Phoebe Ryan interview and photoshoot for FAULT Magazine

 

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EARRINGS: KENNETH JAY LANE NECKLACE: LULU FROST BRACELET: BEN-AMUN COAT: KAELEN BLUE DRESS: LUBA BY HANNAH PAYNE PURPLE SKIRT: CAMILLA AND MARC STOCKINGS: FALKE SHOES: SANTONI

Blasting into the world of pop in a tangle of R Kelly mashups and vivid green hair, 24-year-old singer Phoebe Ryan has taken Soundcloud by storm. She boasts over two million plays for her collaborations with Jaymes Young and Skizzy Mars, and perhaps it’s not too surprising to find her recent single, ‘Mine’ with over a million hits on YouTube. With the likes of Taylor Swift listing to Ryan’s latest single under her selection of songs ‘that will make your life more awesome’, things are looking pretty peachy for this LA-based songstress.

 

What’s been your favourite part of your whirlwind journey into the world of music so far?

Waking up every day and remembering that I’m lucky enough to be living my dream. Still can’t really wrap my head around it sometimes. It rules. I’ll never take it for granted.

 

Earrings: Kenneth Jay Lane White short sleeve:Nanette Lepore Black and White Lace Jacket: Tadashi Shoji Tulle dress: Betsey Johnson

Earrings: Kenneth Jay Lane
White short sleeve:Nanette Lepore
Black and White Lace Jacket: Tadashi Shoji
Tulle dress: Betsey Johnson

What’s your creative process when it comes to songwriting?

Honestly it’s different every time I sit down to write. Sometimes I’ll start with a word, sometimes a concept, sometimes a melody. It’s also important for me to write every day, even if it’s just a couple of sentences. I find that being consistent about it helps me fight writer’s block.

 

How do you find inspiration for your music?

I find relationships to be a great source of inspiration, not just with other people but with myself and the world.

Jacket: ICB Necklace: Lulu Frost Tshirt: Junkfood

Jacket: ICB
Necklace: Lulu Frost
Tshirt: Junkfood

 

 

We all heard Taylor Swift give you a shout out back in October – what was your reaction?

 

Complete disbelief, shock, and gratitude. It was one of the highlights of my year. If I’m ever in Taylor’s position to be such a tastemaker, I will certainly pay it forward and give credit to up and coming musicians, too.

 

Your producer, Kyle Shearer, has worked with the likes of Tove Lo and Augustana, both of whom produce pretty big and epic sounds; who, if any, would you say are the main influences on your music?

That’s really hard to answer, because I’m influenced by so many artists in a really big way. Even if I’m not completely obsessed with someone’s music, I’m still influenced by their work ethic and the way they carry themselves. I always want to know what makes a great artist tick, and I feel like I’m constantly studying. Whether it’s Katy Perry or some dude at an open mic night at a bar…   

 

What’s your plan for 2016?

Keep doing my damn thing. Go on tour, put out a record, meet more fans, write songs for other artists, stay focused and healthy.

 

Sunglasses: Thierry Lasry Necklace: Kenneth Jay Lane Jacket: Nanette Lepore Dress: Michael Kors

Sunglasses: Thierry Lasry
Necklace: Kenneth Jay Lane
Jacket: Nanette Lepore
Dress: Michael Kors

 

Any dream collaborations you have in mind or hopes for the future?

I want to do a hologram duet with Ray Charles. Been listening to him a lot lately. That would be cool, right?

 

Your hit song ‘Mine’ seems to be all about loving yourself for who you are. It’s a strong message for anyone – were you singing to a younger-you perhaps? Who are you trying to get through to with this track?

I was definitely singing to a younger me. I had gone through a really rough period in my life, maybe as most people in their early 20’s do. I want to reach people who feel the same way I did. I get messages pretty often from people who totally understand and relate, and that’s the best thing in the world.

 

Jacket: Kaelen Earrings: Kenneth Jay Lane Necklace: Lulu Frost Teal blouse: Cynthia Rowley Skirt: ÖHLIN / D Pants: Betsey Johnson Shoes: Manolo Blahnik

Jacket: Kaelen
Earrings: Kenneth Jay Lane
Necklace: Lulu Frost
Teal blouse: Cynthia Rowley
Skirt: ÖHLIN / D
Pants: Betsey Johnson
Shoes: Manolo Blahnik

 

What is your Fault?

