‘Artificial Light’ by Frederick Wilkinson – Exclusive Fashion editorial for FAULT Online

Top- Minan Wong
Pants- Layana Aguilar
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- H&M

Blue pants- Chikimiki
Print blouse- Chikimiki
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- H&M

 

Blouse- behno
Earring- H&M

Long sleeve blouse- Behno
Dress- Layana Aguilar
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- H&M

Long sleeve knit top- Chikimiki
Sleeveless knit top- Chikimiki
Skirt- chikimiki
Shoes- ALDO
Earring- H&M

Coat- Layana Aguilar
Earring- H&M

Top- Chikimiki
Long sleeve blouse (worn around neck)- Vintage
Pants- Chikimiki
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- H&M

Top- Chikimiki
Bralette- KORAL
Pants- Chikimiki
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- MANGO

Dress- Layana Aguilar
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- H&M

Photographer: Frederick Wilkinson @fw_photo

Model: Asia, MSA Models NY @asiaprus @msamodels

Stylist: Lauren Walsh @laaurenwalsh

MUA: Elena Thomopoulos @elvendoe

Wig Stylist: Bamby @bambyofsuburbia

Photographer’s Assistant: Yanutzi Diaz @yanutzi

FAULT Favourites: Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

“Yes, I was thinking: we live without a future. That’s what’s queer …” Virginia Woolf

Marius Janusauskas SS18

The Marius Janusauskas SS18 collection marries “a wish-landscape”, mythopoetic categories and queer temporality. The refusal of a certain natural order opens up new possibilities for hope and diversity in the present moment. This celebration of the moment signifies utopian potentiality and an escape from the constraints of reality.

The collection is inspired by uniforms, Andy Warhol’s early hand-drawings and camouflage, which is this context is viewed as an artistic approximation of nature. The process of deconstruction of regular military, white collar and workers uniforms with soft silks and transgender body has progressed into creation of original garments. The suggestion of which is like an unregistered story or a poem.

 

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Photographer: Paulius Zaborskis

Full Collection by Marius Janusauskas SS18

Grooming: Kristina Pasaka Busilaite

Model: Nikita at imagegroup

See more at www.mariusjanusauskas.com

Snow White On The Edge – exclusive fashion editorial for FAULT Online

Kimono: Fendi
Denim: Dior
Accessories: By Highinheels
Shoes: Alaia

Kimono: Fendi
Denim: Dior
Accessories: By Highinheels
Shoes: Alaia

Motor Jacket: Kanye West
Dress: Cos
Necklace: Dior
Shoes: Alaia
Skirt: Vintage Chloe

Motor Jacket: Kanye West
Dress: Cos
Necklace: Dior
Shoes: Alaia
Skirt: Vintage Chloe

Outerwear: Fausto Puglisi
Dress: Versace Vintage
Necklace: Dior
Glasses: Ferre
Shoes: Alaia

Kimono: Fendi
Denim: Dior
Accessories: By Highinheels
Shoes: Alaia

Outerwear: Fausto Puglisi
Dress: Versace Vintage
Necklace: Dior
Glasses: Ferre
Shoes: Alaia

Photographer: Theresa Kaindl – @TheresaKaindl
Stylist: Dominique Reina – @Domi.NYC
Hair + Make Up: Joshua Nyitray – @JoshuaNyitrayhair
Model: Anastasia Salenko – @Miralenko
Agency: Montrueil Group – @MontreuilGroup

‘Label Lust’ – a FAULT Magazine Beauty Story by Sarah Brown

 

PHOTOGRAPHER: Sarah Brown

MODEL: Cynthia @ Elite Models

MAKEUP ARTIST: Sarah Redzikowski

HAIR STYLIST: Sarah Redzikowski

NAIL TECH: Yasmine Elwakil

 

 

70s to 90s Harlem at its best – exclusive fashion editorial for FAULT Online

DFYD Top: Olivia Mains, The George Trousers: Olivia Mains, Trainers/Sneakers: Puma

Leather Coat: Vintage CR MATES, Trousers: Zara, Shoes: Clarks, Shirt: Vintage Versace

Shirt: Chiffon, Trousers: Olivia Mains, Sandals: BU Collection

 

Blazer: Hart Schaffner Marx, Shirt: Gillingan & O’Malley, Trousers: Gillingan & O’Malley, Shoes: Mossimo, Leather Holster: Flux Production, Sunglasses: Gucci

 

Tied Up Croptop: Olivia Mains, The Peakaboo Pants: Olivia Mains, Trainers: Puma, Gold Oversized Chain: Thrift store

Eye C U Top & Leggings & Plastic Pullover: Olivia Mains, Sunglasses: Thrift Store, Sandals: Steve Madden

Photographed by Noa Grayevsky

Styling: Zarah Elizabeth

Hair & Make Up: Admin Rivero

Model: Xiara Waller (Fusion Models)

Produced by Carolin Ramsauer

Liam Gallagher – Exclusive FAULT Magazine Issue 27 Covershoot and Interview Preview

 

Liam Gallagher

As you were. As you are.

