FAULT Weekly Playlist: Corbu

corbu

New York’s newest export is Corbu, a psychedelic electronic outfit led by frontman Jonathan Graves. The band’s latest single “Polygon Forest” is a tripped out synth and plucked guitar led track that’s music to wake up to. The track appears off the band’s debut album “Crayon Soul,” which is expected for release later this year via Big Picnic. Before that, we asked Jonathan, aka the man behind the music, to share some of the tunes that inspire him.

KWKA – Still a Functioning Hypothesis
“KWKA is Mike Fridmann – we got into his music over the fall while mixing our record, and listened to his EP an embarrassing number of times on repeat. The electronics feel innocent, always light and playful, while the guitar is this grown-up, sensual monster that cuts through them. Listen on headphones.”

Matilde Devoli – Dust
“This song is an all-conquering force. I can’t really move when it’s on. We had no idea what time signature it’s in until I wrote to her on Twitter and asked her (it’s in 5). She played every instrument, mixed and mastered it herself, and it’s easily the best album we’ve heard all year.”

Yumi Zouma – The Brae
“This was on their first EP. We went to see them and sang along when there were about 10 other people in the crowd (before they opened for Lorde, etc). The combination of Kim Pflaum’s voice with that reverbed-out guitar is like infinite palm trees. Kim has a really promising solo project called Madeira, always looking forward to hearing her sing again.”

Matilde Devoli – Summer Ending
“Every track on this album (2015’s I’m Calling You From My Dreams) is perfect, but this one’s lazy, late-summer swagger fit best here. She’s becoming one of my favorite guitar players – everything is so tasteful, like the jazzy solo at 1:22. The synths and beat feel like classic Washed Out or Neon Indian, but the lush vocals and guitar keep it in her universe.”

Sunbeam Sound Machine – Wandering, I
“The feeling of being on summer vacation, and daydreaming about the next year of school and your new life, which feel so far away at the same time. Sunbeam Sound Machine are like Tame Impala with the attitude of Beach House. The lyrics have a lot of substance, for something so musically hazy.”

KWKA – Flood
“I lost a friend this past year, and the only thing I wanted to do was sit on my floor and listen to this song over and over. When life presents an emergency, you reach for the music you need to get you through it. I needed ‘Flood.'”

L’Impératrice – Agitations Tropicales
“And now for something completely different. Can anything be more perfectly French than this? Love how it sort of morphs into Daft Punk’s ‘Aerodynamic’ as it moves towards the end.”

Black Light Smoke – Out of Touch
“Jordan Lieb (Black Light Smoke) has more great songs on his hard drive than most bands have on their greatest hits records. This is one of his slow-burning, slowly melting ballads that makes you sink into the couch and sing along, half unconsciously. Go through his Soundcloud sometime and get lost in it.”

Corbu Socials:
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We meet TV’s newest Jekyll and Hyde, actor Shazad Latif, for an exclusive shoot and interview

After landing his breakout role as Tariq Masood in SPOOKS, Shazad Latif has been popping up everywhere. And with the return of the new season of Penny Dreadful on 3rd May, he’ll be back on our screens taking on the iconic role of Jekyll and Hyde. Here, we caught up with him for a chat about his recent work.

 

You play Chandra Mahalanobis in the upcoming ‘The Man Who Knew Infinity’ movie. Did you know much about the man when you took on the role?

No. Chandra was a great mathematician in his own right. But the focus in this film is Ramanujan. I’m there to be his friend in the story.

Shirt – Samsoe & Samsoe / Trousers – CSB London / Shoes – Base London / Socks - Falke

Shirt – Samsoe & Samsoe / Trousers – CSB London / Shoes – Base London / Socks – Falke

TMWKI features such a well seasoned cast, what was it like to work with them? What was the atmosphere like on set?

Again another wonderful and lucky experience, watching Jeremy Irons and Toby Jones discuss a scene was a joy.

 

This is also another time we’ll see you acting opposite Dev Patel. What Do you think it is that draws you both together?

It’s just the way it happened I guess. I’ve played his rival and his friend. What next? I think our energies work nicely together.

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Jacket & Top – Universal Works

We’re all very hyped up for the new season of Penny Dreadful. We saw a short clip of you looking very menacing in the trailer, what can we expect from your character (the infamous Jekyll and Hyde)? What’s your technique for getting into such a character, especially when you’re essentially playing two?

