Film, Fashion and Music Culminate in one outstanding Made By Google Launch Party

 

Last night Google launched the second generation family with a new Pixel, Google Home Mini and Max, Pixelbook, Pixel Buds, Google Clips hands-free camera and updated Daydream View headset, tech lovers were sent into a frenzy as they watched the reveals unfold.

This excitement is not misplaced either, the first generation iterations of many of these products took the market by storm and have long been lauded as far superior to similar products in the market; so as you can imagine, the expectations were high for yesterday’s release.

We’ll save the device by device deep-dive for the tech magazines, where we’re concerned is aesthetic and this new range is beautiful. The coral and slate palette allowed for the Google Home Mini and Max to sit within both modern and traditional households, proving that Google is the only brand to put that level of thought into interior architecture when designing their home assistance speakers.

For our readers working within in the creative industry, you’ll most certainly want to read up on the new Pixelbook and Pixelbook Pen. We had a quick play at the launch party and there truly is an application for the production within literally every corner of the industry. Fashion designers can benefit when sketching new collections, photographers can dot retouch right onto the photo without the need for additional graphic boards, the sleek design allows for fashion writers to review collections live from the front row; truly a product we’ll be looking into more.

Of course, no launch is complete without a star-studded launch party. The night saw a whole host of industry leaders from the worlds of fashion, music, art and pop culture celebrate the new Google family. Previous FAULT stars Ella Eyre and Maya Jama were in attendance alongside the likes of Jourdann Dunn, Jack Saunders, Lady Leshurr and Neelam Gill to name but a few.

Music for the night was provided by DJs Nick Grimshaw and Maya Jama performs awesome respective sets for those inclined to boogie. Taking to the stage for a live set, Nadia Rose brought the house down with an energetic performance and even brought out beatboxer mid-performance (you’ll know the significance of this if you saw her Glasto set…We did!)

The wonderfully interactive evening featured a whole host of playrooms where party goers could interact with the new technology, 360 videos, sensory overloads, doughnuts and fun! It all gets a little hard to explain so just enjoy the photographs below.

 

For more information head over to Google Store

 

Facebook Comments

The House Of Peroni returns to east london Ahead Of London Cocktail Week

Following the success of all their previous innovative initiatives, The House of Peroni is now ready to return to East London. Ahead of London Cocktail Week, the event transports guests to the streets of Italy where they are given the chance to reimagine citrus and explore previously undiscovered flavour combinations. The line-up of guest bartenders includes leading mixologists from Swift, Chiltern Firehouse and The London EDITION, who will be coupled with the founder of florist Grace & Thorn, fragrance specialists from Earl of East London and illustrator, George Greaves.

 

The House of Peroni will open its doors concurrently with the capital’s foremost drinks festival, London Cocktail Week (2nd-8th October, Spitalfields Market). Once again, Peroni Nastro Azzurro will be the only beer brand taking part in the event, serving a selection of Peroni-infused cocktails from an Italian-style street stall, designed as a teaser for the market setting of the main House – just minutes down the road.

We’re looking forward to see what House of Peroni will impeccably have in store for us. The event is open to the public from Thursday 5th of October until Sunday 15th of October and The House of Peroni will take residence at N&C Showrooms – 3-10 Shoreditch High Street, London, E1 6PG

Facebook Comments

We catch up with Rhys Lewis on his European tour – Exclusive shoot and interview

Rhys Lewis has been on our radar since the beginning of the year. In the months since, the release of several singles have cemented him as a regular on our playlists. With raw lyrics and a sound that is mature beyond his years, he’s shaping up to be a promising talent. We joined Rhys in Utrecht, Netherlands to get to know him a little better.

You’re quite direct with your lyrics – everything from mentioning Facebook, to talking about acknowledging a girl you like being in love with someone else, to mental heath issues – how does it feel to put yourself out there?

It’s weird – it feels very vulnerable, because when you’re writing a song you forget that you’re going to have to perform it in front of people. It’s weird to release a song on Spotify; people suddenly are like “I heard it!” or “I can relate to that!”. The words you’ve written obviously have a meaning to you, and other people have a snapshot into your life. Especially when you write from the heart… it can definitely feel vulnerable.

