FAULT Weekly Playlist: Cape Cub

We love Cape Cub and over 18 million Spotify streams, we’re positive we’re not the only ones. His brand of indie pop runs deep with listeners, rooted in its storytelling around the warmth and vitality of human relationships.

His latest single “Searchlight” showcases his natural flair for uplifting and rousing melodies, this time with a more contemplative and autumnal vibe. We’re looking forward to hearing more from Cape Cub in 2018, but before then we asked him to put together a playlist of what he’s currently got on heavy rotation.

Billy Bragg – A New England

I remember hearing this song when I was about 14. It was music to my ears, literally. It had a sense of escapism. Just one bloke and a guitar, no pretence about it and he sounded like a dreamer. I didn’t have a clue at that age who Billy Bragg was or the significance of this song, but it just stood out to me as a beautiful song with a beautiful message.

The Smashing Pumpkins – 1979

This is one of them that doesn’t hang about, it just jumps at you immediately and takes you with it. I love how they used electronic drums but in a super organic way. It never sounds contrived and is one of the more poppy tunes The Smashing Pumpkins put out, but it’s obvious why it’s such a huge song in how it just speaks to you.

Maggie Rogers – Dog Years

Maggie Rogers is one of them artists who just has an identity of their own. She kind of exists in her own sphere and I really respect that. Her songs don’t quite tread on the same stones but jump from place to place and it just makes her a super exciting artist to listen to. I’m looking forward to what comes next.

Bon Iver – 8 (circle)

It’s a current one, and not one of the obvious Bon Iver ‘classics’, but oh my days this song is just KILLED me the first time I heard it. I can’t really go too much into describing this song as it speaks for itself. As a band we went to watch Bon Iver at the Edinburgh playhouse and they were amazing. Their live set has hugely, hugely influenced what we intend to do with ours. It’s about pushing the boundaries that people set for you and if you aren’t going to do that then what’s the point?

Joji – Will He

Jack our lead guitarist put me onto this guy, who’s making pretty cool, odd RnB. He’s an incredibly talented vocalist and producer with an ear for atmosphere. I’m not really much up to YouTube personalities, but he’s apparently a huge YouTube person with his alter-ego and did the Harlem Shake, hilariously. Anyway I digress, check this tune out it’s boss and he’s doing cool things.

The Cure – Letters to Elise

There’s a darkness with the cure that is haunting yet achingly romantic. They do the happy-sad thing better than anyone and are probably one of, if not THE, biggest influences on my songwriting. Robert Smith is a dude.

Wolf Alice – Space and Time

Their new album is phenomenal and I’m still not sick of listening to it. They’re hands down the most exciting UK rock band for some time. I love them and everything they represent. Not since I was a kid have a band got me this pumped. This song is what I can imagine if Stevie Nicks went punk rock and collaborated with the Ramones. Just makes me want to go crazy in a venue somewhere.

Led Zeppelin – Babe I’m Gonna Leave You

Sometimes you’ve got to purchase a one-way ticket to vibe central and Led Zeppelin are the band to do that for you. I’ve been listening to them a lot recently – I grew up listening to them thanks to my Dad – and fuck me they’re just pure, straight from the soul rock and roll. Every single one of them is (and were) so god damn talented and dedicated. This is one of my favourites and gives me the chills every time.

Death Cab for Cutie – Different Names for the Same Thing

Death Cab are one of my all-time favourite bands and Ben Gibbard is one of my biggest influences as a songwriter. I couldn’t pick a favourite song so I just grabbed this one out of Plans. Each of their albums offers something different and again, like Maggie Rogers, they’re a band that exist within their own sphere and no one elses. They channel that independent spirit of Seattle in the north west corner of the USA, something which I totally get and relate to being from the north east of England. You kind of have to make your own way and do what’s true to you. I think that’s what this band represent to me.

Joni Mitchell – River

Finishing with this one. Joni Mitchell has a sense of spirit that as an artist you can only ever dream of having. I think every artist can take something from her songwriting. It’s approaching Christmas so I’ve chosen this song, in which she speaks of regret and sadness and everything in between. This song is one of the most beautiful songs I’ve ever heard and just breaks me every. single. time.

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Jared Harris: Exclusive FAULT Magazine Issue 27 interview & photoshoot

Jared Harris

“Acting… it’s playing, isn’t it? That’s what’s great about the job. If you don’t enjoy playing then why would someone enjoy watching you do it?”

