FAULT Online Exclusive Photoshoot and Interview with MAX

Words and Photography: Miles Holder

Grooming: Shamirah Sairally

New York City born pop-soul singer MAX first hit our radar when we listened to the now famed hit single ‘Lights Down Low’. Currently sitting with over 30 million views on Youtube, it would seem that the love song written for his wife Emily, has now become a love song shared by many other couples around the world.

Most recently Max joined FAULT’s previous stars Fallout Boy on tour so we caught up with Max on the European leg to find out just what it’s like to pen a love song shared by so many. 

 

So you’re about to head off on tour with Fallout boy, excited?

Very excited, they’re good friends of mine, and it’s such an inspiration to see what hard work can do and the longevity that can come from it.

Do you like being on tour or do you prefer getting your thoughts out in the studio?

I think there are aspects of both, I love touring, but I also need to be careful of what I wish for because the last few years it’s been like ten months of travelling each year! This year we’ve come to Europe three times, and before that, I’d even never been before, so I’m fortunate to be able to travel so many places. Travelling also influences the writing because once you visit these different countries, you start to realise what connects in various languages and what energy is universal.

 

Is there anywhere you’ve been that pleasantly surprised you?

Paris, everyone says they can be the worst shows, but that was one of my favourite shows of the last tour and had such high energy. It’s said that the French have a lot of sass, but at the shows, they lose themselves, and that was really special.

What’s your best tour story?

Every time I stay in a hotel room I always leave the “do not disturb sign” on the door because I’m super messy and don’t want the staff to have to deal with it. We were playing a show in the Philipines, and it’s the only time I’ve had round the clock security.
So I’m in my room talking to my wife on the phone, and I look up at my bathroom mirror and see a hand-drawn message written in Sharpie on the mirror, like murder style! I’m freaking out! It said, “Hey max, if you want to see how we really party here, come up to the fourth-floor lobby”. It wasn’t a creepy message, but all I can think about is “someone has been into my room without me being here, climbed onto the sink to leave this message”. I call the front desk, and nobody comes, and I’m just in this foreign country freaking out – I move all my bags to barricade the door and don’t get any sleep that night.

As it turns out it was a fan who worked at the hotel and looked up my room number, asked the manager if this was a neat idea and the manager apparently said: “yeah, go for it”.

So you missed out on the best night of your life on the fourth-floor lobby!?

I know right, it could have been wild! I should have gone to the fourth floor, every time I tell that story people always want to know what was up there!

When ‘Lights Down Low’ was shooting up the charts, was there a “this is it” moment?

There’s been a couple of moments which was like “wow this is happening”. I think an amazing one for me was playing James Corden with a harp player, the very same way I proposed to Emily with. She was in the audience, and I saw a glimpse of her, and it was my first late night show in the states, so that was a cool moment. There was another moment when I remember being in Florida with my friend Nash and I had this amazing US military soldier hit me up on Instagram and say “hey, I’m getting married the day of your show and your song is my wedding song. I’m shipping out to Afghanistan the day after, and I was wondering if there’s anything special you could do on the day”. It was awesome, they’d just gotten married, but they came to our show, and we brought them both out on stage, and that was the first couple to reach out but such a fantastic couple. It’s great to have someone out there, being who they are and loving their life reach out because that’s what the song is all about.

Do you ever feel pressure to now top it or fear that you won’t?

Every day, but I try not to give in to that pressure. Sometimes you try to recreate something, but you can’t recreate special moments in your life, it doesn’t work like that. You can’t try to make those moments; you just need to keep taking risks and telling authentic stories. It’s empowering to know that one song that will always mean so much to Emily and me also now means so much to so many different people.

 

Is it strange to share what was such a personal song between you both with so many others?

Before we put the song out and showed off our wedding video, we had this discussion and decided, “if we’re going to share this news, then we have to share it all”. I think in this day and age with social media you’re either private, or you’re open, and you let people be a part of your experience.

What don’t journalists ever ask you?

