BAFTA Announces the 2018 nominations for EE British Academy Film Awards

This year’s nominations for BAFTA’s EE British Academy Film Awards are an array of both established and newcomer talent.

Sally Hawkings in The Shape of Water – Photograph All Star / Fox Searchlight Pictures

Crowned as the film with the most nominations this year is The Shape of Water – nominated in no less than 12 categories. It’s followed closely by Darkest Hour and Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri with 9 categories. Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk is nominated in 8 whereas I, Tonya is in the run-up to 5 categories.

This year’s awards will take place at the Royal Albert Hall on Sunday 18th of February and shall be presented by Absolutely Fabulous star Joanna Lumley, replacing Stephen Fry.

As award season is approaching swiftly, this year will definitely be filled with surprises. Here is the full list of nominees for BAFTA’s EE British Academy Film Awards 2018.

 

BEST FILM
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME Emilie Georges, Luca Guadagnino, Marco Morabito, Peter Spears
DARKEST HOUR Tim Bevan, Lisa Bruce, Eric Fellner, Anthony McCarten, Douglas Urbanski
DUNKIRK Christopher Nolan, Emma Thomas
THE SHAPE OF WATER Guillermo del Toro, J. Miles Dale
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin, Martin McDonagh
OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM
DARKEST HOUR Joe Wright, Tim Bevan, Lisa Bruce, Eric Fellner, Anthony McCarten, Douglas Urbanski
THE DEATH OF STALIN Armando Iannucci, Kevin Loader, Laurent Zeitoun, Yann Zenou, Ian Martin, David Schneider
GOD’S OWN COUNTRY Francis Lee, Manon Ardisson, Jack Tarling
LADY MACBETH William Oldroyd, Fodhla Cronin O’Reilly, Alice Birch
PADDINGTON 2 Paul King, David Heyman, Simon Farnaby
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI Martin McDonagh, Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin
       

OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER
THE GHOUL Gareth Tunley (Writer/Director/Producer), Jack Healy Guttman & Tom Meeten (Producers)
I AM NOT A WITCH Rungano Nyoni (Writer/Director), Emily Morgan (Producer)
JAWBONE Johnny Harris (Writer/Producer), Thomas Napper (Director)
KINGDOM OF US Lucy Cohen (Director)
LADY MACBETH Alice Birch (Writer), William Oldroyd (Director), Fodhla Cronin O’Reilly (Producer)
FILM NOT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
ELLE Paul Verhoeven, Saïd Ben Saïd
FIRST THEY KILLED MY FATHER Angelina Jolie, Rithy Panh
THE HANDMAIDEN Park Chan-wook, Syd Lim
LOVELESS Andrey Zvyagintsev, Alexander Rodnyansky
THE SALESMAN Asghar Farhadi, Alexandre Mallet-Guy
DOCUMENTARY
CITY OF GHOSTS Matthew Heineman
I AM NOT YOUR NEGRO Raoul Peck
ICARUS Bryan Fogel, Dan Cogan
AN INCONVENIENT SEQUEL Bonni Cohen, Jon Shenk
JANE Brett Morgen
ANIMATED FILM
COCO Lee Unkrich, Darla K. Anderson
LOVING VINCENT Dorota Kobiela, Hugh Welchman, Ivan Mactaggart
MY LIFE AS A COURGETTE Claude Barras, Max Karli
DIRECTOR
BLADE RUNNER 2049 Denis Villeneuve
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME Luca Guadagnino
DUNKIRK Christopher Nolan
THE SHAPE OF WATER Guillermo del Toro
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI Martin McDonagh
ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
GET OUT Jordan Peele
I, TONYA Steven Rogers
LADY BIRD Greta Gerwig
THE SHAPE OF WATER Guillermo del Toro, Vanessa Taylor
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI Martin McDonagh
ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME James Ivory
THE DEATH OF STALIN Armando Iannucci, Ian Martin, David Schneider
FILM STARS DON’T DIE IN LIVERPOOL Matt Greenhalgh
MOLLY’S GAME Aaron Sorkin
PADDINGTON 2 Simon Farnaby, Paul King
LEADING ACTRESS
ANNETTE BENING Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool
FRANCES McDORMAND Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
MARGOT ROBBIE I, Tonya
SALLY HAWKINS The Shape of Water
SAOIRSE RONAN Lady Bird
LEADING ACTOR
DANIEL DAY-LEWIS Phantom Thread
DANIEL KALUUYA Get Out
GARY OLDMAN Darkest Hour
JAMIE BELL Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool
TIMOTHÉE CHALAMET Call Me by Your Name
SUPPORTING ACTRESS
ALLISON JANNEY I, Tonya
KRISTIN SCOTT THOMAS Darkest Hour
LAURIE METCALF Lady Bird
LESLEY MANVILLE Phantom Thread
OCTAVIA SPENCER The Shape of Water
SUPPORTING ACTOR
CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER All the Money in the World
HUGH GRANT Paddington 2
SAM ROCKWELL Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
WILLEM DAFOE The Florida Project
WOODY HARRELSON Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
ORIGINAL MUSIC
BLADE RUNNER 2049 Benjamin Wallfisch, Hans Zimmer
DARKEST HOUR Dario Marianelli
DUNKIRK Hans Zimmer
PHANTOM THREAD Jonny Greenwood
THE SHAPE OF WATER Alexandre Desplat
CINEMATOGRAPHY
BLADE RUNNER 2049 Roger Deakins
DARKEST HOUR Bruno Delbonnel
DUNKIRK Hoyte van Hoytema
THE SHAPE OF WATER Dan Laustsen
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI Ben Davis
EDITING
BABY DRIVER Jonathan Amos, Paul Machliss
BLADE RUNNER 2049 Joe Walker
DUNKIRK Lee Smith
THE SHAPE OF WATER Sidney Wolinsky
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI Jon Gregory
PRODUCTION DESIGN
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer
BLADE RUNNER 2049 Dennis Gassner, Alessandra Querzola
DARKEST HOUR Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer
DUNKIRK Nathan Crowley, Gary Fettis
THE SHAPE OF WATER Paul Austerberry, Jeff Melvin, Shane Vieau
COSTUME DESIGN
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST Jacqueline Durran
DARKEST HOUR Jacqueline Durran
I, TONYA Jennifer Johnson
PHANTOM THREAD Mark Bridges
THE SHAPE OF WATER Luis Sequeira
MAKE UP & HAIR
BLADE RUNNER 2049 Donald Mowat, Kerry Warn
DARKEST HOUR David Malinowski, Ivana Primorac, Lucy Sibbick, Kazuhiro Tsuji
I, TONYA Deborah La Mia Denaver, Adruitha Lee
VICTORIA & ABDUL Daniel Phillips
WONDER Naomi Bakstad, Robert A. Pandini, Arjen Tuiten
SOUND
BABY DRIVER Tim Cavagin, Mary H. Ellis, Julian Slater
BLADE RUNNER 2049 Ron Bartlett, Doug Hemphill, Mark Mangini, Mac Ruth
DUNKIRK Richard King, Gregg Landaker, Gary A. Rizzo, Mark Weingarten
THE SHAPE OF WATER Christian Cooke, Glen Gauthier, Nathan Robitaille, Brad Zoern
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI Ren Klyce, David Parker, Michael Semanick, Stuart Wilson, Matthew Wood
SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS
BLADE RUNNER 2049 Gerd Nefzer, John Nelson
DUNKIRK Scott Fisher, Andrew Jackson
THE SHAPE OF WATER Dennis Berardi, Trey Harrell, Kevin Scott
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI Nominees tbc
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES Nominees tbc
BRITISH SHORT ANIMATION
HAVE HEART Will Anderson
MAMOON Ben Steer
POLES APART Paloma Baeza, Ser En Low
BRITISH SHORT FILM
AAMIR Vika Evdokimenko, Emma Stone, Oliver Shuster
COWBOY DAVE Colin O’Toole, Jonas Mortensen
A DROWNING MAN Mahdi Fleifel, Signe Byrge Sørensen, Patrick Campbell
WORK Aneil Karia, Scott O’Donnell
WREN BOYS Harry Lighton, Sorcha Bacon, John Fitzpatrick
EE RISING STAR AWARD (voted for by the public)
DANIEL KALUUYA
FLORENCE PUGH
JOSH O’CONNOR
TESSA THOMPSON
TIMOTHÉE CHALAMET

HANS WEINHEIMER Kate Moss

 

 

 

 

                                    ANGEL CAME DOWN

 

                               FROM HEAVEN YESTERDAY …

 

 

Kate Moss by photographer Hans Weinheimer

 for John Galliano / Paris

Gets To Know ‘The Gifted’ Star Sean Teale

 

Words: Miles Holder

In recent years, comic book adaptations have dominated box office record books, and with the release of ‘The Gifted’, it would seem that the same magic is being brought to the small screen as well.  

