FAULT Magazine Alumni Clean Bandit, Charli XCX and Bhad Bhabie release new song ‘Playboy Style’

 

It’s always great to see our faves working together so as you can expect, we’re all very excited to hear about the latest track to drop from Clean Bandit’s forthcoming second album, ‘What Is Love’ features both Charli XCX and Bhad Bhabie. All three artists on the song have graced the covers of FAULT respectively and have now joined forces to release this infection track which we’re sure will take over the charts worldwide.

Clean Bandit’s album titled ‘What Is Love?’ is set to release on Friday (November 30) and naturally, we’re all very excited to see what their new music they’ve been cooking up since their debut. If ‘Playboy Style’ is anything to go off, it’s sure to be a stormer!

Until then, check out their infecsious new release below and let us know what you think!

 

 

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FAULT Magazine photoshoot and interview with Joel Baker

 

This week saw the release of Joel Baker’s ‘Winter Dreams’ EP, a brutally honest but wonderful example of the storytelling through music that we’ve come to expect from Joel over the course of his career. Also included on the EP is a cover of Phil Collins’ ‘You Can’t Hurry Love’, completely reimagined in Joel’s own style so wonderfully you could be forgiven in thinking it was a completely original track.

We met up with Joel to discuss his career thus far, and plans for the future in this FAULT Online photoshoot and interview.

 

You have a really unique voice, how did you develop your style?

It was a tone thing which over the years I’ve learnt to develop and use correctly. The singing bit it still the newest thing for me and that’s where I’m trying to grow and learn how to perfect.

 

Who are you listening to at the moment?

Ryan Adams, Leaf, I really like and a lot of Pheobe Bridges. There’s also a lot of HipHop, Chance The Rapper, Common and anything lyrical.

 

What’s your writing process like, are you structured with set times for working or are you an artist who’s always writing anywhere and everywhere?

I try and do a bit of both, I try and have that bit of structure. I like to do writing sessions, where you need to write a song in a day because that adds structure and it forces it out a little bit because I think sometimes just waiting for it to happen isn’t the best. But in saying that I like to have my songwriting antennas on at all time because it usually happens in conversation. I will be talking to somebody and say something weird or whatever and take a mental note of it and then use that so all those random thoughts and notes I wrote down and when it comes to actually produce the song I have a lot to work with.

Is it weird that people are coming to see you?

Today is strange, it’s a gig that has come from outside of my friendship group. it’ll be great to see the people who have come to see me who listen to my music every day and just want to experience me playing live.

 

Is it weird knowing that your song means something different?

that’s the best part. When you write something that someone else loves is so special. Especially when people say “we love it and keep it on repeat” it resonates so much because that’s exactly how I listen and experience music.

 

What’s your favourite on the road story?

I’ve got to be careful what I say Hah! One of my favourite characters I’ve met on the road was in Berlin I met someone called Yesper Monk. He turned up to meet us with this really heavy guitar and a typewriter, leather jack and pack of cigarettes. He looked like something out of the 40’s he’s by far the craziest guy I’ve ever met and I saw him last week and I’ve not seen him in ages and the first thing he tells me is “things are about to get crazy because I’ve just taken an ecstasy pill”. I love him, he’s an amazing artist and so inspirational for me.

What’s been your worse show?

When I first started I was just playing a dingy venue and I didn’t really want to do it. Also, no one was actually there so it was basically just the acts watching each other perform and it was the most horrendous show. It was a club venue atop the stage too so you’re playing a slow emotional song to party music above you.

 

Are you a studio body or do you prefer the stage?

It depends on the setting I’d say but for the most part, I enjoy the studio because I have control of the setup, my comforts etc. That being said, there are those shows where the stars align, the sounds amazing and the crowd is great and there have only been a few of those perfect shows but it’s just amazing to experience.

 

What is your FAULT?

I’m very guilty of comparing myself to people and it’s horrendous. The good things don’t seem as good and the bad things just sound a horrible way to live life.

 

LISTEN TO/SHARE ‘WINTER DREAMS’ EP HERE

WATCH/SHARE NEW TRACK ‘RUPI KAUR’ HERE

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FAULT Weekly Playlist: Taska Black

Belgian producer Taska Black’s first introduction to music came at a young age in the form of violin and piano lessons. Like most kids, Tasks wasn’t initially keen on the imposed structure of a musical education. However, through improvisations, Taska found his deep-seated love for creating.

Stretching past genre definitions with his music, Taska first garnered international attention with his official remix of Charlie Puth’s “The Way I Am.” That soon led to releases on Martin Garrix’s STMPD label. His latest (and debut) five-track EP “Minds” was shared via San Holo’s indie label imprint bigbird.

