FAULT Favourite: Yoko Ono collaborates with Tiger on ‘Conceptual Photograpy’

 

The inimitable Yoko Ono, creative legend and FAULT Favourite, has collaborated with Danish brand Tiger on a new project- a conceptual art book centred on the idea that art should be accessible to all. The 159-page hardback, entitled ‘Conceptual Photography’, coincides with the artist’s latest exhibition, ‘Yoko Ono: One Woman Show 1960–1971’, taking place at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

coverA conceptual coffee-table tome, this project plays with words and photography in a beautifully poetic way, drawing the reader deep into Yoko’s wonderfully eccentric universe. A fantastical film script conjures a musical score consisting of an audience instructed to “hold bunch of white flowers, and pick them slowly”, whilst Ono urges the reader to “rearrange the photos in their mind.” By taking us on such an immersive journey between enigmatic narrative and poetic instruction, ‘Conceptual Photography‘ challenges us to perceive the world in a different way.

Two years in the making, Tiger and Ono have agreed to release the book for just £10-a nod to the idea of making the artwork accesible to all- and it is available in select Tiger stores across the UK. Mai Due Brinch, Concept Development Manager at Tiger comments, “Conceptual Photography breaks down genre borders, creating a fascinating ‘universe’ of text and images. The collaboration with Yoko Ono felt symbiotic given we share the same mission; to democratise access to art and move towards a truly inclusive experience, fair to both artist and spectator.”

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image courtesy of Yoko Ono and Tiger

 

Conceptual Photography is now available in selected UK Tiger stores. Yoko Ono’s exhibition entitled ‘Yoko Ono: One Woman Show 1960–1971’, at MoMA, New York, from May 17–September 7, 2015.

www.tigerstores.co.uk

Miguel new album entitled Wildheart out June 30th!

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Grammy Award winning recording artist Miguel has confirmed the official release date for his highly anticipated third studio album Wildheart, out June 30th. 

Serving as the follow-up to 2012’s incredibly arranged Kaleidoscope Dream which spent 20 weeks on Billboard’ 200 Album Chart, his new album will be just as steamy as its artwork. Speaking to VH1, Miguel described his upcoming release, saying  “It’s Los Angeles, it’s attitude, it’s aggression, it’s sex, it’s psychedelia, it’s lust, it’s loneliness. It’s just more aggressive. It’s just raw. That’s why I love this album.”

Wildheart is out June 30th on ByStorm Entertainment/Rca Records, but until then you can check out the teaser here

Jack Antonoff of ‘Bleachers’ interview with FAULT Magazine Online

 

 

 

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Jack Antonoff of Bleachers, fun. & Steel Train fame is a different kind of juggler. With more than 15 years of touring and writing music under his belt, he’s now releasing his own debut album with Bleachers. You’ve most likely heard their wildly popular tune ‘I wanna get better’ but there’s so much more to Bleachers than you could possibly wrap your mind around. They’re vivid, they’re genuine and they’re all the things you’ve ever wanted to please your ears with. We caught up with Jack and he’s most definitely a refreshingly special kind of special.

FAULT: Now that it’s been a bit more than a year since you first started releasing music as Bleachers, can you tell me how 2014 was for you? You kinda had a lot going on as a band.

Jack Antonoff: It’s been absolutely amazing.  It was really exciting, a bit terrifying as well. But then again, the best times in your life are when you’ve got different feelings happening all at once.

You’ve basically been in bands your entire life. Started out with Steel Train, then fun. and now Bleachers. Is there something specific that you took from each and encompassed musically in Bleachers?

I think I’ve been touring for like 15 years now with different bands, so it was more like going on a journey that keeps shifting, changing and redefining what you do. It’s constantly about challenging yourself, taking what you know and making it vastly different. Somehow.

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You also started to write the album for Bleacher while on tour with fun. How did you manage both? It sounds both physically and mentally challenging.

I don’t know, it was weird, I was never able to do that before. Anytime I’ve been on tour, that part of my brain shuts off, but for some reason, with this process I was able to do it. I’d wake up and be like in Japan, Malaysia, Europe or something, I’d  just open my computer and start writing. Then I’d be on the bus or on a plane and start working on a beat instead of watching a movie. It would just happen like that.