I can be so moody sometimes. I try not to take it out on other people, but it’s really hard for me. It sucks, I always feel bad. But I’m working on it!

 

Words: Josie Carder

Photographers: Alex + Iggy
Stylist: Chaunielle Brown
Stylist Assistants: Donika Hoxhaj + Kerry Robinson
Hair: Akihisa Yamaguchi Using Aveda Hair Care
Makeup: Kuma For Mac Cosmetics
Manicurist: Michelle Matthews/Rona Represents Using Zoya Nail Polish
Manicurist Assistant: Karla Carrington

 

Anne-Marie Photoshoot and Interview for FAULT #22

Today Anne-Marie has released the first single from her upcoming album and so to celebrate, we’re sharing some excerpts and images from our feature with the young star in FAULT #22.

Anne-Marie has been spending the past two years touring the world with Rudimental and now she’s progressing to pop’s waiting list after the release of her debut EP ‘Karate’. She’s clearly no rookie to the music industry and has her eye on the prize.

Suit jacket: Filippa K Slim trousers: Filippa K Cross kiss ring: Meghan Farrell Jewellery Single beat ring: Meghan Farrell Jewellery  Single beat cuff: Meghan Farrell Jewellery  Rose gold jawz earrings: Meghan Farrell Jewellery

Suit jacket: Filippa K
Slim trousers: Filippa K Cross kiss ring: Meghan Farrell Jewellery
Single beat ring: Meghan Farrell Jewellery
Single beat cuff: Meghan Farrell Jewellery
Rose gold jawz earrings: Meghan Farrell Jewellery

You’re first and foremost known as Rudimental’s Anne Marie. Can you talk us through your history with them? How did it all come about?

I had a writing session with them about three years ago and that was before I had any music out, so we just became friends basically. And we stayed friends until they needed someone to go on tour with them and that’s when they chose me.

Do you remember what your first show with them was like?

It was quite scary. I remember just being on stage and being stiff and quite overwhelmed. It was quite a lot to take in. It was a big show as well, it was at a festival in Wales. I ended up getting used to it though. I’m a little bit better now but back then it was a bit scary.

Floorwork Cream Top: Antipodium Taylor Denim Skirt: Pepe Jeans Black Leather Jacket: Filippa K Abbott Stud Black Boots: Rebecca Minkoff Cross Kiss Ring: Meghan Farrell Jewellery Single Beat Ring: Meghan Farrell Jewellery

Floorwork Cream Top: Antipodium
Taylor Denim Skirt: Pepe Jeans
Black Leather Jacket: Filippa K
Abbott Stud Black Boots: Rebecca Minkoff
Cross Kiss Ring: Meghan Farrell Jewellery
Single Beat Ring: Meghan Farrell Jewellery

 

Now you’re coming into your own and releasing your own music as well. What do you feel is the main difference between yourself as an artist and yourself as a featured artist? How do you plan on differentiating yourself?

Well, apart from the obvious outcome of being a featured artist where all you do is sing other people’s music, which I love doing nonetheless, as my own artist, I can write my own stuff, I can put across something that I want out there. I always write about personal experiences or experiences that other people who are close to me have been through. So, it’s finally fine to sing about something that is important to me, which I’m really looking forward to. Obviously when you’re singing other people’s music, it’s still important to have a connection with it, but it’s not the same as it is with your own writing.

Music Video for Anne-Marie’s latest single – Do It Right

Pink Embroidered Faux-Suede Jacket: Fyodor Golan

Pink Embroidered Faux-Suede Jacket: Fyodor Golan

What’s your FAULT?

My biggest fault is that I’m really impatient. And I need to learn how to be patient; it’s becoming a problem.

Words: Adina Ilie

Photographer: Daniele Fummo

Fashion Editor: Rachel Holland

Make Up Artist: Nicky Weir at Sarah Laird using Bare Minerals

Hair Stylist: Kieron Lavine using L’Oreal

Stylist’s 1st Assistant: Belda Chung, Emma Ellen

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 22 – THE UNAPOLOGETIC ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE FOR ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

EMPTY BALANCE – D’Alpaos Exclusive Editorial for FAULT Magazine

Dark and intimate sensations, the feeling of diversity and strangeness goes through such a tedious and standard everyday setting . “EMPTY BALANCE” tells about the need of change and the lonely man strength.

