FAULT Magazine Photoshoot and Interview with YUNGBLUD

 

Photography: Miles Holder

Words: Sammie Caine

With a stark sense of honesty to his music and a clear talent for songwriting, YUNGBLUD has emerged on the music scene and is certainly one to watch. Not only does YUNGBLUD offer music sure to get stuck in your head (including ‘I Love You, Will You Marry Me’), but he also delivers a message with his lyrics and an energy set to get you dancing along at a gig.

Following the release of his self-titled EP, FAULT had the chance to catch up with YUNGBLUD ahead of the exciting year he has before him.

 

So, the YUNGBLUD EP is finally out! How does it feel getting to release it to the world?

It’s pretty amazing. I think it’s kind of the first body of work that I’ve got to put out that represents what’s been going on in my head. Right now the world is such a confusing place for young people – I think we are such a clever, clued up generation and see a future and world that we want to live in, but it’s been held back by a generation that aren’t necessarily ready for the world to go there yet or just don’t understand us.

I didn’t agree with that; do you know what I mean? Me and a lot of my friends were angry and it’s just been so amazing to kind of use my music as an outlet to talk about shit like that, because I think everything right now is so safe and it’s amazing to have [the EP] out and to kind of allow people to go to it and just know exactly who I am as an artist. Yeah man, it’s exciting as fuck.

 

What’s one place you can’t wait to go play on tour?

Probably New York, man. I love New York. I can’t wait to play there in March again. I played a showcase there but I can’t wait to play a proper gig there. I love that city, it just blows my mind.

 

What would you say is your favourite song to play at gigs, and why?

I think probably ‘Tin Pan Boy’ because it just goes off every night and I can just get it out. As soon as I walk on the stage I can be undeniably, completely myself and I can just get everything out and it’s just sick. It’s the last song, so everybody’s going mental together and it’s kind of just uncensored.

I don’t know, I feel like I can just let everything out without people looking at me like I’m completely mental.

You’ve definitely made an impact with your music already – especially with the likes of ‘Polygraph Eyes’, which touches on the issue of sexual assault. Do you think it’s important to make a statement with your music?

Oh absolutely, that’s the fundamental core of Yungblud and what I am. I just believe that music’s been so lost and I think mainstream music’s not representing anything. I think it’s just quite sad because the stuff I grew up on represented a way of thinking or a way of feeling.

I don’t know, I just think the world is such a crazy place right now and politics is an issue. There’s stuff at the forefront of everyone’s mind right now and I just can’t believe that nobody’s talking about it in popular music. So, I just thought I need to do that.

And I’m not trying to preach to anyone or anything because if I get preached to I just switch off. I’m just saying what I think and all I want to do is empower people to say what they think because then that’s how we can change shit.

Who, or what, inspired you to get into writing and performing music?

I think music was just the only thing that encaptured my soul when I was young. I know that sounds really cliché and weird, but I was just brought up in a very musical family and it was always on in the background no matter what, it was just always on.

It was the thing that could kind of make me feel happy or make me feel sad instantly and that just encaptured me. But then I found out I was shit at it – all my mates could play ‘Sweet Child O’ Mine’ better than me and I didn’t like that, so I kind of sat there and approached it from a different way and started writing. That got my interest because the way I could tell a story through music was just so much better to me than just playing the guitar, so it kind of started from there. I started writing my first songs at probably like 11.

You’ve been compared to artists such as Arctic Monkeys’ Alex Turn and Sex Pistols’ John Lydon. how does it feel knowing that you’re already getting that kind of attention as a musician?

It’s amazing. Of course, it’s incredible because Alex is such a big influence of mine and I want to be that. I always said I wanted to be that.

I fundamentally love artists, real artists, who represent something. To me, man, if you’re not representing something or you’re not talking about something real, you’re not an artist you’re a singer. And I don’t want to be a fucking singer, do you know what I’m saying?

So to be compared to people like Alex Turner is just amazing because he was one of the only people that got me growing up and it’s down to him that I’m in to writing music. It’s amazing that I’m kind of placed in that calibre and that category because that’s all I wanted to be. That’s all I want to be. I just want to be an artist, I mean a proper artist like that.

What’s next on the cards for YUNGBLUD?