 

Is it important for you to write your own material?

Yeah. I’ve done co-writing, and sessions with songwriters and producers, but I do tend to write a lot of the lyrics myself. There are songs I’ve obviously written with help from other people. Creativity and collaboration in that way has benefited me a lot. I often go in with a concept of what I want to talk about, and having someone else to help finish it or get ideas flowing is actually really good. When you’re on your own you can down your own methods, and whether ideas are any good. It’s important for me that all my songs come from a real place.

Do you/would you ever consider writing songs for others?

I’d love to. Weirdly, I came to London to study songwriting, and wasn’t really here to be an artist. So in the process of trying to get better at writing songs, I got better at singing and playing guitar. The songs I wrote at Uni became the ones I ended up singing, so I gained more confidence as an artist. Once I left Uni I gained more confidence and started to pursue it as a real option.

 

I see you do a lot of social media and live streams – will you use that and those as a platform for addressing such issues, or do you prefer to keep it to the music?

I think it’s harder sometimes to articulate certain emotions when you talk about them. When you spend a whole day talking about and writing a song, you process your own emotions and thoughts, and feel a lot more able to talk about it. I feel like having a conversation is something I can definitely do now. The good thing about doing interviews is sometimes you’re put on the spot and get asked about something you’ve never thought about, and suddenly you learn about yourself. You have to ask yourself questions, and that’s the same process as songwriting. It’s like free therapy! Getting [your problems] out of your head stops you from making it worse in your own mind.

What was the first time you were moved by music?

When I first saw The Good, The Bad and The Ugly, my dad showed me that film when I was 9 years old. [Sings theme tune] – Ennio Morricone wrote the music for that and I just remember thinking “music’s awesome.” It set a scene, the drama of music… I just remember that moment. Music made it so much better!

 

You play a lot of international gigs – how did you amass a following like that? Do the audiences differ?

I do find it different playing abroad – I think partly because they perceive British artists slightly differently. We forget the wealth of heritage that being British gives you. You’ve got The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin… all the cool artists in the world are from the UK. When you go abroad as a British artist, it feels like you’re already in a different lane. Back home there’s a lot more competition, and everyone’s British! In London there’s so many venues and gigs and they’re all amazing… it’s hard to kind of break out of that and be heard amongst the noise. Abroad, people are more excited to hear you.

With Spotify, it’s so much easier to reach a crowd – you can see which tracks are being played most, and where your fans are. It’s really cool and that data is going to be so important for the future of musicians planning tour. Even selling merch – you can get an idea of your demographic.

 

How is it being apart of the Decca family? Are you feeling the pressure?

It’s inspiring to be alongside so many amazing musicians that have been on Decca. [They’ve got] Gregory Porter, who is one of the most incredible Jazz singers of our time. The heritage is unreal – the oldest British label. It makes you raise your game, being alongside these artists. You’ve got to deliver and do something special. When I signed, that was when the hard work started. [The Decca team] have let me develop organically; they suggest a route but have never forced it upon me. I’ve been all over the world to put together the album. It’s unreal. I’m honoured.

 

What can you tell us about the debut album and what we can expect next? Any collabs? 

I’ve just finished recording the album. It’s very personal to me. It’s quite confessional… it’s about a lot of things I went through in the past few years. Living in London, trying to pursue music as a career. There was ups and downs, I doubted myself… it’s very autobiographical. I’m really proud of it.

 

What is your fault?

I leave the fridge door open. And I leave the tap on when I’m brushing my teeth!

 

Find Rhys on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Watch an acoustic version of ‘Wish I Was Sober’ below.

 

Photography and Words Jack Alexander

Facebook Comments

Molly Kate Kestner: Familiar Story, Unique Perspective.

Shot Exclusively at Bounce Old Street

 

Words: Miles Holder

While Molly Kate Kestner’s “young singer-songwriter blows up on youtube” career isn’t one anyone is particularly shocked by anymore – one thing unique to the young artist is her ability to discuss music and themes as eloquently as an artist with over ten years experience. As you’ll find from our interview – Molly is very much an artist first and everything else a far second and in many ways that is the reason she has avoided the stigma of “youtuber turned artist. We caught up with Molly to discuss, music, goals and all things FAULT…Enjoy!