I’ve noticed that you’ve got two drummers, as opposed to the usual one you’ve had so far. Did you always wanna go for a louder sound?

Well, the two drummer thing is always very literal because, when I made the album, I desperately wanted to find a bridge between synthetic and organic. So I would create a beat on my pc using all these synthetic sounds and then I’d want it feeling different so I’d play live drums on top of it. The album is made with very much these two elements, even like synthesizers and then guitars. So the drums are literally like these two guys and they switch off. One guy will do more like pads and one guy will play more live. They kind of complement each other in that way. So a lot of what happens live is a very literal translation of the album.

So it helped you not lose bits and pieces from the album while playing live basically.

Yeah, because I think when you create a live show, you do the best that you can to represent the album, knowing that’s it’s just going to go in a fucking different place anyway.  Which it ends up doing no matter what.

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Now that you mention it, the whole creative process that lies underneath releasing an album is quite challenging. You go from complete control to no control what so ever.

Yeah, it’s very weird. It’s what’s exciting, it’s what’s scary but it’s also what makes you feel very alive. To be in that sort of really exciting place of knowing that you’re handing it over and it’s gonna be redefined by people emotionally.   

You’ve worked with synth-pop pioneer Vince Clarke of Erasure and Depeche Mode fame on your album. How did you come across him and why did you feel that he was the right person to reach out to? 

I love him, he’s an idol of mine, he inspired a lot of my music and what he did with Erasure and Depeche Mode sonically is just incredible. I wanted those elements in the album, I wanted those pieces of nostalgia mixed with the future. I met him one day for a drink and I told him how brilliant he was for like an hour and we were never in the same room after that. Everything we did, I’d send him a song and he would send back ideas and I would cherry pick them and put them in. It was all very remote.

“I wanna get better” is currently one of your most popular songs. I’ve noticed that there’s a lot going on musically in it. Could you tell me a bit about your production process? 

It’s very layered. I recorded some piano on my phone in Germany and then I started sort of pitching it and then I put these like big kind of drums behind it and it almost felt like a hip-hop beat.  I thought I might give it to a rapper or something. But then, I put that low bass in the chorus and I was like nope, this is my song. And I had this idea in my head for I wanna get better and I was desperately trying to find the right song to put it in.  And the verses, it all was sort of weird, frantic and choppy. Then it got even weirder when I started adding voices of people, just like people in my life, friends and family and thrown them all over the song.  I did that a lot in the album.  And it just started to turn into this thing that sounded like a sound I had in my head that I hadn’t really heard yet out loud. It just built and built and built and built.  Took a long time. It kept slowly combating. Anytime something felt choppy I’d just add a guitar or when something felt too organic, I’d add some fucking synthesizer on top of it. I was just like constantly fighting with it.

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Your album opens with Wild Heart and you’ve worked with Yoko Ono on the track. But you’ve done it both with and without her.

Yeah, two reprise. So she ends up on the later version.

What was the experience like, in both cases? 

Well, the first version is one of the first songs we wrote for the album. I always knew it would open it cause it introduces the whole thing, it guides you in slowly and then smashes you in the face when the drums hit. And lyrically, the song means a lot to me, the concept of finding the best in the people around and not being concerned about death everywhere you go.  But I had this idea that the album would just descend into this digital place, so the reprise of Wild Heart fully crumbles into all synthesizers and I kept hearing this spoken song type of thing in my head that sounded like Yoko. So finally, I asked my manager if he’d call Yoko and see if she’d come to the studio and do it. So she came in, I remember it was Christmas cause she was eating Christmas cookies. She went into the booth and just started screaming and talking and singing and making noises, like all these crazy stuff. I took home the file that night and found all these moments where she’d be yelling and then she’d be singing something really beautiful like “I’m ready to move on” and then keep yelling. So I just grabbed these pieces and kind of created the song out of her organic expression.

You’ve mentioned earlier that lyrically, Wild Heart means a lot to you. You seem to have this tendency in your songwriting to write something extremely depressing and then sprinkle some upbeat pop on top of them. Sometimes, I don’t even know whether to dance or start weeping. Was that your intent?

That’s how I see music. It should be both. I think that the greatest songs make you cry in your bed if you want or dance with your friends if you want. It’s the same feeling. Being super emotionally attached to a song that you cry or so excited by a song that you want to move. It’s the same thing. All my favourite songs do that. Springsteen does that too, it should exist everywhere.

