Wireless Festival 2018 – London’s Hottest Music Festival

 


Wireless 2018 on paper promised to be the king of the day festivals in London this year, with heavyweights from the hip hop and R&B scene converging on a weekend in the Finsbury Park sunshine. We arrived on Friday excited for what was in store, and were not disappointed. 

 


Friday:
We were welcomed by the “The Godfather of Grime” (to give his full title), who launched straight into his summer anthem Wearing My Rolex. Reports he was indeed wearing his Rolex are unconfirmed at this point, but it got the crowd hyped. After some more bangers from the grime legend, we waited the arrival of one of hip-hop’s most respected artists in Big Sean.

Taking us through his major hits, Big Sean showed why his career continues to go from strength to strength. The high point was Bounce Back, and truly went beast mode on the Wireless faithful.  

Post Malone might be the hottest property right now in the music scene, and he showed it here. Taking the crowd through the songs that put him on the map (White Iverson, Congratulations, I Fall Apart), through to a collection from his new album (Paranoid, Candy Paint, Psycho), the crowd was hyped and ready for the headline act to draw the curtain down on the first night.

Enter J Cole. Bounding about the stage with energy and passion, the North Carolina rapper who showed just why he was chosen to return to the headline slot at Wireless. His incredible lyricism was on show, and energised the crowd desperate to hear J Cole deliver his latest album.



Sunday:

67 have been making noise on the UK scene with their energetic brand of drill music popularised in Chicago. And they made some noise here in Finsbury Park. Despite some controversy around the scene here in the UK, 67 showed why there’s a place for them on the UK music scene.

Onto Giggs, the veteran of the grime scene, who took us through a plethora of bangers. From what made him famous in Talkin The Hardest and Look What The Cat Dragged In through to his latest hit, London Town. He closed with KMT, a song he is the feature on with none other than…

Drake – reports earlier in the day confirmed DJ Khaled would not be arriving for his headline set. Understandably, there was worry at what the festival organisers could do at such short notice. But they came through with the biggest hip hop star in the world. Not bad at all. He blasted through songs from his new album, including God’s Plan and Nice For What, whipping the crowd into a frenzy and bringing to a close a quite stunning weekend of music.

With a billion streams in A WEEK, there is no denying that Drake sits on top of the music scene right now.

And that was it for Wireless. Again delivering as the hottest day festival right now in London. Until next year.

Brendon Urie FAULT Magazine Online Covershoot

Words: Courtney Farrell

Photography: Miles Holder

Styling: Edith Walker Millwood

Grooming: Oliver Woods

 

This weekend,  Panic! at the Disco’s ‘Pray for the Wicked’ debuted at No.1 spot on the Billboard 200 Album Charts and we couldn’t be more excited. We’re proud to present our latest FAULT Magazine Online cover star is non-other than band frontman, Brendon Urie! You can also find more images and exclusive photographs within our next print issue but for now, enjoy our very special cover feature below!

 

“Hey Look Ma, I Made It”, one of the songs from your new album, Pray For The Wicked, opens with the lines “All my life been hustling and tonight is my appraisal / because I’m a hooker selling songs and my pimp’s a record label,”  Do you often find yourself torn between celebrating your successes and battling the evils of your industry?

Brendon Urie: It’s not too far from the truth, I am a hooker that sells songs. I’m a glorified t-shirt salesman. I go out on the road and I play songs to make people happy, and to interact with them and so that we can all celebrate, but at the end of the night I’m really trying to sell clothes, right? I’m like, “buy my merch please so that I can have a great life as well and we can all support each other.” It’s a weird contradiction the way the music industry is. Luckily I do this because I have a passion for it, and the byproducts of things I get to talk about ironically a little more tongue-in-cheek, like yeah, I’m a whore that sells my own music, and my record label is a pimp that pushes me to everybody, distributes me, talks me up, and gets as much mileage as they can out of me. It’s a dark realization, it’s a dark truth, it’s a very real thing, but I wouldn’t change it for the world. This is something that I’m so passionate about that I would never want to give up, so it’s bittersweet really.

 

You reference your childhood dreams coming true, but you probably didn’t expect to become somewhat of an LGBTQ icon for your fans. Between the success of Girls/Girls/Boys and your cameo in Love, Simon, it seems that LGBTQ positivity has become a big part of your brand. How do you feel about that?