 

Words: Adina Ilie

Photography: Jack Alexander

Menswear Editor: Kristine Kilty

Grooming: Natalya Chew

 

FAULT Magazine is proud to present our Issue 27 cover story with non-other than Liam Gallagher. With a career spanning over 25 years and a myriad of stories to tell, we sat down to discuss the ups and downs of his career and get to know Liam Gallagher as he was and as he is. Enjoy.

 

FAULT: Do you recall the first 24 hours after Noel quit the band? What was going through your mind at that point?

Liam Gallagher: Oh fuck. That very moment I just went– right, there have been certain powers at play. It wasn’t too big an argument; we’ve had worse arguments. What went down was something that was pre-planned.

 

FAULT: What was the lead up to that point that makes you so sure that it was pre-planned?

Liam Gallagher: Lots of things. A lot of sneaky little meetings. People might say that it’s paranoia. But you can never be too paranoid in life. I kind of knew he was going to map it at some point. It was going to happen at V or it was going to happen at Reading. It only got postponed until Paris. I knew he was going to jump ship at some point. And that’s what made me feel that my paranoia was right. Or maybe I’m clairvoyant; I’ve got 6 senses.

 

FAULT: Did you feel Noel’s absence while writing this record?

Liam Gallagher: Yeah – because I don’t want to be solo. I don’t want to do it on my own. I’m not a guitar player or a prolific songwriter. I can write a few songs every now and again but I miss being in a band. I miss my brother the way he was back then. I miss singing those great songs that we all made great.

 

FAULT: Were you disappointed that your former bandmates did not reach out to you in times of crisis? Are you resentful in any way?

Liam Gallagher: My older brother has always been there. I thought I’d at least get a call from Noel, but there was no call. I thought I’d get a call from my other manager, but nothing from them fucking cunts. But then I met Debbie and she’s been there all the way. A lot of my mates are gone; I don’t really have anyone in London and that is fine. The universe is my mate.

 

Liam Gallagher: I’ve been through a lot of shit, but it was shit that I caused. When you cause shit – you man up and fucking deal with it. Sometimes you have to fucking man up to your shit.

 

 

 

FAULT: Did you ever feel that you were done? That you hit your peak in ’96 in Knebworth and then it was all downhill from there? 

Liam Gallagher: I feel like I’ve maintained it without turning into the traps of the business. I’m still outspoken, I’m still wearing my heart on my sleeve and if people like it that’s fine. If you don’t then you don’t. I’m not a ‘yes man’.

 

FAULT: Did you ever see yourself hitting the top once more by yourself?

Liam Gallagher: The night Oasis split I felt absolutely disappointed and then I felt exactly the opposite when my album went number 1. In this day and age, rock’n’roll has got cobwebs on it. I never actually saw myself hitting the top once more. But if you truly believe, things will happen. I’ve been good to rock’n’roll and I reckon rock’n’roll will be good to me. It saved me twice.

 

FAULT: Hollywood is ablaze with accusations of sexual assault against Harvey Weinstein. Have you seen similar occurrences in the music industry? 

Liam Gallagher: : Not really, but you know it’s there. The shady little fuckers at the top. It’s not even with just men and women, it’s men and men too. All these pop bands – you hear about it with Take That but I’ve never witnessed any of it. Nobody would come near us. We were caught up in our own bubble. We weren’t hanging about with the record company. We’d go to the awards show and they’d be there, but we’d just get off and do our own thing. And I certainly didn’t see any weird shit.

 

FAULT: What changes do you reckon we should make to keep things safe for both men and women alike?

Liam Gallagher: That’s a big tough question. Obviously get rid of all the shit bags. Obviously, if everyone took care of their shit – everything would be cool. We all live together under one sky at the end of the day. Everyone just needs to cool the fuck out.

 

FAULT: Do you think Liam Gallagher has the power to get people to go back to the roots of rock’n’roll?

