What You Need to Know if You Want to Start a Fashion Business

The fashion industry is notoriously difficult to crack. Designers and fashion stores come and go. Some are more successful than others and go the distance, but many fashion startups fail. But, what’s good to know is that this is an industry you can get a foothold in. Creativity is purely optional, and you don’t need to be a designer to achieve success. Here is some helpful guidance if you want to start your own fashion business.

Choosing the Right Startup Idea

There are many different ways to enter the fashion industry and most of them don’t require creativity. Of course, if you have a flair for design and you want to be the next Alexander McQueen, a fashion degree is a good place to start. But if your interest is purely making money, you will find more success in opening a store.
The internet has made it incredibly easy to go into retail, fashion or otherwise. It’s very easy to buy a domain and create an online store. Content Management Platforms such as WordPress, Shopify, and Magento are all geared to e-commerce and you don’t need to be an experienced coder to build an online store.
However, until you have a recognisable brand, your best bet is to start selling on eBay, Etsy, or a similar online platform. Sites like these are perfect for fashion startups. It costs nothing to create listings and until you actually sell something, you won’t pay any fees.
Choose a niche within the fashion industry. For example, if you are interested in accessories, buy some belts, ties, hats, etc., and start listing them. Men’s fashion is a good place to start, but there is no reason why you can’t target women’s fashion too. Women’s fashion is a much bigger market, but it’s also saturated with sellers. Your best chance of success is to find an underserved niche and make it your own.
There is a big market for second-hand goods, especially fashion items. Used designer goods always sell well online. If you know your designers and can source some good quality designer goods, there is money to be made.

Funding a Startup

There are many ways to fund a startup. The most obvious – and cheapest – one is to use your own savings. If you don’t have any spare cash, ask family and friends to help out. You probably won’t need a huge sum of money, to begin with, unless you are jumping in feet first and plan on opening a retail unit on the high street. If this is the case, or you need to invest in more expensive stock, consider taking out a business loan or using a credit card.
Don’t worry too much if your credit rating is less than stellar. There are loan companies who specialise in bad credit loans. Look for a specialist bad credit loan provider with good reviews and fill out an application form. Online loan companies are often more competitive than high street banks and building societies.

Buying Stock

For new items, the best place to source stock is overseas, specifically China. Thanks to sites like Alibaba, you can chat with suppliers and order samples from your armchair. Start small until you know there is a market for your goods. Expect to pay higher prices for items until you can place larger orders. Always check samples before you place an order and remember to factor in shipping costs/taxes when ordering stock from overseas.

Dropshipping

If you don’t have space to store stock, look at Dropshipping. The dropshipping model has become popular in recent years. It’s very simple. You act as the middleman between the supplier and the customer. When the customer places an order on your site, you order direct from the supplier and arrange for the goods to be shipped straight to the customer. The difference between the price the customer pays and the price you pay the supplier is your gross profit. Deduct any cost and you are left with the net profit.

Marketing

It takes time to build a brand, so you will need to do some marketing to find customers. Working via a site like eBay is easy, as the site takes care of all the SEO for you. As long as you set your prices at the optimum level, use the right keywords, and provide good customer service, you are good to go. Once you leave these sites behind, you need to put more effort in.
Start with social media. Create a social media presence and try selling through Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. PPC ads are also effective, as well as economical. If you want your fashion website to be more visible, hire an expert to plan an online marketing campaign, but for a high street store, more traditional marketing methods still apply.

If you have a burning desire to be an entrepreneur, fashion is a fun business to get into, so give it a try!

Bebe Rexha Exclusive Covershoot and Interview with FAULT Magazine

Bebe Rexha X FAULT Magazine

Bebe Rexha for FAULT Magazine Issue 29

Photography: David Yeo | Fashion Editor – Rachel Holland | Make-Up: Brittany Lambert Paige | Hair: Rio Sreedharan | Nails: Diane Drummond | Fashion Assistant: Ana Carnu & Lupe Baeyens | Words: Aimee Phillips

 

FAULT Magazine speaks to Bebe Rexha about her debut album, Expectations, the importance of retaining creative control and still having those pinch-me moments in this exclusive FAULT Magazine issue 29 reverse cover shoot.