A lot. I’m getting tired looking at my travel schedule. I can’t wait though – so much touring. I don’t even think I come home ’til September already. I literally gave up my flat in London because I’m not going to be home before September.

And just releasing so much music, there’s so much music in the bag and I can’t wait to just release it all and get it out there. It’s weird, man, as soon as I write a song I just want to put it out. I know you’ve got to do the whole fucking games and shit, but I just can’t wait to put all the music out, it’s gonna be sick.

 

What is your FAULT?

Ooh, what is my fault? I pick my nose.

The self-titled ‘YUNGBLUD’ EP is out now, and YUNGBLUD is playing shows across Europe and the US throughout 2018.

FAULT Magazine Weekly Playlist by L Devine

L Devine first caught our eye with her EP with her full EP video ‘Growing Pains’. Despite her young age, L Devine opening narration speaks of an artist far beyond her years as she speaks about inspiring women and all the inspiring women in her life who gave her the courage to release the EP. You can watch the full video by Emil Nava HERE.

Today we’re very proud to present L Devine’s FAULT Magazine Playlist of all her personal favourite songs and just why she loves them. Sit back, relax and enjoy!

 

Miss You: Cashmere Cat, Major Lazer & Tory Lanez
This is my favourite song right now. I’ve had it on repeat since it came out. The chorus is a flip of another song and it works so well but I just love how simple the whole song feels, it’s like they did one pass on the mic for melodies while writing and they just went with it. I’m really into Tory’s vocals on it too, sounds so soft and lazy. This song is such a vibe!!

Imperfections: Starrah & Diplo
I’m totally obsessed with Starrah. She’s definitely my favourite artist right now. Every one of her tracks is so hooky but still really understated and cool. She’s written hits like Havana for Camila and Fake Love for Drake and more but her own stuff rocks my fkn world!! And it’s so inspiring seeing a young female completely dominate the songwriting game. She’s written the biggest songs of the past couple of years – it’s so motivating.

Mango: Siba
Siba is my favourite collaborator and my best friend! He produced and co-wrote my song Like You Like That with me, and many more yet to be released songs of mine. When he’s not writing pop gold, he works on his artist project, which is all written, recorded and produced by him. This is my favourite of his, it’s such a head nodder!!

Don’t Worry Baby: The Beach Boys
The Beach Boys are probably my favourite band of all time. Brian Wilson is my ultimate songwriting idol, I think he’s truly a genius. I saw him live a few years ago and I was sat right in the front row. I think Brian and his band loved the fact there was someone under 50 years old there so they passed me their setlist, guitar picks and drumsticks at the end. Pretty cool!!  I don’t know if this is my favourite song by The Beach Boys because there’s too many to choose from, but I love it, it’s so sweet.

Hands To Myself: Selena Gomez
I’ll never ever get sick of hearing this song. I think the chorus is the most satisfying thing I’ve ever heard and I just love Selena’s tone – it’s so delicate and intimate. Plus, it was written by Julia Michaels, another one of my songwriting idols!

Overload – Sugababes 
Nothing can beat old Sugababes. This song in particular. The melodies feel kinda weird and eerie. And I love how the vocals don’t have any tuning on them and feel really dry…it fits with the eerie vibe!!

When I See U: Fantasia
This song really makes me feel something. The lyrics are just so good. It just takes me back to anytime I’ve ever had a crush on someone and was too scared to tell them…which is pretty much all the time haha.

With Every Heartbeat: Robyn
Robyn is such a big inspiration of mine, I love that she makes sad songs you can dance to! She definitely inspired my song Like You Like That. This song in particular was the start of my obsession with arpeggiators and the whole Scandi-pop sound.

You’re Not Good Enough: Blood Orange 
I’ve got really into Dev Hynes while I’ve been writing my next EP. I first heard about him through the beautiful Solange song Losing You and then became obsessed with his Blood Orange stuff. I really like the whole sombre 80s vibe, it’s so funky but so melancholy.

Pink: Julia Michaels
I completely rinsed this track from Julia’s debut mini-album. I really wasn’t expecting the album to be so left and quirky, but I’m so glad it is! She writes pop smashes like Sorry for Justin Bieber and her own Issues and then also makes these really weird and interesting tracks with so much of her personality in them. It feels like I’m having a conversation with her in every track.

