Molly Kate Kestner: Familiar Story, Unique Perspective.

Shot Exclusively at Bounce Old Street

 

Words: Miles Holder

While Molly Kate Kestner’s “young singer-songwriter blows up on youtube” career isn’t one anyone is particularly shocked by anymore – one thing unique to the young artist is her ability to discuss music and themes as eloquently as an artist with over ten years experience. As you’ll find from our interview – Molly is very much an artist first and everything else a far second and in many ways that is the reason she has avoided the stigma of “youtuber turned artist. We caught up with Molly to discuss, music, goals and all things FAULT…Enjoy!

 

You’re putting songs out on Youtube and getting all the views – are you still pinching yourself?

There’s not a day that goes by when I don’t go “wow this is just the dream”, and I’m still right at the beginning of my career. I would say my success is minuscule compared to the people around me in Hollywood and it feels rewarding but I think it’s a mixture of timing, luck and hard work.

 

What’s it like to still be at the start of your career and having Starsmith want to work with you?

It’s humbling, but at the same time, it’s cool to work with people who have all the success and to see that in the end, they are just people. It’s so relieving that they’ve stayed human and humble and to know that not everyone at the top has these scary personalities!

Talk us through your songwriting process – is it always fluid and easy?

There are some days where I wake up, and the song is already in me, and it writes itself, but there are days when the last thing you want to do is write, and sometimes the best songs come from when you have to push to get them. There’s a quote by Leonard Cohen, and he’s asked where all great songs come from, and he said “I don’t know. If I did, I’d go there all the time.” And I don’t think I’ve ever heard something described so well because it is a mystery and no ones figured it out… well maybe Max Martin!

 

When you release a song, and it’s a hit, and the fans go wild, does it scare you to try and top that next release?

At the beginning I was, but I’m at a place now where each song is unique to themselves. I’m not trying to beat a song, that song was right for that time and process. The ‘Good Die Young’ is different to ‘His Daughter’, and they all have their own lives. I feel like I was just placed in the industry and so crazy that I haven’t felt the pressure to beat something, I don’t feel that pressure.

 

Prom Queen is such a stunning video, is that something you’re learning to be a part of more?

That’s one of my favourite parts, and I didn’t realise it would be. Adding the visual aspect to the music gives it so much meaning and shooting that video specifically was so much fun and you get to be more dramatic. Day to day I’m pretty low-key and a little bit tomboyish so getting to film things and do cool looks like this shoot for FAULT, I’d never do on my own but stepping out of my comfort zone lets my perspective grow.

 

Many of your fanbases are young and impressionable – do you feel like you need to act a certain way with people looking up to you?

I think it’s all how you receive their support and love. I think a lot of artists and influencers feed into the fan mentality, but I don’t want to be anybody idol or goddess – I’m just a girl. I want my fans to feel connected to me and inspired, but more importantly, I want them to know that my message is bigger than I am. I’m just a human I can fail and fail myself and mess up, but the music I’m creating is about something much bigger than I am. I want them to know that my music is about humanity and we’re a lot more connected than we realised.

 

When you shut your eyes and picture that dream goal of what you want to do, what do you see?

I see myself travelling to as many countries as I can! If I could perform in every country that’d be a dream come true especially those that don’t see many performances. Also, I’d love to mix speaking with singing, I think singing is very open to interpretation, and even now I’ve mixed into my shows – I’m pouring out my heart and giving the audience the backstory and letting them know what I want to take from this.

It’s not easy to put yourself out there – what drives you to keep doing it?

I think part of it is I believe it’s part of my purpose as part of this world. I think we’re all given these talents and abilities, and we’re called to do the most of this. I can write and sing, so that’s what keeps me going. It’s my purpose, and I’m driven towards it, and even if I never become famous and if my career failed I’d always be striving for influence in my area of reach. Be that in a school or volunteering – I feel like if you make yourself available to help you’ll always find purpose.

Advice to your younger self?

I guess a big thing would be that “confidence doesn’t come from anybody but yourself.” I feel we get bogged down in the idea that people liking us will bring trust and other superficial things, but you have to give yourself confidence by recognising that there’s never been you in the history of the world and you have this unique part of the time to play a role in. You should be confident in that and grow up I struggled and depended on how people like me and if people didn’t like my singing or me – it effected to such a high degree. I’m so happy to be a part of my life where I just understand that if someone who doesn’t know me doesn’t like me – it’s probably a result of the former.

 

What is your FAULT?

Not speaking up when I want to. I’m working on it now, and it’s something I’m better at now. I’ve never been someone who spoke out of turn or felt like I should speak out and I was never a bully in school, but I remember how many times I saw it happening and didn’t say anything out of fear of being targeted. Now I’m like “who cares!” you shouldn’t be bothered for speaking up for what I know isn’t right. I’m so passionate about it now, and I never want to stand by if I see something wrong and if you say something bad about me I need to challenge it. We live in this electronic world where it’s so easy to see so many awful things online, and now I’m like “REPORT!” and I have no issue. There’s so much division in the world right now and in my country specifically right now and I want my music to speak for unity and build bridges between people and groups who maybe have bridged burnt. It’s something I’m still working at though because even though I know it’s there, I still feel like my instinct is to stay quiet, so I’m trying to combat that.