Jared Harris for FAULT Magazine Issue 27

Photographer | Osvaldo Ponton
Stylist + Art Director | Chaunielle Brown
Groomer | Scott McMahan @ Kate Ryan
Set Designer | Lauren Bahr @ Kate Ryan
Photo Assistants | Nicasio Andrade + Xiangyun Chen
Fashion Assistants | Francis Harris + Ariane Velluire

A far cry from the typical, theatrical masks sputtering their pre-fabricated phrases, Jared Harris is a poised and reflective interviewee. As we banter about Brexit, Boris, and all that bullshit, there’s no suggestion that he’s keen to move things along in the direction of some scripted lines about his next role.

It’s a little surprising that he isn’t fervently plugging what promises to be another significant milestone in his storied career: the role of Absalom Breakspear in Amazon’s 2019 series ‘Carnival Row’. After all, the show reportedly has an enormous budget, stars eye-widening leads in Orlando Bloom and Cara Delevigne, and has been put together largely by his former college pal, René Echevarria. But it’s clear that Jared’s been around the block a few times. When he speaks, it’s with the assurance of someone who knows that the next role is never very far away. And it’s reassuring to get the sense that he’s treating our interview with the same sense of enjoyment as he has the rest of his career to date. It’s all part of the job, after all, so you might as well make the most of it…

FAULT: Tell us about your current project [AMC’s ‘The Terror’]

Jared Harris: The job’s great. It’s sort of special, really: the showrunner is a friend of mine from Duke University, so I’ve known him for a really long time. My younger brother’s on it as well, so I get to work with him. That’s always been a personal goal of mine.

The show itself is really well written, and that’s always the first question that one asks: how’s the script?

Jared Harris for FAULT Magazine Issue 27

There’s often a temptation to qualify actors based on a role call of who they’ve worked with – and you’ve worked with some of the biggest names in the business (Tarantino, Soderbergh, Guy Ritchie, David Fincher etc). How important is that to you? To what extent do you take jobs based on the personnel vs the project?

First of all, it’s the script. That said, when I was starting out – and I’ve kept some of those scripts – I remember reading Dracula (by Francis Ford Coppola) and thinking what a load of old tosh it was! It was almost softcore porn – there were a lot of scenes with girls in flimsy blouses getting their boobs out, and I thought to myself, “What on earth is he doing this for? It’s just dreadful!” But then, of course, you go to see the movie and you think, “wow!”

That’s when I got my first education in dealing with really great directors. You just don’t know what they’re going to do with the project. You have to assume that, with films in particular, it’s almost like a lump of clay. Not quite, because scripts are never entirely shapeless, but the great directors fully intend to reshape the material. That was true when I worked on Natural Born Killers. I read the original Tarantino script and it was completely different to the final film as it was directed by Oliver Stone. So, with films in particular, the director is almost more important than the script.

That said, it’s very difficult to improve a bad script. The shape and the structure has to be there to begin with, otherwise no-one really knows what they’re supposed to be doing. You’ve just got so many people trying to tell a story: the costume designers, the cinematographer… the script is the starting point for all of them.

Jared Harris for FAULT Magazine Issue 27

On that note, what level of influence do you – as an actor – have when it comes to interpreting the script?

It really depends. There are so many different factors at play: what type of movie it is; who’s making it – is it studio or independent; who’s directing it; the size of your role… Generally speaking, if it’s a studio film and you’re not the lead, you have very little input at all and no-one’s really interested in hearing your opinion…! They all just want to cozy up to the movie star and stay there.

That said, when I was working on Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows there was total collaboration with Guy Ritchie and Robert Downey Jr. What tends to happen with that sort of film is that the screenwriter is trying to deliver a fresh product – a new take on an old story – and then, during the endless period of noting (where studio executives give notes on the script), it tends to deviate back to something incredibly familiar. Or, to be blunt, something that you’ve seen a thousand times before…

The studios’ obsession is, “when in doubt, re-state the plot.” Tell the audience what’s going to happen, what’s happening as they’re watching it develop, and then tell them what they just saw. And, of course, it’s fucking boring. So they [Ritchie and Downey Jr] tried to figure out a way of taking out as much of the exposition and plot as possible and delivering just enough so that the audience could stay ahead of the story and yet still be surprised be it: because no-one was as far ahead as Sherlock Holmes.

 

You’ve said that actors nowadays don’t have the same opportunities to rehearse as often as you used to. How do you manage to go between so many different, diverse roles so quickly and without that opportunity to really get into gear?

Well, I’ve never had that opportunity, to tell you the truth. From the beginning, I was always cast late. If you’re the main person on the movie, or the person whom the financing is lining up behind, then you know what you’re going to be doing well in advance. But with me…

George Hall, my principal at Central School of Speech and Drama, said it best, in my opinion. He told us, “You’re not going to have time. You’re going to have to learn how to sketch. You’re going to go into an audition and you’re going to be handed material with 5 minutes to figure something out. You can’t afford to be precious: you can’t do research and character study and work on a back story… you’re not going to have time to do that.” That was some of the most pertinent advice I got from that school.