Taken place within the X-Men universe and centred around one’s family’s journey to find acceptance, peace and place to call home – we caught up with actor Seal Teale to find out about the role he plays and just why he loves playing it.

 

FAULT: Could you tell us a bit about The Gifted and the role you play in it? 

Sean Teale: The basic premise of the show revolves around an all American family and a government agency called ‘The Sentinal Services’ who are mobilised to prosecute mutants before their powers are activated.

Thunderbird, Polaris and my character called Eclipse, run an underground mutant network, and we try to find safe passage for persecuted mutants.

Eclipse is a new character created for the show,  he was born to a wealthy family, and at the moment his power is to absorb light and fire them out of his palms. He was born in Bogata and got kicked out of his family for being a mutant, and now he’s in the US looking for a family and a place to finally call home.

 

FAULT: While ‘The Gifted’ is an original storyline, it’s derived from the much loved Marvel comics landscape – do you feel pressure to do fans of the comics justice through your portrayals of characters new and old?

Sean Teale: There is a pressure to take on such a loved series of comics. The team are exploring what the X-Men is all about and taking into account how important the universe is to the fans. There is a middle ground with my character, in one way I can go back and read the comics for background on the world that Eclipse lived in but I also have the joy of introducing a brand new character into the fray.

 

FAULT: As you said, Eclipse hasn’t appeared in the comic or cinematic universe, how did that affect your research process?

Sean Teale: For me, it was always about remembering that while Eclipse is an original character, he comes from the same universe of which the X-men and mutant-kind live. In that mind, there is still a vault of knowledge that I could draw from for my character’s motivations as they pertained to that world. Also, culturally  I’m Venezuelan, and I’ve been to the countries my Eclipse comes from so in many ways we shared a similar cultural history too. Not forgetting that Bryan Singer and Matt Nix who are have been huge parts of the X-Men were on board for any questions I might have had.

 

FAULT: Does being on television as opposed to the big screen help tell character-led stories such as ‘The Gifted’?

Sean Teale: I think you can lose a lot of heart on the big screen with all the spectacle of the special effects, but I don’t believe down-to-earth storytelling is the intention of those blockbuster movies. ‘The Gifted’ has a large budget, and we do have massive set pieces, but we are striving for the best of both worlds.

The intention for me as an actor is to make sure our quieter scenes match the same intensity of the large action ones. I think it’s quite relevant, in today’s world and to be honest, any other decade prior. There has always been people fighting for their fundamental rights regardless of skin colour, sexual orientation, religion, sexuality and that’s what this show is all about.

 

FAULT: You’ve been working on lots of sci-fi projects – is that where your heart lies?

Sean Teale: For me, I just want to try everything and tell good stories. My last few jobs have been sci-fi but what I love so much about all the roles is their inclusion of stories which mirror our real world. That could be environmental issues, immigration, percussion and it just so happens that it’s the sci-fi projects which have been telling those stories.

FAULT: You were born in 1992, which means you grew up with the X-Men animated series on TV, were you sad to not see a rail full of similarly bright costumes?

Sean Teale: I think the whole cast is really hoping that at some point we’ll get to don the bright coloured suits. I know that Emma Dumont is really hoping to wear the bright green and cape Polaris costume but as enjoyable as it’d be, it’s not right for the story we want to tell. We’re not superheroes, we’re trying to tell such a grounded story that donning a cape and flying around wouldn’t be correct for this time in the show.

 

FAULT: What is your FAULT?

Sean Teale: It’s always plagued me professionally and personally; I am my harshest critic. When I was younger there was a project about to be in a big movie, and it fell through for an amalgamation of reasons but this one was personal, I was young, and it was too close to a done deal than it should have been. That knocked me a fair bit. A director once said that if you leave the room feeling like you could have done more then that’s your motivation to do better on the next project. If you’re an actor who always feels you can do more, that can hurt your self-confidence and lead to a vicious cycle of disappointment.

