SYLVIAN HYDE : NYFW INTERVIEW

 

Sylvian Hyde is the newly favorable and elevated neoclassical menswear brand to crave and desire. Birthed just last year of October 2017, Belize born Sylvian Hyde has introduced a new conversation to menswear titled with unswerving fearless confidence. A striking debut in summer’s heat, making everyone melt at every thread, much is to be expected from this evolving brand. An exuberant color palette seasoned with spark and spice and just to our explorative delights. We caught up for a little bit of chatter to learn some more about this engaging enterprise. 

FAULT: Who is Sylvian Hyde? As you are a very young brand, born just last year yes? How did it come about?

Sylvian Hyde: So yeah, I’m Sylvian Hyde, 25 years old, originally from Belize, migrated to the states in 2014. Yes, so I’ve lived there the majority of my life but I relocated here in December 2014 for political asylum. Um yea, so the brand started, like you said, last year in October. Really I just had a bunch of sketches and I always said one day I want to have my own line and then being friends with Jabari; I knew his interest in fashion, the administrative business side, and he had also interned for fashion week twice; so he shared stories with me. So one day we’re like let’s just stop talking about it – he has the business side, I have the design side, so we just started and once the ball started to roll and we saw our samples being made, and were like “Woah this really is a reality” and then every day it just got more serious and more serious till where we are today. 

How long have you been sketching? When did it start?

Sylvian Hyde: I’ve been drawing from when I was a kid. It’s like architecture, automotive design, it’s fashion. It wasn’t until I came to the states, that I really chose fashion. I really thought, growing up I would have done architecture, because where I was in Belize, a career in fashion or starting your own brand there, it’s like, “Ya you can do it but you’re not going to have the success rate to make a living off of it.” So it wasn’t until I got here I was like, “Wow, I’m living here in New York City, the fashion capital of the world. It’s possible.”

Where does your name come from? It’s so interesting and regal. Is there a backstory to it?

Sylvian Hyde: It’s the name my mom had. Interesting back story, so I changed my first name recently to Sylvian. My first name originally is Terrell which is the name my dad gave me from his best friend, and I changed it because I – it’s a whole long back story into my family background, but when I relocated here, starting over, a fresh start, I decided to take the name my mom wanted for me. I was the first child for both parents, so normally the guy gets to name his son. 

What would you say are your greatest influences for your designs and your day to day? Does Belize have an influence?

Sylvian Hyde: I feel the biggest influence coming from Belize is the depravation – the lack of opportunity. Now that I have the opportunity, it makes me want to work harder and appreciate the opportunity. In terms of influences for me my biggest is when I watch the red carpet events. When I see these distinguished men, looking like the help, I just wish men would make more fashion statements. That is my angle to make great fashion statements with men on the red carpet. Starting where I am at now, it’s to try to have guys evolve their style on a day to day basis. 

What sets Sylvian Hyde apart from other menswear designers?

Sylvian Hyde: I definitely say more use of untraditional menswear fabrics, and just doing things out of the box. For example, recently we just did some tailored suits out of athletic mesh. From the onset of designing I just really try to put my mind into the mind-frame to try to do something original. So I don’t pay attention to trends. I just do what I feel comes to me natural and is original. 

Does Sylvian Hyde function as a unisex brand?

Sylvian Hyde: When we started we didn’t think of ourselves or aspire to be a unisex brand, but however the women who have attended our shows and have seen our clothes have expressed interest and said, “Oh I would wear that.” So that definitely opened up our eyes to that possibility and it’s one that we are happy to entertain and foster. 

When and will you start thinking about venturing into a womenswear or swimwear brand?

Sylvian Hyde: I’d like to have my first womenswear collection by 2020. That’s kind of the goal. 

Aside from womenswear and considering how far and fast you have come, what other directions do you see the brand going? What else would you like to branch into with Sylvian Hyde?