Expect emotional duologues between me and Frankenstein played by Harry Treadaway. Lots of dark science. Expect a brilliant new take on this wonderful character thanks to John Logan.  A lot of focus for such a role. An intense time on set. Exploring Angels and Demons can be scary.

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Shirt – Scotch & Soda / Trousers- Farah / Shoes – R.M. Williams / Socks – Falke

What is your dream role?

No dream role as such.. Just the dream of working with the best directors and writers, I would love to be in an Asghar Farhadi movie, a Jacques Audiard movie, Steve McQueen, Paul Thomas Anderson.

 

You’ve played in a number of period pieces as well as more modern dramas. Which do you prefer?

I love doing both modern and period. I really do love a family drama. Played out in an epic sense.

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Jacket – Gieves & Hawkes / Top- Villain / Trouers – Baartmans and Siegel

Shazad – What is your FAULT? 

My fault is my anger. Jekyll and Hyde’s fault. My friends and family keep me grounded though. I’ll be alright.

 

Shazad can next be seen in Penny Dreadful on Sky Atlantic from 3rd May, and you can follow him on Twitter.

 

Photography Jack Alexander

Styling Felicity Gray

Grooming Shamirah Sairally

Vanessa White Exclusive Photoshoot And Interview With FAULT Magazine

 

Vanessa White rose to fame as part of The Saturdays one of the UK’s best selling girl groups. Vanessa is now out on her own with a clear vision and mindset for her artistry. Listening to Vanessa White’s debut EP ‘Chapter One’ (which is out now) we are pleasantly surprised by Vanessa’s sound. ‘Chapter One’ is a million miles away from the sound we’re used to from The Saturdays and instead we’re chucking on a heavy denim and ‘Tims’ and swagging out to the 90’s RnB inspired tracks like Lipstick Kisses.

We sat down with Vanessa to go over her new sound and new solo career. Vanessa will also appear in our spring print issue – with more exclusive images.

 

 

Being in a girl group, it can be very hard to let your individual selves shine. Being in a group of 5 musicians makes it even harder. Did you ever feel it was hard to show off your personal flair while a member of The Saturdays?

“I wouldn’t say it was hard.  I think it was often my own decision to take a bit of a step back.  Like with interviews, when you’re in a group with four other people and you’re asked a question you’re always going to get people talking over each other so sometimes I didn’t mind being the person who wasn’t going to talk as much.  But I wouldn’t say it completely affected my personal flair, even though I’ve taken a very different direction with my solo music.  Anything around the music I always had an opinion on, but of course that opinion was split with the other girls. I’ve always been into the music that I’m doing now, but once again when you’re in a group you’re aware that you’re not necessarily going to record and perform the type of music you listen to everyday.  So I guess it was affected to an extent but not completely. I love live music and always have so whenever I get a chance I’m out at gigs checking out some of my favourite artists and brand new acts too.”

 

 

 

Is it harder as a soloist?

“I knew it was bound to be harder in ways being solo and not having the rest of the group there, but I’m allowed to express myself so much more which makes me feel so fulfilled, so in that respect it’s not harder, in fact it makes it feel easier.  And now I have an amazing team of talented writers, producers and creatives I work with and who I trust so much and really get me, such as Tre Jean-Marie who I worked on a lot of the EP with and Thomas Eriksen who I’ve known for years now.  I’ve also been in the studio with Snakehips, who I love. Then there is Rob Heppell, who is such an incredible director and created the visuals for ’Nostalgia’ and ‘Lipstick Kisses’  He also put together some stunning visuals specifically for my first live shows last month. It’s also nice getting to collaborate with other music artists too.  I did a refix of ‘Exchange’ by Bryson Tiller that I mixed a bit of KP & Envyi’s ’Swing My Way’ into.  I was obviously singing the track from a female perspective and wanted to get a male response into that too so I asked Kojey Radical do a verse on it, which is so sick, and we’ve performed the track live a couple of times now which was  amazing to be able to do. And Wretch 32 who obviously features on the track ‘Lipstick Kisses’ which dropped on the same day the EP was out which was a cool way to launch that.”

 

The music you’re releasing now is very different to the music you released as part of the Saturdays. Did you ever feel like your creative was stifled while part of the group?

“I don’t think it was stifled. The difference now is I just have a lot more free reign so I’m able to explore my creativity a lot more now I’m doing this thing on my own.”

 

 

Who/what are your main influences?