He, powerless but aware to be able to face any aggression and issue of the worst and darkest moments that just like a whirl bring the mind into obscure and perdition places. Hope and awareness on their own ability incite the will of revenge and the personal everyday win.

Hope and awareness on their own ability incite the will of revenge and the personal everyday win.

 

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CREDITS:

Photography : Lorenzo Acqua

Model: Oleh Serdiuchenko

Stylist: Matteo Chiaro

Clothes: D’Alpaos

Shoes: Officine Creative

Robert Sheehan for FAULT Magazine issue 22 – Sneak Peek

 

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Irish actor Robert Sheehan brings an air of tragedy to every part that he plays. Now he’s touching new grounds and has taken on the role of auteur as well as actor in his upcoming production ‘Jet Trash.’ Prior to that, you’ve seen him deliver compelling and dynamic performance in ‘The Road Within,’ where he plays a young man with Tourette’s syndrome, proving his versatility once more. His latest release,
‘The Messenger,’ sees Sheehan as a wayward character, a bit homeless looking, who shows up at people’s funerals and talks to dead people. There wasn’t too much debate on who else would’ve been a more suitable fit. After going back into theatre for ‘The Wars Of The Roses,’ we caught up with the Irish actor and it’s safe to say that his excitable, charming, yet compelling, and substantial characters aren’t a far cry from the real deal.

 

Now you’ve taken on the role of auteur as well as actor in ‘Jet Trash.’ This was your first time producing and building something from the ground up. How was the whole process for you?
All in all, it’s been about a two and a half year experience. Andy Brunskill, who’s the main producer, came to my agent with
a treatment of about 15 pages and said ‘Would Rob like to come on as an actor but also as a producer?’ And for over six to 12 months we commissioned a writer to do the script, who was actually the writer of the book that ‘Jet Trash’ is based on. Initially, we weren’t too happy with it and had to transform it into a more complex body of work. That was a brilliant experience because it was the director, Charlie, and myself sitting in my kitchen until five or six in the morning, managing sections of the script. Afterwards, we all went out to film
in India for five weeks and had this sort of chaotic experience. It was something that we’ve been developing and growing for a year and a half and all of a sudden, we had all these people helping us make it. It wasn’t without it’s chaos but it was a really joyous experience.

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Since you were so heavily involved in it, did you manage to keep any sort of objectivity?

I don’t think so, no. The only way you can improve it, particularly in post-production is to keep watching different manifestations of it, take notes, see what bits stuck with you most and then fight for those bits. I was in LA, so I was watching cuts of the film digitally, taking notes and then comparing the notes to the last thing. I was trying my best to have objectivity, but, by definition, you can’t because you’re so close to it. You feel loyal to bits that might not entirely work. But you get better at it; you learn to kill your smaller babies in order
to save the bigger babies.

 

Of all the roles that you’ve played, which one do you reckon was the one that you could relate to most?

I think in my early 20s, I was more like the character Lee in ‘Jet Trash.’ Not as selfish as him, but I was always trying to be the life and soul of the party and absolutely craved human company. But I was a decent kind of person who was doing stuff kind of hair-brained. I’ve mellowed out to some extent in my old age.

 

What’s your FAULT? 

My biggest fault is the ability to forget everything that’s not in front of my face. If someone’s not getting me to focus, it just goes clean out of my head.

 

Find the whole interview and photoshoot exclusively inside FAULT 22

Words: Adina Ilie

Photography: Joseph Sinclair
Styling: Krishan Parmar

Grooming:Stefano Mazzoleni @ EMMA DAVIS

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 22 – THE UNAPOLOGETIC ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE FOR ORDER NOW

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…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

Jamie Campbell Bower is FAULT Issue 22’s Menswear cover

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Sweater:Scotch & Soda
Necklaces: Pyrrha 
Cuff: Pyrrha
Large knuckle ring: Pyrrha
Bronze Ring: Dominic Jones
Silver Ring: Chrome Hearts

 

You’ve seen Jamie Campbell Bower everywhere ever since his acting debut in 2007 with ‘Sweeney Todd’. In the meanwhile, he’s done a Burberry campaign, started a band and played in the all-top fantasy film franchises (‘Twilight’, ‘Harry Potter’, ‘Mortal Instruments’, you name it, he’s done it). He’s the kind of character who uses all of his creative outlets when he’s going through shit and makes something worthwhile out of it. Living in a day and age where instant gratification is a given, Jamie Campbell Bower is a prime example of how sometimes you just have to work really hard and be patient in your pursuits.