Jared Harris for FAULT Magazine Issue 27

Special Thank You (Location) | Tomcats Barbershop and Renee McCarty

 

What’s your FAULT?

Oh God. Forget the magazine; you’ll have a phonebook to fill!

I’m never happy with the work that I’ve done. Someone told me once on ‘Mad Men’ that I’d just done an iconic scene, and asked me if that was the one that my character would be remembered for, and that I’d be remembered for then how would I feel about that? And I remember saying, “Can I do it again? Because I think I can do it better…”

Jared’s next project to appear on screens is The Terror for AMC which begins broadcasting right after the finale of Walking Dead. The Terror is an adventure/horror story that fictionalises the real life events surrounding the disappearance of The Franklin Expedition in the Arctic during the Winter of 1847.

 

Find out who else will appear alongside Jared Harris in the issue here

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 27 – THE BEST OF BRITISH ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

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FAULT meets Schoony – Hollywood’s favourite artist

Since storming the London art scene in 2008, urban artist Schoony has certainly made his mark within the art world and beyond – his celebrated Boy Soldier sculpture having garnered international recognition, and a number of Hollywood fans.

 

Boy Soldier is again reincarnated in the artist’s latest collaboration with Woodbury House, along with two more exclusive pieces; FAULT spoke with the multi-talented Schoony to discuss his partnerships with Woodbury House and streetwear brand Dark Circle, his experience across the film and art industries, and the inspirations behind his pioneering hyperrealist sculptures…

 

You worked in film prosthetics and special effects for a long time – what drew you away from this to become a solo art practitioner?

I took the plunge into a new career as an artist to share a skill and a passion for my artwork, inspired by my work in the film industry.

Your sculpture ‘Boy Soldier’ has been featured in films, and is a favourite among big Hollywood names – what do you think is the appeal of this particular piece?

I think Boy Soldier has become so well-known because it resonates with so many people from every walk of life. Some countries do send their children to war and the repercussions are horrific, and this piece is able to highlight this injustice.

I used a life cast of my nephew Kai for the piece, as he was aged seven when it was created; the same age as some of the soldiers in Afghanistan and Iraq would have been ten years ago, which added an additional level of meaning for me. It is a future I do not want for my nephew, and I think this piece is able to bring that to life.


War and mortality seem to be key themes within your work, what is it about these aspects of society that you find so intriguing to explore in your practice?


War and mortality are both issues that are of huge importance to me, and very much in the forefront of people’s minds, as the media is plagued with horror stories of war and terror happening globally.

My work is able to reach people on a different level to online news or national papers, as people are less able to distance themselves from it or become desensitized to it – it is brought to life in a bigger way. I try to be influenced by everything I see, hear or feel and work on matters that demand attention.

 

 

You work predominantly in life cast sculpture, but do you see yourself experimenting with other mediums in future?


I have worked and experimented in many mediums over the years but, primarily, I use fiberglass resin as the foundation for a majority of my works as it is so versatile and robust. I do use various silicones of varying density, pliability and viscosity for my hyper-realistic pieces, as it is almost like the touch of skin.

In recent years, I have branched out into 3D scanning and printing. I own a number of different printers that produce works in different materials: ABS plastic, liquid resin, and powder. I use this medium exclusively now to create the heads for my models as you can achieve a true copy, compared to traditional lifecasting techniques. It’s a long process, but with much better results.


I do also experiment and play with different painting techniques – I particularly like the Montana spray paint range for its vivid dense colours.


Are there artists, past or current, who you have found inspiration in, or whose work you admire?

I have always been a huge fan of James Jean – I’m always amazed by the work he produces. In terms of artists who I feature on my walls at home, I have numerous Jeremy Geddes, James Jeans, Pipsqueak, and my most recent acquisition is a light work from Max Patte, from an astounding show that was held at Sir Ian McKellen’s house.


You recently collaborated with Woodbury House Contemporary Art on three exclusive pieces – how did the collaborative process behind that come together?
I have worked with Woodbury House for a number of years, and we have a great working relationship. They put forward the opportunity to do a three-way collaboration with Dark Circle, and I immediately jumped at the idea.

Having the chance to work collaboratively with Woodbury House and Dark Circle has been a unique and highly inspiring artistic process; we’ve been able to amalgamate two very different artistic styles to create a unique range of works.