Liam Gallagher: I’ve got a lot of fans out there and I always have. My oldest kid is 18 and my friends have kids about the same age – so they’re going to bring them to the shows. That’s a good thing. All you can do is make good music and do good gigs. Do good interviews and try to sell it how it is. Stay honest to what you are and don’t get carried away with all the show business shit. That’s all that I can do. I’m definitely not the savior of music, I’m the savior of me.

 

Liam Gallagher:I don’t get involved with the industry and the business side of it. I let my manager do that. That’s the problem with music today – it’s got no fucking soul. I get being business minded, but it can overpower. You forget about the fucking music.”

 

Find out who else will appear in the issue here

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 26 – THE BEST OF BRITISH ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

 

 

BAFTA Announces Breakthrough Brits 2017 in partnership with Burberry

Last night FAULT attended The British Academy of Film and Television Arts, commonly known as BAFTA announced their twenty standout talents in film, games and television. Revealed in partnership with fashion mega-house Burberry and hosted by FAULT Magazine Issue 24 star Maya Jama, the evening saw industry veterans gather to celebrate and impart their wisdom on the twenty budding talents. This year’s initiative is also supported by The Langham London and Audi UK.

To be named a Breakthrough Brit is an accolade to take seriously; since the launch of the initiative in partnership with Burberry back in 2013, winners have gone on to do great things some even collected their very own coveted BAFTA awards.

2016 winner Malachi Kirby (see his interview with FAULT here) career has gone from strength to strength as we’ve seen him ear the coveted part of Kunta Kinte in 2016’s retelling of Roots, a role previously played by Emmy nominated actor LeVar Burton.

The initiative doesn’t just cater to those within the film industry as is commonly thought, Games artist Anna Hollinrake appears on the list for her artwork featured on mobile VR game Lola and the Giant.

Similarly, Creative Director Henry Hoffman whose game Mush has already earned him both a Dare to be Digital competition and a BAFTA Cymru award and now he takes his place as a breakthrough brit as he continues to blur the lines between developer and creative.

Selected by a jury of industry experts including FAULT Magazine Issue 9 star Will Poulter and FAULT 27 star Reggie Yates – the diversity of the expertise speaks volumes for just how much talent there is and at such an early in their careers.

See the highlights from the night in the video below!  

Actors Jenna Coleman, Joe Dempsi, Suranne Jones and Vicky McClure revealed the names on the shortlist on the night and allow us to do the same below.

· Adam Vian and Thomas Vian – Game Directors
· Anna Hollinrake – Games Artist
· Charlie Cooper and Daisy Cooper – Writers/Actors
· Chloë Thomson – Cinematographer
· Daniel Fountain – Game Designer
· Francis Lee – Writer/Director
· Henry Hoffman – Creative Director (Games)
· Hope Dickson Leach – Writer/Director
· Jessie Buckley – Actress
· Josh O’Connor – Actor
· Kit Fraser – Cinematographer
· Lydia Hampson – Producer
· Mahalia Belo – Director
· Molly Windsor – Actress
· Olivia Wood – Games Writer & Editor
· Sarah Quintrell – Writer
· Segun Akinola – Composer
· Susan Wokoma – Actress

Amanda Berry OBE, Chief Executive of BAFTA, said: “Breakthrough Brits, in partnership with Burberry, identifies the very best emerging talent in film, games and television. As it reaches its fifth year, I am so proud of what the initiative has achieved, and the talented people it is has honoured. Over the next year, the Breakthrough Brits will be supported by BAFTA and mentored by some of the industry’s most established professionals. This year’s Breakthrough Brits truly represent the diverse range of talents that make up our industries. We’re thrilled to be recognising these individuals this evening.”

Click here for more information about BAFTA Breakthrough Brits, in partnership with Burberry,

Molly Kate Kestner: Familiar Story, Unique Perspective.

Shot Exclusively at Bounce Old Street

 

Words: Miles Holder

While Molly Kate Kestner’s “young singer-songwriter blows up on youtube” career isn’t one anyone is particularly shocked by anymore – one thing unique to the young artist is her ability to discuss music and themes as eloquently as an artist with over ten years experience. As you’ll find from our interview – Molly is very much an artist first and everything else a far second and in many ways that is the reason she has avoided the stigma of “youtuber turned artist. We caught up with Molly to discuss, music, goals and all things FAULT…Enjoy!

 

You’re putting songs out on Youtube and getting all the views – are you still pinching yourself?

There’s not a day that goes by when I don’t go “wow this is just the dream”, and I’m still right at the beginning of my career. I would say my success is minuscule compared to the people around me in Hollywood and it feels rewarding but I think it’s a mixture of timing, luck and hard work.