Sylvian Hyde: 10 years plus I really see us becoming a real lifestyle brand. As I said I have interest in architecture, all different facets of design. I mean going way farther than interior design I mean actual architecture itself. Having a real designer home. With just details, details, details. If I could collaborate with an automator that way Victoria Beckham did with Landrover; she designed the interior for the Land Rover Range Rover Evoque. That type of stuff I would love to see the brand to do in the future. 

In another year, where are you looking to be, considering how fast you have moved in less than one year?

Sylvian Hyde: I think headed in the direction where I hope for it to go, which is guys just being a little more free and expressive with their style and not as limiting. For me I hope my influence is – I admire that the industry allows women to have clothing that flatters their body. I want guys to be able to have that same opportunity without it having any type of labels or stereotype. I’d like to see menswear make that jump. And society also to make that jump. 

If you could live in any other time, period and place, where would that be and why?

Sylvian Hyde: I would like to live in the future. Because hopefully in the future, I would be that much closer to realizing my vision and just enjoying the progression of society. 

What is your FAULT?

Sylvian Hyde: My fault is I could learn to be a little more patient. To just trust the process of things. But I also feel, let me try to clarify…I feel that with my impatience, I don’t like hearing no and I don’t like limitations and I see how that has helped us to achieve so much in such a short space of time. But I need to work on knowing and identifying, the little things that you  know, some things you are supposed to put some brakes on or just let it go. I guess choose battles better I guess. Choose projects better I guess and just let it get wrought out. 

Words + Interview: Chaunielle Brown | Images: Jennifer Laurantius 

COSMO’S MIDNIGHT FAULT MAGAZINE INTERVIEW

Let’s get this out into the open straightaway: Cosmo’s Midnight is a banger addict’s dream come true. With their full-length debut, What Comes Next, producer twins Cosmo and Patrick Liney are here to enable you.

Once scrappy upstarts in Australia’s beat-making scene, Cosmo’s Midnight has since become one of its finest electronic exports. The duo’s newly-released 12-track effort is dreamy, intoxicating, and complex—with the brotherly duo enlisting both local and international features to help bring their insatiable project to life, from L.A. rapper Buddy to Swedish wunderkind Tove Styrke, and Melbourne vocalist Woodes to Sydney’s six-piece Winston Surfshirt. Libidinal R&B (“Lowkey”), heartbreak disco (“Talk To Me”), cloud rap (“Where You Been”), near-instrumentals (“Polarised”), and sultry come-ons (“History”)—their tightly curated, summery, feel-good songs are all here for the taking.

The album dropped ahead of their Australia/New Zealand tour, which kicked off in July, and the fellas are now on the Asian leg of their tour before heading off to Europe next month. FAULT caught up with Cos and Pat at their show last week in Seoul, South Korea to discuss the music, the inspirations, and their journey to her.

Interview: Kee Chang

Photography: Jordan Kirk.

What Comes Next is incredibly addictive. Did it exceed your personal, creative expectations?

Patrick Liney: I think it definitely exceeded our expectations. At the very start of the process, we just couldn’t see the end and we were finding along the way what we really wanted to do with it. Looking back now, I’m really glad we ended up where we did. Three years ago, when we were writing the first demos for the album, I don’t think we—

Cosmo Liney: It was stabbing in the dark.

Patrick: With a lot of the album, it wasn’t like we went in like, “This is exactly what we’re gonna make.” We were figuring it out over three years and piecing together all these bits. So it wasn’t an album like, “This is the concept and we’re gonna smash it out in two months.” When we finished it and looked back, it sort of made sense that it was a combination of all these different things that influenced us growing up, up until the point that we became producers and musicians.

Cosmo: We feel really lucky to have had it work out, especially with a lot of the things that happened in the process. It was very fortunate because they may not have happened. For example, when we sampled N.E.R.D./Pharrell, that could’ve not happened.

Patrick: Yeah, they might not have cleared it.

Cosmo: A lot of the features were very difficult to get and hard to maintain contacts for.

Patrick: For example, we’d get a sick verse from a rapper and you just wouldn’t hear from them for like six months. You’re like, “This demo is so sick. Let’s finish it off,” and then they hit you back like, “Here’s a finished song.”