 

See Molly’s Latest ‘Footprints’ below! 

 

 

Sneak Peek of Nat Wolff inside FAULT Magazine Issue 26

Words: Cody Fitzpatrick

In his 23 years, Wolff stars in a film adaptation for Netflix of the manga series Death Note, in which his character comes across a notebook that gives him the power to kill anybody he pleases by simply writing their name in it.

He’ s also in the forthcoming rom-com Home Again and the animated feature Leap! , in addition to a bunch of other stuff that’ s not yet finished. Still, he finds time to be active in his pop-rock duo with his brother, Alex.

We catch up with Natt inside FAULT 26 for an exclusive photoshoot and interview – see the preview below!

 

FAULT: How have you grown or changed since The Fault in Our Stars?

NatThe Fault in Our Stars was super-important because it put me in touch with John Green, who became a good friend of mine. And I also got to work with Shailene Woodley, who Ansel [Elgort] and I both learned a lot from. I became friends with both of them. And then I got to work with one of my buddies, Josh Boone, so it was a big, friendly affair.

But I also think the book was very important because it introduced me to a lot of patients who were battling cancer—and also other diseases—who I think felt recognized by the book and the movie. I actually ended up having personal experience in my family with that, so it was an extremely personal and important experience for me.

 

FAULT: In Death Note, what motivates Light Turner? What does he need in life, and what’s he willing to go through to get it?

NatI think he feels unheard and misunderstood. When he gets this power, first he uses it to kill they guy who killed his mom, and then he uses it to kill the rapist high school bully. Then things start spiraling out of control.

I think Death Note is good wish fulfillment for anybody who’s ever felt like the world was against them. In an immature way, he kind of has to learn to grow up.

 

FAULT: Do you have any upcoming plans for Nat & Alex Wolff?

NatWe put out an EP in December called Public Places. Alex has been jumping around working in a bunch of films, too. So whenever we’re not on set, we’ll play shows in the city or maybe do a little tour—things like that. In August, we have this little thing of time, so hopefully we’ll get back in the studio for a little bit.

 

FAULT: You seem insanely busy. What do you like to do when you’re not working?

NatWhat do I do, or what do I like to do? I spend a lot of time refreshing Google to see what the next disaster is in my country.

But what do I like to do? I have a really good group of friends in New York. I think that’s why I end up gravitating toward New York any time I’m not working. I definitely like being busy. And if I’m not busy, I find ways to stay busy.

 

GET THE FULL SHOOT AND INTERVIEW EXCLUSIVELY IN FAULT ISSUE 26 – AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

London Fashion Week SS18, ON|OFF presents Jack Irving, Luke Anthony Rooney, and CAPLANENTWISLE

   

Designs by Jack Irving, Luke Anthony Rooney, and CAPLANENTWISLE (presented by ON|OFF)

Photographed by Adele Baron

London Fashion Week SS18 – A.W.A.K.E.

 

Photographed by Adele Baron

London Fashion Week SS18, Backstage with Faustine Steinmetz

     

Photographed by Adele Baron

FAULT Magazine Attends Fenty Beauty Launch Party

Last night we attended the official launch party of Fenty Beauty by Rihanna in London’s Knightsbridge. The night also marked the end of London Fashion Week, and much like New York, Rihanna was going to make sure that it went out with a bang!

It being Rihanna, this wasn’t your standard fashion week party, we weren’t oversold through lavish theatrics, Rihanna let the product speak for itself, so guests were encouraged to be colour matched for their Fenty shade and shown the best additional products available.

The night was also host to many VIPs who came to show their support, FAULT Issue 24 stars Maya Jama and Becca Dudley were in attendance alongside the inspirational fashion legend, Edward Enninful – and of course, Rihanna herself was there to celebrate too.

Whether you work in the beauty industry or not, it’s hard to ignore the impact Fenty has already had worldwide. Fans have queued overnight to get their hands on the collection with the 5-star reviews pouring in non-stop and it’s not just because Rihanna’s name is tied to the product. Fenty has already found its niche in the beauty market, and while it is sad it took so long for a brand to claim it, their niche is being a product for everybody regardless of skin tone and people are loving and commending them for it.

Regardless of your skin tone, you can find a product for you at Fenty and Rihanna herself has said that she wanted the collection to be “something enjoyed by all people” and from last night’s event, it’s clear that people are listening and getting behind Fenty. I spoke to the musician, Melissa Whiskey who explained just how much Fenty means to her –  “I’ve struggled in the past to find a foundation to match my skin tone because I’m not the lightest skinned person, so I love that Rihanna has released a collection like this”.

All in all, the evening was the perfect close to London Fashion Week SS18, we laughed, we danced and most importantly, we had something worthwhile to celebrate! Despite this only being the launch party, Fenty has already ascended beyond just the role of makeup – truly Fenty is a movement and one which will no doubt have a bright future.

Shop the whole range at Fentybeauty.com or head down Harvey Nichols in London!

 

London Fashion Week SS18, Backstage and Show with Ashish

 

Photographed by Adele Baron

London Fashion Week SS18, Backstage and Presentation with Osman

    

Photographed by Adele Baron