I was saying the other day that journalists rarely ask about your bad shows. It feels horrible; it feels like you’re trapped outside of your house naked, with thousands of people watching you. This gig, in particular, was a private show, and we don’t always treat them as a regular performance. It wasn’t well communicated that it was going to be in front of 5000 people though. So we didn’t have our sound person, (our mistake), we were booked as an acoustic act in front of 5000 people, and it’s in Germany, so I can’t cover for myself in the same way. It was horrible, and no one booed or anything, but it was awful.

What is your FAULT?

I’m not a very functioning human; I can’t do my laundry or other life basic skills. I’m so thankful to have my wife to balance out my life; she’s definitely the boss. We’re all flawed but that’s what helps other parts of you excel but for me, I can’t function, if you just left me in the wilderness, I’d be fucked!

FAULT Magazine OTW Photoshoot and Interview with Dan Crossley

Dan Crossley X FAULT Magazine

Words & Photography: Miles Holder

Grooming: Shamirah Sairally

Despite his young age, Dan Crossley ripples within the music industry have turned to waves thanks to the release of his debut EP in 2017 and singles ‘Feel’ and ‘Nothing But Love’. Latest single ‘Talk’ caught our attention so we sat down for an interview and photoshoot with the young star on his way to stardom.

 

How would you describe your sounds to people who haven’t heard your music before?

My sound has been influenced by a number of past and present artists. I’m currently on a soulful future pop kinda vibe but we’re throwing a range of different elements in there from an urban perspective. Did I just make up a new genre? Haha.

Biggest musical inspiration?

As a songwriter, Amy Winehouse was a huge inspiration to me growing up but I could never settle on just one person. There are so many great writers and artists that I aspire to.

How easy is it for you to write openly about your life experiences – some people find it hard but for others, it can be quite therapeutic?

Writing my own material has always come naturally for me. When I was younger this was the only way I could let my thoughts and emotions out. Whatever I was going through at that particular time in my life would always come out of me through music. I struggle to sing and relate to other peoples songs unless I can feel they are written from a genuine place and feeling.

What’s a song that always makes you cry?

‘Breath Me’ – Sia – Such a powerful song.

When should we expect to hear your next release?

We haven’t set a really firm date yet. This EP is really important to me so I’m not rushing the process. The way things are shaping up I’d expect the first single to be released in the summer. I can’t wait to share it with everyone.

What are your plans for the rest of 2018?

I want to be doing A LOT of live stuff once the EP drops. Whenever I’m not in the studio I’m rehearsing and working on ideas for my live show. I really can’t wait to connect with as many people as possible and give them some epic music to relate to.

What is your FAULT?

Regretful unnecessary hangovers. Haha. No, I would say I’m impatient. I want to do it all now and have to remind myself to slow down and relax from time to time.

 

 

Island

With a couple of EP’s already under their belt, London four-piece ISLAND have been tweaking away at their debut album Feels Like Air which is due out on April 6th.

Forming as teenagers, frontman Rollo Doherty’s former acoustic project has transformed into a fierce blend of coastal grooves mixed with languid rock that explodes effortlessly with such rugged precision thanks to the aid of guitarist Jack Raeder, bassist James Wolfe and drummer Toby Richards. Their DIY ethic and close-knit approach to the album has paid off and holds testament to a band approaching stardom at breakneck speed. We caught up with drummer Toby Richards to discuss life on the road and inspiration behind their stellar debut.

Let’s talk about your debut album Feels Like Air. Where was it recorded and what was the process like?
Yeah so when we first started writing, we knew we were working towards an album but we didn’t really have a purpose, so when we were touring out and about on the road we’d been listening to a lot of driving inspired records. Bands like War on Drugs, Future Islands, Leif Erikson that sort of stuff and it just got us thinking about kind of putting together a soundtrack to a journey. As soon as that came into place, all the tracks fell together pretty quickly in the space of a couple of months really. We’d always planned to go into the studio with an old friend of ours, a guy called Mike Hill, he’s got a studio just outside Oxford.
It was a comfortable set up there with him, we were all together in one room playing all four of us together and we’d record it to see what works and what doesn’t and keep it very much a live feel really. It took shape really quickly, I think we actually recorded it all in about eleven days so it was pretty quick.

How important is it the album represent a collective body of work as opposed to individual songs?
Yeah, we definitely did look at it as a full body of work and just with the theme of driving and the journey, it definitely brought the songs together as one. Lyrically, Rollo who writes the lyrics definitely drew on the idea of the songs being written from the point of view of a passenger on a journey so that’s what ties it all together. Sonically we didn’t set too many boundaries, we’d just go with whatever felt right.

