FAULT Magazine In Conversation With Reggie Yates PT.1

Photography Joseph Sinclair | Styling Rachel Gold @ Red Represents | Lauren Alice @MandyCoakleyRepresents using Medik8 and La Roche Posay

Words: Miles Holder

 

For those who grew up watching 1990s terrestrial television, Reggie Yates has always been a household name – the recognisable young face who young POC across the country grew up with as their pillar of cultural representation on children’s television. Programs have come and gone since he made his debut on the Desmond’s in 1993, but still to this day, Reggie is still a mainstay on our television screens.

In 2013, we were introduced to a new side of Reggie through his documentary ‘Reggie Yates’s Extreme South Africa’, I say this was a “new side” of Reggie, but for many of us it was the first time we’d ever gotten to know Reggie Yates the person as opposed to the Saturday morning television presenter. Lying alone in his tent and discussing how South Africa’s race issues were affecting his own perception of self, it was a million miles away from the Reggie I remembered interviewing Atomic Kitten on ‘Smile’ or from his seldom spoken about appearance on Celebrity Fame Academy in 2005. A real Reggie; down to earth, an undeniably, unashamedly “black” Reggie Yates.

As more projects have released, the idea of Reggie Yates as a documentary maker has gone from career pivot to career-defining; critics and viewers alike now hold his work in the same esteem as one might the documentaries of Louis Theroux or Andrew Marr – a merit not many young British stars achieve.

 

FAULT: All those years of presenting children’s television, was the plan always to move into documentary making?

Reggie: No, and to be honest, there has never been a plan until now. It’s only in the last decade that the focus has been on doing projects which I genuinely care for. I know where I’d like to be at forty years of age in my personal and professional life and at the age of twelve I just wanted to have fun and as I’ve matured my desires for my career changed.

FAULT: Your career is an anomaly; it prompted The NewStatesman to run a story entitled ‘Does Reggie Yates Have The Weirdest Career In Television?’ – do you feel as though it’s been weird?

I don’t think I do have the weirdest career on television, I would replace “weird” with “authentic”. When I was eighteen, the BBC were telling me that I was going to be a ‘Blue Peter’ presenter and I was like, “no I’m not.” I never watched ‘Blue Peter’ growing up, and it never spoke to me, and quite frankly, I didn’t care for it. For those reasons, I didn’t do it and they just couldn’t understand and didn’t get it.

FAULT: Blue Peter is a big gig to pass up, what did you do instead?

What I went on to do was doing children shows where it felt like I was allowed to be me in, I helped create ‘The Crust’ a sitcom we did in a tower block, and it had a predominately black cast and I was twenty-one at that point. I always did things that feel right at the time, and that’s why there’s been this crazy flow but if you study my career, it’s always moved me forward, and now, everything aligns. The book makes sense next to the documentaries, the documentaries make sense with the photography, and that’s what I’m spending my life doing. All about empathy and learning, growth, sharing and I’m not just taking pictures for the sake of it like I used to do, I’ve just shot an exhibition for amnesty international on refugees, and their stories are as important as the imagery, and that’s where I am in my career.

The night before our interview I had watched ‘Reggie Yates In A Refugee Camp’ which saw him enter the largest refugee camp in Iraq alongside 30,000 Syrian refugees. A news report played on the television showing the death of an Iraqi journalist only twenty miles from the cafe where Reggie sat. This now deceased journalist, much like Reggie, placed herself in the line of danger to get her story. One does wonder if that journalist was possibly the Iraqi counterpart of Reggie Yates, one whose career mirrors his own  and what it must be like to watch someone with such a shared experience, meet such a tragic end.

 

FAULT: What was it like to sit and hear the news on a journalist, possibly one whose careers closely mirrored your own killed so close by?

I can see why you can make the comparison, but I think I disengaged from the similarities because I’m not a war journalist, and in situations where bombs are going off, that’s the last place I’ll be. I put myself in situations which are difficult, yes, but it’s human interest stories which drive me. I look to find the heart of the issue through the people that I meet, and I don’t feel like I’m in a similar level of danger. It did sadden me though; her life was cut short because she was trying to do the right thing and open conversations and that’s wrong.