BU: It makes me so happy. Growing up and having friends who weren’t accepted in certain circles, whether they were gay, not a certain religion or creed, or whatever, it’s nice to know that now I feel a part of a family that maybe I didn’t feel an affinity to in the past.

What’s even cooler than that, is that I write songs for myself about things that I’m feeling personally about my own life, and fans can take a song and completely give it a new meaning, which makes me so happy. I wrote the song “Girls/Girls/Boys” about my first threesome, and kids grabbed onto that and took it as a universal language for like, it doesn’t matter who you are, we can all love whoever we want to. That’s a way cooler idea, and the fact that fans have the mentality and the mobility to do that just inspires me to move forward in a more generous light and try to give as much as they’ve given me.

 

That song really has taken on a life of its own, when you play it live you’re handed rainbow flags and fans light up rainbow hearts. That must be amazing.

BU: It’s my favorite. When I look out into the crowd and I see how happy they are and how liberated they seem to be, that makes it all worthwhile. That’s better than any drug, that’s better than any other experience. That right there, that interaction, I get to see the immediate happiness that they receive from that. It makes me so proud to be a part of whatever this is.

Jacket – Ben Sherman | T- shirt – Brendon’s own

Pray For The Wicked is your sixth studio album, and you’ve managed to stay active and successful for the 13 years since your first album. Do you ever consciously think about staying relevant or is it not important to you?

 

BU: Honestly, I don’t really care about that shit. It’s not that I don’t want to do things, I only do things if I have a passion for it and I can see a greater outcome, not just for me. We get offered things all the time, whether that be endorsements or shows or whatever, and I say no most of the time. My manager will send me some stuff and he’ll ask what I think, and the majority of the time I’m saying no because it doesn’t feel right to do something just for a company because they’re looking for a handout or whatever it may be. I only do things if it feels right, if it makes me proud to have done that. I never used to think that way until the last year or two, so that has changed a lot of what I do for the better. I think it’s much better to do it that way, I just want to do better all the time.

 

That ties in with a line from “Say Amen (Saturday Night)”, which is “I can’t change into a person I don’t want to be.” It’s about honesty, is staying true to yourself important for you?

 

BU: Absolutely. That’s one of the most key things I think for any human as a trait. Honesty is one of the most important qualities to have as a human being. Other people say that politeness is key, and that’s fine. It’s good to be kind and polite to other people, but at the same time don’t change change your views. Have courage behind your convictions, know who you are. You’ve got to be you. You have to be unapologetic about who you are, don’t ever apologize for that. If people get offended, they’re just looking for something to be offended by, and if not they’re just offended by it and they have a more delicate sensibility and I couldn’t give a shit, you know what I mean? That’s not to say I don’t care, but I want to make sure that honesty and directness come across as more important.

 

You almost named this album “fame is the thirst of youth,” a quote by Lord Byron, which reminded me of “Dying in LA”. Is that a direct correlation, that as time goes on the less fame means?

BU: Yeah to a certain extent, that is a pretty fair summation. When I was younger, I thought it was going to be so cool to be famous, but I didn’t think about it a lot. I was still focused on the things that I loved, like just making music, performing, making music videos, doing records, wearing funny clothes, putting on makeup. All this stuff was so fun for me to do, so I wasn’t really thinking about what I’d do when we get big. There were a couple instances over a couple years that I maybe didn’t handle fame that well. I realized that I was never searching for it. I think my goal is never to be famous. I’m never trying to not be able to leave my house because I’d be noticed all the time, that would suck.

 

When you released “High Hopes”, you tweeted that you’d “worried about how it felt to fail,” and “had to aim high and fail, fail, fail in order to keep growing.” Have there been any moments throughout the years that felt like failures you wouldn’t be able to overcome?

 

BU: For me, failure in the moment always feels like I’ll never overcome it. I have to push past a certain point and almost have faith that I’m going to get through it because it’s happened every single time fear hits me. I just have to hit a certain point and trust myself that as long as I show up and as long as I’m doing what I’m passionate about it’s going to work out in the way that I saw fit because I tried and I did the things I was passionate about, rather than hoping that people like me, hoping that I get notoriety, hoping that I get a number one album. That’s all byproduct. It’s cool if it happens, but it’s not what I’m after. I’m after making something that I’m so proud of that I can share with however many fans. That’s something better than drugs, it’s better than most things in my life. Being able to be on a stage, connect with fans, meet them and hear their stories, see their tweets, read their amazing poems, and hear their covers of our songs. They inspire me and it’s really cool to know that as long as you’re doing what you love, how can you be wrong?