 

 

KYGO – EXCLUSIVE ONLINE COVER SHOOT AND INTERVIEW

Jacket by Frame | Tshirt by London Denim | Jeans by Zadig & Voltaire |

Kygo – real name Kyrre Gørvell-Dahll – is always on the go. When we caught up with the tropical house sensation, he was in New York, doing promo for his new sophomore album, ‘Kids In Love’. It won’t be long until he’s jumping on a plane to his next destination.

 

The 26-year-old DJ and producer wasn’t planning a career in music, but what started off as experimentation on Soundcloud has resulted in a meteoric rise to fame, billions of streams, and shows at huge festivals such as Coachella and TomorrowWorld. We caught up with Kygo to chat about mixing up his sound, his dreams to work with Ed Sheeran and never sitting still.

Hoody by Kygo Life | Trousers Kygos own

 

How has your unexpected success affected you personally and how do you stay grounded when you’re playing gigs to thousands of people on an almost daily basis?

It’s about the people you surround yourself with. I’ve kept all my old friends, my manager, my girlfriend. They keep me grounded. It [fame] doesn’t really affect me that much. I see my family, I keep busy by always traveling and playing shows. I get to do what I love for a living.

 

You popularised tropical house to the point where you were working with superstars such as Ellie Goulding and Selena Gomez. How did you arrive at this unique personal sound?

It was just through a period of experimenting. When I was studying [at university] I would play music in my bedroom all the time. I spent hours and hours experimenting with different sounds. I was inspired by [artists like] Avicii and Swedish House Mafia but I felt like everyone else was trying to sound like them, so I started listening to other stuff like deep house and found the sound I have now. It wasn’t like a plan, it was just stuff that I thought was cool.

 

How do you prepare to play live? Do you have any pre-show rituals?

I like to take ten or fifteen minutes before the show to concentrate and get in the zone. There’s always so much stuff going on and so many people around.

Jacket and T- Shirt by Prevu London | Jeans by Zadig & Voltaire

You’ve recently collaborated with a plethora of artists such on your new album; some which are well known, like John Newman and OneRepublic, but some which are still largely under the radar like The Night Game. Why did you choose to work with these artists in particular?

My label sets up a lot of studio sessions for me. They recommend people to work with. I like to be very open-minded about people I work with. Even some songwriters or artists I’ve never heard of before, I’ll just try it and see what happens.

 

Is there anyone you’d love to work with down the line?

There’s a lot of people! Always on top of the list is Ed Sheeran. I did some remixes of Ed Sheeran four years ago. The Weeknd would be cool. Coldplay could be cool. Imagine Dragons as well.

 

In what way is your new album, ‘Kids in Love’ the follow-up or partner album to your last record, ‘Cloud 9’?

I think it’s a follow-up. There’s definitely some of the same sounds in there but a little different. I’ve tried to have fun with myself and my sound and mix it up. I didn’t want to make the same album or a similar album all over again, I wanted to make something new. I’m very happy with it. Some of the songs I’d be jamming on the piano but some of the songs were demos that would get sent over that I’d feel really inspired by. With the OneRepublic track and The Night Game track, we wrote those both from scratch together.

Coat by Coach 1941 | Shirt by Diesel Black Gold | Hoody by Kygo Life | Trousers by Michael Kors

Do you have a favourite song from the album?

It’s always tough to pick a favourite as I like all the songs on the album but I think ‘Kids In Love’, the title track if I had to pick, would probably be my favourite.

 

Is it because it means the most to you?

Yeah, it does! I’d been working on the song for over a year. When I make a track it only takes three days or a week or two, then after a while, you make some tweaks and release it. I usually like to tweak a song but it doesn’t make it much better. It’s not good to change it too much. This song sounded so big and powerful that I wanted to make sure it was perfect before I released it, so I spent a lot of time on it.

Jacket by Frame | Tshirt by London Denim |Jeans by Zadig & Voltaire

What is your FAULT?

I’m definitely always late. I can’t sit still. If I’m sitting in a chair I always have to move my feet. It must be quite annoying – not for me but for the people around me!