Cosmo: We’re very used to writing songs in the studio with the person and getting the songs made that way. A lot of this album was done over the Internet.

Patrick: Yeah, just emailing back and forth with ideas and stuff.

Cosmo: We’re just really glad it came together and that it’s something we can be proud of for our first album.

Patrick: Again, with a lot of the songs, we never met who wrote on them so a lot of it feels like we have this connection with the people we haven’t met yet. We wrote that song with Jay Prince and Buddy as well.

Those guys worked independently from each other as well, right?

Patrick:  Yeah, yeah. Then there’s Boogie, Winston Surfshirt, and Tove Styrke. Panama is from Sydney so and that was good for the process. I feel like we write our best music like that.

Cosmo: It’s easier to write like that.

Patrick: It’s definitely a challenge to work over emails. You can’t be like, “Change that take,” and stuff like that because it just takes too long, whereas in the studio you can change so much in a minute.

What was it like curating what ultimately ended up on the album? Are there a lot of unused demos?

Patrick: So, so, so much. The album has 12 tracks including the interlude, but I think we had somewhere around 50-ish demos.

Cosmo: And a lot of them were good. It was about finding—

Patrick: What works. There were songs that we really liked that we kind of put on hold. They just wouldn’t have worked for the album. We’re saving them for something later, further down the line. We sort of curated the album four months out of release like, “This is the final ones,” and then we went out and finished all the tracks after that. You always have the “What if?” in your head like, “What if we did this song instead? What if I tweaked this song forever?” which is why it’s good we didn’t mix it ourselves. This is the first project we’ve not mixed ourselves. I mixed all of our previous singles up until “Get to Know.” We brought in this incredible mixing engineer, George Nicholas, on board. He’s from this band called Seekae. Sometimes when you’ve been working on a song so closely for so long, you get tunnel vision. You need someone who’s objectively looking at it like, “I know what’s best for this song.” When I mix my own stuff, I don’t know what to change: “Am I making it worse or am I making it better?”

Cosmo: You just don’t know. You kind of lose track of the entire thing.

Patrick: We often come up with ideas really quickly and take a long time to finish it because all the details take a long time.

Is there any validity to artists who say that the songs that come together fast are usually the best cuts?

Cosmo: There’s no really right or wrong way to do it, but I think you can’t argue that when you write something that quickly and something that feels so right, you’ve kind of hit a nerve in some way.

Patrick: And you can only hit it every now and then. A lot of the times, you’re banging your head like, “Come on! Come out, song!” Then sometimes it happens without you even doing much and it sort of writes itself. It’s super weird. It feels really good when it’s effortless.

You guys came to play a show in South Korea just around this time last year, right?

Patrick: We did.

You were just in Singapore and headed to Thailand tomorrow. Are the vibes glaringly different?

Patrick: Oh, it’s so vast.

Cosmo: Even in Australia, it’s so different between cities. I don’t know what that comes down to at all.

Patrick: Cultural differences and like—

Cosmo: Just how much it’s different, though.

Patrick: Yeah, it’s insane. Playing in Singapore yesterday was kind of a shock. I couldn’t believe that people came to see us play in Singapore. It was really cool. Then you have the different crowd vibes. The crowd here in Seoul—at Soap anyways—they go crazy. [Laughs] At least at our last show, it was so much fun. We’ve played in China and other places where they’re more reserved.

Cosmos: They’ll politely enjoy the show and come up to you afterwards like, “That was amazing! I had so much fun!” and you’re like, “Really?” But they really did. They just didn’t show it.

What do you prefer?

Patrick: Obviously, the instant gratification of everyone sort of jumping around is really fun. But a lot of the times, we also go and talk to people after the show to see what they thought or just to say “Hi.” Hearing what they thought of the show is where you feel good. Some people just don’t like dancing and drinking or whatever—it’s not necessarily their vibe. There are different flavors. As long as they enjoyed it, that’s all that matters to me. At the end of the day, if they have a good time, then we have a good time. If someone’s not having a good time, me and Cosmo will not have a good time and it would just spiral. If everyone’s having a good time, it spirals in the reverse way.