 

You’ll be headlining Reading and Leeds Festival later this summer, are you looking forward to it?

BU: I’m losing my mind! I’m losing my mind because it was billed as a co-headline show with Kendrick Lamar, but I’m not treating it that way. I’m treating it the same way that I treated the Weezer tour, like we are opening for Weezer. We are the warm up band for Kendrick Lamar, and that’s how I’m going to treat it because I have such a love and respect for Kendrick Lamar as an artist and a human being. His seems like his head is in the right place, he’s so wise beyond his years, and I’m just a fan of the music. I’m going to have to stay away, they’re going to have to get extra security. He just seems like the coolest person ever so it’s an honor to be on the same bill as him, I can’t wait to watch him live.

 

What is your FAULT?

BU: I feel like everything is my fault. This whole album is my fault. I didn’t expect to have an album out, but I’m so glad that I did. I’m so glad that I felt inspired, because I was not expecting it and it was the biggest, most pleasant surprise I could have asked for.

 

Style In My DNA – An Exploration of Windrush Style and Fashion

Seventy years ago today, the SS Windrush pulled in at Tilbury dock, bringing with it the first Caribbean workforce to help rebuild Britain after the second world war. This would mark the first but not the last mass migration of peoples from the Carribean to the UK as more and more citizens of the commonwealth were encouraged to “do their part” and help rebuild the then wartorn motherland.

Lorna Holder’s ‘Style In My DNA: 70 years of British Caribbean fashion’, chronicles the ever-changing waves of Carribean fashion. The book begins with the very first men who stepped off the SS Windrush in 1948 and continues up to the present the day.

The book features a mixture of fashion photography, illustration and archival imagery to show the idea fashion and style helped bring an entire generation of peoples from outliers of society to being at the very forefront of fashion, design and beauty industry today.

Lorna Holder (centre) – Head of Young Fashion at Davis and Field (1980s)

Alongside the fashion analysis, the book also contains Lorna Holder’s own personal memoirs, giving us a first-hand account of just what was happening within the fashion industry behind closed doors. Most notably, it reveals just what a black woman in 1952 would have to face in order to gain notoriety within the worlds most exclusive industry.

1980’s Preppy look

While there is a focus on the British style, the book also take us on a journey around the world as we read Lorna climbs the ladder at New York City’s Bloomingdales, studies under the tutelage of Pauline Denyer, (wife of the well-known fashion designer, Sir Paul Smith), conducts Oman’s first televised fashion show in Oman and much more.

All in all, ‘Style In My DNA: 70 years of British Caribbean fashion’, provides a look at the fashion industry from a whole new vantage point. While both a theoretical study and autobiographic read, it reminds us that the Windrush generation and the generations that followed played a huge part in shaping the fashion industry into what it is today. To bear witness to the fundamental ways Carribean culture and fashion have shaped the UK and beyond, is to ensure that the
significant contributions made throughout the years will never be forgotten.

 

Style In My DNA is available from Foyles, Waterstones, Taureg

Join Lorna Holder as she discusses her 35-year career in the fashion industries at London V&A Museum on June 24th 2018

 

 

FAULT in conversation with Warpaint’s Theresa ‘TT’ Wayman

Words: Jennifer Parkes

 

Have you heard of TT? The moniker may not be too familiar right now, but you’re almost certain to know of Theresa Wayman, founding member of iconic indie rock band Warpaint, and otherwise known as TT.

 

While the group’s psychedelic dream pop has enticed and entranced fans for the past 14 years, last month saw Wayman release her own offering, LoveLaws, under her two-lettered alter-ego. But this is no band break-up – Warpaint shows no signs of slowing down, with several tour dates in the diary for 2018. FAULT caught up with Wayman in between shows to talk more about her debut solo offering, the challenges facing women in the music industry, and dream festival line-ups…

 

So, you’ve just released a solo album, which is pretty exciting! What made you decide to do that alongside Warpaint?