 

Words: Aimee Phillips 

Photography: Conor Clinch 

Styling: Dee Moran

Grooming: Graziella Vella using Becca and Kevyn Aucoin

Production: Adina Ilie

 

FAULT Weekly Playlist: Cape Cub

We love Cape Cub and over 18 million Spotify streams, we’re positive we’re not the only ones. His brand of indie pop runs deep with listeners, rooted in its storytelling around the warmth and vitality of human relationships.

His latest single “Searchlight” showcases his natural flair for uplifting and rousing melodies, this time with a more contemplative and autumnal vibe. We’re looking forward to hearing more from Cape Cub in 2018, but before then we asked him to put together a playlist of what he’s currently got on heavy rotation.

Billy Bragg – A New England

I remember hearing this song when I was about 14. It was music to my ears, literally. It had a sense of escapism. Just one bloke and a guitar, no pretence about it and he sounded like a dreamer. I didn’t have a clue at that age who Billy Bragg was or the significance of this song, but it just stood out to me as a beautiful song with a beautiful message.

The Smashing Pumpkins – 1979

This is one of them that doesn’t hang about, it just jumps at you immediately and takes you with it. I love how they used electronic drums but in a super organic way. It never sounds contrived and is one of the more poppy tunes The Smashing Pumpkins put out, but it’s obvious why it’s such a huge song in how it just speaks to you.

Maggie Rogers – Dog Years

Maggie Rogers is one of them artists who just has an identity of their own. She kind of exists in her own sphere and I really respect that. Her songs don’t quite tread on the same stones but jump from place to place and it just makes her a super exciting artist to listen to. I’m looking forward to what comes next.

Bon Iver – 8 (circle)

It’s a current one, and not one of the obvious Bon Iver ‘classics’, but oh my days this song is just KILLED me the first time I heard it. I can’t really go too much into describing this song as it speaks for itself. As a band we went to watch Bon Iver at the Edinburgh playhouse and they were amazing. Their live set has hugely, hugely influenced what we intend to do with ours. It’s about pushing the boundaries that people set for you and if you aren’t going to do that then what’s the point?

Joji – Will He

Jack our lead guitarist put me onto this guy, who’s making pretty cool, odd RnB. He’s an incredibly talented vocalist and producer with an ear for atmosphere. I’m not really much up to YouTube personalities, but he’s apparently a huge YouTube person with his alter-ego and did the Harlem Shake, hilariously. Anyway I digress, check this tune out it’s boss and he’s doing cool things.

The Cure – Letters to Elise

There’s a darkness with the cure that is haunting yet achingly romantic. They do the happy-sad thing better than anyone and are probably one of, if not THE, biggest influences on my songwriting. Robert Smith is a dude.

Wolf Alice – Space and Time

Their new album is phenomenal and I’m still not sick of listening to it. They’re hands down the most exciting UK rock band for some time. I love them and everything they represent. Not since I was a kid have a band got me this pumped. This song is what I can imagine if Stevie Nicks went punk rock and collaborated with the Ramones. Just makes me want to go crazy in a venue somewhere.

Led Zeppelin – Babe I’m Gonna Leave You

Sometimes you’ve got to purchase a one-way ticket to vibe central and Led Zeppelin are the band to do that for you. I’ve been listening to them a lot recently – I grew up listening to them thanks to my Dad – and fuck me they’re just pure, straight from the soul rock and roll. Every single one of them is (and were) so god damn talented and dedicated. This is one of my favourites and gives me the chills every time.

Death Cab for Cutie – Different Names for the Same Thing

Death Cab are one of my all-time favourite bands and Ben Gibbard is one of my biggest influences as a songwriter. I couldn’t pick a favourite song so I just grabbed this one out of Plans. Each of their albums offers something different and again, like Maggie Rogers, they’re a band that exist within their own sphere and no one elses. They channel that independent spirit of Seattle in the north west corner of the USA, something which I totally get and relate to being from the north east of England. You kind of have to make your own way and do what’s true to you. I think that’s what this band represent to me.

Joni Mitchell – River

Finishing with this one. Joni Mitchell has a sense of spirit that as an artist you can only ever dream of having. I think every artist can take something from her songwriting. It’s approaching Christmas so I’ve chosen this song, in which she speaks of regret and sadness and everything in between. This song is one of the most beautiful songs I’ve ever heard and just breaks me every. single. time.