 

What’s it like to still be at the start of your career and having Starsmith want to work with you?

It’s humbling, but at the same time, it’s cool to work with people who have all the success and to see that in the end, they are just people. It’s so relieving that they’ve stayed human and humble and to know that not everyone at the top has these scary personalities!

Talk us through your songwriting process – is it always fluid and easy?

There are some days where I wake up, and the song is already in me, and it writes itself, but there are days when the last thing you want to do is write, and sometimes the best songs come from when you have to push to get them. There’s a quote by Leonard Cohen, and he’s asked where all great songs come from, and he said “I don’t know. If I did, I’d go there all the time.” And I don’t think I’ve ever heard something described so well because it is a mystery and no ones figured it out… well maybe Max Martin!

 

When you release a song, and it’s a hit, and the fans go wild, does it scare you to try and top that next release?

At the beginning I was, but I’m at a place now where each song is unique to themselves. I’m not trying to beat a song, that song was right for that time and process. The ‘Good Die Young’ is different to ‘His Daughter’, and they all have their own lives. I feel like I was just placed in the industry and so crazy that I haven’t felt the pressure to beat something, I don’t feel that pressure.

 

Prom Queen is such a stunning video, is that something you’re learning to be a part of more?

That’s one of my favourite parts, and I didn’t realise it would be. Adding the visual aspect to the music gives it so much meaning and shooting that video specifically was so much fun and you get to be more dramatic. Day to day I’m pretty low-key and a little bit tomboyish so getting to film things and do cool looks like this shoot for FAULT, I’d never do on my own but stepping out of my comfort zone lets my perspective grow.

 

Many of your fanbases are young and impressionable – do you feel like you need to act a certain way with people looking up to you?

I think it’s all how you receive their support and love. I think a lot of artists and influencers feed into the fan mentality, but I don’t want to be anybody idol or goddess – I’m just a girl. I want my fans to feel connected to me and inspired, but more importantly, I want them to know that my message is bigger than I am. I’m just a human I can fail and fail myself and mess up, but the music I’m creating is about something much bigger than I am. I want them to know that my music is about humanity and we’re a lot more connected than we realised.

 

When you shut your eyes and picture that dream goal of what you want to do, what do you see?

I see myself travelling to as many countries as I can! If I could perform in every country that’d be a dream come true especially those that don’t see many performances. Also, I’d love to mix speaking with singing, I think singing is very open to interpretation, and even now I’ve mixed into my shows – I’m pouring out my heart and giving the audience the backstory and letting them know what I want to take from this.

It’s not easy to put yourself out there – what drives you to keep doing it?

I think part of it is I believe it’s part of my purpose as part of this world. I think we’re all given these talents and abilities, and we’re called to do the most of this. I can write and sing, so that’s what keeps me going. It’s my purpose, and I’m driven towards it, and even if I never become famous and if my career failed I’d always be striving for influence in my area of reach. Be that in a school or volunteering – I feel like if you make yourself available to help you’ll always find purpose.

Advice to your younger self?

I guess a big thing would be that “confidence doesn’t come from anybody but yourself.” I feel we get bogged down in the idea that people liking us will bring trust and other superficial things, but you have to give yourself confidence by recognising that there’s never been you in the history of the world and you have this unique part of the time to play a role in. You should be confident in that and grow up I struggled and depended on how people like me and if people didn’t like my singing or me – it effected to such a high degree. I’m so happy to be a part of my life where I just understand that if someone who doesn’t know me doesn’t like me – it’s probably a result of the former.

 

What is your FAULT?

Not speaking up when I want to. I’m working on it now, and it’s something I’m better at now. I’ve never been someone who spoke out of turn or felt like I should speak out and I was never a bully in school, but I remember how many times I saw it happening and didn’t say anything out of fear of being targeted. Now I’m like “who cares!” you shouldn’t be bothered for speaking up for what I know isn’t right. I’m so passionate about it now, and I never want to stand by if I see something wrong and if you say something bad about me I need to challenge it. We live in this electronic world where it’s so easy to see so many awful things online, and now I’m like “REPORT!” and I have no issue. There’s so much division in the world right now and in my country specifically right now and I want my music to speak for unity and build bridges between people and groups who maybe have bridged burnt. It’s something I’m still working at though because even though I know it’s there, I still feel like my instinct is to stay quiet, so I’m trying to combat that.

 

See Molly’s Latest ‘Footprints’ below!