 

FAULT: Let’s talk about your single ‘Meant To Be’ ft. Florida Georgia Line. The country vibe is quite different from your usual style – what made you switch things up?

Bebe Rexha: It was quite unexpected but I kinda think all the best things in life are unexpected. That’s why I called my album Expectations, because you never know what’s gonna happen. It’s been an incredible journey and I’m so grateful for it. I’d never done country before so didn’t really know what to expect, and I think that was the beauty of it.

Bebe Rexha for FAULT Magazine Issue 29

FAULT Magazine Issue 29 is available to order for delivery worldwide

 

Where was your head at when you were creating the album? What were the circumstances and emotions that inspired it?

Bebe Rexha: I was thinking a lot about life and how I’ve always expected it to go a certain way but it took me on a different path. Life is better when you just go with the flow. For me, this album has been all about me trying to figure things out.

 

You’ve co-written or co-produced every song on the album – that’s quite rare. It must be extremely important to you to retain creative control?

Bebe Rexha: Yeah definitely. There were some songs that were sent to me and I was like, oh gosh, I need to have this record, it just speaks to me in such an incredible way. I would go in and make it my own, working with the producer to tweak it. Throughout the process, I’ve been involved in the production of various songs. I couldn’t see any other way. For me, writing music has been like therapy. I couldn’t imagine putting out an album or song without being

 Bebe Rexha for FAULT Magazine Issue 29

On writing “Monster” for Eminem

Bebe Rexha:  That really changed the game for me. It changed everyone’s perspective of who I was and really shone a spotlight on my songwriting, so when I transitioned into an artist, I never once had people tell me what to do. When you write the song yourself, people really connect with it on a different level.

 

You started off writing songs for other people. What journey did you have to go on in order to get where you are today?

Bebe Rexha:  I was signed to my first record deal when I was 18 or 19 but I was mainly writing pop songs for other people. Then I got into a band with Pete Wentz called Black Cards. We travelled the world for a few years and then got dropped, so that spurred me into really focusing on my songwriting and my craft. It was a blessing in disguise because it taught me a lot about the industry and perfecting what I can do. That’s when I wrote ‘The Monster’. No one really understood the song because they thought it was a little creepy or too weird, so when Eminem got it I was thrilled. That really changed the game for me. It changed everyone’s perspective of who I was and really shone a spotlight on my songwriting, so when I transitioned into an artist, I never once had people tell me what to do. When you write the song yourself, people really connect with it on a different level.

Bebe Rexha for FAULT Magazine Issue 29

Do you think you’ve gotten used to all then – the success and fame?

Bebe Rexha: Not at all, I still feel like I don’t belong. It was never handed to me on a silver platter, like, here you go, you’re a star! I was always the underdog. I was a little quirky, a little different, I would write my own songs. But I’m so supportive of other females and other artists

 

What is your FAULT?

Bebe Rexha: It’s hard for me to enjoy being in the moment, I’m always thinking about the next thing.

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 29 – THE MOVEMENT ISSUE –  IS AVAILABLE TO PRE-ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

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SWONNE : MFW SS19 HIGHLIGHTS

Katie Golinczak is the new menswear talent to watch. After having solid exposure working for Ralph Lauren, John Varvatos, Levi’s, to name a few, Katie launched her debut collection for Swonne at NYFW Men S/S 2019. Her first collection is inspired by Mod Rockers of the 60s, and consisted of a seasonless denim collection, t-shirts, biker jackets, parkas with tailoring details. Her SW1 parka, which is one of her (and our) favorite piece, is designed, constructed and hand painted in Brooklyn, NY. Swonne’s debut collection definitely lived up to our expectations and we look forward to see what it has to offer next season!

