Look 1- WEBLaissaIMG_1145

Jacket: Altuzarra
Boy’s shorts: Dolce & Gabbana
Neck piece: sophieblakeny.com
Ring: vintage
Shoes: Saint Laurent

Look 1 - WEBLaissaIMG_1090

(as above)

Look 2 -WEBLaissaIMG_1368

Bodysuit: Atsuko Kudo
Shoes: Saint Laurent
Neck-piece: Marni

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Shoes: Saint Laurent

Look 4 - WEBLaissaIMG_1616

Top: Bordelle
Chain: Chanel
Skirt: H&M
Boy’s shorts: Dolce & Gabbana
Shoes:Saint Laurent
Earrings Michael Kors
Ring: Chloe

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Bra: DSquared2
Leather Pant: Daniele Carlotta
Large pointer finger ring: Dannijo
Middle finger ring: Bliss Lau
Shoes: Saint Laurent
Ear cuff Vintage

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Fishnets: Betsy Johnson
Scarf & Diamonds: Vintage

Model: Laissa @ RED NYC
Photography: Oriana Layendecker
Styling: Stara PezeshkianThe Artist Agency

Hair: James Cornwell
Makeup: Carolyn Thombs