Cosmos: Upwards.

One of the things that seems to come up a lot when you’re asked about your early influences is your older brother Nik who really turned you onto music, as older siblings tend to do. Is he shocked by how much you took to music and how far you’ve come?

Patrick: I think so.

Cosmo: None of us were prepared for what would happen. None of us really knew that we’d be touring and playing around the world and stuff. To him, being our brother, I think it’s just more shocking because he knows us so well. To see it happening is really surprising for him.

Patrick: It’s weird. And he lives in London so he has this outsider’s perspective. Even though he’s our brother, he sees a lot of stuff through—

Cosmo: He won’t be at the shows, but he’ll see recaps or photos or something.

Patrick: We’re gonna go over to Europe next month so we’re gonna hang out and he’ll come to some of the shows. I don’t think he’s seen us play in a super long time—it’ll be cool to hang out. We’re really close, even though we don’t see each other that much. He’s only two years older than us so we’re pretty close in years as well.

What Comes Next is an interesting title for your debut album because it sounds prophetic. It seems to really set you up for what’s to come after this work.

Patrick: Yeah, it’s kind of cool because it’s acknowledging that it’s our debut effort—a launchpad for all the things that can come afterward. It’s prophetic in like a hopeful sense. It’s a prediction. At the same time, it acknowledges all the stuff that built up to this point as well. When we’re talking about our album and our process, we’re referring back to when we were kids. On the album cover, the artwork is based off a collage of all these photos of us from when we were little. We’ll be sitting in different rooms in our family house and my dad would be playing vinyls to us. They’re basically three things: Switch-On Bach, which is like a Minimoog version of all these Bach songs. Then he’d play us Jim Hall’s Undercurrent, which is this jazz-guitar album that I heard a million times. Also, a lot of disco as well. At the time, we were like, “Ugh—I hate this so much.” But then, you know, as you start getting into music, you come to appreciate it. My mom and dad would email us all this music like, “You listened to this when you were little! Don’t you remember it?” It’s like, “Holy shit. We’re really just a product of our parents.” They totally put us into this shit without us knowing. Then you’re like, “Cool.” [Laughs] I’m happy for it. That’s sort of what the album is about. It’s all these things that have coalesced and shaped us into musicians and just as people in general. We’re sort of filtering that through our experiences into a musical format. So a lot of the inspirations behind the album is super far and wide. There’s a lot of the disco stuff like Chic and Nile Rodgers. There’s some jazzy elements as well on a few tracks. Then there’s like 2000s R&B and Hip-Hop that we listen to a lot. Recently, we came back to Pharrell’s stuff and Timbaland and N.E.R.D. and The Neptunes and stuff. Then there are new inspirations—we listen to so much stuff. Lately, we’ve been listening to BadBadNotGood, The Internet, Blood Orange…

Cosmo: It’s obviously a big one. I just love Kaytranada for the fact that he can still sound like he’s got enough going on, even though he has such a specific sound.

Patrick: It’s just what’s really minimal about it that’s really full. We learned a lesson listening to all these artists we like where they do a lot with little. A lot of people will try to—us included—fill in the album’s gaps and stuff by adding more layers and details, but often, you just have to get rid of that and just make the initial sound bigger. You can write a really good, incredibly dense song with just 10 layers, whereas when we were starting out we’d do like 100+ tracks and it would just get super dense and get to be a nightmare to mix. This album was about paring back from that and going back to the fundamentals—just really focusing on the core things that make a song great to us. It’s about what we really like about the song and not over embellishing it and trying to keep it to “This is what works.” If it gets overdone, when we finally know that we’ve worked a song too hard, we can stop and pull back a bit and then send it off to George so he can just mix it. It’s good—we finally figured it out. The funnest part of writing a song is like the first day and the rest is hard, meticulous work where you’re concentrated but not necessarily creative. You’re just working at that point and it doesn’t feel fun.

What is your FAULT?

Patrick: Maybe I’m too meticulous—to a fault. I’m too overanalyzed and too self-critical and detailed.