“Back in the day, growing up I was listening to stuff like Destiny’s Child, Aaliyah, Mariah, Janet Jackson, all of that kind of thing.  I still listen to a lot of that music but I’m also listening to a lot of Kehlani, Anderson Paak, Tinashe, Bryson Tiller and Ty Dollar Sign.  There are also a lot of things outside of music that influence me such as experiences and even places that have had a big impact on me.  Over Christmas I went to the Philippines, where my mum is from, for nearly a month and did a lot of island hopping while I was there. I was inspired by so much while I was out there as it has such an amazing and vibrant culture. Everything from the colours you see, the food, the music and the lifestyle too.  When I came back home from that trip I just became even more interested in the whole wider Asian vibe with the colours, flowers and different styles.  Also, on the trip I spent a lot of time on the beach and travelling between different places so I wasn’t really dressing up or wearing any make-up for a month, it was more of a simple, castaway feel so when I got back I immediately didn’t want to wear as much make-up, the lashes went and aren’t as long anymore so I really toned things down even more and I prefer it.”

 

 

Where do you want to see your career in 10 years?

“You know what, I’m just so excited about what’s happening now and what’s to come next after what’s happening now.  I have so many great ideas and things in the pipeline so I’m trying to take it all one step at a time and to enjoy the moments as they come.  I’m excited to put more music out there, to get on the road to give more people the chance to hear it live and seeing how that all naturally evolves. Music is such a huge part of my life so I hope I’m still doing all of what I love so much for years to come.”

 

What are your plans for the rest of 2016?

“For the rest of the year I’ll be putting out more new music, doing more live shows and some festivals hopefully.”

 

What is your FAULT?

“I’m a really big perfectionist, especially when it comes to music.  Even if it’s the tiniest little thing, I’ll never be happy until I feel it’s perfect.”

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 23 – THE ART ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE FOR PRE-ORDER NOW

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Alexandra Shipp “Storms” her way onto FAULT 23’s Film Cover

 

Alexandra Shipp shares a familiar tale when probed about her early days as a starry-eyed performer with her sights set on Hollywood superstardom. The fast-rising actress/singer scored a manager and an agent at just 14, and she would spend the next several years splitting her time between Los Angeles and her family home in Phoenix, Arizona. “It’s a cutthroat, dog eat dog world,” she says.

Shipp has transformed into Aaliyah in the late singer’s biopic, starred in last year’s cult phenomenon Straight Outta Compton, and of course there’s X-Men: Apocalypse, the latest installment in the blockbuster franchise in which she plays Storm, one of Marvel’s most beloved superheroes first made popular in film by Halle Berry.

X-Men Apocalypse releases in the UK on May 18th and we’ve got 3 of the stars for our X-men special collection. Kicking off with Alexandra Shipp. Enjoy the preview and watch this space…

 

 

What can you reveal about Storm’s origin story in the film and how that might have shaped her worldview at large?

You find Storm just a few years after her parents have passed and she’s living on the streets of Cairo. She’s pickpocketing for cash to buy food, stealing clothes, and camping out in abandoned buildings. It’s sad to see someone so great being reduced to so little and I think that’s what attracts Apocalypse to her. For Storm, that’s all she’s ever known. All she knows is that, if you have powers, you can make money off of that. You can make money by protecting people or by taking it from them. So when Apocalypse tells her, “How are you living in the gutter when you’re a goddess? You should live your potential. Come with me,” Storm realizes, “You’re right! Don’t mind if I do, Apocalypse! Papi!” [Laughs] I hope they do a full origin movie with Storm and T’Challa. That would be so dope. That’s all I can think about.

 

How long did it take you to settle into Storm, your Storm?

It took a couple of months. What I wanted to convey with Storm is that she can kill you with a look, and if you know me, you know there’s no killing anyone with my look. [Laughs] I’m the biggest nerd! I’m way too silly to be that badass. It was hours and hours in front of a mirror, which is no surprise for an actress. It was about trying to find the right head tilt, the right gaze and the right thing, that if I shoot you a look, you will feel my power. It took around 3 months to find her body.

With ­X-Men, you’re entering a universe that has a longstanding comic book fan base and a movie fan base, not to mention people who look up to you for taking on such an iconic black female superhero. Is that a lot to take in?

I do feel pressure because I want to give girls an accurate representation of a powerful black woman. Halle Berry did such a great job that I felt the fear of living up to her Storm. But I also felt the fear of living up to my own nerdy expectations. I’m a fan of X-Men. I grew up on the cartoons. I grew up reading the comics. I wanted to do that right. I wasn’t sleeping, just going over my Arabic and my Kenyan accent all the time. I wanted to make sure that girls who see this movie, young girls of any race or color, are excited by Storm and the way I portrayed her.