So it sounds like you enjoy being on the road?
Yeah big time, playing live is a huge part of the sound for us and something we wanted to take into the studio. We wanted to sound like it’s us on stage performing a show. We keep things very DIY, we drive ourselves a lot of the time and Mike who we did the album with does the sound for us, it’s a very small little family that we take on the road with us. As soon as we finish playing a show we’re at the merch stand selling all our merch and chatting to fans. We try and cover as much as possible just between the four of us really.
It’s always awesome being out on the road, we’re heading out again this month in Europe and then UK in May and then we’re excited to be going to America because it’s going to be our first time going over there so yeah lots of touring to be done for this album.

Did you have more creative freedom on this album as opposed to previous EP’s?
In terms of the writing we’ve always tried not to have too much structure to how things evolve, the songs can come from anywhere, a drum beat, guitar riff, vocal line so many different avenues. I think with this album we wanted to keep it as live and rough and ready as possible, production wise we didn’t add too much in the studio, we really wanted to keep it just the four of us playing together. Creatively, I suppose we did try and few new routes but nothing too crazy from what we’ve done before, we always like to experiment with lots of different effects, guitar wise lots of delay, reverb and things like that but yeah nothing too out the box, definitely still within the realms of the ISLAND sound.

Is keeping your signature sound something you’ll consider on your next album?
Interestingly since we got back from Christmas we’ve actually been writing quite a lot. We don’t know whether it’s going to be an EP or an album we haven’t talked about that yet but just in terms of what’s coming out it is a progression from the album already it’s got a bit of a darker vibe without giving too much away.

What’s your FAULT?
I would say I have quite bad OCD, especially on tour. I get a bit funny about cleanliness on the road in the van, small little things like socks being on the seats or something. I’m also obsessed with driving whilst the others are resting up for the show. I like to take the wheel and love driving through the mountains in Europe but probably a bit too much that I end up knackered just before a show.

Dylan Sprouse – Hollywood’s next IT Boy – Exclusive FAULT Online Cover

 

 

 

Things have changed drastically for Dylan ever since his early days as a Disney superstar – but all for the better. Dylan is currently diving head-first into his soon to be opened meadery All-Wise Meadery,  all while expanding his wings into independent film and proving to the world that he’s a multi-faceted performer. Dylan is part of a new generation of actors that bring hope to the industry. At the close of award season, we spoke to Dylan as our March Online Cover Star about all things Hollywood and the positive aspects of the #metoo movement. In spite of his young age, he’s wise beyond his years and sets the examples that we’ve so desperately needed to have. Here’s Dylan Sprouse – FAULTs and all.

Let’s talk about your newly started business – All-Wise Meadery. What do you reckon is the most rewarding part of being an entrepreneur and what advice do you have towards young people looking to start their own business?

I would say that the most rewarding thing for me has been the realization of this project with my friends who are now also my business partners. Particularly because they were people who believed in me and not only invested their time but also their money in the prospect that we could really succeed together. The only advice that I’ve got for young entrepreneurs who are looking to start a business is that it’s easy to think that you won’t succeed if you don’t put a lot of your own money upfront and that’s not true. The first step to actually succeeding is just starting and thrusting yourself into uncomfortable scenarios. Just learning the ropes of how to open a business and really getting in there. If you look at it from the outside and you never step in, you’ll never figure it out. And you’ll never get anything done. So I would say just start. Immediately.

 

What were the biggest challenges on an emotional level that you’ve encountered along the way?

 

The biggest emotional challenge was, on a similar level, knowing that my friends invested so much in the meadery that our futures were intertwined. If one of us slips up, all of us do. That was particularly nerve-racking. But on an emotional level, probably the most rewarding thing has come recently when we were actually stood in the space of All-Wise Meadery after nearly two years of trying to put it together. Seeing it physically, tangible – was just overwhelming.

Your latest released film – Dismissed – features quite an intense troubled young man. What catches your eye when you’re going through a script and how did you manage to identify with Lucas?