Cosmo: My fault is that I’m the opposite of that. I don’t bring enough control to what I do. It’s too off-kilter to what we’re trying to do.

Patrick: So it kind of works out.

The yin and yang.

Cosmo: It’s totally feng shui.

Patrick: Cosmo brings the vibe and I bring the technicality to it.

For more information on COSMO’S MIDNIGHT, including tour dates, head over to www.cosmos-Midnight.com.

A special thanks to Astral People and SOAP Seoul.

SWONNE : MFW SS19 HIGHLIGHTS

Katie Golinczak is the new menswear talent to watch. After having solid exposure working for Ralph Lauren, John Varvatos, Levi’s, to name a few, Katie launched her debut collection for Swonne at NYFW Men S/S 2019. Her first collection is inspired by Mod Rockers of the 60s, and consisted of a seasonless denim collection, t-shirts, biker jackets, parkas with tailoring details. Her SW1 parka, which is one of her (and our) favorite piece, is designed, constructed and hand painted in Brooklyn, NY. Swonne’s debut collection definitely lived up to our expectations and we look forward to see what it has to offer next season!

Katie Golinczak, Designer of SWONNE

Words + Images: Jennifer Laurantius Art Design/Layout: Chaunielle Brown

 

ALESSANDRO TRINCONE | MFW SS19 | HIGHLIGHTS

A modern day set whimsical romance orchestrated for pleasures play. Menswear reimagined for a possible futuristic walking strut of design, fantasy and exploration. A carefree confidence floating on air with ruffles, waves, tiers of tulle and femme delights. With imagination and disco discovery we’re presented with stapled stamped pieces of a light plush blush palette and marshmallow. Recollections of Viktor & Rolf echoed with ease; alas a fearless collection with no boundaries or limits. Ingenious strolling works of art and visionary obsessions. Tinsel streams of silver, metallics, glitters, gloves and knee highs, leaving mouths ajar for the elements of surprise. Alessandro Trincone has us kept in an excess of life’s secret garden.

Words by: Chaunielle Brown | Photographer: Jay Blum

Picnic at Hanging Rock

Self Portrait (@mrselfportrait) lace dress via The Real Real (@therealreal)
Asos (@asos) black patent leather buckled flats

 

Self Portrait (@mrselfportrait) lace dress via The Real Real (@therealreal)
Asos (@asos) black patent leather buckled flats

 

Self Portrait (@mrselfportrait) lace dress via The Real Real (@therealreal)
Asos (@asos) black patent leather buckled flats

 

Asos (@asos) white satin dress
Asos (@asos) black patent leather buckled flats
Hat is stylist’s own

 

Asos (@asos) white satin dress
Asos (@asos) black patent leather buckled flats
Hat is stylist’s own

 

Asos (@asos) white satin dress
Asos (@asos) black patent leather buckled flats
Hat is stylist’s own

 

Asos (@asos) white satin dress
Asos (@asos) black patent leather buckled flats
Hat is stylist’s own

 

Elliatt (@elliatt) floral embroidered dress via Asos (@asos)
Jeffrey Campbell (@jeffreycampbell) boots
Asos (@asos) black wasit belt

 

Elliatt (@elliatt) floral embroidered dress via Asos (@asos)
Jeffrey Campbell (@jeffreycampbell) boots
Asos (@asos) black wasit belt

 

Elliatt (@elliatt) floral embroidered dress via Asos (@asos)
Jeffrey Campbell (@jeffreycampbell) boots
Asos (@asos) black wasit belt

 

Roksanda (@roksandailincic) dress via The Real Real (@therealreal)
Jeffrey Campbell (@jeffreycampbell) boots

 

Roksanda (@roksandailincic) dress via The Real Real (@therealreal)
Jeffrey Campbell (@jeffreycampbell) boots

 

Roksanda (@roksandailincic) dress via The Real Real (@therealreal)
Jeffrey Campbell (@jeffreycampbell) boots

Photographer: Caroline Lawlesswww.carolinelawless.com
Model: Lucy Rexrode
Stylist: Melissa de Leon

MAALS Watches: guest post by co-founder Andy Sealey

In the beginning: the start of MAALS Watches

 

MAALS Watches - #MAALSWatches

Jump Over The Moon brushed steel by MAALS

 

Guest post by @AndyLSealey

My brother and I have always collected watches. None of them too expensive – some old, some new – but all a bit out of the norm in design. After years of talking but not doing, we bit the bullet and finally decided to start our own watch company and design watches that we’d be happy to have in our own collections.