I just needed to be expressing more than I can do in Warpaint; it’s been 14 years being in a collaborative process, and I wanted to experience being on my own and having more control.

 

Did you approach this album differently at all to how you approach creating an album as a band? What were the challenges in that?

I didn’t have to do it in any specific timeframe, so I was able to indulge myself and question things more. It was scary to do that at times, and I worried I would never make it to the end – sometimes it seemed like I could keep questioning forever, but I figured it out!

 

You examine love and relationships in a number of ways across different tracks, but I’m also intrigued by the album’s title ‘LoveLaws’ – how did that come to be?

I thought of that title as a good concept to build an album from. I was feeling ruled by love and romance, and also seeing love as being a fundamental of life in so many ways. It seemed important to write about it.

 

Who would you say your influences have been, both in your own music and as a band? 

First and foremost, my music is always influenced by my emotions and mood. I tend to go into starting a song feeling blind, like I have no idea what will come out of me until I see it on the page. But then I start to hone it and let influences in, like Al Green, Sade or Trip Hop like Portishead and Massive Attack. Also current artists like King Krule, Rihanna and Adele, and that song ‘Get Free’ by Major Lazer.

 

How do you feel Warpaint’s sound has developed over the last 14 years?

I think Warpaint has gone in many directions over the years; we’re becoming more concise with our arrangements and clearer in what we’re saying. We used to jam a lot and write together in a room, but we did less of that on this last album – I think we’re into the idea of going back to that again, just because that old way now seems like something new and different.

 

 

It’s impressive that, as an all-female four-piece, Warpaint has stood the test of time in a notoriously misogynistic industry – how have you dealt with challenges that you’ve faced over the years in this respect? 

I think there’s more freedom in the indie-rock world for a girl band to exist, and not feel as much pressure and expectation to be something appealing to men. I think that’s a lot more common in the pop world.

 

I’ve generally felt very welcomed by our male peers, although there are times I’ve felt excluded from “the boys club”, like I can’t be a part of some technical conversation or ask questions. But I think the guys that act like that are the most insecure, and ultimately want to exclude women just because they just don’t know how to talk to them or don’t feel attractive to them.

 

Are there any new artists that you’re into at the moment you think we should keep an ear out for?

Kali Uchis, who I’m sure you’ve already heard of! And Dick Stusso – he’s from Oakland, he’s a really great singer/guitar player/overall musician, and he’s self-produced.

 

You guys have a few tour dates  over summer, including playing at All Points East Festival – are there any bands you happened to catch while you were there, or at other festivals?

Yes! War On Drugs at All Points East, and I saw Bjork and Fever Ray at Primavera – they were absolutely incredible!

 

If you were to host a festival, anywhere in time and space, what would your dream location and line-up be? 

Probably on the beach somewhere in the Caribbean. It would be Bjork from the Homogenic tour, so that she’s playing songs from debut and post too, with Portishead, Nirvana, Al Green, Kendrick Lamar, Fever Ray, Tina Turner, Aretha Franklin, Nina Simone, and Bob Dylan playing all my favourite songs from over the years (I would get to choose)… the list could really go on and on!

 

Lastly, something we ask all of our guests, what is your FAULT?

I can be really stubborn and not let things go, and I always need to be right. I’m working on it!

 

LoveLaws is available to buy now – visit ttlovelaws.com for more info.

 

First Aid Kit talk Ruins, burnout & brave new beginnings for FAULT Online cover

FAULT Magazine X First Aid Kit

Photographer: David Yeo, Fashion Editor: Rachel Holland

 

FAULT: Stay Gold came out in 2014. What were you doing for the four years until Ruins?

Johanna (First Aid Kit): We toured Stay Gold intensely for about a year and a half following it’s release. After that we felt quite burnt out and exhausted. We could’ve kept touring forever. However, since we’d toured pretty much non-stop since we were teenagers we felt like we needed a little break. We needed time to figure out our lives, beyond First Aid Kit. We lived in separate countries. I stayed in Stockholm while Klara moved to Manchester for two years. It was necessary to get a break from not just the band and the music, but from each other. It was pretty difficult but we feel like we learnt so much about ourselves and about life during this time period. We built serious relationships, bought our own apartments. Klara started taking acting classes. I got a driver’s license. We needed to catch up on some grown up things we’d been missing out on.