 

You’re putting songs out on Youtube and getting all the views – are you still pinching yourself?

There’s not a day that goes by when I don’t go “wow this is just the dream”, and I’m still right at the beginning of my career. I would say my success is minuscule compared to the people around me in Hollywood and it feels rewarding but I think it’s a mixture of timing, luck and hard work.

 

What’s it like to still be at the start of your career and having Starsmith want to work with you?

It’s humbling, but at the same time, it’s cool to work with people who have all the success and to see that in the end, they are just people. It’s so relieving that they’ve stayed human and humble and to know that not everyone at the top has these scary personalities!

Talk us through your songwriting process – is it always fluid and easy?

There are some days where I wake up, and the song is already in me, and it writes itself, but there are days when the last thing you want to do is write, and sometimes the best songs come from when you have to push to get them. There’s a quote by Leonard Cohen, and he’s asked where all great songs come from, and he said “I don’t know. If I did, I’d go there all the time.” And I don’t think I’ve ever heard something described so well because it is a mystery and no ones figured it out… well maybe Max Martin!

 

When you release a song, and it’s a hit, and the fans go wild, does it scare you to try and top that next release?

At the beginning I was, but I’m at a place now where each song is unique to themselves. I’m not trying to beat a song, that song was right for that time and process. The ‘Good Die Young’ is different to ‘His Daughter’, and they all have their own lives. I feel like I was just placed in the industry and so crazy that I haven’t felt the pressure to beat something, I don’t feel that pressure.

 

Prom Queen is such a stunning video, is that something you’re learning to be a part of more?

That’s one of my favourite parts, and I didn’t realise it would be. Adding the visual aspect to the music gives it so much meaning and shooting that video specifically was so much fun and you get to be more dramatic. Day to day I’m pretty low-key and a little bit tomboyish so getting to film things and do cool looks like this shoot for FAULT, I’d never do on my own but stepping out of my comfort zone lets my perspective grow.

 

Many of your fanbases are young and impressionable – do you feel like you need to act a certain way with people looking up to you?

I think it’s all how you receive their support and love. I think a lot of artists and influencers feed into the fan mentality, but I don’t want to be anybody idol or goddess – I’m just a girl. I want my fans to feel connected to me and inspired, but more importantly, I want them to know that my message is bigger than I am. I’m just a human I can fail and fail myself and mess up, but the music I’m creating is about something much bigger than I am. I want them to know that my music is about humanity and we’re a lot more connected than we realised.

 

When you shut your eyes and picture that dream goal of what you want to do, what do you see?

I see myself travelling to as many countries as I can! If I could perform in every country that’d be a dream come true especially those that don’t see many performances. Also, I’d love to mix speaking with singing, I think singing is very open to interpretation, and even now I’ve mixed into my shows – I’m pouring out my heart and giving the audience the backstory and letting them know what I want to take from this.

It’s not easy to put yourself out there – what drives you to keep doing it?

I think part of it is I believe it’s part of my purpose as part of this world. I think we’re all given these talents and abilities, and we’re called to do the most of this. I can write and sing, so that’s what keeps me going. It’s my purpose, and I’m driven towards it, and even if I never become famous and if my career failed I’d always be striving for influence in my area of reach. Be that in a school or volunteering – I feel like if you make yourself available to help you’ll always find purpose.

Advice to your younger self?

I guess a big thing would be that “confidence doesn’t come from anybody but yourself.” I feel we get bogged down in the idea that people liking us will bring trust and other superficial things, but you have to give yourself confidence by recognising that there’s never been you in the history of the world and you have this unique part of the time to play a role in. You should be confident in that and grow up I struggled and depended on how people like me and if people didn’t like my singing or me – it effected to such a high degree. I’m so happy to be a part of my life where I just understand that if someone who doesn’t know me doesn’t like me – it’s probably a result of the former.

 

What is your FAULT?