This series of blogs will be about our journey from cool idea to reality. We’ve never written a blog or started a company before, so this is a whole new exciting – but a little scary – world for us. Welcome to MAALS Watches.

 

MAALS Watches - #MAALSWatches

Etched caseback art by The Art of Okse on the steel and black versions of Jump Over The Moon

 

MAALS Watches: the history

 

I, (Andy), started collecting watches when I moved to my own place at 18. New job, new city, new flat, so (of course) new clothes and a new watch or two had to be done. I started off with a Storm Camera which I stumbled across in a trendy charity shop in Worcester where I was living. That first one sparked an interest in Storm watches and their designs. After that I picked up a Storm Navigator and a lovely Storm Bubble, then a couple of Tokyo flash pieces.

The Storm Bubble was swapped for drinks on a special works night out by a friend of mine, whom I’d lent it to – we had some serious words about that one. The rest of my collection was unfortunately stolen – along with the TV, Stereo, photographs, (honestly, why?), and my housemates’ car – when the house I was living in was burgled. I stopped collecting after that for a long while. Partly because there wasn’t anything I really wanted, but mostly because I simply didn’t feel like collecting anymore.

MAALS Watches - #MAALSWatches

Jump Over The Moon black and steel – UK designed, unique moonphase timepieces

 

I started collecting again thanks to my other half who bought me an Armani as a birthday present. My small collection now consists of:

  • Armani
  • Two Skagens
  • Nooka Zub Blue
  • Nooka Zaz with its see-through dial
  • Storm Ovnik Blue
  • A gorgeous brushed rose gold Lasser jump hour, which is about as old as me I think.

My brother Bruno’s love of watches started much longer ago than mine. Old Mr Manny, who lived upstairs from us in the block of flats we lived in when we were both young, used to repair watches and taught him about movements and some basic repair bits for mechanical watches.

 

MAALS Watches - #MAALSWatches

Jump Over The Moon black steel by MAALS

 

MAALS Watches: the watch collectors

 

Time moved on and so did we. Bruno went to Uni in Liverpool in the 1990s where he brought his first watch: an Adidas sports watch, with money from being a lifeguard and working for the university. He had been given several by then but this one was with his own money. That was followed quickly by one of the first Puma watches, which he unfortunately lost. Several digital watches came and went while living and working in Japan, which would have been exceptionally cool if he still had them.

His collection today is very eclectic and goes like this:

  • Adidas sports watch
  • Next Prism
  • 1973 Damas 17 jewels automatic jump hour
  • Swatch London
  • Swatch California
  • Zirro Mercury
  • A Skagen
  • A Mondaine
  • Citizen Eco Drive Stealth
  • Lip Mach 2000 Chronograph
  • Xeric Xeriscope Square
  • A Garmin fitness tracker/sports watch

And

  • 3 Disney watches

I did say it was eclectic…

 

MAALS Watches - #MAALSWatches

Jump Over The Moon black steel with MAALS handmade leather watch pouch

 

MAALS Watches: The brand

 

Coming up with the idea for our watch has been far easier than creating the brand for it, to be honest. At first, we just wanted a cool name, which sounds easy but, frankly, every idea sounded rubbish. Eventually moving away from trying to be cool, we settled on simply making the brand personal. The idea being that the more it means to us, then the more we’ll put into it. It all sounds so obvious now that  I’m sitting here writing it…!

MAALS stands for Mark Anthony Andrew Lee Sealey – the initials from my brother and my name tailed with our family name. Simple and personal.

After that it was just a question of researching the watch market, creating a unique watch design, finding a reputable manufacturing partner, creating business and finance plans and lots more besides…

Still: at least the name is simple.