There are a bunch of different things. One criterion that I use is doing something that I’ve never done before. Even if we’re talking about a negative character – in the case of Lucas. But also – Do I think that the cast and crew will be good to work with? That’s huge for me. You could be doing the coolest role ever, but if you don’t like any of the cast and crew, it’s going to be a terrible shoot. And it will also show in the end result. I’ve been away for so long that I want to stretch my acting again and I want to do things that are different. When my audience sees me in a role, I want them to go like – he’s definitely got more range than I thought he did.

How did you manage to identify with Lucas or empathize with him in any way, shape or form?

I only identified with a part of him. Definitely not his actions. But with parts of him, I certainly did. The stress of wanting to succeed for your family’s sake in a classroom setting is something that I think any student can identify with. The fact that you’re potential future hinges on a single individual and their personal opinion of you can be really damaging and frightening. I think that’s the part of Lucas that I really identified with. When I was young, we were kind of a lower class family and so I was very desperate to bring things to my family and elevate them. That’s something that made me relate to Lucas. It was the struggle of having to succeed in any way and not just for yourself, but also for your loved ones and your family that made me understand him.

 

 

When looking at your acting career – it’s been Disney and then you’ve gone into independent film. How do you feel you’ve managed to find your identity outside of the Disney bubble, considering the fact that you were involved in it at a very impressionable age?

It was a little bit of everything. Diving into my hobbies, like my meadery, has defined me in a way. I also think that taking time away from the industry and letting people forget about me for a while was a good thing. Furthermore, I think I’m also trying to do different roles. The truth is that I don’t think I’ve got the angst to define myself against Disney. I don’t care that much. But at the same time, I would like to do other things. Needless to say that I played Zack for 7 years before I took my break! Doing the same thing was tiring after a while.

 

You and Cole are very distinguishable in terms of the paths that you’ve both chosen to pursue. Yet while growing up, you still had to go through self-identification – while having someone identical to yourself by your side, working in the same industry and being in the public eye. Was it difficult for you to find your own separate ways?

 

I don’t think it was too difficult. As twins do, sometimes you just try to push away from the other, in terms of fashion and hobbies. And I think we did it in college, but it was never a moment of us being like ‘no, fuck you, see you later’. We were never combative about it. We’re actually pretty tame. There are twins who go through this mental awakening whereas we were just like ‘meh, I like this, you like that’. Although we were also careful not to step on each other’s toes. At the same time, I don’t like photography for example; I don’t personally like doing it. Even if Cole hadn’t started his photography, I wouldn’t have picked it up. If I started doing photography after he did it, it would seem bizarre.

 

Would you say that you’re quite opposite characters then?

I think yes and no. I mean, we’re not super different, but definitely, enough so that we moved into different directions with our hobbies, for sure.

 

Hollywood is currently ablaze with sexual accusations left and right. Have you ever witnessed similar occurrences while on Disney?

I’ve never seen or experienced anything of that sort while I was on Disney. But my heart goes out to people who have. What’s giving me hope is that so many people are responding to it. So many people are speaking out, which is the first step in order for a major movement or change to take place. I’m hopeful, I have hope. In a way, I think it sounds bad right now, but actually, it’s a great time to be in the entertainment industry. The bad times were previously. Because people were literally being bullied into being silent. Now is the good time to be in this industry because this bullshit isn’t going to happen anymore.

 

What do you think people in the industry should do to in order to make it safe for both men and women?

I think that these occurrences are happening by and large because of individuals who are corrupt. The best thing that can be done is what’s already being done. But it’s also boycotting and taking a personal stance against artists that you don’t agree with. I hear the same thing a lot, which is ‘I really dislike them as a person but they make great films.’ Well okay – you shouldn’t watch them then. Because when you do, you support their personal habits indirectly. People are notorious for having really corrupt practices and we hold them as artists still. And without naming names, I would say – just stop.

How do you support good art and not support bad behavior if the two are intertwined?