Not speaking up when I want to. I’m working on it now, and it’s something I’m better at now. I’ve never been someone who spoke out of turn or felt like I should speak out and I was never a bully in school, but I remember how many times I saw it happening and didn’t say anything out of fear of being targeted. Now I’m like “who cares!” you shouldn’t be bothered for speaking up for what I know isn’t right. I’m so passionate about it now, and I never want to stand by if I see something wrong and if you say something bad about me I need to challenge it. We live in this electronic world where it’s so easy to see so many awful things online, and now I’m like “REPORT!” and I have no issue. There’s so much division in the world right now and in my country specifically right now and I want my music to speak for unity and build bridges between people and groups who maybe have bridged burnt. It’s something I’m still working at though because even though I know it’s there, I still feel like my instinct is to stay quiet, so I’m trying to combat that.

 

See Molly’s Latest ‘Footprints’ below! 

 

 

Facebook Comments

Sneak Peek of Nat Wolff inside FAULT Magazine Issue 26

Words: Cody Fitzpatrick

In his 23 years, Wolff stars in a film adaptation for Netflix of the manga series Death Note, in which his character comes across a notebook that gives him the power to kill anybody he pleases by simply writing their name in it.

He’ s also in the forthcoming rom-com Home Again and the animated feature Leap! , in addition to a bunch of other stuff that’ s not yet finished. Still, he finds time to be active in his pop-rock duo with his brother, Alex.

We catch up with Natt inside FAULT 26 for an exclusive photoshoot and interview – see the preview below!

 

FAULT: How have you grown or changed since The Fault in Our Stars?

NatThe Fault in Our Stars was super-important because it put me in touch with John Green, who became a good friend of mine. And I also got to work with Shailene Woodley, who Ansel [Elgort] and I both learned a lot from. I became friends with both of them. And then I got to work with one of my buddies, Josh Boone, so it was a big, friendly affair.

But I also think the book was very important because it introduced me to a lot of patients who were battling cancer—and also other diseases—who I think felt recognized by the book and the movie. I actually ended up having personal experience in my family with that, so it was an extremely personal and important experience for me.

 

FAULT: In Death Note, what motivates Light Turner? What does he need in life, and what’s he willing to go through to get it?

NatI think he feels unheard and misunderstood. When he gets this power, first he uses it to kill they guy who killed his mom, and then he uses it to kill the rapist high school bully. Then things start spiraling out of control.

I think Death Note is good wish fulfillment for anybody who’s ever felt like the world was against them. In an immature way, he kind of has to learn to grow up.

 

FAULT: Do you have any upcoming plans for Nat & Alex Wolff?

NatWe put out an EP in December called Public Places. Alex has been jumping around working in a bunch of films, too. So whenever we’re not on set, we’ll play shows in the city or maybe do a little tour—things like that. In August, we have this little thing of time, so hopefully we’ll get back in the studio for a little bit.

 

FAULT: You seem insanely busy. What do you like to do when you’re not working?

NatWhat do I do, or what do I like to do? I spend a lot of time refreshing Google to see what the next disaster is in my country.

But what do I like to do? I have a really good group of friends in New York. I think that’s why I end up gravitating toward New York any time I’m not working. I definitely like being busy. And if I’m not busy, I find ways to stay busy.

 

GET THE FULL SHOOT AND INTERVIEW EXCLUSIVELY IN FAULT ISSUE 26 – AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

Facebook Comments

UK Music Video Awards Announces 2017 Nominations

 

For all its problems, 2017 has truly been a great year for music in the UK and across the globe. As the UK Music Video Awards 2017 roll around again this October 26th, we’re reminded of some great music videos to come out this year.

Mercury prize winner Sampha receives four nominations this year and Mercury prize nominee Loyle Carner. Ray BLK, Dua Lipa, Charli XCX, Loyle Carner, Mura Masa and Rag n’ Bone Man also make some of the young British talents all in the running this October. Kendrick Lamar and alt-J tie for most nominations, both picking up seven.

What’s got us excited this year is to see younger artists appreciate in the same categories as some music veterans. Dua lipa and Charli XCX are in the running alongside Elton John for Best Pop Video while A$AP Mob and Young Thug go toes to toes with powerhouse and living legend, Jay Z for Best Urban Video – international

FAULT will most certainly be in attendance on the night but until then, find a full list of the nominations below.