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Apart from making people feel confused when listening to your music (I’m absolutely joking), what’s your FAULT? 

I can focus too much on stressful or anxious things.  Also, I get really stressed out when people are sick. And I make them feel bad.

Photography: Miles Holder

Interview: Adina Ilie

ANNINA ROESCHEISEN : A MULTIMEDIA ARTIST TO WATCH

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Credit to Annina Roescheisen

Annina Roescheisen is a half German half Slovenian multimedia artist based in Paris since 2009 ; she is specialized in Medieval art and she used to work for a little while for Sotheby’s in Munich before being full time dedicated to photography, films, sculptures, drawings, writings and human causes, especially to children. I met her last Saturday at her Parisian studio in 17th arrondissement and we naturally started talking about our common friend and visual artist Fawad Khan who used to sublet his Brooklyn apartment to her when she visited the big apple for work from times to times… At the moment, she is living between Paris and NYC ; NYC is the place where she is creating and writing whereas Paris is where she produces her artwork.  She is exhibiting her last video piece “What are you fishing for?” at the 56th International Venice Biennale in a few days and she is very excited about it : “It will be my first time attending the official opening as a featured artist so I will be going with the flow, it’s a big step for me! I hope I will be meeting up there with some friends : Xavier Veilhan and his studio team, some NY friends and my friend the galerist Imane Fares. I still don’t realize I am part of this international exhibition. It’s completely surrealistic…”. She added : “Having good supportive friends is very important when you enroll yourself in an artistic venture as you can easily feel lonely… It is essential to open yourself to what life is for real, accept failures and be patient, and of course, stop judging and labelling as good and bad things which are around you.” If you closely look at her website, you will notice she has a tab entitled “HUMANITY” where she features all of her actions towards human causes. She was recently selected by a French charity, L’Assiette Gourm’Hand, to take part in the jury process, under the patronage of the President of the Republic François Hollande, of a food experience designed by several groups of developmentally disabled people alongside big French Chefs next November. This human creature is a bottomless pit of generosity and creativity ; it is hauntingly beautiful. At the end of our talk from German painters to autism, she invited me to watch her selected video for the Venice Biennale in a darker and smaller space. The setting was perfect ; she built a TV frame made of birchwood to add a little something to her eight-minute narrative story. The music created by The Shoes’s band member Benjamin Lebeau as a background noise fits it so well. It helps you plunge in the water with this young pale girl all in white -played by the artist herself-, clean yourself from fears and thoughts and make peace with all around you for a bit. It feels so good to be stranded in the present time at this space full of good vibrations and energy. When going back to the main space, she handed me a little rainbow-colored book entitled LILLIE recommending me to read it on the train whenever I feel like it (Of course I read it right after leaving her). LILLIE is her first published book and I believe she is telling her own story through a little girl who is searching for peace of mind, facing both interior and exterior barriers… Welcome home, Annina! And thank you for being true to yourself.

Iwan Rheon: Game Of Thrones & Vicious Star in Exclusive Photoshoot For FAULT #20

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Words: Olivia Pinnock
Photography: Leigh Keily @ lovely Management
Fashion Editor: Kristine Kilty
Grooming: Amy Brandon @ lovely ManageMent

 

FAULT 20 has hit the shelves and we can now preview shots from our interview with Iwan Rheon!  We’re half expecting him to slither up to the table and eyeball us with a disjointed grin on his face. Instead, Welsh actor Iwan Rheon, the man behind Ramsay Snow, swaggers up in a leather jacket and sunglasses and flashes a ‘cheeky chappy’ .

Ian McKellen’s ‘Vicious’ co-star is developing a dark streak in his work. FAULT digs deeper with Iwan Rheon on the unusual inspiration behind ‘Game of Thrones’ most twisted villain and a strange fairy tale film coming soon.

 

Ramsay Snow is a really nasty piece of work. How do you get into the mind-set of someone like that?

You have to try and figure out why he is like he is, and figure out the reasons for him being like that. Things like: he loves inflicting pain, why is that? The key to it is that it really is the joy of it all. He just loves it. So you have to find that joy in it which is a bit dark.