 

You can be a good artist and not have a bad behavior. The two aren’t linked. I think people like seeing and talking about this idea of the ‘insane artist’. There were painters in the medieval period who used to cut people’s heads off and everyone went like ‘oh my god, he’s the best’. Okay, but at the same time, he’s cutting people’s heads off and you shouldn’t be supporting a guy like that. There are so many great artists in the film and television industry that don’t cut people’s heads off that you should support. It’s baffling to me how people support the movement and wear black at awards shows yet continue to support artists and filmmakers like these. It’s very hypocritical – take a stance and really stand by it. I think that way everyone can bring change to the industry from inside his or her household.

 

What’s your FAULT?

I’ve got an intense love of food – up to a point where that’s a fault. Because I’m not a chef and I’m not equipped to cook well and I’m also lazy. So I spend so much money on food that it’s becoming ridiculous.

 

 Interview: Adina Ilie

Photography: WOLAND

Hair and Make Up: Valentina Creti using Charlotte Tilbury

 

Swarovski showcases an array of effervescence at the Russian Ballet Icons Gala 2018

Warrior of Light world premiere at the Russian Ballet Icons Gala 2018. Photo credit Daniel Kulakov

Celebrating the 200th anniversary of Marius Petipa, the master of Russian ballet, the English Opera House hosted an incredible set of performances from the world’s most known ballet dancers in order to celebrate the master’s bicentennial.

Swarovski sponsored the production of the costumes that stunned the audience on Sunday evening for the world premiere of Warrior of Light. Gracing the stage, we had the pleasure of witnessing the spectacular talent of Maria Sascha Khan, Nadia Khan, Nicholas MacKay under Julian and Nicholas’s MacKay stellar choreography. All dancers were donned in Theresa Khan MacKay’s stellar costume design featuring carefully embellished Swarovski crystals in awe-inducing patterns.

 

 

Warrior of Light world premiere at the Russian Ballet Icons Gala 2018. Photo credit Daniel Kulakov

The programme of the evening also included the eponymous Don Quixote, Swan Lake, La Sylphide and also a world premiere of Warrior of Light. Gracing the stage with sublime examples of the theatrical craft were some of the prime figures in contemporary and classical ballet, from rising stars to established talent.

Ballet is rightfully considered as one of the symbols of Russia and the diverse nature of the programme and the performers all united under their love of dance. From established stars to new talent, the Russian Ballet Icons is one of the most poignant events in the cultural life of the British capital.

Warrior of Light world premiere at the Russian Ballet Icons Gala 2018. Photo credit Daniel Kulakov

Since the year 2006, Ensemble Productions has brought the Russian Ballet Icons Gala to London and the show at the Coliseum has become a hub for culture lovers. Stars of the Bolshoi and the Mariinsky – but also the Royal Ballet and the leading companies of Europe have joined forces for more than a decade to celebrate the strength and creativity of Russian artistic traditions.

Ballet is one of the most powerful images of Russia and its accurate representation depends on everyone involved in the production – from the Orchestra to the Décor to the Costumes. Swarovski has managed to transform a world of fantasy into a reality to graces the stage. A spectacle of light emerged during the world premiere of ‘Warrior of Light’ when an array of incredibly crafted and carefully embellished costumes adorned the frail yet powerful bodies of the dancers.

Warrior of Light world premiere at the Russian Ballet Icons Gala 2018. Photo credit Daniel Kulakov

The evening was an all-encompassing celebration of art, culture, tenacity that culminated in an exhilarating experience worthy of repeat – celebrating everything that Russian decadence represents.

Coverage: Adina Ilie

MFW : WOODHOUSE

Words: Chaunielle Brown | Images: Liana Vine

The Woodhouse Army never fails to strike a nuclear and revolutionary chord with collection presentation. This season is no different. Designer Julian Woodhouse continues to surprise and  push the fashion boundaries for menswear while creating echoing staple statements that run concurrently with the society dailies we presently swim and endure in. Marked with traditional army fatigue and bomber jackets, splashed finishes of fur and liquid leather with baseball and beanie caps come strapped on for security. Accompanied by footed favorites, Dr Martens, Woodhouse advances on with strength and unity and encourages the commander in chief in us all. As Julian Woodhouse puts it, “Imagine if we viewed ourselves as a collective society. Imagine our possibilities…Imagine just how far our civilization could venture, together.”