 

Listen To The Playlist on the go HERE

BAFTA EE Presents The Costume Series in partnership with Swarovski

 

Each year, the BAFTA Awards showcase an incredible array of talent in the most poignant cinematic categories.

 

This weekend, The Sessions held at BAFTA HQ shone a light on the makers of the most incredible films to grace the screen in 2017. From Production Design to Hair and Makeup, along with talks from this year’s EE Rising Star Nominees, the panels offered an exclusive in-depth look at the work and passion that is put behind each film and each talent nominated for this year’s awards.

 

As part of the Costume Sessions, we had an exclusive opportunity to see what actually went into the makings of the incredible dressings from BAFTA Nominated films The Shape of Water and I, Tonya.

 

The process that goes into the making of a costume is intrinsically fascinating and complex. Speaking to the crowd, Jennifer Johnson, the costume designer behind I, Tonya’s iconic looks has delved in depth into what actually goes into the garment-making of an iconic biographical film.

Photo: Neon

`’It’s a magical time when an actor feels incredibly wholesome with the costume” she says while reflecting on working with Margot Robbie. Robbie’s costumes were made from scratch – there was no particular insight into Tonya’s actual outfits that she wore during the Olympics. By studying significant amounts of documentary series on Tonya’s performances along with VHS footage and very old poor quality photographs, Johnson only had 5 weeks of pre-production time to be able to put together all of Robbie’s outfits. Challenging yet rewarding at the same time, the team behind I, Tonya acted as a very nurturing environment for Johnson to work in. Margot Robbie acted as a title character as well as a producer alongside her husband who was a screenwriter. We’d call it a family affair. It was very important for Johnson to get a good grasp of Margot’s character at first. Speaking to FAULT of her experience, she recalls that the moment Robbie became one with the costume was a wholesome process. “The body warms up, they accept the costume and they become one with it. If the actor doesn’t accept the costume in their sphere and their comfort, then that’s when difficulties occur.”

 

The second panelist of the evening was Luis Sequeira, the designer behind the iconic period looks of The Shape of Water who is currently being nominated in 13 different categories.

Octavia Spencer and Sally Hawkins in the film THE SHAPE OF WATER. Photo by Kerry Hayes. © 2017 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation All Rights Reserved

When working with Guillermo Del Toro, Luis explains that it’s a very particular and intense experience. On a production of the scale of The Shape of Water, it was very important to keep all the details in check from start to finish. A fabric that looks a certain way in the palm of your hards takes entirely different dimensions when put in front of a camera. The second part of the film was shot entirely underwater, which added an extra element of difficulty when addressing the costumes. For the final scene, Sequiera explains that he chose to use a different type of fabric that would accurately reflect the movements of Sally. When speaking of his experience of working alongside her, he explains that there’s “always a magical melding of actually creating characters with Sally and that forms a healthy balance.” In perspective, the cast is at their most vulnerable with the costume designers and they believe in that a strong blend of trust and friendship needs to exist. Although Sequeira insists that a boundary still needs to exist. Even though he’s close to Sally, he explains that ‘close friends don’t tie her shoelaces’ – which inevitably creates a division in between a working relationship and an actual friendship. Not to say that one can’t be formed, but what’s most important on a film set is a level of professional trust in between designers and cast members.

 

The question on everyone’s lips is ‘Who’s going to win Best Picture at the awards this weekend?’ Reluctant to answer, Sequeira believes it’s quite likely ‘Guillerom del Torro’s turn this year’. We tend to agree, yet the answer to the question shall be revealed this evening.

 

The EE British Academy Film Awards is broadcast on BBC One at 9pm on Sunday 18th February. For advice and inspiration from the best creative minds working in film, games and television, visit:www.bafta.org/guru

 

 

 

 

 

HAIM announce UK & EU Summer tour dates

Fresh from their Best International Band win at Wednesday’s NME Awards and their nomination for Best International Group at next week’s BRITs, FAULT Favourites HAIM have announced their UK & EU summer touring schedule with a glorious Spice Girls tribute at London’s Alexandra Palace:

The FAULT Issue 15 stars released their sophomore record, Something to Tell You, last year as an eagerly awaited follow-up to the sound of our Summer 2013, Days Are Gone. The latter has since gone on to be recognised as one of the best albums of the decade so far. Something to Tell You also made the Top 10 charts in both the UK (#2) and the US.