 

Throughout the documentary, we’re shown all the damning emotions one might expect from the people now forced to seek shelter within the refugee camp, but through all of this, Reggie reminds us of the power of friendship, love and compassion can make the worst of circumstances, that little bit easier. In the later episode ‘A Week in a Toxic Waste Dump’ we’re introduced to the Burner Boys, a group of young men working in dangerous conditions in the largest electronic waste dumps in the world – Accra’s Agbogbloshie. Much like the formerly discussed episode, we also end with the Burner Boys a little closer to happiness from when the documentary opened.

This isn’t the case with all of Reggie’s documentaries. In the previous series, we’ve seen him come face-to-face with the far-right, misogynists, racists and projects do inevitably end with his subjects no happier or less angry at the world than when the documentaries started.

 

FAULT: Has there has ever been a particular person who he wished he could have steered into seeing a happier way of living?

Every film there’s someone I meet that I wish I could steer to a happier future, but I think I have to be realistic about my capabilities. I can’t fix everybody that I meet in a documentary or the real world. My job is to connect with people and tell their story, but it’s not to change the world, and it’d be irresponsible and unfair for me to promise a relationship with everyone. A lot of people had said to me, “please tell me you stayed in touch with the Burner Boys and did more” but it’s hard because two weeks earlier I was in Iraq, and a month before that I was in jail in North Carolina and what about staying in touch with those guys?

I don’t do these films as a one-off project; I’m not some kid on a gap year building a house in Africa and pissing off forever. I have plans where there is legacy, and I return; for instance in Kenya and Iberia, I’ve been back several times. In Awal, I was affected by being there and my connection to the land from being of Ghanian decent I’ve started the ball rolling on a campaign to bring about change. It’s not something I feel the need to shout about here because I’m not doing it for promotion, I’m doing it out of personal responsibility as a Ghanaian the position that I’m in.

 

FAULT: You touched on a point saying that you’re not a student on your gap year going in and fucking off. How do you respond when people counter with the argument that you’ve gone into Iraq, made your documentary and then like you say, fucked off?

It’s a very easy answer; the difference is I’ve made a film about it which you and many people have seen across the country. It’s started a conversation which wasn’t there before, and we don’t know what the legacy of that documentary will be – it could sell internationally, and it explains displacement in a way I’ve never seen before. I’ve done something different and original, and it will effect change even if it’s just in the attitude of the audience watching it.

 

FAULT: Do you have any career regrets?

I don’t have any. There are things I could have done better, things go wrong all the time, there are documentaries which I’ve made which have been a bit rubbish, but I’ve learnt from all of them, and it’s cheesy textbook crap, it reigns true. It’s essential that I celebrate my failures as much as my successes because of nothing is a better teacher than failure.

 

 

In Pt2 – we’ll discuss Reggie’s new book, future projects, race and above all else – FAULTS.

Coming Soon…

 

Unseen: My Journey by Reggie Yates published by BBC Books, price £18.99 | THE INSIDER S2 is available on BBC3

FENTY Beauty Is About To Top Christmas Lists With Their Release Of The Galaxy Collection

A few weeks ago, FAULT attended the London launch of Fenty Beauty and from seeing the collection up-close, we have hopped on the hype train. Today, we’ve received information that Fenty Beauty’s holiday collection will be releasing THIS FRIDAY and we can barely contain our excitement.

Entitled ‘The Galaxy Collection’, you’ll truly look out of this world in their glitter-drenched assortments of lipsticks, glosses, eyeliner, eyeshadows! In Rihanna’s own words, the songstress turned business tycoon wanted the collection to be “glitter on glitter on glitter” and as a fully fledged “female boss” what Rihanna wants, Rihanna gets.

Fenty Beauty has already cut a swath through the exclusive beauty industry with the inclusive message of her line of Fenty foundations in over fifty shade. We have no doubt that the new Galaxy collection will be another top seller and it’s most certainly on the top of our Christmas list this year!

 

 www.fentybeauty.com     

Film, Fashion and Music Culminate in one outstanding Made By Google Launch Party

 

Last night Google launched the second generation family with a new Pixel, Google Home Mini and Max, Pixelbook, Pixel Buds, Google Clips hands-free camera and updated Daydream View headset, tech lovers were sent into a frenzy as they watched the reveals unfold.

This excitement is not misplaced either, the first generation iterations of many of these products took the market by storm and have long been lauded as far superior to similar products in the market; so as you can imagine, the expectations were high for yesterday’s release.