FAULT Magazine Photoshoot and Interview with YUNGBLUD

 

Photography: Miles Holder

Words: Sammie Caine

With a stark sense of honesty to his music and a clear talent for songwriting, YUNGBLUD has emerged on the music scene and is certainly one to watch. Not only does YUNGBLUD offer music sure to get stuck in your head (including ‘I Love You, Will You Marry Me’), but he also delivers a message with his lyrics and an energy set to get you dancing along at a gig.

Following the release of his self-titled EP, FAULT had the chance to catch up with YUNGBLUD ahead of the exciting year he has before him.

 

So, the YUNGBLUD EP is finally out! How does it feel getting to release it to the world?

It’s pretty amazing. I think it’s kind of the first body of work that I’ve got to put out that represents what’s been going on in my head. Right now the world is such a confusing place for young people – I think we are such a clever, clued up generation and see a future and world that we want to live in, but it’s been held back by a generation that aren’t necessarily ready for the world to go there yet or just don’t understand us.

I didn’t agree with that; do you know what I mean? Me and a lot of my friends were angry and it’s just been so amazing to kind of use my music as an outlet to talk about shit like that, because I think everything right now is so safe and it’s amazing to have [the EP] out and to kind of allow people to go to it and just know exactly who I am as an artist. Yeah man, it’s exciting as fuck.

 

What’s one place you can’t wait to go play on tour?

Probably New York, man. I love New York. I can’t wait to play there in March again. I played a showcase there but I can’t wait to play a proper gig there. I love that city, it just blows my mind.

 

What would you say is your favourite song to play at gigs, and why?

I think probably ‘Tin Pan Boy’ because it just goes off every night and I can just get it out. As soon as I walk on the stage I can be undeniably, completely myself and I can just get everything out and it’s just sick. It’s the last song, so everybody’s going mental together and it’s kind of just uncensored.

I don’t know, I feel like I can just let everything out without people looking at me like I’m completely mental.

You’ve definitely made an impact with your music already – especially with the likes of ‘Polygraph Eyes’, which touches on the issue of sexual assault. Do you think it’s important to make a statement with your music?

Oh absolutely, that’s the fundamental core of Yungblud and what I am. I just believe that music’s been so lost and I think mainstream music’s not representing anything. I think it’s just quite sad because the stuff I grew up on represented a way of thinking or a way of feeling.

I don’t know, I just think the world is such a crazy place right now and politics is an issue. There’s stuff at the forefront of everyone’s mind right now and I just can’t believe that nobody’s talking about it in popular music. So, I just thought I need to do that.

And I’m not trying to preach to anyone or anything because if I get preached to I just switch off. I’m just saying what I think and all I want to do is empower people to say what they think because then that’s how we can change shit.

Who, or what, inspired you to get into writing and performing music?

I think music was just the only thing that encaptured my soul when I was young. I know that sounds really cliché and weird, but I was just brought up in a very musical family and it was always on in the background no matter what, it was just always on.

It was the thing that could kind of make me feel happy or make me feel sad instantly and that just encaptured me. But then I found out I was shit at it – all my mates could play ‘Sweet Child O’ Mine’ better than me and I didn’t like that, so I kind of sat there and approached it from a different way and started writing. That got my interest because the way I could tell a story through music was just so much better to me than just playing the guitar, so it kind of started from there. I started writing my first songs at probably like 11.

You’ve been compared to artists such as Arctic Monkeys’ Alex Turn and Sex Pistols’ John Lydon. how does it feel knowing that you’re already getting that kind of attention as a musician?

It’s amazing. Of course, it’s incredible because Alex is such a big influence of mine and I want to be that. I always said I wanted to be that.

I fundamentally love artists, real artists, who represent something. To me, man, if you’re not representing something or you’re not talking about something real, you’re not an artist you’re a singer. And I don’t want to be a fucking singer, do you know what I’m saying?

So to be compared to people like Alex Turner is just amazing because he was one of the only people that got me growing up and it’s down to him that I’m in to writing music. It’s amazing that I’m kind of placed in that calibre and that category because that’s all I wanted to be. That’s all I want to be. I just want to be an artist, I mean a proper artist like that.

What’s next on the cards for YUNGBLUD?

A lot. I’m getting tired looking at my travel schedule. I can’t wait though – so much touring. I don’t even think I come home ’til September already. I literally gave up my flat in London because I’m not going to be home before September.