 

For more information on MAALS watches, visit http://maals.co.uk

Follow MAALS watches on Facebook | Instagram |

Follow MAALS watches co-founder, Andy Sealey, on Twitter

Is Fashion School a Worthy Investment?

The global fashion is currently valued at 3 trillion dollars, making up 2% of the world’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Traditionally favoured by those with sartorial flair, fashion is now being scene as a potential moneymaker, with high-end companies such as Chanel boasting brand values in the region of $8 billion. Because it is so intricately tied in with glamour and celebrity, fashion is fast becoming an interesting career choice for creatives. According to The World University Rankings, the UK is currently the world’s top destination for fashion students, with British institutions accounting for five of the 10 best BA and MA programmes in the Business of Fashion’s (BoF’s) world list of top fashion courses.

 

Fashion Education is Booming

Students today have many more options when it comes to a degree in fashion than they did just a decade ago. In the UK, for instance, the London College of Fashion recently launched a new Fashion Business School, where students learn about much more than designing garments, “Projects can range from future forecasting to creating a limited edition range of footwear and accessories or even looking for the response to a burning issue in sustainability. And our students of media and communications know all about promoting the outcomes of these projects,” claims the school. Today, there are many options for those who study fashion; rather than focusing merely on product design, they can use skills obtained to work in a plethora of roles, including marketing, social media, sales, and production management.

 

What ROI can an Education in Fashion Provide?

Central Saint Martins and The Royal College of Art have officially been deemed the top two schools in the BoF Global Fashion School of Rankings. Interestingly, the BoF notes that among the over 4,000 students who participated in their survey, most were ‘satisfied’ or ‘very satisfied’ with aspects such as the teaching, study materials, and campuses. However, they were less satisfied with the support offered to find employment. Many students have to raise finances for their schooling through bank loans or loans from family, and wish there was more help from their educational institutions once their degree was over.

 

What is the Solution?

The BoF suggests that top fashion institutions should place greater emphasis on career options, increasing student awareness on possible options through career fairs and similar events. They also note that there is an oversupply of graduates from the fashion sector, with only one in seven UK students finding employment as designers in 2014. However, they noted another interesting statistic: around 85% of fashion school graduates did find jobs in the industry, though not necessarily as designers.

 

Success Stories

There is no doubt that studying at a prestigious institution can open doors. Thus, studying at the UK’s top school or other European stalwarts such as the Istituto Europeo di Design in Italy or the Institut Français de la Mode in France can mean a chance to work as an intern at high-end firms such as Marni, Louis Vuitton, or Reem Acra. Students should be prepared to work in departments they aren’t necessarily interested in. At top fashion companies based in London, Milan, or Paris, movement is possible and students can find that time spent in sales or administration is a small investment for a career in fashion.

 

Advice from Experts

In a recent article in The Guardian, editor-at-large of Refinery UK noted that practical experience and building contacts were key to making it in the fashion world. In the same article, a host of experts recommended attending fairs, considering a placement year, starting local, and looking for alternative routes; everything from garment tech to pattern cutting. Creativity is also key; students should look for ways to start one’s own business rather than form part of the vast group of job applicants who send their CVs to a handful of established firms. Building a name for oneself through a beautiful, well-thought-out Instagram account is also important. Social media has made many a star in areas as vastly different as music, art, and literature. 

Fashion school continues to boast a good employment rate, though changes need to be made both in the way students are guided towards a career in their final years, and in students’ expectations. Students should realise that the aim is to make it into a firm that offers them the opportunity to work in a variety of departments. That is, they may begin in sales or marketing, and eventually work their way to product. Many students actually find abilities they did not previously know they had in areas such as communication and media. There are many roads to success, so keeping an open mind in this time of high supply is key.