We’ll save the device by device deep-dive for the tech magazines, where we’re concerned is aesthetic and this new range is beautiful. The coral and slate palette allowed for the Google Home Mini and Max to sit within both modern and traditional households, proving that Google is the only brand to put that level of thought into interior architecture when designing their home assistance speakers.

For our readers working within in the creative industry, you’ll most certainly want to read up on the new Pixelbook and Pixelbook Pen. We had a quick play at the launch party and there truly is an application for the production within literally every corner of the industry. Fashion designers can benefit when sketching new collections, photographers can dot retouch right onto the photo without the need for additional graphic boards, the sleek design allows for fashion writers to review collections live from the front row; truly a product we’ll be looking into more.

Of course, no launch is complete without a star-studded launch party. The night saw a whole host of industry leaders from the worlds of fashion, music, art and pop culture celebrate the new Google family. Previous FAULT stars Ella Eyre and Maya Jama were in attendance alongside the likes of Jourdann Dunn, Jack Saunders, Lady Leshurr and Neelam Gill to name but a few.

Music for the night was provided by DJs Nick Grimshaw and Maya Jama performs awesome respective sets for those inclined to boogie. Taking to the stage for a live set, Nadia Rose brought the house down with an energetic performance and even brought out beatboxer mid-performance (you’ll know the significance of this if you saw her Glasto set…We did!)

The wonderfully interactive evening featured a whole host of playrooms where party goers could interact with the new technology, 360 videos, sensory overloads, doughnuts and fun! It all gets a little hard to explain so just enjoy the photographs below.

 

For more information head over to Google Store

 

Sneak Peek of Nat Wolff inside FAULT Magazine Issue 26

Words: Cody Fitzpatrick

In his 23 years, Wolff stars in a film adaptation for Netflix of the manga series Death Note, in which his character comes across a notebook that gives him the power to kill anybody he pleases by simply writing their name in it.

He’ s also in the forthcoming rom-com Home Again and the animated feature Leap! , in addition to a bunch of other stuff that’ s not yet finished. Still, he finds time to be active in his pop-rock duo with his brother, Alex.

We catch up with Natt inside FAULT 26 for an exclusive photoshoot and interview – see the preview below!

 

FAULT: How have you grown or changed since The Fault in Our Stars?

NatThe Fault in Our Stars was super-important because it put me in touch with John Green, who became a good friend of mine. And I also got to work with Shailene Woodley, who Ansel [Elgort] and I both learned a lot from. I became friends with both of them. And then I got to work with one of my buddies, Josh Boone, so it was a big, friendly affair.

But I also think the book was very important because it introduced me to a lot of patients who were battling cancer—and also other diseases—who I think felt recognized by the book and the movie. I actually ended up having personal experience in my family with that, so it was an extremely personal and important experience for me.

 

FAULT: In Death Note, what motivates Light Turner? What does he need in life, and what’s he willing to go through to get it?

NatI think he feels unheard and misunderstood. When he gets this power, first he uses it to kill they guy who killed his mom, and then he uses it to kill the rapist high school bully. Then things start spiraling out of control.

I think Death Note is good wish fulfillment for anybody who’s ever felt like the world was against them. In an immature way, he kind of has to learn to grow up.

 

FAULT: Do you have any upcoming plans for Nat & Alex Wolff?

NatWe put out an EP in December called Public Places. Alex has been jumping around working in a bunch of films, too. So whenever we’re not on set, we’ll play shows in the city or maybe do a little tour—things like that. In August, we have this little thing of time, so hopefully we’ll get back in the studio for a little bit.

 

FAULT: You seem insanely busy. What do you like to do when you’re not working?

NatWhat do I do, or what do I like to do? I spend a lot of time refreshing Google to see what the next disaster is in my country.

But what do I like to do? I have a really good group of friends in New York. I think that’s why I end up gravitating toward New York any time I’m not working. I definitely like being busy. And if I’m not busy, I find ways to stay busy.