Best Pop Video – the UK in association with Rushes
Aquilo – You Won’t Know Where You Stand / Silhouette
Charli XCX – Boys
Dua Lipa – New Rules
Ed Sheeran – Castle On The Hill
Elton John – Bennie and The Jets
Jessie Ware – Selfish Love

Best Dance Video – UK
BICEP – Aura
Bonobo – Kerala
Bonobo – No Reason
Duke Dumont x Gorgon City ft Naations – Real Life
SOULS – Bad Girl
Stylo G + Jacob Plant – Bike Engine

Best Rock/Indie Video – UK
All We Are – Animal / Dance
Coldplay – Everglow
Kasabian – God Bless This Acid House
Mick Jagger – England, Lost
Radiohead – I Promise
Royal Blood – Lights Out

Best Alternative Video – UK
alt-j – 3WW
alt-j – Deadcrush
alt-j – In Cold Blood
Metronomy ft Robyn – Hang Me Out To Dry
Sampha – Process
Young Fathers – Mr Martyr

Best Urban Video – UK in association with PPL
Loyle Carner – Isle of Arran
Mura Masa & A$AP Rocky – Love$ick
Rag’N’Bone Man – Skin
Ray BLK – Patience
Sampha – (No One Knows Me) Like The Piano
Tinie Tempah – Chasing Flies

Best Pop Video – International
Cassius ft Pharrell Williams & Cat Power – Go Up
HAIM – Want You Back
Katy Perry – Bon Appétit
Lorde – Green Light
Oren Lavie ft Vanessa Paradis – Did You Really Say No
The Weeknd – False Alarm

Best Dance Video – International
Jain – Makeba
Joris Delacroix – Start The Engine
Kanye West – Fade
Majid Jordan ft Somewhere Else – Move Together
The Avalanches – Because I’m Me
The Blaze – Territory

Best Rock/Indie Video – International
Every Time I Die – Map Change
Father John Misty – Things It Would Have Been Useful To Know Before The Revolution
Mourn – Irrational Friend
Naive New Beaters – Words Hurt
The All-American Rejects – Sweat
Twenty One Pilots – HeavyDirtySoul

Best Alternative Video – International
Beck – Up All Night
Leningrad – Kolshik
Mashrou’Leila – Roman
Peder – Shadows Of My Mind
Polo & Pan – Coeur Croisé
The Avalanches – Subways

Best Urban Video – International
A$AP Mob ft A$AP Rocky, A$AP Nast, Yung Lord, Skepta – Money Man / Put That On My Set
Frank Ocean – Nikes
Jay-Z – Moonlight
Kendrick Lamar – ELEMENT.
Kendrick Lamar – HUMBLE.
Young Thug – Wyclef Jean

Best Pop Video – Newcomer
Cartae – Long Time
Charlotte Cardin – Like It Doesn’t Hurt
Lea Santee – Rollin’
Poppy Ajudha – Spilling Into You
Slang – What Happened To You
Stars and Rabbit – Man Upon The Hill

Best Dance Video – Newcomer
Cathedrals – Try To Fight
Courage – Latinman
Fabich ft Josh Barry – Hold On
Noga Erez – Dance While You Shoot
Obongjayar – Endless
Punctual – What I Love

Best Rock/Indie Video – Newcomer
Lemon Twigs – I Want To Prove To You
Marika Hackman – My Lover Cindy
Microwave – Vomit
The Shins – Half A Million
Ultrasound – Kon-Tiki
Willie J Healey – Would You Be

Best Alternative Video – Newcomer
BadBadNotGood ft Kaytranada – Lavender
Beyond The Wizard’s Sleeve – Black Crow
Bonnie Banane – L’Appétit
Cherry Glazerr – Told You I’d Be With The Guys
Ghostpoet – Freakshow
Moses Sumney – Worth It

Best Urban Video – Newcomer
Avelino ft Stormzy & Skepta – Energy
Bossman Birdie – Walk The Walk
Monster Florence – Resourceful
Newham Generals ft Wiley – Unruly
Oscar Worldpeace – Tate Modern, Wary, Pearls
Slick Don – Highs & Lows