 

When did you start work on Ruins?

Johanna (First Aid Kit): When we took our break we told ourselves we didn’t need to work on new material straight away, we didn’t want to rush another record. We didn’t even have to listen to any music or go to any shows if we didn’t want to. However, pretty quickly after the touring ended we felt quite eager to perform and write again. Klara broke up with her boyfriend and had a little bit of a life crisis. This inspired the theme of the album and sort of got us started on it.

We went to Los Angeles for six weeks in April 2016. We rented a house in Echo Park and went on road trips across California. We hung out with other musician friends and gathered inspiration. That’s when we finished writing most of the tracks that ended up on Ruins.

 

 

How does it differ to your previous records?

Johanna (First Aid Kit): We wanted to try new things on Ruins. Because it’s dealing with a relationship ending, the lyrics are both more personal and more universal than on our previous records. Before our lyrics were a lot more fictional and had more story telling elements. This time the songs are more direct. I think it stems from us being older, more experienced and more in touch with our own emotions. We’re also braver in a sense, it takes a lot of courage to write so openly about your inner feelings.

We decided to work with a new producer in a new city, so we reached out to a long-time favorite producer of ours, Tucker Martine. We told him we wanted to make an album that was less polished, had more of a live feel and a little more edge. Previously, we’d been pretty strict about the sounds we allowed on our records. It had to be very folky, pretty and acoustic. This time we sort of through all those ideas away, and we’re very open to new things. Whatever fit the song, we went for. It was super refreshing.

 

First Aid Kit - FAULT Magazine

Johanna Wears: Red Silk Slip Dress by Amanda Wakeley, Black Poloneck Top by Alice McCall, Red Boots by Zadig & Voltaire, Pearl Hooped Earrings by Dower & Hall

 

Obviously, this is your fourth album, has the process been different to your others? 

Klara (First Aid Kit): The songwriting process hasn’t changed that much since we started, but this time we wanted to make sure we really took the time we needed not to rush the record. All songs stem from a line, an idea, a lyric and then we work from there. Sometimes that takes less than five minutes, sometimes it takes years. In the end the most important thing for us is that we end up with songs that feel real and interesting. Something that makes us curious.

This time the recording process was different because we had a live session band that improvised a lot in the studio. It was so much fun! Getting to hear all these musicians that we’ve looked up to for so long play on our songs was a dream come true.

 

First Aid Kit - FAULT Magazine

Klara Wears: Black Blazer by Stine Goya, Red Tule Skirt by Amanda Wakeley, Black Top by Black Gold by Diesel, Red Loafers by Kim Kwang, Gold Curved Earrings by Dower & Hall, Silver Ring by Dower & Hall

 

How have you grown since your 2010 debut?

Johanna (First Aid Kit): When I watch old YouTube clips of us performing I feel like we’ve changed so much. We were just kids when we started out, although we felt like we were so much older back then. We were pretty insecure. We can hear in our old songs when we’re trying to imitate our idols and it’s kind of cute. It’s definitely not something we’re ashamed of.

We’ve always been good at what we do and had a strong core in our music, but we’ve just grown so much more confident with the years. Both in the studio and on the road, we trust our instincts much more and can relax. I don’t think we care so much about what people think anymore. We’ve always sort of been following our gut feeling, and it’s lead us this far…so we must be onto something, right?

 

Does this last album feel like the most “First Aid Kit” like album?

Johanna (First Aid Kit): I think all records are very ”First Aid Kit”-like in their own pretty ways. They’re just documents of who we were at that certain period of our lives. We think of them as time capsules. We don’t want to stick to a sound too much, we truly are open for experimenting. Who knows what the future will bring, getting too comfortable in a certain style is boring.

 

So talking about Ruins, can you tell me a bit about the lyrical inspirations behind it?

Klara (First Aid Kit): When we went to Los Angeles to write the record I had just gone through a breakup. The wound was quite open. I thought I was going down one road and then it all changed. The songs came through that and so of course, they all mirror that intense experience of this major loss. Visually, we see the record as a ruin of a relationship, walking around it, exploring it and trying to understand it. It felt like an important record to write as honestly and boldly as possible. That is how you get a real connection with people, which is always what we strive for.

 

And musically?