Do you have any inspiration points for him?

I was thinking The Joker from The Dark Knight meets Dennis the Menace. That was my initial thoughts. He’s an evil Dennis the Menace.

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What’s your dream role?

I would have said Bilbo Baggins but that’s already been done… bastards.

Do you like playing a villain?

I do, yeah! [Chuckles]. It’s good fun. I’ve played lots of characters who are really introverted and hold everything inside so it’s nice not to have all that. It’s all extrovert and it’s really good fun.

 

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Vicious is filmed in front of a live audience, how does that change the dynamic?
It’s actually quite helpful I think because they’re having such a wonderful time. The first time I remember thinking, ‘What’s this going to be like?’ I was standing backstage ready to go on and then I could hear the warm reception that Derek [Jacobi] and Ian [McKellen] were getting so I thought, ‘Oh this is going to be fine.’ You go out and everything falls into place. The audience love it because they never get to see great actors like Ian and Derek and Frances [de la Tour] mess up. They absolutely love it and that gives you that warm feeling that you’

 

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 20 – THE FACES ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

Yasmine Hamdan on Soapkills

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Yasmine Hamdan

Do you remember Soapkills? They were one of the first underground electro bands created in Beirut by Yasmine Hamdan and Zeid Hamdan (They are not family-related!) in the 1990’s playing a mix of dub + trip hop, arabic and folk sounds. They stopped creating music together in 2005 when Yasmine was studying in Paris and collaborating with Mirwais, the ex-guitarist of the Taxi Girl band and three albums producer of the American pop star Madonna.

Still supported by hundreds of thousands of fans, we just heard they were releasing their best of on May 11th and we had a little chat with Yasmine Hamdan in Paris last week about the origin of their band’s name… The band was created at the end of the Lebanese civil war when there was absolutely nothing in terms of music and art. They had the vision of starting a new form of expression for the after-war young rootless generation : “Soapkills was kind of a joke ; Beirut was very moving, melancholic and hopeful at that time. It was very inspiring and when they started to rebuild the city, Zeid wrote a song named “Soap kills”. The soap actually referred to the reconstruction that was going to erase all the war marks, the hurtful moments and make everything look beautiful and sexy… The song meant it was actually dangerous. We opted for this band’s name and we started to film a lot of short videos playing with little bomb-shaped soaps from Tripoli. In one of these videos, I was walking in the half-destroyed city of Beirut and I came up on a little pedestal ; I had long black hair, all dressed in white… There was a little post apocalyptic side in it but it was made with a lot of humour. It was like a “wake up call” to say “Let’s be careful, the war is over, let’s take our time”. So we had a lot of fun playing with this term of “soap””…

She also shared with us a bit of her experience playing in Jim Jarmusch’s Only Lovers Left Alive (2014). She met the director during a film festival in Marrakech after being randomly invited to perform ; he approached her at the end of her gig saying he had a role for her. Then she wrote Hal for the movie and she enjoyed a lot her part in it : “It was an extraordinary experience, Tangier is a beautiful city ; we shot all night long and there was a real magic energy that night between the public and me. I don’t know if it was Ramadan but it felt very special… I remember this little boy walking by himself on the streets at about 2 am. It was surrealistic. I really felt the beginning of something good coming in this city…”.

Yasmine will be on tour from next week starting on May 7th at the Arab world institute in Roubaix. Check out all the tour dates on her website.

 

Meet the Wilders

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Credit to Neil Wilder + Tanja Wilder-Roos

 

The creative Brooklyn-based pair Neil + Tanja want their art works to make people smile; and they hope they help them think about what is important in life. They do fashion and advertising. They do portraits too. Vivienne Westwood, Clint Eastwood, Tim Burton, JK Rowling, Yoko Ono, Beth Ditto, Arctic Monkeys, Adrien Brody, Adele, Scarlett Johansson… The list of celebrities they already shot goes on and on… What else? They like brie cheese, the orange colour and Ozzy Osbourne ; and today they are enrolling their kids and friends in a new venture. Au menu : animation, illustration, video and conceptual art direction. The Bushwick chocolate factory Fine & Raw whose mission is to save the world through silliness and chocolate is among their best clients. You can find more info about how their hypnotic + childish world looks like by visiting their website. Anything is possible inawilderworld

 

 

FAULT Future: Flo Morrissey

 

Flo Morrissey is a chanteuse who sits somewhere between a Lana Del Rey penchant for romantic nostalgia, the bohemian power of Florence & the Machine, the whispered and mystical vocals of early Björk, and the effortless charm of Jane Birkin or Stevie Nicks.