With every track, Taska unravels a rawness through his intrinsic aptitude for melody and sound design which has seen him garner support from fellow heavyweights Zeds Dead, Alison Wonderland, Marshmello, Martin Garrix and more. Utterly refreshing and thrilling in its pursuit of greater sonic diversity in the pop sphere, Taska Black’s “Minds” EP showcases all the promising musical avenues that the young artist continues to progress into. As the year is winding down, listeners can only expect that Taska’s 2019 will hold even bigger musical moments, as hinted at by this debut EP. Until then, take a listen to his exclusive inspirations playlist for FAULT.

Sia – Soon We’ll Be Found

I’ve always loved Sia and she’s one of the best voices in pop music in my opinion. This is the very first song I heard from her from 2008 and I still can’t get tired of it.

Unknown Mortal Orchestra – Multi-love

I’ve only recently got to know this band but they’re absolutely amazing. Whenever I’m traveling or doing nothing this is the only thing I listen to.

M83 – Midnight City

It feels like this song has been stuck in my head for 7 years now. That sound in the intro just never lets me go.

King Princess – 1950

When I first heard this song I was blown away. Just when that first verse comes in it just grabbed my attention and I can’t stop listening to it anymore.

Alison Wonderland – Church

I’ve always been a fan of Alison Wonderland. This is one of the songs off her “Awake” album and it’s just so well written.

Frank Ocean – Solo

I don’t think this one needs explanation. Blonde was one of my favorite albums of 2016 and ‘Solo’ has been in my daily playlist ever since.

Red Hot Chili Peppers – Otherside

When I was a kid I used to listen to the RHCP all the time. I could really pick any song of theirs because they’re all great, every single song is just so nostalgic to me.

ODESZA – Falls ft. Sasha Sloan

I don’t think ODESZA needs any explanation, they’re just legendary. Falls is definitely one of my favorite songs of their ‘A Moment Apart’ album.

Taska Black – Forever

This is a song I wrote with David Thomas Jr. His voice just sounds so good… This was my first song ever to be played on local radio in Belgium, where I live, and it was a crazy feeling to hear yourself on the radio like this.

Shawn Mendes – Lost In Japan (Zedd Remix)

I’m definitely a fan when it comes to Zedd’s music and it has been a while since he released a remix. This track inspires me because it shows how Zedd can twist a pop song and still push his sound and his production forward.

Taska Black Socials:
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Twitter
Soundcloud
Instagram

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Get weekend ready with Bohnes’ “Raging On A Sunday”

Meet Bohnes. The solo project of Alex DeLeon from the band The Cab, Bohnes is a meeting of alternative rock and pop music. Today he shares a new single called “Raging On A Sunday” that comes just in time for this holiday weekend.

“This song was written when I thought the album was finished; it snuck up on me,” Bohnes says about the track. “I wanted to write a song that I would listen to. I wrote it with a live show in mind. I had a dream about people starting a mosh pit in a church so wrote the song to accompany the dream and to build the soundtrack for it. I love the mix of the grungy angst and the smoothness that comes from it’s r&b background.”

Bohnes Socials:
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Soundcloud
Instagram
Spotify

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Kandace Springs at Southbank Centre for EFG London Jazz Festival 2018

Kandace Springs

Kandace Springs

Sounds the trumpets! The EFG London Jazz Festival has officially begun, and, this Saturday, we headed to the Southbank Centre to see Kandace Springs perform her soulful tracks to a packed-out audience.

The 10-day celebration hopes to provide audiences with a mixture of renowned artists and emerging stars from the world of Jazz. The popular event will see artists such as Camilla George, Cherise Adams-Burnett and Jeff Goldblum and the Mildred Snitzer Orchestra bring jazz to the forefront of London culture this winter. Kicking things off, Kandace Springs channelled her inner Dusty Springfield for a wonderful end to the first week. However, we were also treated to opening act AJ Brown and his Elton John-esqe piano renditions.

You wouldn’t be the only one to mistake Yorkshire-born AJ Brown for an American cruise ship performer. His upbeat, popular performances had strong Burt Bacharach influences (who he’s actually performed with), and his charismatic charm had the audience tapping their feet. His powerful voice carried around the newly refurbished Queen Elizabeth Hall at the Southbank Centre, performing his own tracks as well as many of his idols, including Luther Vandross. Closing his set with a ballad version of Latch by Disclosure feat. Sam Smith, AJ Brown revealed his vocal talents, hitting all the high notes with ease. Although, it may have not been the jazz I was expecting (the style of Michael Buble with the reach of Tom Jones), he definitely got the audience alert and ready for the next act – Kandace Springs.