On the Menswear cover of FAULT Issue 22, we catch up with the young star about his experiences within the industry, and where he hopes to take his craft.

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Tshirt: Jil Sander
Jacket: BLK DNM
Jeans: BLK DNM
Boots: Aigle
Necklace: Pyrrha

You’ve worked with both Johnny Depp and Sir Ian McKellen. Which one of them stuck with you?

Johnny was really lovely to me, he could tell that I was nervous; he could tell that I was a bit rash and quite young. And with Ian I spent about five months. I tend to go a bit stir crazy when I’m on set just because it’s quite a weird experience, and Ian was always there, he was around when things would get a bit hectic. I think we come from the same genes, we’re pretty similar and he’s a phenomenal actor. I’ve always been the kind of person who’s a bit of a magpie. I’ve always taken little bits of other people’s performances or other people’s writing and tried to make them my own. Art is imitation at the end of the day. But yeah, I loved them both. I think of myself as quite a personable person. I like to talk; maybe I piss people off sometimes. But I like to find out about people’s lives and try to do the best that I can.

What about the music? What happened with The Darling Buds?

The music is going mental as well. We put The Darling Buds to bed at the beginning of this year. It’d been going for so long and I loved it, but there was something about it that didn’t seem like me. It was all very light and I’ve been through some hefty shit in the past year or so and I needed something that allowed me to rid myself of the things that really affected me. Music allows me to be me. To say what it is that I feel, how I feel, in an artistic fashion. I’m trying to be genuine and honest. I’m trying to be as real as I possibly can be on a day-to-day basis. And so, we changed the name of the band to Counterfeit and it’s the most raw and fucking real thing that I will have ever put out there. There are things out there that I haven’t told anyone and there are things out there that I’m nervous to talk about. But at the same time, they come across on the record and they come across beautifully. And it’s fucking loud. Jesus Christ, is it loud.

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Shirt: BLK DNM
Jeans: BLK DNM
Boots: Aigle
Necklace: Pyrrha

Of all the things that you’ve done so far, which ones are closest to your heart?

I couldn’t live without every single thing that I do. If my acting was to fall away, I’d be crushed. If my music was to fall away, I’d be crushed, if my creativity was taken away from me, I don’t know what I’d be. This isn’t to say that I define myself by what I do, I define myself by how real I am with what I say and what I give. I put so much effort and work into everything that I do that if one of them was taken away, it would feel like a part of me was missing. I wouldn’t be able to function anymore.

What’s your FAULT?

Because of the way that my mind works, I wake up and send emails to people at five o’clock in the morning and, within an hour, if I haven’t received a response, I’d lose my shit. I have to constantly remind myself that not everyone else is as mental as I am and that they’re not up at five o’clock in the morning. I need more patience. I need to learn to be mild, to be calm and to be calculated rather than be a fucking lunatic at all times.

Words: Adina Ilie
Photographer: Sarah Dunn
Fashion Editor: Kristine Kilty @ Lovely Management
Grooming: Lee Machin @ Caren
Fashion Assistant: Belda Chung
With special thanks to Team Rock

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 22 – THE UNAPOLOGETIC ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE FOR PRE-ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

Robert Sheehan Brings Cartoons To Dalston With Joe Sangre’s Exhibtion “The God Damn Beauty Of It All”

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A cartoon show will fill the basement of BSMT’s space as of this week. Produced by Irish actor Robert Sheehan who will be appearing in FAULT issue 22, the exhibition will showcase an abundance of cartoons inspired by the Great Depression, courtesy of artist and filmmaker Joe Sangre.

Accurately entitled “The God Damn Beauty Of It All”, Sangre’s work is heavily rooted in the 1930s depression era with a 1980s counterculture aesthetic. Keeping Max Fleischer’s work at the conceptual forefront (also known as the father of animation and no, it wasn’t Disney who thought of it first), the cartoons have their own language and ambiguity.