The LA trio’s UK & EU tour dates follow on from a 21-date US leg of the ‘Sister Sister Sister’ tour, which includes a spot at both weekends of Coachella festival on Saturday April 14th and April 21st. Their UK/EU tour will be bookended by appearances at Barcelona’s Primavera Sound on Friday June 1st, following their surprise late night appearance at the festival last year, and Lisbon’s Rock in Rio on June 23rd.

Haim announce UK & EU tour dates for Summer '18 - FAULT

The siblings’ UK & Ireland leg will kick off at Glasgow’s O2 Academy on June 10th, finishing up at London’s iconic Alexandra Palace on Friday June 15th. Tickets will go on sale from February 23rd, with a pre-sale from February 21st.

HAIM UK/EU dates:

Fri 1st June
Barcelona, Spain – Primavera Sound

Sun 3rd June
Milan, Italy – Fabrique

Mon 4th June
Zurich, Switzerland – X-tra

Tues 5th June
Cologne, Germany – E Werk

Thurs 7th June
Warsaw, Poland – Stodola

Fri 8th June
Berlin, Germany – Columbiahalle

Sun 10th June
Glasgow, UK – O2 Academy

Mon 11th June
Manchester, UK – O2 Apollo

Tues 12th June
Dublin, Ireland – Olympia

Fri 15th June
London, UK – Alexandra Palace

Mon 18th June
Amsterdam, Netherlands – Paradiso

Tues 19th June
Copenhagen, Denmark – Tap1

Weds 20th June
Stockholm, Sweden – Annexet

Thurs 21st June
Oslo, Norway – Sentrum Scene

Sat 23rd June
Lisbon, Portugal – Rock in Rio

Get your tickets via http://www.haimtheband.com

 Something To Tell You is out now on Polydor Records

Jacob Banks Exclusive Photoshoot and Interview for FAULT Magazine

Jacob Banks X FAULT Magazine

Words & Photography: Miles Holder

Styling: Rachel Gold

Leather tassel waistcoat Rokit
Roll neck Ralph Lauren

It’s no big secret, that here at FAULT we’re all huge fans of Jacob Banks; you can read our live review of his London show as proof here. The 26-year-old British-Nigerian singer-songwriter is often described as the saviour of blues, the “young man with the voice to bring blues into the 21st century”, but behind the hype lies a man wanting only to tell great stories through music. Moving unphased by the titles and accolades unwantedly bestowed upon him, Jacob lives in the moment, wishing only to create great music for himself and those willing to listen to it. We caught up with Jacob on the London leg of his worldwide ‘Into The Wild’ tour to find out more about the man behind the music.

 

FAULT Magazine: You’re currently on your worldwide tour, do you find that you enjoy the stage and perfoming more so than the studio enviroment?

Jacob Banks:  I think it has to be equal; I don’t do both at the same time. If I’m touring, I’m touring, and if I’m writing I’m writing. When I write a song, I write and then record, and then I’m done but the song isn’t truly ready until it’s had a chance to exist in a different space outside of the studio. Sometimes I can write what I believe to be a good song, but I don’t know if it’s a great song until I’ve tested it on tour and that’s why touring gives me the chance to experiment and really push the songs that I create to another level.

 

Denim suit: Newell Bespoke
Roll neck: Hackett
Pocket square: Dunhill
Beenie and trainers models own

 

FAULT Magazine: What’s your writing discipline like, do you do the writers workshops and say “today, I’m writing x amount of a song’ or do you let the songs come to you organically over time? 

Jacob Banks: For me, I’m writing constantly, and I’m almost trying to remember a song as opposed to writing a new one. I listen to people that inspire; listen to them talk, and I love vocabulary and the way different people can string sentences together in a certain way. For me, it’s about staying open to inspiration no matter where it might come from. That may be a chord progression that I hear from a television advert or an odd sound that I hear whilst playing Fifa but it’s always about staying open and being aware of every sound, every thought and conversation that’s around me that might become my next song.

 

Where do you go from there and find inspiration to turn those fleeting moments into a narrative within your music? 

