Janelle Monae Covers FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Janelle Monae X FAULT Magazine

janelle Monae FAULT Magazine dirty computer

Fashion Editor: Rachel Holland | Photographer: David Yeo | Make Up Artist: Jessica Smalls | Hair Stylist: Nikki Elms | Nail Artist: Diana Drummond | Photographer’s Assistant: Anna Forbes | Stylist’s Assistant: Anna Cirnu | Photographed at Handel & Hendrix in London handelhendrix.org

 

Words: Miles Holder

Special Thanks: Handel & Hendrix

In 2007, Janelle Monae released her EP entitled ‘Metropolis: Suite I (The Chase), the first in a seven-part conceptual series set in the year 2719’s civilisation of Metropolis and told through the eyes of a sentient android, Cindi Mayweather.

The story continued through her 2010 album ‘The ArchAndroid’ and 2013’s ‘The Electric Lady’ and fans followed Cindi Mayweather as she fell in love with a human and travelled back in time to warn of the imminent threat posed by the secret organisation, ‘The Great Divide’.

For her 2018 Album entitled ‘Dirty Computer’, Janelle will be leaving Cindi behind and telling a new story, the story of Janelle Monae. The first two releases from the record ‘Django Jane’ and ‘Make Me Feel’ are still filled with Janelle’s signature style, Afrofuturism and punk soul swag. While a departure from the narrative fans are accustomed, it nevertheless provides what so many have a craved – a glimpse into Janelle’s personal life.

Could it be that as our reality begins to mimic that of the fictitious dystopian future of Metropolis, as too has Janelle been forced to follow in the footsteps of Cindi Mayweather and save the present day from its own “great divide”? Only time will tell. For Janelle at least, it’s all about being present, and at long last, finding the confidence to tell her own story.

 

janelle Monae FAULT Magazine dirty computer

 

FAULT Magazine: You’ve always included social commentary within your music but it was vailed within the narrative of Metropolis. On Dirty Computer, the message is a lot more in your face – why?

Janelle Monae: I knew I was supposed to make Dirty Computer before my first album came out and I always wanted to speak out, but I put it off because I needed to understand where my anger was coming from and how best to channel it.

I am such an honest person and speak very candidly when I’m with friends and family, and that’s what you’ll hear on this album. I sing about politics, race, sexuality, gender on the record but to release the album, I needed to make sure I had the confidence to not self-edit. I needed to be vulnerable, honest and open.

This project is about my freedom and challenging myself to live in the present and not in 2719 through Cindi. I feel like I can contribute to the present day and that I should contribute. I’m choosing to live in the now and to celebrate the people that are not celebrated in the present day. I want to honour those living on the outskirts of society due to their sexuality or gender identity. These are people who I love, and that love me but waking up as an American who cares deeply about the American dream and the rights of all people to it, I feel there is too much at stake to be quiet and to mince my words on specific issues.

 

Despite the social commentary, it doesn’t feel like a sad or hope lost album. There are many songs about self-love and sexual discovery that it ends up as quite an empowering record, was this the intention?

I’m happy you said that because it’s not meant as a sad album, it’s intended as a celebration for the “dirty computers” of the world who get told that they’re dirty and that they have viruses making them different which they need to have taken away. Dirty Computers should see their uniqueness and their so-called viruses as positive attributes which make them valuable to society.

 

What’s given you the confidence to say “Right, it’s time to tell the world who Janelle is and tell my story”?

Janelle Monae: There is power in vulnerability, and I think that it needed to start with me. I was inspired by many movies, some of which I’ve been a part of and the stories I read and people I’ve met; when people shared their stories with me so honestly, it resonated.

I’ve been talking about it, but I feel I wasn’t entirely embracing the things that made me unique. I was telling others to as part of my music, but I wasn’t living it, and I think that I was afraid I would lose supporters for doing so.

I had a lot of conversation with myself about who was going to be the subject of the album myself or Cindi, but I’m here now, and I think it’s right that I stay in the present and share my story and walk in my truth as fearlessly as possible.

janelle Monae FAULT Magazine dirty computer
And how does one live fearlessly?

Janelle Monae: It’s not that I don’t experience fear, but in those moments, I choose freedom and freedom is not free. Freedom always comes with great sacrifice, and there will be people who say hurtful things and not support me because I’m living my truth.

 

Does it scare you to put yourself out there for scrutiny when people won’t just discuss your music, they’ll twist your music and message and start discussions on you as a person and your personal life?