 

GET THE FULL SHOOT AND INTERVIEW EXCLUSIVELY IN FAULT ISSUE 26 – AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

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Justin Prentice – exclusive shoot & interview for FAULT Magazine Issue 26

Justin Prentice exclusive shoot for FAULT Issue 26 – Click to order your copy now

13 Reasons Why has been the most talked about show on Netflix over the past year. Produced by Selena Gomez, the show follows the trail of 13 teenagers as they uncover the reasons for their friend Hannah’s suicide. Heavily influenced by the negative impact of social media, teenage bullying and sexual assault, the show brings to light an unexplored side of leisure television. Speaking to Justin Prentice who plays Bryce Walker – Hannah’s sexual abuser – FAULT uncovers whether it’s beneficial or irresponsible to expose a young audience to explicit suicide.
 

 ORDER YOUR COPY OF THE ISSUE TO SEE THE FULL SHOOT & INTERVIEW

 
What were your initial thoughts going into a show like 13 Reasons Why with such a heavy character to play?

It’s always rewarding to play such meaty characters. I was excited for the challenge. I was also thrilled to be working with Brian Yorkey, Tom McCarthy, Selena Gomez, and Anonymous Content. Each has cemented themselves as power plays in the industry, so that alone were ample reason to climb aboard the show.

 

Having Selena Gomez as Executive Producer on the show – did you have any preconceived ideas in regards to the end result and what was your overall experience of working with her?

I knew that this project was going to be special, in part because of how much it meant to Selena. She and her mother, Mandy Teefey, have been a main force in adapting this story from the Jay Asher novel. If it weren’t for the two of them, we wouldn’t have a show. I’ve had a great experience working with Selena. She is a great boss to have.

Photography: Lionel Deluy @love artists agency
Styling: Angel Terrazas
Grooming: Melissa Walsh using jack black
Special Thanks: RCNSTRCT

To say that your character is not likable would be an understatement – how did you approach playing him so accurately and were you at any point reluctant?

Yeah, Bryce isn’t the best kind of person. I was never reluctant to play the part, but I was concerned with portraying him accurately. I had many conversations with psychiatrist Dr. Rebecca Hedrick and sexual assault expert and advocate Alexis Jones. They gave me great advice on people like Bryce and were instrumental in bringing Bryce to life. I wanted Bryce to be recognizable to the viewers. We all thought it would be more powerful if audiences were able to relate Bryce to someone they knew in their own lives vs. Bryce being a sheer monster. Not to say that his acts weren’t monstrous, but he still needed to be human.

 

The show in itself holds a strong responsibility towards young people battling depression and social bullying. Did you ever feel that it might be harmful to put out a project so heavy? There have been reports of a suicide in Austria that followed 13 Reasons Why’s formula with the tapes.

Any time you have a show that unapologetically sheds light on controversial issues, there’s going to be controversy. 13 Reasons Why is often times hard to watch because it can hit so close to home, but that makes it real. It gives people an opportunity to talk about these deep issues that are so often hard to initiate conversations about. We get so many letters and so many people coming up to us in person thanking us for the show and our portrayal of the events in the show. It’s definitely helping people. I wouldn’t say they followed the formula in 13 Reasons Why. For starters, their method was different than Hannah’s. They also didn’t leave any tapes. Any blame on the show is just speculation at this point. The girls had recently watched the show, but it has been admitted that there is no conclusive evidence of any correlation. Cases like this are heartbreaking, and our hearts go out to all people who are going through similar things. We have heard from several experts that a show does not cause someone to take their own lives. Anxiety, depression, stress, etc can. Our show gives people an outlet to talk about these issues that they may be experiencing.

 

Interview by Adina Ilie

What do you think are the positives of putting a character like Bryce Walker out there?

Most people know someone similar to Bryce Walker, and if they don’t personally, there are many cases of privileged athletes who get away with rape. Bryce is real. That’s terrifying, but true. Film and Television have the wonderful roles of spotlighting problems in society. The lack of education on sex and what consent looks like create people like Bryce and create people who think they can take whatever they want. These are kids, who would, often times, never do such things if they were just given the proper guidance early on.

 

13 Reasons Why has been confirmed for a second season  – where is the story going for Bryce?

My lips are sealed [laughs]! I can say that it’s going to be great! There is more to see in all of these characters. Season two takes some interesting turns.

 

Lastly – what’s your FAULT?

I suck at time management! I’m working on it. We only have one life, that we know of, so I should spend less of it procrastinating. There are a lot of things that I hope to accomplish. All of which are going to be hard to achieve if I don’t start cracking down…

GET THE FULL SHOOT AND INTERVIEW EXCLUSIVELY IN FAULT ISSUE 26 – AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

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Alfred Enoch in FAULT Magazine Issue 26

 

We’re delighted to announce that Alfred Enoch appears in an exclusive spread for FAULT Magazine Issue 26 – The Millennial Issue.