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Jared Harris: Exclusive FAULT Magazine Issue 27 interview & photoshoot

Jared Harris

“Acting… it’s playing, isn’t it? That’s what’s great about the job. If you don’t enjoy playing then why would someone enjoy watching you do it?”

Jared Harris for FAULT Magazine Issue 27

Photographer | Osvaldo Ponton
Stylist + Art Director | Chaunielle Brown
Groomer | Scott McMahan @ Kate Ryan
Set Designer | Lauren Bahr @ Kate Ryan
Photo Assistants | Nicasio Andrade + Xiangyun Chen
Fashion Assistants | Francis Harris + Ariane Velluire

A far cry from the typical, theatrical masks sputtering their pre-fabricated phrases, Jared Harris is a poised and reflective interviewee. As we banter about Brexit, Boris, and all that bullshit, there’s no suggestion that he’s keen to move things along in the direction of some scripted lines about his next role.

It’s a little surprising that he isn’t fervently plugging what promises to be another significant milestone in his storied career: the role of Absalom Breakspear in Amazon’s 2019 series ‘Carnival Row’. After all, the show reportedly has an enormous budget, stars eye-widening leads in Orlando Bloom and Cara Delevigne, and has been put together largely by his former college pal, René Echevarria. But it’s clear that Jared’s been around the block a few times. When he speaks, it’s with the assurance of someone who knows that the next role is never very far away. And it’s reassuring to get the sense that he’s treating our interview with the same sense of enjoyment as he has the rest of his career to date. It’s all part of the job, after all, so you might as well make the most of it…

FAULT: Tell us about your current project [AMC’s ‘The Terror’]

Jared Harris: The job’s great. It’s sort of special, really: the showrunner is a friend of mine from Duke University, so I’ve known him for a really long time. My younger brother’s on it as well, so I get to work with him. That’s always been a personal goal of mine.

The show itself is really well written, and that’s always the first question that one asks: how’s the script?

Jared Harris for FAULT Magazine Issue 27

There’s often a temptation to qualify actors based on a role call of who they’ve worked with – and you’ve worked with some of the biggest names in the business (Tarantino, Soderbergh, Guy Ritchie, David Fincher etc). How important is that to you? To what extent do you take jobs based on the personnel vs the project?

First of all, it’s the script. That said, when I was starting out – and I’ve kept some of those scripts – I remember reading Dracula (by Francis Ford Coppola) and thinking what a load of old tosh it was! It was almost softcore porn – there were a lot of scenes with girls in flimsy blouses getting their boobs out, and I thought to myself, “What on earth is he doing this for? It’s just dreadful!” But then, of course, you go to see the movie and you think, “wow!”

That’s when I got my first education in dealing with really great directors. You just don’t know what they’re going to do with the project. You have to assume that, with films in particular, it’s almost like a lump of clay. Not quite, because scripts are never entirely shapeless, but the great directors fully intend to reshape the material. That was true when I worked on Natural Born Killers. I read the original Tarantino script and it was completely different to the final film as it was directed by Oliver Stone. So, with films in particular, the director is almost more important than the script.

That said, it’s very difficult to improve a bad script. The shape and the structure has to be there to begin with, otherwise no-one really knows what they’re supposed to be doing. You’ve just got so many people trying to tell a story: the costume designers, the cinematographer… the script is the starting point for all of them.

Jared Harris for FAULT Magazine Issue 27

On that note, what level of influence do you – as an actor – have when it comes to interpreting the script?

It really depends. There are so many different factors at play: what type of movie it is; who’s making it – is it studio or independent; who’s directing it; the size of your role… Generally speaking, if it’s a studio film and you’re not the lead, you have very little input at all and no-one’s really interested in hearing your opinion…! They all just want to cozy up to the movie star and stay there.

That said, when I was working on Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows there was total collaboration with Guy Ritchie and Robert Downey Jr. What tends to happen with that sort of film is that the screenwriter is trying to deliver a fresh product – a new take on an old story – and then, during the endless period of noting (where studio executives give notes on the script), it tends to deviate back to something incredibly familiar. Or, to be blunt, something that you’ve seen a thousand times before…

The studios’ obsession is, “when in doubt, re-state the plot.” Tell the audience what’s going to happen, what’s happening as they’re watching it develop, and then tell them what they just saw. And, of course, it’s fucking boring. So they [Ritchie and Downey Jr] tried to figure out a way of taking out as much of the exposition and plot as possible and delivering just enough so that the audience could stay ahead of the story and yet still be surprised be it: because no-one was as far ahead as Sherlock Holmes.