Janelle Monae: No, I have soul searched, and this time around, I think being honest is most important. It’s about being able to say “hey I’m ok if people don’t like that I’m embracing this side of me”, it’s the side that my friends and family get to see and they still love me the same. I think that my evolution is more important than pleasing people and I may not say it right, I might get some things wrong, and I may stumble along the way but was I honest, was I sincere, was my heart in the right place? Yes, yes and yes.

What scares Janelle Monae?

Janelle Monae: That I won’t have a family within the time frame that I want to have a family. I want to have children, but I don’t want to miss that time because I was so focused on my career and because I didn’t plan accordingly. That scares me most now more than anything. I do want to usher in a new generation of babies that will be better than me and able to dream bigger than me and go out into this world and turn it upside down in a very positive way.

janelle Monae FAULT Magazine dirty computer (1 of 1)
What is your FAULT?

Janelle Monae: One of my FAULTs is that I’m a self-editor and perfectionist and I don’t enjoy my experiences when I’m so focused on being consistently perfect in every situation. It’s something that I’ve had to work on my entire life actively. It used to consume my experience, and I couldn’t enjoy things because I was so focused on how they were going to be presented. I was so concerned with what people thought, but now I’m just at this point in my life where I’m finding strength in my imperfections, and I realise that I connect more with myself and with other people when my FAULTs are being shared for all to see.

 

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 28 – THE STRUCTURAL ISSUE –  IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

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…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

 

FAULT Magazine Exclusive Fashion Editorial – Benjo’s Arwas’ FAULT

Photographer: Benjo Arwas

Model: Emilia Vucinic @ The Lions

Stylist: Jordan Grossman

Hair and Makeup: Nicole Chew @ Art Department

Video Production: Tribe Federation

Daphne Guinness Launches Second Album at London’s BFI IMAX

Album cover on BFI IMAX screen

Last night saw the launch of British fashion muse and musician Daphne Guinness ’ second album as Daphne and The Golden Chords, It’s a Riotat the BFI IMAX. As what can only be described as an extravagant homage, the heiress to Guinness – yes, the Irish stout – was the main focus of the night from the start to finish, complete with glass sculptures of the singer at the entrance and projections of her mirage covering the walls as drinks were served. As an air of nepotism swept the room, the event was bustling with friends and confidants of Daphne. From old rockers in leather jackets to big names in the fashion industry, the crowd was an eclectic mix of all ages, some of which wouldn’t have looked out of place 50 years ago.

Once ushered into the cinema for the screening with bags of popcorn, glasses of prosecco and merchandise, FAULT was treated to a sensory eye bath. With the help of Tony Visconti, the American record producer who helped the likes of Bowie and T. Rex, Daphne’s music – set to visuals created by artist Nick Knight – made an instant impact, leaving the audience mesmerised.

Over a collection of arty clips and kaleidoscopic visuals of the singer herself, the music poured out poppy, Lauper-esque hooks with ethereal lyrics taking influence from Marc Bolan and Bowie – Visconti definitely left his mark on the album. The self-proclaimed autobiographical record visits her recent near-death experience and her life as it has progressed in last few years. Using her classical training, penchant for poetry and love of Wagner (thanks to hours chatting with Bowie in the studio), Daphne has created her own unique style of glam rock – think a lot of spoken word and catchy repetition.

The unashamedly self-assured Daphne was soon interviewed on stage by music journalist Will Hodgkinson, who’s written for the likes of The Guardian and Vogue. However, as the Q&A progressed, her coquettish facade transformed into a timid, more vulnerable persona, speaking about her fears and anxieties both in her personal life and musical career, before mentioning her new relationship with her bandmates who are, of course, also big names in the music industry, including keyboard player Terry Miles.

The singer’s 80s-inspired sound and alias is a perfect partnership and, in Daphne’s own words, completes her world. Tour? She doesn’t know. But, if she does, make sure you bring your glitter platforms and leave the Guinness Toucan Tees at home.