Born and raised in the suburbs of North London, Sangre’s early years have been heavily influenced by counterculture rebellion amongst youngsters. Artworks from bands like the Black Flag, The Minuteman and Subhumans were formative influences on his early conceptual developments and strokes of it resurface in his work.

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The core subject matter of his upcoming show is the 1930s depression era, used merely as a reflection of modern times, as opposed to a sentimental nod. The cartoons emphasise even further the fact that one of the strange characteristics of contemporary bourgeois life is the sheer pleasure we take in inverting it, our darker natures finding pleasure in allusions to misery.

As Sangre said, the fact of the matter is that “using bold images in mainly black ink allow me to take sometimes complex issues or feelings and represent them visually with simplicity, but at the same time leave a certain amount of nuance or ambiguity. I have to remind myself that I’m not making bumper stickers or greeting cards, at least not until Hallmark offer me a good price for my tattered, soiled mattress of a soul.”

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The exhibition will be running on 5 Stoke Newington starting December 11th and will last until the 17th. The artworks will also be available for purchase at the gallery.

 

Aida Emelyanova – I Do Whatever You Animals Do

 

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Aida Emelyanova is a Kazakh-Russian artist who brought her works to Lights of Soho in celebration of Frieze.

Entitled “I Do Whatever You Animals Do”, the exhibition is inspired by the role reversal of humans and animals. She has transformed herself into the animals that humans capture, objectify and kill for pleasure. As the producer, director and protagonist of the photos, you get to see Aida transforming in each photograph, as they all carry a story.

Her collection was on display for one day only at Lights of Soho and FAULT was there for a chat with the artist

How did you come up with all of this?

Initially, I wanted to put myself in the animal world and showcase female stereotypes. I tried to compare ourselves to animals and illustrate how women feel caged. So, I made a narrative behind every single photograph.

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What made you feel that the best way to portray humans as animals was to choose yourself as the protagonist of the scenes?

I did the whole production by myself. I did the pictures, I even worked on the objects in the pictures. I did have other models in it at first, but the outcome was inaccurate to the idea that I had in my head. In order to get what I had in mind out there, I had to do it all by myself. It took ten times longer, but I knew how every image was going to work. I knew what expressions I wanted to get, I knew how everything was supposed to play out.

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You incorporate fashion as well into your photographs. In what way do you feel that emphasizes your purpose of showing that humans can learn so much from animals on humanity and humility?

I didn’t feel like incorporating much fashion in the project, to be honest. Apart from two or three pictures, there aren’t many clothes, because you don’t get clothes in the animal kingdom but then again, I didn’t want everything to be completely nude. The purpose of the dresses and the use of fashion in this array of pictures is merely to balance them out. I tried to stay as far away as possible from fashion because it could have become confusing to the viewer.

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Aida’s show can be seen at Debut Contemporary in London at 82 Westbourne Grove.

 

Words: Adina Ilie

Lights of Soho opens new exhibition: Signs That Say What You Want Them To Say

Dannielle Hodson woman and the moon
On the evening of 8th of October, Lights of Soho opened their doors to welcome a new wave of neon artists.

The exhibition accurately entitled “Lights That Say What You Want Them To Say” showcased over 30 artists from around the globe. The show, curated by renowned light artist Robert Montgomery, united storytellers and poets alike.

ClusterFront - Bobby PatmoreThe gallery hosted a wide range of neon art. You had traditional approaches to neon, courtesy of Victoria Lucas, who uses art with selected subject matter that play on memory, narrative, absence and temporality. Her piece, ‘Quiet Dustis a quote taken from Bronte’s Jane Eyre and relates to the aftermath of an event and describes the eerie stillness after an encounter has taken place.

Although it may have seemed from the distance that the artworks were clustered around the gallery, all the items were connected in the subtlest way. It was a show that was deep rooted in lyrical inspiration and stories hidden beneath the bright lights.

Victoria Lucas - Quiet Dust

When talking about the exhibition, curator Robert Montgomery said that in an ideal world we would give the billboards back to the people and everyone could write their dreams in neon. Which is exactly what’s happening now at Light of Soho.

Neon Orb - Mark Beattie

 

Signs That Say What You Want Them To Say is open to the public until November 21st

 

Words: Adina Ilie