Kandace Springs performing at the Southbank Centre for EFG London Jazz Festival 2018

The late and great Prince once said that Kandace Springs ‘has a voice that could melt snow’, and he wasn’t wrong. Captivating from start to finish, the wonderful Kandace Springs from Nashville, Tennessee performed an amazing set of meaningful and beautiful songs. Alongside the two-piece band, comprising the double bass and the drums, Kandace brought new tracks, her favourite songs and anecdotes of growing up with her father (also a jazz musician), Scat Springs, to the stage.

Kandace’s voice sounds like an old soul, despite her young age. Her husky, dulcet tones are mesmerising and send you into another world. Her range, however, was outstanding and she made sure she performed tracks to showcase her vocal repertoire. Performing songs by Dusty Springfield, Nina Simone and many other talented jazz musicians, Springs also performed her new single Fix me, which was an amalgamation of R&B, pop, jazz and classical genres – Chopin is one of her most-loved composers. Springs’ music was full of classical inspiration, merging well with her love of jazz. A welcoming and upbeat concert, by the end I felt like I knew the singer well. Kandace Springs is one to watch.

 

To book tickets to other shows in the EFG London Jazz Festival, head to efglondonjazzfestival.org.uk

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Fashion Trends and the Stars that Started Them

Fashion is a massive part of our culture and it’s often influenced by the films that Hollywood produces. When an actor is seen wearing something new or a blast from the past in a film, the general public, with a sense for fashion, tend to follow suit.

For instance, right now the U.S. has seen a lot of changes in fashion trends. Not too long ago, animal print was shunned and gawked at. Now, cheetah and zebra print outfits are becoming one of the most stylish fashion choices.

Women might also remember how they were expected to wear clothing that showed off their feminine figure in past years. That’s not the case in the fall of 2018. The newest trend is focused more on modest clothing. Layers are more popular than ever and so are squared pantsuits that you would normally find on masculine forms.

Cowboy boots have been making a huge comeback for men. There’s a sudden interest in laid-back, blue-collar worker outfits that are paired with a solid array of modern cowboy boots. It’s simple, it’s fashionable, and it’s easy enough for men who aren’t fashion minded. Modern cowboy boots come in a variety of styles, like Ariat mens square toe cowboy boots, for example.

Today’s trends are interesting and attractive to the eye, but what about the fashion trends of yesteryear? Well, let’s look at some of the most iconic fashion trends that Hollywood inspired in the past.

Marilyn Monroe and the White Dress

Everyone knows who Marilyn Monroe is and has most likely seen the infamous scene where her dress is blown around from a gust of wind. That billowing white dress became an icon in both film and fashion during the time. The jaws of every person alive at the time dropped during the infamous scene and it cemented Monroe’s place in pop culture for decades to come. It was so impactful that it remains an icon in fashion to this day.

Anne Hathaway in The Devil Wears Prada

The Devil Wears Prada is a classic from not so long ago. Not only was the film a massive success that is still referenced to this day, it also left a lasting impact on the fashion world. Anne Hathaway and her co-stars only wore the highest quality brands in the movie. This piqued the interest of the average woman to begin enjoying the class and sophistication that comes with Chanel, Fendi, and Prada clothing.

Diane Keaton as Annie Hall

In the 1977 movie Annie Hall, Diane Keaton was dressed in several layers of men’s clothing. At the time, it was completely unheard of. Diane started a firestorm in the fashion industry when women around the world rushed to copy the signature look. To this day, the look is still copied regularly.

Audrey Hepburn’s Little Black Dress

Audrey Hepburn was already a bright star in Hollywood, but in 1961 she starred in Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Not only is the film a classic, but Audrey Hepburn’s outfit became an instant classic. The little black dress that she wore was accented with a three-strand, pearl necklace and little else. The simplicity of the dress became timeless and it remains iconic to this day.

Audrey Hepburn’s White Gown

As stated above, Audrey Hepburn was a star in Hollywood long before she wore the little black dress by Givenchy. In fact, as early as 1954 she was making headlines in another Givenchy creation. She wore a white gown with a black flower pattern in Sabrina. The outfit isn’t as well known or referenced as often as the little black dress, but it had a huge impact on fashion at the time.

Jennifer Beals in Flashdance

In 1983, Jennifer Beals created a look that would take the fashion world by storm and continue to do so for decades. In the movie Flashdance, Beal took an ordinary sweater that was too large, slipped it on, and utilized the massive neck opening to expose one of her shoulders. It was ridiculously simple, accessible to everyone, and overall, it became a timeless fashion statement.

John Travolta in Grease

Slicked hair, leather jackets, blue jeans, and black leather shoes are iconic of an entire generation. This can be attributed to John Travolta’s character in the 1978 film Grease. He was considered to have the coolest look around at the time and the outfit still influences men’s fashion.

If you can’t get enough of the fashion world and you want to learn more, Forbes has an article to help with that.

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