I was especially excited by the fresh look and feel the Boy Soldier sculpture was given by the Dark Circle team, and I love the design they have worked into my creation.

 
As well as your Boy Soldier sculpture, you also created two-panel pieces for the collection – Butterfly Kiss and Bruiser – what were your inspirations behind these works?
The inspiration for Butterfly Kiss was based on the short lifespan butterflies have, some only living days or weeks. The sculpture shows the same person in this moment together, and through this connection, they create the shape of a butterfly.

The sculpture was a life cast of my wife and, to me, showcased how fleeting and short-lived love can be and to appreciate the time you have, to appreciate the beauty, and to love yourself.

 When my daughter was born in December 2015, it made me realize how women can be repressed and feared by certain groups in this world. Bruiser was taken as a 3D scan of my mate’s daughter, as I wanted to make a piece that represented that underlying strength and power that all women have.

 

 
You’ve also recently collaborated with the clothing brand Dark Circle to create a collection around these three pieces – is fashion an area that you’re interested in, either as a medium to create works, or more widely as a part of modern society and self-expression?
I love fashion! Fashion and art go hand in hand. It’s a form of art and self-expression; the way somebody dresses can speak a thousand words. If I can spread my ideas through this medium, then I really like the idea of art being able to cross all borders and giving anyone the chance to own something that speaks to them.

I am always open to new and creative ways to bring my work to the masses – and it’s pretty cool to see your work walking down the street!

 

 
There is a lot of discussion about the art industry’s accessibility, pricing and regulation – what are your thoughts on this?
Anything that can make art feel more accessible and available to a wider range of people has my backing. Art should be attainable to all, and not a select few.

 

What is your FAULT?

One of my biggest faults is money – I get through it too easily!

 

 

Words: Jennifer Sara Parkes

 

 

 

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Gary Numan: Exclusive FAULT Magazine photoshoot and interview preview

Gary Numan

I know exactly what I’m doing and I’m in a really good place.”

Photo: David Richardson
Styling: Margherita Alaimo
Grooming: Gemma Webb
Words: Flora Neighbour

Given his new-wave edge and awkward façade, not to mention his well-documented Asperger Syndrome, you’d be forgiven for thinking that Gary Numan was a shy, introverted man. You’d be mistaken. The quick-witted and honest songwriter has a lot to say – both about his own past and his (partly) Trump-inspired vision of a near-apocalyptic future. Despite maintaining a cult following to this day, the 80s electro trailblazer has only recently returned to the limelight with Savage, his first top 10 UK album since I, Assassin all the way back in 1982.

FAULT: How’s the tour going?

Gary Numan: It’s great! Last night in Bournemouth was fantastic – much better than the first night, which was a huge shock to the system. I’m still trying to get to grips with it all again while remembering my lyrics. It’s been a completely different experience to my other tours, but I’m really enjoying it.

Do you feel more in control of your work nowadays?

I’ve always felt that I had a say but, now that I manage myself, it’s opened up a whole new path for me. I was always fairly in control of my work before: I’ve always written everything and been hands-on in the process, so it doesn’t feel that different. The thing about my new album, Savage, is the self-managing aspect. It’s been the first big project that I’ve been in charge of from beginning to end without anyone to lean on. I’ve had to make all the big decisions myself, which was a bit daunting to begin with but, strangely enough, once I got into it, I began to realise it wasn’t that too difficult. There’s no black magic involved, just staying organised.

 

Can you talk us through the ideology of Savage?

It came from a book I’d been writing, which was set in a post-global warming future. The idea being that the earth’s temperature wasn’t controlled and it became this unstoppable phenomenon, leaving the planet with a large amount of desert and full of despair. That’s it in a nutshell.

If you go into it further, it looks at people living in that world and how brutal it would be. It looks at the evaporation of [grouped] eastern and western cultures and the potential for us to become far more fragmented and tribal. The album presents snapshots of how brutal it would be, and how unforgiving and savage the environment would become.

It was also influenced by Trump and how he’s come along and started to undo all the good that has been done. I didn’t write the album because of Trump but he certainly helped it along.

 

Gary Numan was shot at Cable Street Studios, London

How has your style developed over the years?

Visually it’s certainly evolved, but I have adapted musically as well. I think it’s easier because my music is essentially electronic. Every time I’ve started a new album, there’s been new technology that helps me to adapt my style and create new sounds. It’s difficult not to change your sound and move forward if you’re working with electronic music – every album should sound like a progression of the one before. My early stuff was very minimal and simple and, as I’ve grown as an artist, it’s become more complicated and heavier. The thing that has never changed – in terms of being recognisable – is my voice.