Klara (First Aid Kit): We always follow where we feel the songs want to go, arrangement wise. We usually have more a broad sense of what we want a record to be – this one we felt needed to be a little more raw with more of a live sound. Honestly, it’s all about the gut feeling. You go on in with ideas and expectations but in the end you go with what feels right and good.

We were listening to a lot of different music during the writing process, like Big Thief, Angel Olsen, Whitney and Mitski. We are always returning to our old favorites Townes Van Zandt, Joni Mitchell, Gram Parsons, Bob Dylan too. The list is endless. It’s hard to pinpoint where the inspiration comes from, it can be so random.

 

You’ve said that most of the record is about questioning yourself following the breakdown of a relationship. Can you tell me a bit about that?

Klara (First Aid Kit): It’s so easy to grow comfortable and be blinded by what you once thought was good. It’s hard to uproot yourself and leave it all behind. You feel so very lost. In the midst of all that it’s hard not to second guess yourself, looking for simple answers to things that will never really make sense. The record was written during a really vulnerable, exciting, scary time.

 

Do you find it cathartic to write about these kinds of subjects?

Klara (First Aid Kit): It is very cathartic. Writing is the way that we deal with whatever is hard in life, which is why our music is so sad, haha. Getting to share our deepest emotions with people, even though that can be scary, is so rewarding. The connection that we feel with people who love our songs is so special. Playing shows and singing the lyrics to another human being in the crowd, seeing their reaction and knowing the song means so much to them, there is nothing like it.

 

You’ve previously said that you wanted this album to be “more real”. Can you tell me about the ideas behind that? 

Klara (First Aid Kit): That wasn’t something that we planned to do but the songs ended up being more direct and open. Like we previously stated, we wanted to have more of a raw feel, of a live performance.

 

First Aid Kit - FAULT Magazine

Klara Wears: Tan Leather Jacket by Scotch & Soda, White Embroidered Shirt by MCQ by Alexander McQueen, Black Leather Skirt is Klara’s Own, Black & White Ankle Boots by Malone Souliers, Silver Ring by Dower & Hall

 

Is it difficult knowing that such personal songs will be listened to around the world?

Klara (First Aid Kit): All the songs and themes are very universal. We left out names or anything that felt too personal. The songs are still very emotional and of course that can be scary but it’s ultimately the most rewarding thing, when people react to something that came straight from the heart.

 

How has your relationship with each other changed during this album?

Johanna (First Aid Kit): I think our relationship is stronger now than ever. Touring together for so long has been hard. We’ve been put under a lot of pressure and pretty much been around each other 24/7. No wonder we some times argue and can’t get along.

For a while I think we were on totally different wavelengths. We wanted different things for the band but didn’t express it clearly enough. We’re much better at communicating now to make sure we’re on the same page. We also know when we need space from each other. We have so much more fun together now, too!

 

Now that it’s out, how has the reception been?

Johanna (First Aid Kit): Honestly, it’s been pretty darn amazing. Releasing Ruins was scary, especially after that four year break in-between albums. We didn’t know what kind of reaction to expect from either music critics or our fans. We didn’t know if anyone was still into our music. We never expect anyone to care or take our popularity for granted.

Also, when we’re making music we’re constantly torn between feeling like what we’re doing is the greatest thing ever and feeling like it’s a complete piece of shit. Sometimes when you’re in the studio singing a song you feel like it’s a masterpiece. Then when you get home and get some perspective on it, you listen to it and get doubts about it. That definitely happened with Ruins in a sense. However, it’s been amazing playing these sold-out tours full of crowds who know the new songs by heart. When we look at our listeners we can tell that the songs mean so much to them. It’s powerful.

 

First Aid Kit - FAULT Magazine

Johanna Wears: Pink Embroidered Suit by Alice Archer, Silver Silk Shirt by Bogdar, Silver Mules by Jones, Gold Earrings by Dower & Hall, Silver Rings by Dower & Hall, Bracelet by Dower & Hall

 

What do you want people to take away from your latest album? 

Johanna (First Aid Kit): We want people to feel comforted, to not feel alone in their feelings. We hope it’s a relatable album. Everyone goes through heartbreak in their lives, one way or another. It’s important to realize that it’s completely normal and that things are going to be OK. That’s the beauty of sad songs. They allow you to wallow in those sad feelings for a while and then hopefully gather the strength to move on.