 

You’ve said that actors nowadays don’t have the same opportunities to rehearse as often as you used to. How do you manage to go between so many different, diverse roles so quickly and without that opportunity to really get into gear?

Well, I’ve never had that opportunity, to tell you the truth. From the beginning, I was always cast late. If you’re the main person on the movie, or the person whom the financing is lining up behind, then you know what you’re going to be doing well in advance. But with me…

George Hall, my principal at Central School of Speech and Drama, said it best, in my opinion. He told us, “You’re not going to have time. You’re going to have to learn how to sketch. You’re going to go into an audition and you’re going to be handed material with 5 minutes to figure something out. You can’t afford to be precious: you can’t do research and character study and work on a back story… you’re not going to have time to do that.” That was some of the most pertinent advice I got from that school.

Jared Harris for FAULT Magazine Issue 27

Special Thank You (Location) | Tomcats Barbershop and Renee McCarty

 

What’s your FAULT?

Oh God. Forget the magazine; you’ll have a phonebook to fill!

I’m never happy with the work that I’ve done. Someone told me once on ‘Mad Men’ that I’d just done an iconic scene, and asked me if that was the one that my character would be remembered for, and that I’d be remembered for then how would I feel about that? And I remember saying, “Can I do it again? Because I think I can do it better…”

Jared’s next project to appear on screens is The Terror for AMC which begins broadcasting right after the finale of Walking Dead. The Terror is an adventure/horror story that fictionalises the real life events surrounding the disappearance of The Franklin Expedition in the Arctic during the Winter of 1847.

 

Find out who else will appear alongside Jared Harris in the issue here

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 27 – THE BEST OF BRITISH ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

Gary Numan: Exclusive FAULT Magazine photoshoot and interview preview

Gary Numan

I know exactly what I’m doing and I’m in a really good place.”

Photo: David Richardson
Styling: Margherita Alaimo
Grooming: Gemma Webb
Words: Flora Neighbour

Given his new-wave edge and awkward façade, not to mention his well-documented Asperger Syndrome, you’d be forgiven for thinking that Gary Numan was a shy, introverted man. You’d be mistaken. The quick-witted and honest songwriter has a lot to say – both about his own past and his (partly) Trump-inspired vision of a near-apocalyptic future. Despite maintaining a cult following to this day, the 80s electro trailblazer has only recently returned to the limelight with Savage, his first top 10 UK album since I, Assassin all the way back in 1982.

FAULT: How’s the tour going?

Gary Numan: It’s great! Last night in Bournemouth was fantastic – much better than the first night, which was a huge shock to the system. I’m still trying to get to grips with it all again while remembering my lyrics. It’s been a completely different experience to my other tours, but I’m really enjoying it.

Do you feel more in control of your work nowadays?

I’ve always felt that I had a say but, now that I manage myself, it’s opened up a whole new path for me. I was always fairly in control of my work before: I’ve always written everything and been hands-on in the process, so it doesn’t feel that different. The thing about my new album, Savage, is the self-managing aspect. It’s been the first big project that I’ve been in charge of from beginning to end without anyone to lean on. I’ve had to make all the big decisions myself, which was a bit daunting to begin with but, strangely enough, once I got into it, I began to realise it wasn’t that too difficult. There’s no black magic involved, just staying organised.

 

Can you talk us through the ideology of Savage?

It came from a book I’d been writing, which was set in a post-global warming future. The idea being that the earth’s temperature wasn’t controlled and it became this unstoppable phenomenon, leaving the planet with a large amount of desert and full of despair. That’s it in a nutshell.

If you go into it further, it looks at people living in that world and how brutal it would be. It looks at the evaporation of [grouped] eastern and western cultures and the potential for us to become far more fragmented and tribal. The album presents snapshots of how brutal it would be, and how unforgiving and savage the environment would become.

It was also influenced by Trump and how he’s come along and started to undo all the good that has been done. I didn’t write the album because of Trump but he certainly helped it along.

 

Gary Numan was shot at Cable Street Studios, London

How has your style developed over the years?