 

Words: Kee Chang

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 23 – THE ART ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE FOR PRE-ORDER NOW

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Tuareg Productions releases never-before-seen historic photography archives

 

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Rio Del La Plata Argentina 1980 Photographer Errol Holder

 

Tuareg Productions provide a vast range of digitised photographs, spanning from 1960s – to 2000, of the British Caribbean experience. These are available for your commercial and cultural use for film, television, newspapers, leaflets, books and magazine publishing.

To purchase our archive and contemporary images visit our on-line picture library

www.tuaregproductions.com

Boy George Photoshoot & Interview For FAULT Magazine Issue 23 Cover

 

Within the court of British pop royalty, Boy George sits on top of a (impeccably decorated) throne. Throughout his decade-spanning career he’s topped charts, collaborated with superstars, travelled the world and seen more than his fair share of controversy. He can now be found judging Britain’s latest batch of new talent on BBC One’s The Voice.

Boy George appears on the cover of FAULT Magazine Issue 23 (available for preorder now). 

 

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Congratulations on your work on The Voice so far. Did you have any reservations about joining the show? 

Not really. I think my only reservation was how involved I would be with the people that I chose; whether I could have any kind of impact on what they did. And, to my surprise, it is very interactive. You can get as involved as you want to.

 

 

You’ve had your fair share of demons: drugs, incarceration, negative press attention. How has this shaped you and your music?

Everything that happens shapes you and influences what you do, but I don’t tend to focus on the past. Why would I look back? Difficult things inform my writing but – if you want other people to move on – then you have to move on yourself… I try to live in the now – it’s the only sensible time to live. Living in the past or future is a bit insane: sometimes, in relationships, people spend all their time worrying about what the other person’s thinking or feeling, and get so engrossed in it that they miss living. I think it’s important to live in the now and not focus too much on what went wrong. Just learn from it and move on.

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What else does the future hold in store for you?

[Culture Club} have got a tour coming up in the summer. I’m also doing stuff on my own: I’ve got a tour with Cyndi Lauper in about a month on the East Coast of America. At the moment I’m trying to build my empire, so anything’s possible.

 

Who excites you musically at the moment?

I really like Christine and The Queens. The music they make is really beautiful. It’s in French though, so it’s a bit difficult to understand, but you don’t really need to. I’ve also been getting back into Kate Bush: recently I came home, laid on the floor and listened to Hounds of Love in it’s entirety, and it was wonderful. You can really learn from the way people made records in the past. People had more freedom.

I like Stromae as well: I think he’s the best pop star at the moment. He’s really androgynous, and really out there.

 

Finally, what is your fault?

Where do we start! My weakness is probably…bread! Haha – I have no patience. I’m completely impatient.

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 23 – THE ART ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE FOR PRE-ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

Jewellery Series: Q&A With Sarah Richey New York

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Get The Look In 5: Jerry Hall

Jerry Hall

Model, actress and all round icon, Jerry Hall is undoubtedly one of the most stylish women of our generation. Get her look with these top 5…

1. Mystikol, Jane Iredale

Jane Iredale has been providing the very best mineral makeup since 1994 and the Mystikol double-ended highlighter/eyeliner sticks are perfect for achieving this look. Highly pigmented, the powder eyeliner enables you to create a soft, smoky eye in seconds without any mess.

www.janeiredale.com

 

2. Light Glow Blush, Burberry Beauty

This Burberry Beauty blush is ultra lightweight and formulated with moisturizing Wild Rose extract, as well as silicones for an ultra-smooth and even finish. Sweep it across your cheekbones to add structure.

www.net-a-porter.com

 

3. Hydra Smooth Lip Colour, Benefit Cosmetics

Enriched with shea, mango butter and vitamin E, the Hydra Smooth Lip Colour is packed with ingredients to keep the lips supple and hydrated. Try the shade of nice ‘n teasy rosy neutral for the Jerry look.

www.benefitcosmetics.com

 

4. Strawberry Jam Nail Lacquer, Nailberry

This dark red nail lacquer in the colour way of Strawberry Jam is highly pigmented and super long lasting to ensure your manicure stays.

www.nailberry.co.uk

 

5. Crystal Earrings, Starkeeper Vintage

We love the vintage rhinestone earrings from Starkeeper Vintage. Glamorous and statement, they are oh-so Jerry.

www.etsy.com