And just releasing so much music, there’s so much music in the bag and I can’t wait to just release it all and get it out there. It’s weird, man, as soon as I write a song I just want to put it out. I know you’ve got to do the whole fucking games and shit, but I just can’t wait to put all the music out, it’s gonna be sick.

 

What is your FAULT?

Ooh, what is my fault? I pick my nose.

The self-titled ‘YUNGBLUD’ EP is out now, and YUNGBLUD is playing shows across Europe and the US throughout 2018.

FAULT Magazine Weekly Playlist by L Devine

L Devine first caught our eye with her EP with her full EP video ‘Growing Pains’. Despite her young age, L Devine opening narration speaks of an artist far beyond her years as she speaks about inspiring women and all the inspiring women in her life who gave her the courage to release the EP. You can watch the full video by Emil Nava HERE.

Today we’re very proud to present L Devine’s FAULT Magazine Playlist of all her personal favourite songs and just why she loves them. Sit back, relax and enjoy!

 

Miss You: Cashmere Cat, Major Lazer & Tory Lanez
This is my favourite song right now. I’ve had it on repeat since it came out. The chorus is a flip of another song and it works so well but I just love how simple the whole song feels, it’s like they did one pass on the mic for melodies while writing and they just went with it. I’m really into Tory’s vocals on it too, sounds so soft and lazy. This song is such a vibe!!

Imperfections: Starrah & Diplo
I’m totally obsessed with Starrah. She’s definitely my favourite artist right now. Every one of her tracks is so hooky but still really understated and cool. She’s written hits like Havana for Camila and Fake Love for Drake and more but her own stuff rocks my fkn world!! And it’s so inspiring seeing a young female completely dominate the songwriting game. She’s written the biggest songs of the past couple of years – it’s so motivating.

Mango: Siba
Siba is my favourite collaborator and my best friend! He produced and co-wrote my song Like You Like That with me, and many more yet to be released songs of mine. When he’s not writing pop gold, he works on his artist project, which is all written, recorded and produced by him. This is my favourite of his, it’s such a head nodder!!

Don’t Worry Baby: The Beach Boys
The Beach Boys are probably my favourite band of all time. Brian Wilson is my ultimate songwriting idol, I think he’s truly a genius. I saw him live a few years ago and I was sat right in the front row. I think Brian and his band loved the fact there was someone under 50 years old there so they passed me their setlist, guitar picks and drumsticks at the end. Pretty cool!!  I don’t know if this is my favourite song by The Beach Boys because there’s too many to choose from, but I love it, it’s so sweet.

Hands To Myself: Selena Gomez
I’ll never ever get sick of hearing this song. I think the chorus is the most satisfying thing I’ve ever heard and I just love Selena’s tone – it’s so delicate and intimate. Plus, it was written by Julia Michaels, another one of my songwriting idols!

Overload – Sugababes 
Nothing can beat old Sugababes. This song in particular. The melodies feel kinda weird and eerie. And I love how the vocals don’t have any tuning on them and feel really dry…it fits with the eerie vibe!!

When I See U: Fantasia
This song really makes me feel something. The lyrics are just so good. It just takes me back to anytime I’ve ever had a crush on someone and was too scared to tell them…which is pretty much all the time haha.

With Every Heartbeat: Robyn
Robyn is such a big inspiration of mine, I love that she makes sad songs you can dance to! She definitely inspired my song Like You Like That. This song in particular was the start of my obsession with arpeggiators and the whole Scandi-pop sound.

You’re Not Good Enough: Blood Orange 
I’ve got really into Dev Hynes while I’ve been writing my next EP. I first heard about him through the beautiful Solange song Losing You and then became obsessed with his Blood Orange stuff. I really like the whole sombre 80s vibe, it’s so funky but so melancholy.

Pink: Julia Michaels
I completely rinsed this track from Julia’s debut mini-album. I really wasn’t expecting the album to be so left and quirky, but I’m so glad it is! She writes pop smashes like Sorry for Justin Bieber and her own Issues and then also makes these really weird and interesting tracks with so much of her personality in them. It feels like I’m having a conversation with her in every track.

 

Listen To The Playlist on the go HERE