Visually it’s certainly evolved, but I have adapted musically as well. I think it’s easier because my music is essentially electronic. Every time I’ve started a new album, there’s been new technology that helps me to adapt my style and create new sounds. It’s difficult not to change your sound and move forward if you’re working with electronic music – every album should sound like a progression of the one before. My early stuff was very minimal and simple and, as I’ve grown as an artist, it’s become more complicated and heavier. The thing that has never changed – in terms of being recognisable – is my voice.

Would you call yourself a British icon?

No way! I don’t really know what makes an icon. What qualifies an icon? There are many people I look up to but I wouldn’t call them icons. I’m a huge Trent Reznor [Nine Inch Nails] fan. I think he’s done pretty amazing things but he’s not British.

There aren’t many people I would say I look up to, but there are many British people I admire. If you have a look at the music industry now there are some pretty phenomenal artists. For example: M.I.A. In terms of what she’s trying to achieve – both in the music industry and outside [it], she’s definitely someone I admire. There are definitely a lot of artists doing a hell of a lot of good.

What is your FAULT?

I don’t think you’d have enough ink! If I have to choose one, it would probably be my lack of patience. My wife, however, would say that I’m very, very moody. Actually, let’s go with that. My kids would love that I’ve admitted to being moody.

Find out who else will appear in the issue here

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FAULT Weekly Playlist: A Story Told

A Story Told, comprised of vocalist Alex Chaney, guitarists Josh Allen and Jason Lieser, bassist Zach Holley, and drummer Casey Hardman, are an emotionally forward and irresistibly catchy five-piece outfit that are pioneering their way through the West Virginia scene. Trailblazing their way through the Appalachians, A Story Told, kicked off their career with their full-length debut album, Keep Watch in 2016. The 10-track effort struts along the intersection of pop and rock with songs like “All of You” and “Cold Blooded” showcasing their enthralling rock melodies, while “Weather” spotlighted their pop disposition.

After the recent release of their second album “Good Looks,” we asked to guys to put together a list of their current favorite tracks. Stream them below in a new exclusive playlist for FAULT.

Taylor Swift – …Ready For It?
“We’re all huge fans of Taylor’s work. Reinventing herself with every release, we had no idea what to expect in terms of new music after the insanely successful 1989. However, from the very first listen, this immediately became one of our favorite tracks she has ever written.”

Julia Michaels – Worst In Me
“This song kind of came out of nowhere for us. We had heard the single Issues and obviously many of the songs she has written for other artist such as Sorry by Justin Bieber, which led us to checking out her latest album. The emotion in the track immediately had us hooked.”

Lorde – Green Light
“We were so stoked on this release. Pop music can seem manufactured sometimes and Lorde as an artist I don’t feel falls in this category. Jack Antonoff produced this record and we totally geeked out over that fact in anticipation for this song/album with his impressive resume of artists he’s worked with that we love (Taylor Swift, fun, etc.)”

Paramore – Fake Happy
“We’re all life long die hard Paramore fans. We wouldn’t be who we are without them to be quite honest lol. Easily one of the most anticipated records of the year for all of us. It has an honest message that isn’t trying to be something it’s not. ‘Fake Happy’ sums up the album for us. A message that had influence in our latest record.”

COIN – I Don’t Wanna Dance
“We’ve been huge fans of COIN for quite some time now. We have mutual friends with them and couple of the guys grew up only 30 minutes away from us in Huntington, WV. Their sound is just so fresh right now. A perfect mix of rock & roll and synth pop. I Don’t Wanna Dance is a go-to track off their latest record.”

Ed Sheeran – Castle on the Hill
“‘Castle on the Hill’ I think speaks to the heart of every human being. It’s a feel good track that reminisces on ‘home’; whatever that may mean to you. It identifies to specific times, scenarios, people. Something we can all relate to. So it’s easily a song that sticks with you and has with us throughout the entire year.”

Here Again – A Will Away
“Easily one of the best songs I’ve ever heard lol. We heard about these guys through mutual friends in the Columbus, OH scene. They released this song as their first single with a video and I immediately sent it to the guys. It hits you the same way Castle on the Hill does.”

Symmetry – 7 Minutes In Heaven
“You could say we’re biased just coming off of a tour with these guys. But seriously, this anthem that is Symmetry packs so many emotions. I think that’s what we love about it. It’s been stuck in our heads for months.”

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