Music, art, family and sometimes I tell stories about other people. Every second of the day is as an opportunity to tell a story and as an artist you can’t miss them. If I’m having a conversation with someone and it’s just a conversation where we’re not thinking of music, it’s in those moments that I find great inspiration because it’s natural and people are at their most honest. Staying unique is a personal battle because it’s easy not to stay unique, you can do it only once, and it’s so easy to fall back into old patterns because it felt so great the first time around. As an artist, it’s important for me to be unique and I’d rather be hated for being weird than known for mediocracy.

 

FAULT Magazine: Many people claim that you are the “saviour of blues” and the one person who can bring the genre to a new generation of music lovers, does the pressure of such acclaim ever get to you?

Jacob Banks: Nah, I didn’t know people cared! [laughs] I’m just having fun and making records with great people. I think everything else is a bonus and a constant struggle for me is figuring out what truly matters. For me, it’s just ensuring that I’m nice to people. My job is to give people company through my music and I’m not concerned with blues or being the saviour of anything as much as people think I am. I’d be happy to write a book as long as I felt that I was expressing my true self.

 

FAULT Magazine: How did the Timbaland remix to ‘Unknown’ (to you) come about?

Jacob Banks: That’s random! He came across the song and loved it so he reached out. For the longest time, I didn’t believe it would happen because it was “The Timbaland” and I grew up with his music with Aaliyah and Missy Elliot. It gave me great bragging rights for the longest time, and no one could tell me anything!

Denim suit: Newell Bespoke
Rollneck: Hackett
Pocket square: Dunhill
Beenie and trainers models own

 

FAULT Magazine: What’s been the proudest moment of the musical moment so far

Jacob Banks: Not to sound cliché but literally every day of being of musician and that is such a luxury. I get to see the world and play music to fans who might as well be my friends. I always pinch myself to remind myself how lucky I am. For me, the highlight is getting to express myself so openly.

 

FAULT Magazine: How do you ensure that you’re always true to yourself as an artist and expressing yourself and not a version of yourself that others want you to be?

Jacob Banks: I just ask myself, do I like the song? That’s all that matters so I just have to be honest with myself, and it’s easy to be influenced, and sometimes I get influenced if pressured. If you leave me for a week, then I will know if it’s truly a song that I like because I’ll go back to it naturally. If I’ll go out of my way to listen to a song again, it’s because I’ve wanted to and it’s something that I’d appreciate even if another artist were singing it.

Coat: Newell | Bespoke Zip top: Luke

What is your FAULT?

Jacob Banks: I’m always trying to rationalise everything; one plus one is two and that’s a fact I can hold on to but I’m trying to not be so rigid in my understandings of certain things.

 

To see Jacob Banks in a city near you, CLICK HERE

Oliver Stark ‘Breaking The States’ FAULT Magazine Interview

Oliver Stark: Breaking The States 

(Originally published inside FAULT Issue 25)

 

Photography by Irvin Rivera at Graphicsmetropolis Styling by Monica Cargile Grooming by Preston Wada at Opus Beauty using Kevin Murphy using V76 Photography assistance by Phill Limprasertwong at phillldotcom

 

Words: Miles Holder 

Fans of British tv and cinema will likely recognise Oliver Stark from various independent movies and UK television dramas. While the roles were small, they gave Oliver the confidence he needed to join a long list of British actors to head to the states with hopes of landing a big time role in Hollywood. It’s a move that many make but one that very few manage to succeed at and while Oliver knows all too well what defeat can feel – he conversely has seen what persistence, courage and the drive born from those setbacks can produce. On his second attempt to crack the US television market, Oliver landed the role of Ryder on AMC’s ‘Into The Badlands’ and the rest, as they say, is history. Now reaping the rewards from years of dedication to his craft, the only way is up for this young actor. As his career climbs to new heights, we sat down with Oliver to discuss his journey into Hollywood and to find out what’s next for the London-born actor with so much more to give.

 

What is it about a script or a role that draws you in?

I think that’s changed over the past year. Now, I really want to be involved in projects focussed on what’s happening around us at the moment and tell a story that has a relevance to society. The way the world is now and where it’s going as a population, I think there are stories that need to be told and I’d love to be a part of that.

 

Much like the parallels Into The Badlands shares with gun control laws?

That’s something that I didn’t expect to come into the discussion with Into The Badlands but it’s great to be a part of things and see it’s connected with people that way. I want to get people talking about real life and even though the show is in such a different world, it’s great it’s a vehicle for wider discussions.