Vevo MUST SEE Award
Charli XCX – Boys
Dua Lipa – New Rules
Jay-Z – The Story of O.J.
Kendrick Lamar – HUMBLE.
Marika Hackman – My Lover Cindy
Young Thug – Wyclef Jean

Best Interactive Video in association with The Mill
Björk – Notget
Chainsmokers – Paris VR
Gorillaz – Saturnz Barz (Spirit House) 360
Naïve New Beaters – Words Hurt
N’to – Chez Nous (Fantasynth)
Portugual. The Man – Rich Friends

Best Production Design in a Video
Bonobo – No Reason
Elton John – Bennie and the Jets
Frank Ocean – Nikes
Kendrick Lamar – HUMBLE.
Sampha – Process
Young Thug & Carnage: Young Martha ft Meek Mill – Homie

Best Styling in a Video in association with i-D
Beck – Up All Night
Frank Ocean – Nikes
Kendrick Lamar – ELEMENT.
Police Dog Hogan – Tyburn Jig
Rosalía – De Plata
The Blaze – Territory

Best Choreography in a Video
alt-j – Deadcrush
Everything Everything – Can’t Do
Kanye West – Fade
P!nk – What About Us?
Polo & Pan – Coeur Croisé
Sia – The Greatest

Best Cinematography in a Video in association with Panalux
alt-j – 3WW
Ed Sheeran – Castle On The Hill
Jimmy Whoo – Motel Music part ll
Kendrick Lamar – ELEMENT.
Placebo – Life’s What You Make It
The Avalanches – Because I’m Me

Best Colour Grading in a Video in association with CHEAT
Jain – Makeba
Jay-Z & Damian Marley – Bam
Majid Jordan ft Somewhere Else – Move Together
Mick Jagger – Gotta Get A Grip
Radiohead – I Promise
The Hamilton Mixtape – Immigrants (We Get The Job Done)

Best Editing in a Video in association with Cut+Run
alt-j – Deadcrush
Bonobo – Kerala
Elton John – Bennie and the Jets
Leningrad – Kolshik
The Rolling Stones – Ride ‘Em On Down
Young Thug – Wyclef Jean

Best Visual Effects in a Video
Arcade Fire – Everything Everything
Jain – Makeba
Leningrad – Kolshik
Majid Jordan ft Somewhere Else – Move Together
Royal Blood – Lights Out
The Weeknd – False Alarm

Best Animation in a Video
Elton John – Rocket Man
Father John Misty – Things It Would Have Been Helpful To Know Before The Revolution
Jay-Z – The Story of O.J.
Kaada /Patton – Red Rainbow
Katie Melua – Perfect World
The Avalanches – Subways

Best Live Session
Alicia Keys in Paris – A Take Away Show
J Hus – Common Sense (Four To The Floor, Channel4)
London Grammar – Rooting For You
Mr Jukes – Angels/Your Love (Live At The Church)
Mura Masa ft Damon Albarn – Blu (Live)
Vevo Presents: The Weeknd – False Alarm

Best Live Concert
HAIM – Behind The Album
Metallica – Hardwired at House of Vans
Rammstein – Paris
The Killers – Hyde Park
The Rolling Stones – Trip Across Latin America
Toro Y Moi – Love From Trona

Best Commissioner
Andrew Law
Elizabeth Doonan
James Hackett
John Moule
Phil Lee
Semera Khan

Best Producer in association with WPA
Amber Millington
Clemence Cuvelier
Katie Lambert
Natalie Arnett
Nathan Scherrer
Tom Birmingham

Best Production Company
Agile Films
Caviar
Friend
Iconoclast
Pulse Films
Riff Raff Films

Best New Director in association with Time Based Arts
Hector Dockrill
Matilda Finn
Max Weiland
Salomon Ligthelm
Thomas James
Zhang + Knight

Best Director
Dent de Cuir
Georgia Hudson
Jake Schreier
Oscar Hudson
Ryan Staake
Young Replicant

Best Artist
alt-j
Bonobo
Kendrick Lamar
Radiohead
Sampha
The Weeknd

Facebook Comments