Katie Golinczak, Designer of SWONNE

Words + Images: Jennifer Laurantius Art Design/Layout: Chaunielle Brown

 

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Feeric Fashion Week 2018 in Romania

Feeric Fashion Week 2018 in Romania is the biggest fashion week in Eastern Europe. This year saw the launch of the fiercely contested Feeric33 competition for 33 breakthrough designers to win various opportunities to help launch their label to the international market. The judging panel included the likes of Diane Pernet, (founder of ASVOFF), Liana Satenstein (Senior Fashion Writer at Vogue US), Adriana di Lello (Fashion Features Director at Elle Italia) Raoul Keil (founder of Schon Magazine), Patricia Lerat (founder of PLC Consulting and curator of Designers Apartment in collaboration with Fédération de la Haute Couture et de la Mode), Riccardo Terzo (Fashion Stylist and Contributor to VOGUE Talent), Tania Cursano (founder of IT-ELITE Showroom) and Carolina Molossi (founder of Get Book A Look Digital Showroom).

FAULT was in attendance to see Polish designer Kalina Kocemba win the grand prize: a 3 year management contract with The Secret Code of Fashion Agency and Feeric Fashion Week, worth €30,000. Other prizes for the talented finalists included a cover feature in 33 Magazine, a collaboration with V for VINTAGE trade fair platform, and a Summer Course scholarship with IED – Istituto Europeo di Design in 2019. Romanian model and Vice-President of Feeric Fashion Week Landiana also chose 3 lucky contestants and wore their looks throughout Feeric Fashion Week 2018.

Kalina Kocemba, the winner of Feeric33 @ Feeric Fashion Week 2018

Kalina Kocemba, the winner of Feeric33

Winning designer Kalina Kocemba declared nature to be the inspiration behind her first collection, one dominated by white fabric which tightly surrounds the body and gives the sensation of wearing a second skin.

Other shortlisted and noteworthy participating designers at Feeric Fashion Week 2018 included Zeta, Eliza Dobai, Lili Eva Bartha, Tara Lalic, Ariana Spin, Aigerim Kairat – along with many others.

 

 

 

 

 

For more about Feeric Fashion Week 2018 & Feeric33, please visit:

www.feeric.ro
@F33ric

Photography by Ancira Adeon

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ALESSANDRO TRINCONE | MFW SS19 | HIGHLIGHTS

A modern day set whimsical romance orchestrated for pleasures play. Menswear reimagined for a possible futuristic walking strut of design, fantasy and exploration. A carefree confidence floating on air with ruffles, waves, tiers of tulle and femme delights. With imagination and disco discovery we’re presented with stapled stamped pieces of a light plush blush palette and marshmallow. Recollections of Viktor & Rolf echoed with ease; alas a fearless collection with no boundaries or limits. Ingenious strolling works of art and visionary obsessions. Tinsel streams of silver, metallics, glitters, gloves and knee highs, leaving mouths ajar for the elements of surprise. Alessandro Trincone has us kept in an excess of life’s secret garden.

Words by: Chaunielle Brown | Photographer: Jay Blum

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FAULT Magazine Exclusive Interview With The Real Bhad Bhabie

Bhad Bhabie X FAULT Magazine

Photography – Jack Alexander

Styling – Thomas George Wulbern

Make-Up – Sophie Moore @ERA Management Using Mac

Hair – Brady Lea @ Stella Creative Artists

 

Words: Aimee Philips

Bhad Bhabie (real name Danielle Bregoli) is one of those people that you think you know all about, and it’s hard not to have presumptions. Two years ago, Bregoli became an internet sensation after appearing on an episode of Dr. Phil titled, ‘I Want To Give Up My Car-Stealing, Knife-Wielding, Twerking 13-Year-Old Daughter Who Tried To Frame Me For A Crime’. Her volatile attitude and amusing catchphrase “Cash Me Outside, Howbow Dah?” (loose translation: fight me) turned her into an internet meme.

Since then, Bregoli has, rather impressively, taken her infamy and used it to chase her dream of becoming a rapper. It seems like a natural move given her badass attitude and gift for rapid, superfluous speech. Her first single, ‘These Heaux’ was released in August 2017 and reached #77 on the Billboard Hot 100, making her the youngest female rap artist ever to debut on the music chart. She’s collaborated with Lil Yachty and Ty Dolla $ign, racks up tens of millions of views on her YouTube videos, has a net worth of $2m and a following of 14.4m on Instagram alone.