Having appeared in the Harry Potter films as a kid, Alfred made waves when he popped up – all grown up – in TV series ‘How To Get Away With Murder’. A runaway success for ABC, the show sees Alfred star opposite Viola Davis. After a wildly dramatic season for his character, we caught up to find out what’s next for the young actor…

Alfred wears looks by Michael Kors, Gieves & Hawkes, Zadig & Voltaire, Songzio & more in our exclusive shoot

Now that your time as Wes Gibbins on ‘How to Get Away with Murder’ has come to an end, are you going to take a break or jump straight into a new project?

I don’t like taking time off. It’s a nice thing if your job is your passion, and you’re fortunate enough to make a living from doing what you love, you just want to keep doing it. I enjoy working so I don’t want to take a vacation. Those naturally come anyway as an actor, it’s just the nature of the job, so I’m just looking to work – I don’t want to rest!

Are you going to experience a fear of missing out now that you’re no longer working on the show?

I mean, It’s sort of inherent in the work of an actor that you’ll get that. I’ll get more fear of missing out if I’m just doing
one thing for ages and then not doing other things. I was talking to someone recently who said that they were surprised that that was it, and they said it’s “only been three years” — three years is quite a long time! For me, I think that more of my fear of missing out comes from thinking about all the other jobs I’m not able to do. It was a terrific, terrific experience and I loved it, but it was good.

I think it was good for the show because it was unexpected, it opens up room for the other characters, and I get to do other things as well. It doesn’t feel like it was too soon, three years is a long time.

Click to order your copy

You’re currently in South Africa filming Troy: Fall Of A City. How are you liking playing the role of Aeneas?

This time, I know where it goes for my character. I didn’t actually study The Iliad, I studied The Aeneid, which is actually a later Roman text. It’s kind of nice to go into something and think well, at least I know my character survives!

It’s a cracking story you know, and from the perspective of a sort of slightly hyperactive
boy who always wanted to be an actor, this is one of those things you sort of dream of doing, getting to be on horseback, do sword fights, and all that stuff.

As an actor who doesn’t use social media, how do you gauge an audience’s reaction to your work?

That’s something that, for example with ‘How to Get Away with Murder’, people tell me. People are still telling me they’re excited about it, apparently it’s very big in Cape Town where I am now, so I have a lot of conversations where people express their surprise at what happened to my character.

I still have those conversations; just because I’m choosing to have those conversations personally rather than virtually doesn’t mean I’m locked in a hermetic box. There is a life outside of social media, which I’m very happy to embrace.

 

Words Courtney Farrell

Photography Jack Alexander

Styling Indigo Goss @ ERA

Grooming Jo Hamilton using Nars

Jack’s assistant Vivian Oparah

Indigo’s assistant Hafsa Hussain

BTS Video David Evans & Kiloran McLaren

Special thanks The Courthouse Hotel, Shoreditch

 

SEE THE FULL SPREAD INSIDE FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 26 – THE MILLENNIAL ISSUE

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Sophie Cookson – Queen of Kings – kills it in FAULT Issue 26 – The Millennial Issue

Sophie Cookson exclusive for FAULT Issue 26 – Click to order your copy now

When she first hit our screens with a starring role in Kingsman: Secret Service in 2014, it was hard to believe that it was Sophie Cookson’s first big-time project since leaving drama school. An alumna of the National Youth Music Theatre and Oxford School of Drama, her career has taken an impressive and rapid trajectory – from being named as one of Screen International’s Stars of Tomorrow in 2014 to securing roles in blockbuster titles and starring alongside industry greats.

Now, reprising her role as the ass-kicking Roxy in Kingsman: The Golden Circle, fans of the franchise can look forward to seeing Sophie and her fellow Kingsman spies face a deluge of dangers, with their headquarters in ruins while the world is held hostage by a nefarious new nemesis…

Things are obviously going to be a bit different in Kingsman: The Golden Circle. How do you think Roxy has developed as a character by this point? Will we learn more about her?

You’ll have to wait and see! She’s definitely now an established working cog in Kingsman with a great suit… apart from that, I can’t tell you much more!