What are you working on next?

Johanna (First Aid Kit): Though we just started touring Ruins, we’re already thinking about the next record and future tours. We can’t say much at this point. All we know is we think we’ve got a really exciting future ahead of us.

 

Interview by Ely Watson

To find out more and to purchase RUINS, visit here.

Photographer: David Yeo
Fashion Editor: Rachel Holland
Make-up artist: Jaimee Thomas at Untitled Artists
Hair Stylist: Jordan Leigh
Nail Artist: Diana Drummond
Stylist’s Assistant: Ana Carnu
Photographed at Yoyo Studios

Rhys Lewis – From tour to studio with FAULT Magazine

Photography: Jack Alexander 

Words: Miles Holder

Late last year we caught up with Rhys Lewis  on his European tour, finished with his critically acclaimed tour, we were recently treated to new music in the form of single ‘No Right To Love You’. The heartbreaking tune encapsulates exactly why Rhys’ artistry in songwriting is so beloved; it’s intimate, he’s vulnerable and when performed live, it captures everyone in the room. Now back in the studio, no doubt working on even more hits, we caught up with Rhys to discuss his writing process, touring and all things FAULT.

 

You’ve just come off a whirlwind tour, what’s this stage of being a performer like for you? Are you in a rush to get back into the studio or will you be taking it slow?

Yeah, I’ve definitely got a case of ‘tour blues’ but I’m in a great place at the minute. I’ve never felt more confident and comfortable walking out on stage as I have the past few weeks whilst touring. You get into a rhythm playing the same set every night, you start to discover new ways of playing the songs, small moments that you can turn into something more memorable. And having the band behind me is really special for me, they are all way better musicians than I am so I’ve felt quite inspired playing with them every night.

But it’s been straight back to the studio for me. Finishing off some songs I started working on before the tour, and writing some new ones! The album is pretty much written but I feel like I’m writing the best stuff I’ve ever written at the minute so it’s hard to commit to 12 songs when I’m still in a bit of a zone creatively.

 

What tour dates really surprised you? Were there any dates which just didn’t go how you expected for the better?

They all did to be honest! I couldn’t believe how many people showed up to the shows, in quite random places too. We played lots of small Dutch towns and I was really worried we were going to be playing to a lot of empty rooms, but I was overwhelmed by the support, felt like my first proper tour in that respect! Highlights would be Rotown in Rotterdam and the last show of the European tour in Paris!

 

Any that went worse?

Belgium was the only show that was a bit though. I had a lot of sound issues on stage that were not there in soundcheck for some reason. It really put me off and I made so many mistakes, probably not that noticeable but once I’d lost focus I found it hard to enjoy annoyingly. Only about 80 showed up and it was rather large room so it didn’t look great either haha, but probs for the best considering I didn’t play so well…!

 

Do you do much writing on tour? Some artists like to switch off and split their performing and writing time and others like to do both at the same time, which one Arte you?

This tour I didn’t do any writing actually, we didn’t have much time off and when we did we all just needed to chill or do laundry (rock and roll…). The drives on this tour were filled with crosswords and Mariokart on the Nintendo switch. But on previous tours without the band I’ve had a lot of time on my own and I do really enjoy writing when I’m in that kind of situation. Being in new places every day you end up thinking quite differently, and the perspective you have on your own life changes. So I’ve found writing quite rewarding on tour when I’ve got more time by myself. I actually wrote Reason To Hate You and Bad Timing on the last support tour I did.

 

Some of your music is really heart-wrenching like ‘Be Your Man’ and ‘Reason To Hate You’ have really piercing messages, are they written from personal experiences?

Yeah sorry, they are both quite depressing songs! They were both written from personal experience, although I borrowed some emotion for Reason To Hate You from a friend who was going through something similar at the time. I told him about the song and he opened up about what he was going through and it really helped me get deeper into the sentiment of the song.

 

If so, how do you cope with singing about your lowest moments over and over again on tour?