Words: Flora Neighbour

Flora Neighbour with Daphne Guinness

Flora Neighbour with Daphne Guinness

 

Flora Neighbour with KC and Jordon Wi-Fi from Last Night in Paris

Flora Neighbour with KC and Jordon Wi-Fi from Last Night in Paris

 

Flora Neighbour with Daphne and The Golden Chord keyboard player Terry Miles

Flora Neighbour with Daphne and The Golden Chord keyboard player Terry Miles

 

Flora Neighbour with music journalist Will Hodgkinson

Flora Neighbour with music journalist Will Hodgkinson

Nothing’s changed… exclusive editorial by Alberto Raviglione

For her: dress and shoes: Mila Schon Earrings Madame Paane
For him: Jacket and pants: Isabel Benenato

 

For her: Body versus Mini bag: Ies Petits jouers Belt Sergio gavezzeni
For him Total look: Versus Versace

 

For her: jacket: march rambaldi, Bra and earrings: rada ,Pants cestIaV
For him: Jacket: Andrea Pompilio, Shirt: Versace, Pants: Levis

 

For her Dress: Lou De Bètoly Ring: Rada
For him: Shirt: Les Homme

 

For her: Jacket and pants: Armando serving Shirt and gloves: Cristiano burani
For him: Jacket and shirt Legos Pants Andrea Pompilio

 

For her: Dress: Alessia Giaoobino Earrings: Madame Pauhne
For him: Total look: Angelos Frentzos

 

For her: Top and skirt: redemption Earrings rada Bracelet Rosa Antioa
For him: Jacket: Antonio Marras

 

For her: dress:Antonio marras Earrings: Mila Sohon
For him: Total look: Antonio Marrass

 

Collier: Gerlando Dispenza Jacket: Alessia Giacobino Belt: Stefano De Iellis

 

Jacket: model’s own

Photographer: Alberto Raviglione
Stylist: Enrica Lamonaca @freelancer
Make Up: Chiara Cima @aldocoppolaagency
Hair Styling: Mimmo Di Maggio @freelancer
Stylist Assistant: Martina Repetto

Model: Mats @ILove
Model: Aleksandra @Fashion

I Am With You – new editorial by Holger Maass

Blouse: Rebekka Ruetz
Culotte: Mademoiselle Yéyé

Jacket: mbyM
Jeans: DAWN Denim

Coat: Stefania Sarre

Jacket: mbyM
Jeans: DAWN Denim

Jacket: Prandina
Trousers: mbyM

Vest: Rebekka Ruetz

Jacket: mbyM
Jeans: DAWN Denim

Coat: Rebekka Ruetz

Pullover: Rebekka Ruetz
Jeans: DAWN Denim

Vest: Rebekka Ruetz
Bra: Victoria Secret
Panty: Magic Bodyfashion

Dress: Escada
Jacket: Escada
Cuffs: VintageLove

Dress: mbyM
Coat: mbyM

Dress: Escada
Jacket: Escada
Cuffs: VintageLove

Photographer: Holger Maass
Photographer’s Assistant: Michel Truong Nhu

Model: Vlada Petrenko @Woman Model Management, Milano
Styling: Claudia Cerminara
Hair & Makeup: Jani Danilakis

MFW : WOODHOUSE

Words: Chaunielle Brown | Images: Liana Vine

The Woodhouse Army never fails to strike a nuclear and revolutionary chord with collection presentation. This season is no different. Designer Julian Woodhouse continues to surprise and  push the fashion boundaries for menswear while creating echoing staple statements that run concurrently with the society dailies we presently swim and endure in. Marked with traditional army fatigue and bomber jackets, splashed finishes of fur and liquid leather with baseball and beanie caps come strapped on for security. Accompanied by footed favorites, Dr Martens, Woodhouse advances on with strength and unity and encourages the commander in chief in us all. As Julian Woodhouse puts it, “Imagine if we viewed ourselves as a collective society. Imagine our possibilities…Imagine just how far our civilization could venture, together.”

Diesel release FAULTless Embrace Your Flaws Campaign Video

Diesel release FAULTless ‘Go With The Flaw’ Campaign Video

 

Words: Miles Holder

While 2018 hasn’t gotten off to the most optimistic start, if you search hard enough, you can still find the good news meshed within the sea of dystopian updates. Today that update comes from Diesel’s ‘Embrace Your Flaws’ campaign. Celebrating the flaws that make us all unique, Diesel has followed on from their 2017 ‘Go With The Flaw’ campaign and once again enlisted director Francois Rousselet to create a beautiful, poignant yet still comical romance story.

In their own words “If in the first film we saw the perfectly flawed result of a rookie director’s attempt at making his first film, in this new episode, with irony and a good dose of carelessness, we show you what happens when you… Don’t go with the flaw? When, in fact, you do everything you can to hide the flaws in your life, chasing perfection as the world imposes, because common sense thinks that beauty is just another duty.”