At only 20, her sound and lyrics are incredibly well-honed, born of influences her contemporaries haven’t heard of and a detachment from pop culture that has made her incredibly unique both to listen to, and to look at.

Having just released her debut single ‘Pages of Gold‘, and just finished her first tour in the UK supporting The Staves, we sat down with Flo to talk cinematic sounds, the world around the artist, and the power of not always saying yes…

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

How are you finding the tour so far?

I’m loving it – it’s my first one so it was quite daunting to start with, doing something new every night for people who haven’t necessarily come to see you! But it’s great to be playing with The Staves because the audience is there to really listen.

In terms of your biggest performances so far – SXSW, Green Man, etc. – it seems like you are really selective when it comes where to play. Is that the case?

Yeah, it’s just the way my path has gone. I think it’s down to the Internet- I started putting up my demos at 14 and never really did shows in pubs or clubs like other acts. I was just lucky that my manager found me online. I think people say yes to too many things nowadays, and it takes away the special nature of actually doing a show.

Is the live aspect something you enjoy, or is it something you find daunting?

I enjoy it more and more because I’m still new to it – but you never know how you’re going to feel after a show. One thing could change and you wish you had done it differently. But I want to perform more and I’m excited to do more shows. It’s just hard in the beginning! When I go on the road, I’ll hopefully have a multi-instrumentalist to play with me so it will be a little less daunting and lonely.

Beyond the live show, is sharing the actual music something that makes you feel vulnerable?

I don’t really think about it until after, when I realise how weird it can be to speak about the songs. I’d rather people had their own interpretation of it. It’s nice to think that someone else might get something from it as well.

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

The individualism of your music and vision is clearly close to your heart. As you grow as an artist- being signed and managed and touring in the UK and beyond- is it harder to retain that sense of self?

I picked my label because they completely let me do what I want to, and I don’t have to compromise. People have this idea of the music industry as this place where you always have to say yes, but you really don’t. I still do my own Facebook and Instagram, and I wouldn’t want that to ever change.

How did you start writing music?

I started putting stuff on Myspace when I was about 14. I used to sing more classical music at school, but I started playing guitar and it was just more fun! So I made my own recordings, and my own videos, and put covers online. I was this 15 year-old girl acting as my own manager, sending my music out to blogs and it just felt really natural.

In that vein of being your own manager, it seems that your vision is really all-encompassing? Is it important to you that all the elements are cohesive in that way?

I think it is really important to have a kind of world around the artist, but then you can’t think about it in that way. I just try to be natural about it.

How do you see yourself going forward? Pages of Gold, (the upcoming single), marks a shift towards a much bigger sound.

I am really open to experimentation and a lot of the songs on the album have big string sections. I’d love to bring a live band on tour because a lot of the songs are quite cinematic and I’m glad it went that way. It could have been a real folk record but I always wanted to have this more cinematic sound.

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

How was the process of recording your album in LA over the summer?

It was quite lonely at time because LA is just such a huge place. It was the longest I’ve ever been away from home but my manager lives there which was great, and I get along so well with Noah, the producer.

You are quite a quintessentially British artist- what do you see as the differences between making music in the US and the UK?

It was quite inspiring to be there because they won’t say no- they had this kind of “you go girl!” mentality (laughs) and it was actually really good for me! They strive for a lot and it’s so easy, and English, to be self-deprecating but it helped in music terms to have that empowerment on hand.

Do you feel the music industry has been really supportive so far?

I’ve been so lucky but I try not to think about it too much! I sometimes feel like my music is maybe not that accessible, especially with just me and a guitar because it’s so vulnerable and raw. It won’t appeal to everyone but I strangely like that. Usually the best things are the ones that have flaws.

On that note, what is your FAULT?

I worry too much!

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

Flo Morrissey (2015), by Kurtiss Lloyd

https://www.facebook.com/FloMorrissey

All photographs by Kurtiss Lloyd