 …

Sophie wears looks by Ralph Lauren, DSQUARED2, and Zeynep Kartel in our shoot

 

As most people will be aware, the Kingsman series has comic book origins – is that a genre that interests you, or are there others you’re more into?

I have to say, I’ve never been a comic book fanatic – but, through Kingsman and the fact that the movie industry does seem focused on that genre at the moment, I’ve learnt a lot about it in the last few years.

For me if it’s a great script and concept then I’m interested, regardless of genre. Having said that, I do love a good psychological thriller; something intriguing, with dark undertones. Right now I’m loving The Handmaid’s Tale – it’s so brilliantly harrowing and moving.

 

Photography: Roberto Aguilar
Styling: Rachel Gold @Red Represents and BTS Talent
Hair: Diego Miranda Hair @BTS Talent using Dyson supersonic & Sebastian professional
Make up: Emily Dhanjal @BTS Talent using Rodial skincare & MAC cosmetics
Nails: Nickie Rhodes-Hill @BTS Talent using Barry M
Photographer’s assistant: Khalil Musa
Interview: Jennifer Sara Parkes
Production Manager: Adina Ilie

 

You’re also starring in Gypsy on Netflix– what’s your character, Sidney, like in the show?  

Sid is super complicated, which is what drew me to her. She talks about owning your circumstances and living this authentic ‘I don’t care what anyone else thinks’ life – yet, at the same time, she lies and has this deep- rooted vulnerability. She can lie and manipulate, but also has this amazing zest for life and ability to draw people out of themselves. I was so excited to play someone who straddles the good and bad side of human nature. It’s still rare to see such three-dimensional women on screen.

Gypsy is, refreshingly, quite a female-led series – did you find it to be a different vibe on set, with women in so many of the production and on-screen roles we often see going to men?

There are sensitive issues we deal with in the show, and I was definitely happy to have all my intimate scenes with Naomi directed by women. There’s an implicit level of safety and understanding that is perhaps more automatic than when you’re working with a director of the opposite sex. It’s the first time I’ve done a scene of that nature surrounded by so many women – it felt empowering.

And, lastly, what is your FAULT?

I can be incredibly stubborn – I like to see it as determination, but it can definitely swing the other way!

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 26 – THE MILLENNIAL ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

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Tom Grennan storms the pages of FAULT Issue 26

 FAULT are pleased to announce that the man of the moment, Tom Grennan, features inside Issue 26 – The Millennial Issue – with an exclusive shoot and interview.

Tom wears looks by Moschino, Champion and Dickies in our shoot (courtesy of samgreenbergvintage.com)

Nestled on the back streets of a slightly sunny Shoreditch, we’re having breakfast with Tom Grennan. “I haven’t seen my mum in time” the singer tells us over a juice, and it’s no surprise – this past year has been a whirlwind. After lending his distinctive vocals to Chase & Status (and more recently Bugzy Malone) he’s now gearing up to release his debut album [Lightning Matches, available to pre-order now] after a largely sold-out UK tour. Tom’s outstanding vocal ability to stop you dead in your tracks also saw the musician nominated for the prestigious BBC Sound of 2017 at the beginning of the year, the latest benchmark in a career which shows no sign of slowing. Naturally, we had to sit down with the rising star to find out more…

The new EP is out soon, what’s your favourite song from it?

Probably ‘Found What I’ve Been Looking For’. The EP only has four tracks on it, I love ‘First Day Of The Sun’ as well though, that one’s wicked.

You’re on tour in September?

Yeah I’m buzzing to play KOKO, I’m buzzing to play Birmingham and Manchester too. I’m just buzzing for the whole tour really, it’s going to be sick!

What’s the best bit of advice Chase & Status have given you?

Probably to keep being me and keep believing in what I’m putting out, because if I believe in it then other people hopefully will. Just keep it real really.

What are you getting up to in your spare time… or, is it just music, music, music at the moment?

At the moment everything is about this, the EP really. I play football but at the moment I haven’t got the time. I sometimes get in a couple of runs here and there but apart from that I haven’t got much time on my hands.

Is there anyone else you’d like to collaborate with?

I haven’t really thought about it [pauses], Adele would be cool.

Photography Jack Alexander
Styling Gary Salter
Grooming Doey Drummond

SEE THE FULL SPREAD INSIDE FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 26 – THE MILLENNIAL ISSUE

AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40