Viktor & Rolf: Fashion Artists 25 Years, A Retrospective

The House at the End of the World, 2005 By David LaChapelle Studio Viktor&Rolf, Bedtime Story, ready-to-wear collection, AW 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fashion royalty Viktor&Rolf, are celebrating a 25 year retrospective at the Kunsthal gallery in Rotterdam, Holland. From May through to 30 September 2018, fans of the designers can get an up close and personal viewpoint of some of their most famous and innovative pieces. From the theatrical Van Gogh Girls of 2015, the iconic 2010 Chainsaw Massacre collection, with gaping, gravity-defying holes in each piece, to the overtly padded 2005 Bedtime Story collection, consistently taking the designer’s concept of ‘Wearable art’ to the highest levels of art and dramatic haute couture.

Russian Doll, haute couture collection, AW 1999

 

Canadian curator Thierry-Maxime Loriot has worked directly in collaboration with the Dutch designers Viktor Horsting and Rolf Snoeren,  to create a thoroughly intriguing exploration into the various areas of inspiration in the designers’ World. Enabling the general public to view in accurate detail, the construction of each iconic runway couture garment and a glimpse into the genius psyche of the Viktor & Rolf partnership.

 

Van Gogh Girls, haute couture collection, SS 2015

 

In their own words: “We often play with the idea of two people being one, or both of us being of one mind, and we play with our image to express that.” This theme is visible throughout the retrospective, showcasing the power of two creative minds in creating serious art-based fashion and then fabricating these mind-bending concepts into reality. These show-stopping and notable couture pieces by the design duo are now all available for scrutiny at the Kunsthal, a homecoming for the Dutch designers.

 

Viktor&Rolf by Anton Corbijn Amsterdam, 2018

 

Over 60 haute couture pieces from the designers’ archives have been carefully selected by Loriot for the Kunsthal retrospective, including stage costumes created for ballet and operas, alongside special pieces, such as the costume created for Madonna’s 2016 Miami Art Basel fundraising concert. New works from the latest collections, ‘Boulevard of Broken Dreams’ and ‘Action Dolls’ are also displayed for the first time within the retrospective.

Solidifying Viktor&Rolf’s 25 year journey to date within their home country of Holland, the retrospective features their strongest collections, marking a chapter of exceptional high couture work and achievement so rarely achieved by designers within fashion. The fact that the duo have also managed to remain as unpredictable, ground-breaking and art-driven within that timeframe, well, we cannot wait to witness the next 25 years of their creative partnership.

 

Getting There

Rotterdam or Amsterdam airport is only a short (less than an hour) flight from London. We flew from Heathrow to Amsterdam via British Airways and the flight only lasted a mere 45 minutes. A train shuttle will then quickly transport you across to Rotterdam with the metro system being extremely easy to navigate on arrival.

 

Accommodation

The 5 star Design hotel, Mainport is offering a Viktor & Rolf Hotel package for visitors of the Kunsthal. Upgrade your visit to the exhibition by booking the V&R hotel package, which includes a City XL room, entrance to the Kunsthal ‘Viktor&Rolf: Fashion Artists 25 Years’, a signed catalogue of Viktor&Rolf, a poster, the champagne breakfast buffet on the relaxing riverside terrace, cocktail bar, rooftop swimming pool, gym & sauna. Mainport is ideally located at the shores of the Maas in the city centre and it’s then only a short walk or metro journey into the town centre.

Book here: www.mainporthotel.com/en/viktorrolf
The offer is 144.50eu per night until the 30th September.

 

Places to Eat

Heroine Restaurant

Unique 70’s inspired decor combined with cosy fine dining.
Address: Kipstraat 12, 3011 RT Rotterdam, Netherlands
Phone: +31 10 310 0870

Supermercado

A unique concept restaurant & bar situated in a disused Swimming pool,  featuring Mexican & Latin-American cuisine. After the meal the rooftop turns into a dance party for a fun dining experience.
Address: Schiedamse Vest 91A, 3012 BG Rotterdam, Netherlands
Phone: +31 10 404 8070

Ayla

Mediterranean food suitable for lunch, brunch, bites, dinner or drinks.
Interesting food combinations & killer cocktails.
Address: Kruisplein 153, 3014 DD Rotterdam, Netherlands
Phone: +31 10 254 0005