 

How daunting was your move to LA?

I first came out here in January 2014 and I originally came for two months with a head full of dreams and didn’t actually have the best time if I’m honest with you. I wasn’t very busy and I didn’t do very well in auditions so I came home very dejected after that. The second time I went out was a much bigger deal for me because I had to rebuild all the confidence I’d lost and it was on that trip that I booked Into The Badlands.

It’s a big commitment to British actors to do it because it’s a lot of money and you have to readjust your entire life so there is a certain level of commitment to the craft actors show when they make the jump.

 

Even if it has already been done, what would be your dream role?

Some part of me has always wanted to be involved in a football movie! One of those by the numbers movies when it’s very clear who is going to win but is also very heartfelt and glory to all at the end. I’ve always wanted a movie which lets me show off my football skill too! [Laughs]

 

 

What’s it like to meet fans of Into The Badlands?

I think the greatest compliment I can receive is “I didn’t know you were British” because that is always a phew moment because it means I’ve got the accent nailed at the very least.

 

What is your FAULT?

The inability to escape my own head at times because there is always that voice back there that in a room full of great actors will ask “do I deserve to be here?” I think it’s something that everyone struggles.

The Rise Of Owen Teague – Taken From FAULT Magazine Issue 24

Owen Teague – Taken From FAULT Magazine Issue 24

Photography: Lionel Deluy @loveartistsagency | Stylist: Angel Terrazas | Grooming: Michelle Harvey @opusbeauty | Post Production: Pixretouch.com | Location: Special thanks to US Alteration | Production @loveartistsagency

 

Words: Miles Holder

Owen Teague first caught the eye of FAULT during his captivating performance as Nolan Rayburn in Netflix’s ‘Bloodline’. Despite his young age, Owen’s talent matches that of a performer far beyond his years. Currently filming for upcoming thriller entitled ‘The Empty Man’ and with other large projects in the pipeline, I wanted to catch up with the actor while he’s propelled to greatness.

 

It looks like you have a lot of thrillers and horror projects in your future. Do you find the darker productions more enjoyable?

I’ve always been attracted to darker things, ever since being a little kid. I’ve found that thrillers seem to have the fullest characters, regarding having both a dark and a light side. It’s been these kinds of flawed characters that have drawn me to the darker projects.

 

You play the part of Nolan Rayburn in Bloodline, are there parallels between Nolan’s character and your own personality?

Definitely. We’re both searchers, in at least an existential sense. His search is also for home, and how he’s going to eat and sleep and all that, but he also searches for a philosophical home, where he belongs in the world. I also feel that way. So because of this, we’re both kinds of distrustful of the world, and we protect ourselves, in our different ways. Nolan and I also are pretty creative people. We like making stuff. That’s only hinted at through Season 2, but it’s something I think is a big part of his personality.

That being said, our lives are incredibly different, and we deal with problems in very different ways. Everyone who knows the show tells me I’m so different from him, and it’s mostly true. But there is undoubtedly a part of me in Nolan.

 

What do you look for most when auditioning for a part?

I’ve found I really enjoy playing messed-up people. Not bad, or evil, per-say, but troubled. They’re complex, and becoming those people is always a combination of fun and difficult. 

 

What’s been the favourite part of your acting journey so far?

Bloodline, and playing Nolan. When you’re with a character for a long time — multiple episodes, multiple seasons — they start feeling real to you because you know them so well. So Nolan has become this weird kind of other-me, and the Rayburns this other-family. And working on Bloodline is always such a wonderful experience, because of the people and the feeling of the set. And, you know, the Keys aren’t too bad either. 

 

If you could play any part (even if it’s already been done), what role would be the dream role?

Oh man… well, if they ever made a movie about Jack Nicholson, I would love to play him. I mean, I’d love to work with him above that, but I’d also love to play him. He’s a big source of creative inspiration. 

 

Who is your biggest professional inspiration?

Leonardo DiCaprio. I love his movies and what he’s done as an actor, and also his work for the environment. He’s used his power as a celebrity to do something good for the world — in this case, work to combat what is probably Earth’s biggest issue right now, and will be for a long time to come: climate change — and I think that’s admirable, and important. 