It’s a very odd feeling. There are a few songs that are so personal that when I’m singing them I feel almost a bit embarrassed or vulnerable. But the writing process is actually quite cathartic, and by the time the song is out it’s not as raw or as painful a feeling as it was when I was writing. So I’d be lying if I said I still connected to the emotion of those songs every single night. Sometimes I really feel every word, other times I’m worrying about something random or my mind is miles away and I’m wondering what time lobby call is tomorrow morning. I try to stay present and connect with the songs and the crowd as much as I can, but I found this tour that some shows I just didn’t, for one reason or another, fall into that zone and lose myself in the performance. Maybe it’s partly because those songs are so emotionally draining when I do connect with them.

 

What else do you have planned for the rest of 2018?

Festivals, another tour, some time with family and friends, a few writing trips and maybe a holiday. I need to start learning to drive too, one of my New Years resolutions was to pass my driving test. Still not even booked a lesson…here’s to 2019…

 

What is your FAULT?

I think too much.

 

Wireless Festival 2018 set to be the best yet

 

Entering its 13th year, Wireless Festival 2018 is ready to continue its dominance of the London day festival scene. Taking place across 6th, 7th, 8th July, this year’s iteration sees the heavyweights you hear on Spotify every day making their way to Finsbury Park. It’s proved to be the hottest ticket in London town, with all 3 days sold out.

Friday sees the return of J Cole as a headliner to the main stage. Since his appearance in 2016, he’s released two albums both topping the charts in the US. Friday also sees the return of Post Malone, who has had an incredible 2018 with his album Beerbongs & Bentleys breaking the first day streaming records on Spotify. Supported by PARTYNEXTDOOR, Big Sean and British behemoths Wretch 32 and Wiley, Friday promises to kick the weekend off in style.

Man of the moment and king of grime Stormzy take the stage to headline on Saturday. From a late afternoon appearance in 2015 away from the main stage, Stormzy’s elevation to the main stage speaks volume of the impact he’s had on the music scene since. He’s supported by hip hop’s power group Migos and Stormzy’s heir apparent to the throne, J Hus.


Closing out the festival will be DJ Khaled and friends, with some exciting surprises in store for festival-goers. The notable headliner is supported by revered grime artist Grime and the energetic Lil Uzi Vert.

Each day sees a whole host of emerging British talent taking the stage from 3.30pm onwards, including Mist, Kojo Funds, Big Shaq and Mostack to name a few.

For those lucky enough to grab their ticket, it promises to be a stunning weekend. And one which will leave people already looking ahead to Wireless 2019.

LSTD 2018 Kicks off British Festival season with a bang

 

While stateside, Coachella is the place to be to kick off festival season, here in the UK, FAULT tradition is to always start our summer with a trip to Love Saves The Day Festival. Granted, it’s not the usual choice, however, for years we’ve watched the festival grow in both accolades but also in the acts that they pull in to perform.

This year, Fat Boy Slim, Bicep, Tom Misch and FAULT’s very own ‘Raye’ headlined the Saturday billing with Mercury award 2017 rivals Sampha and Loyle Carner topped the billings for the Sunday amongst the likes of Mabel, Mostack, Shy FX many more.

We attended the Saturday dates and as with every year, rain was on the forecast, but also as with every year, not a single drop fell that day, while this is by no means the doing of the organisers…we’re just saying, it’s tradition.

The standout performances of the day definitely go to festival veterans, ‘Bicep’ who never fail to give a standup performance year after year and they’re always a crowdpleaser which could account for their regular attendance every LSTD.

Of course, it must be said that previous FAULT star Raye was sensational on the day. Her career might still be in its infancy, but her discography is electric enough to keep the crowd well and truly pleased.

As night fell, it was time for the legendary Fat Boy Slim to take to close the festival. All in attendance gathered around the main stage for what was billed to be the closing performance of ALL closing performances, and we can say with some authority that he lived up to the hype. With a city as diverse as Bristol is, LSTD tends to draw a crowd of varying ages and as much as it pains us to say, we weren’t quite as sure just how wise it was to end with such a seasoned artist but we were certainly proved wrong! The crowd, in its entirety, went wild and partied together under the moonlight right there, right then, for the perfect closing to an awesome day out.

And just like that, another year down and another year the organisers of LSTD knocked it out the park (the Eastville Park if you will). So, would we recommend LSTD to our hardcore music fan readers? Yes! While it might not be the most “alternative” nor is it a festival which takes itself too seriously (neither does the crowd), one thing is for certain – if you’re looking for a good time, great crowd and wonderful music – Love Saves The Day is the place for you.