To echo the words of FAULT Magazine Issue 23 cover star Alicia Keys, “Let go of the word “perfection”. It’s not real, and it’s a word that tears us down. There is no way to be perfect and no fun in being perfect.” And Diesel has hit the nail on the head with this new campaign video.

While it goes without saying that the campaign is commendable, a visual delight and more evidence of Diesel’s honest commitment to promoting self-love, the production team on ‘Embrace Your Flaws’ also deserve credit for sending such a poignant message without preaching. Sometimes humour is the best device to deliver an important message and judging by the number of shares this campaign has received; this is one of those times!

Check out the video below!

 

Diesel artistic director for this campaign NICOLA FORMICHETTI

VIDEO CAMPAIGN

Director FRANÇOIS ROUSSELET

VISUAL CAMPAIGN
Photographer FLORENCE & NICHOLAS
Agency PUBLICIS ITALY

Brushing With Style Thanks To The UberSonic Club

 

I won’t patronise you; everyone understands how important oral hygiene is and why it’s essential for both your personal and professional life. What a lot of people fail to recognise is in fact just how important getting a good toothbrush is. Sure, sure, it’s all subjective, and there are so many on the market right now it’s hard to work out precisely what the best model to go for might be. I didn’t know the first place to start, so I decided to find one that would fit into my lifestyle first and go from there. 1) I travel a lot for work and I don’t like to spend my precious home time running to the shops to buy replacement toothbrush heads. 2) I work in fashion, and I have an affiliation for anything of good design, where do I turn? Enter, winner of the Red Dot Design Award 2016, ‘The Ubersonic.’

As a member of the Uber Sonic Club, in theory, you’ll never have to buy a toothbrush ever again. Anyone that owns an electric toothbrush can attest to their many benefits, but sadly, in turn, we can all also attest to the annoyance at running out to buy replacement heads every couple of months, leading to many of us simply neglecting to change them. With the Ubersonic, the all too common stress of hunting down a compatible replacement head on the high street is removed from the equation. After the initial purchase of the Ubersonic for the ludicrously low price of £19, every two months you’ll receive two more replacement heads for £9 direct to your door.

The toothbrush design is certainly deserving of its award-winning acclaim, the grip and overall presentation of the brush far outperform its price tag. Of course, The Ubersonic team have wanted to produce a toothbrush which is still competitive on the market so while they have opted for cost-effective materials they have not reigned in the design.

The brush heads use sonic vibrations at a rate of 35,000 times a minute to break down plaque and provide a far more significant feeling of clean than a standard manual brush. The vibrating mechanism allows the user to brush just as they would with a manual as opposed to oscillating models. Every thirty seconds, the toothbrush will emit a beeping sound to remind you that it’s time to switch from your upper set of teeth to the lower if you’re a zombie in the early hours, this makes for a gentle reminder.

Along with your first set of brushes, you’ll also receive an at-home tooth whitening kits. The at-home whitening package is similar to those you’ll find touted by all the top beauty bloggers on Instagram. Inside the pack, you’ll receive a mouth guard and whitening gel which you’ll need to mould to your teeth and then leave on for thirty minutes, all of which is far easier than it sounds and the results are pretty impressive.

Best of all with the model, you can cancel the subscription at any point without any fees. I’ve heard criticism that changing your toothbrush heads every month is excessive, and I’m inclined to agree; but with the free cancellation, there’s nothing stopping you from ending your subscription after two months and using the four heads throughout the rest of the year.

All in all, we were pleasantly surprised with the Uber Sonic. While there are improvements which can be made, namely in build quality and battery life (which despite claims, I found would only last three brushes), for the price you’re paying, you are receiving a great product. Where I do feel the Uber Sonic might fail, is in gauging the British public’s interest in a subscription model for toothbrushes. While there are many subscription boxes for a variety of male grooming products, I have yet to find anyone who has one set up for their toothbrush. Maybe Uber Sonic is here to change that, in the US there are already a plethora of companies already offering the service so maybe 2018 will see the UK consumer base joining in on all the fun. At a low price of £19, you’ll receive an electric toothbrush and whitening kit (the latter alone usually retails at £30), so we’d recommend picking up a start kit and seeing for yourself. As for me, I’ll be keeping my UberSonic subscription, it’s simpler and cheaper than what I’m currently spending, and as with most grooming subscriptions, it’s one less thing to worry about.

Find out more here: www.ubersonic.co.uk