The Bregoli that FAULT meets, however, is a world away from the cocky, potty-mouthed teen that she’s portrayed as. In fact, Bregoli is docile, polite, and quite mature for her 15 years… but we wouldn’t want to ruin her reputation.

FAULT: You’ve been touring recently – how’s that been going?

Bhad Bhabie : I’ve done my whole US tour and I’m in the middle of my European tour right now. I’ve been to Belgium, France, Barcelona, Germany, now I’m here [London] and I’m going to Amsterdam next. I’m going to New York for press then I’m going home [Bregoli lives in Florida]!

You were cast into the spotlight when you just 13 and became a viral meme. How did you cope with that at such a young age?

Bhad Bhabie: I’ve always been real old for my age. I just thought, OK, this is life, just do it or don’t. There’s nothing you can really do. You either wanna be famous or you don’t. I had that choice and I decided to make it.

Was rapping always your goal? You said on Dr Phil that you wanted to become a nurse…

Bhad Bhabie: Yeah, I did, then this really started pulling up and I was told, you can do anything you want. I was like, I wanna do music.

How did you make that dream into a reality?

Bhad Bhabie: I went to a studio session with a couple of people from the head of Atlantic [Records] and they said they had this song that they thought I would sound good on, called ‘Hi Bich’. I put my own shit on it. They heard it and were like, we wanna sign her.

Tell me about the album. Are you going to be putting some rumours to rest?

Bhad Bhabie: Yes, some rumours are put some rest. There are some features on there. Asian Doll…maybe some other artists. I’m not sure yet.

Who would you absolutely love to work with?

Bhad Bhabie: I really wanna work with Drake. I’m not gonna lie. After his album came out, I started listening to more of his shit. I was a really big Drake fan when I was younger and then I kinda fell off, and then I started listening to his new stuff lately and was like, this is why I listened to Drake before [laughs].

Tell me about your stage name, Bhad Bhabie. Was that a nickname you always had or did you just come up with it?

Bhad Bhabie: I’m tiny and I’ve always been the youngest out of all the people I hang out with, so I’ve always been called the baby anyway, and ‘bhad’ means ‘bin haters and doubters’ so I was like… Bhad Bhabie. Alright, cool.

You do a lot of live streams on Instagram. Is that because you love showing your fans more of your life?

Bhad Bhabie: It really just proves to people that this is really what happens. I’m doing the same shit, I just turn on the camera.

Your tracks ‘Mama Don’t Worry’ and ‘Both of Em’ reflect on your past. Did you hope that they would help people understand you better and what you’d been through?

Bhad Bhabie: Yeah, I wanted to make tracks that tell people what’s really happened and what’s really been going on, and that I’m not just some squirrel-ass girl who beats her mom and gets money. No, this is what is it and that’s not what it is.

Your music career has really has taken off. Did your success surprise you?

Bhad Bhabie: At first, I was like, oh shit, people really like me? Whaaat? Then I thought, OK, this is what I’m doing now, let’s give it my best.

What do your friends and family think of your success?

Bhad Bhabie: My friends – or the people who I thought were my friends – got really jealous and mad. They thought that they should be owed something, so I was like, you gotta go, goodbye! My family loves it; they think it’s hilarious. They love it so much [laughs].

What have you learnt since becoming famous and a rapper?

Bhad Bhabie: I’ve learnt that this industry is really shady! I just wanna be the biggest. I wanna be on top.

Who are some of the artists that inspire you?

Bhad Bhabie: I don’t really admire anyone. I wouldn’t call anyone an inspiration. In terms of people I listen to, Travis Scott, Cardi B, Tyga… people like that.

What would you say to the people who have doubted you?

Bhad Bhabie: Umm… that’s your problem!

What is your FAULT?

Bhad Bhabie: One of the things that I really don’t like is when I meet little kids and they start cursing cos they think it’s cool. It’s like… no…. please don’t do that. I grew up a certain way, you’re lucky to have someone there to tell you what’s good and what’s not good. Take that, use that, don’t be like me, I’m a different story.

So you want to set an example for younger people?

Bhad Bhabie: Yeah, I feel like it’s kinda bad but kinda good at the same time.

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