KYGO – EXCLUSIVE ONLINE COVER SHOOT AND INTERVIEW

Jacket by Frame | Tshirt by London Denim | Jeans by Zadig & Voltaire |

Kygo – real name Kyrre Gørvell-Dahll – is always on the go. When we caught up with the tropical house sensation, he was in New York, doing promo for his new sophomore album, ‘Kids In Love’. It won’t be long until he’s jumping on a plane to his next destination.

 

The 26-year-old DJ and producer wasn’t planning a career in music, but what started off as experimentation on Soundcloud has resulted in a meteoric rise to fame, billions of streams, and shows at huge festivals such as Coachella and TomorrowWorld. We caught up with Kygo to chat about mixing up his sound, his dreams to work with Ed Sheeran and never sitting still.

Hoody by Kygo Life | Trousers Kygos own

 

How has your unexpected success affected you personally and how do you stay grounded when you’re playing gigs to thousands of people on an almost daily basis?

It’s about the people you surround yourself with. I’ve kept all my old friends, my manager, my girlfriend. They keep me grounded. It [fame] doesn’t really affect me that much. I see my family, I keep busy by always traveling and playing shows. I get to do what I love for a living.

 

You popularised tropical house to the point where you were working with superstars such as Ellie Goulding and Selena Gomez. How did you arrive at this unique personal sound?

It was just through a period of experimenting. When I was studying [at university] I would play music in my bedroom all the time. I spent hours and hours experimenting with different sounds. I was inspired by [artists like] Avicii and Swedish House Mafia but I felt like everyone else was trying to sound like them, so I started listening to other stuff like deep house and found the sound I have now. It wasn’t like a plan, it was just stuff that I thought was cool.

 

How do you prepare to play live? Do you have any pre-show rituals?

I like to take ten or fifteen minutes before the show to concentrate and get in the zone. There’s always so much stuff going on and so many people around.

Jacket and T- Shirt by Prevu London | Jeans by Zadig & Voltaire

You’ve recently collaborated with a plethora of artists such on your new album; some which are well known, like John Newman and OneRepublic, but some which are still largely under the radar like The Night Game. Why did you choose to work with these artists in particular?

My label sets up a lot of studio sessions for me. They recommend people to work with. I like to be very open-minded about people I work with. Even some songwriters or artists I’ve never heard of before, I’ll just try it and see what happens.

 

Is there anyone you’d love to work with down the line?

There’s a lot of people! Always on top of the list is Ed Sheeran. I did some remixes of Ed Sheeran four years ago. The Weeknd would be cool. Coldplay could be cool. Imagine Dragons as well.

 

In what way is your new album, ‘Kids in Love’ the follow-up or partner album to your last record, ‘Cloud 9’?

I think it’s a follow-up. There’s definitely some of the same sounds in there but a little different. I’ve tried to have fun with myself and my sound and mix it up. I didn’t want to make the same album or a similar album all over again, I wanted to make something new. I’m very happy with it. Some of the songs I’d be jamming on the piano but some of the songs were demos that would get sent over that I’d feel really inspired by. With the OneRepublic track and The Night Game track, we wrote those both from scratch together.

Coat by Coach 1941 | Shirt by Diesel Black Gold | Hoody by Kygo Life | Trousers by Michael Kors

Do you have a favourite song from the album?

It’s always tough to pick a favourite as I like all the songs on the album but I think ‘Kids In Love’, the title track if I had to pick, would probably be my favourite.

 

Is it because it means the most to you?

Yeah, it does! I’d been working on the song for over a year. When I make a track it only takes three days or a week or two, then after a while, you make some tweaks and release it. I usually like to tweak a song but it doesn’t make it much better. It’s not good to change it too much. This song sounded so big and powerful that I wanted to make sure it was perfect before I released it, so I spent a lot of time on it.

Jacket by Frame | Tshirt by London Denim |Jeans by Zadig & Voltaire

What is your FAULT?

I’m definitely always late. I can’t sit still. If I’m sitting in a chair I always have to move my feet. It must be quite annoying – not for me but for the people around me!

 

Words: Aimee Phillips 

Photography: Conor Clinch 

Styling: Dee Moran

Grooming: Graziella Vella using Becca and Kevyn Aucoin

Production: Adina Ilie