Would you call yourself a British icon?

No way! I don’t really know what makes an icon. What qualifies an icon? There are many people I look up to but I wouldn’t call them icons. I’m a huge Trent Reznor [Nine Inch Nails] fan. I think he’s done pretty amazing things but he’s not British.

There aren’t many people I would say I look up to, but there are many British people I admire. If you have a look at the music industry now there are some pretty phenomenal artists. For example: M.I.A. In terms of what she’s trying to achieve – both in the music industry and outside [it], she’s definitely someone I admire. There are definitely a lot of artists doing a hell of a lot of good.

What is your FAULT?

I don’t think you’d have enough ink! If I have to choose one, it would probably be my lack of patience. My wife, however, would say that I’m very, very moody. Actually, let’s go with that. My kids would love that I’ve admitted to being moody.

Find out who else will appear in the issue here

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 27 – THE BEST OF BRITISH ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

 

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Shaving With The Force With Philips’ Star Wars inspired Razors

 

Many of us share the childhood Christmas memory of us rushing to the tree to see what newfangled toy Father Christmas had placed there. Sadly, we all also share the memory of watching those toys turn into the dreaded “practical gift” territory as the years went by. Don’t get me wrong, I’m very grateful for the suitcase, umbrella, fountain pen and notebooks I have received in my adult years, they’re practical, and I did need them; they just failed to conjure up the same level of excitement as years gone by. This Christmas, I was setting up for very much the same experience, but then I discovered that Philips has teamed up with Star Wars: The Last Jedi with a new range of electric razors, and trust me, these ARE the droids you’ve been looking for.

The range of shavers fuses Philips high tech innovation with Star Wars creative vision to release five different shavers based on characters from the franchise. Choose between The Dark Side, The Light Side, Poe Dameron, BB-8 or franchise favourite R2-D2 inspired designs!

 

I went for the Poe Dameron (played by Oscar Isaac in the movie) model otherwise known as the Philips SW6700, and it’s a beauty. I’ve bought film inspired grooming products from other brands before, and the visual design has never been to this high standard. The attention to detail which I’ll go into later is astounding, and it’s great to see a brand which is synonymous for it’s visual and graphic design on screen, implementing their same high design quality into their products off-screen.

Usability wise, it’s up there with the best of them. Its 8-direction head works well both wet or dry shaving, and as someone with sensitive skin I was a little apprehensive before using the razor dry, but I’m happy to report that it didn’t irritate or feel uncomfortable. A brief look through its various settings and I found the Turbo+ mode. Activated by pressing the X-wing symbol (which is an excellent easter-egg to Star Wars fans), you’ll be able to cut through thicker stubble and achieve a closer shave in less time – something to remember if you’re buying for someone with thick facial hair.

Each design delivers its own unique shaving experience. For example, if destroying planets and building massive clone armies is more “your thing” (and who are we to judge), opting for the ‘Dark Side’ razor might be more suitable. The battery level metre is ingeniously displayed using Kylo Ren’s unique lightsaber design, but there’s more to this than merely visual design. A SmartClick Precision Trimmer allows for the user to shape their moustache, sideburns or perform shape ups which is something which isn’t available on the R2-D2 model, so it’s well worth having a read through all the specific designs on their website below if buying as a gift.

With the Darkside, Lightside and Poe model, you’ll also receive a hard case within the box making them perfect gifts for people who find themselves needing to travel a lot. On the R2D2 model, the lights flicker on and off in the same manner as the sassy droid to which it gains inspiration from.

All in all, I couldn’t recommend these shavers enough not only as a great gift for movie fans but also for as a gift for someone after a top of the range electric razor. Using the Poe Model, I was able to shave the closest and most comfortable shave compared to any other electric razor that I’ve tried. As a Star Wars fan, it’s a well designed and thoroughly considered homage to the franchise; it’s clear that they are developed by a team who understand the franchise and its favourite characters. The collection is an excellent example of practical and well-constructed gifts not having to be boring; a great shaver made better by expert creativity.

Click here to find out more

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Dive into the cooling waters of Australian singer/songwriter Benji Lewis

After the triumphant success of his “Home For Now EP”, Melbourne singer-songwriter Benji Lewis took a little trip to California to visit his sister and soak up the sun. Teaming up with Los Angeles based artist TRACE, Benji returns with the effortless new single ‘Never Mine’.

The track came at a time where Benji needed to unload pent up thoughts and emotions from a broken down relationship. It was messy and it wasn’t easy, but soaking up the sea breeze in Venice Beach saw a new bond develop between Benji, TRACE and producer Mike Derenzo.

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