Alexander McQueen fever is officially in the air.

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‘Inferno: Alexander McQueen’ by Kent Baker and Melanie Rickey

Five years after his untimely death, London is celebrating this genius London talent with two major exhibitions (‘Savage Beauty’ at the V & A and Nick Waplington’s ‘Woking Progress’ at the Tate Britain), alongside the stunning picture book ‘Inferno’ by Kent Baker and words by Melanie Rickey.

Focussing on one show- the breakout AW 1996 ‘Dante’, described as groundbreaking couture meets club culture, which took place at a Crypt in the midst of Jack the Ripper’s killing ground on a freezing March evening, in East London.

The venue in itself set the scene for mystery and intrigue, and the off the beaten track show was bound to be controversial with the fashpack who were keen to see what was next from the inventive young designer.

Coffee table book ‘Inferno’ is an insider’s view of that night. It showcases exclusive, intimate behind the scenes photographs, as viewed from the lens of fashion photographer Kent Baker; After meeting Lee through mutual friends, he casually asked if he could take document the evening, not imagining he would say yes!

The infamous show, set in the apparently haunted venue of Christ Church in Spitalfields, complete with skeleton on the front row, has never been re-created, but you can now see for yourself the buzz and excitement of the show preparation, unseen portraits, model shots, hissy fits and the master at work.

With words by fashion journalist Melanie Rickey, Lee’s peers, his ex, the creative teams, and models that walked for him, all tell their version of what it was like to know and work with the legend on the show. High energy, raw, dramatic, are all phrases that crop up time and time again, alongside tales of the freaky vibe, dark spirits and electricity, which make the anecdotes worth their weight in gold.

Known for always pushing the boundaries in fashion and production, this show was bound to be remembered- as a performance as well as the designs. With Lee once stating “You’ve got to know the rules to break them. That’s what I’m here for”

This is a book for everyone that agrees with that, and can appreciate couture, and a dark, thoughtful visionary. Long live that sentiment. Even now you’re gone.

By Sara Darling

Inferno: Alexander McQueen by Kent Baker and Melanie Rickey is published by Laurence King Publishing in March, available from www.laurenceking.com

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FAULT Focus: Marie Naffah returns with #Blindfold – a special collaboration to raise awareness of visual impairment

 

FAULT Favourite Marie Naffah, MTV’s Unsigned Artist for 2014 and a star of FAULT 18 (The RAW Issue), has returned with a special project.

In a not-for-profit project to raise awareness and understanding of the issues surrounding visual impairment and sight loss, Marie has teamed up with a group of six blind and visually-impaired musicians to record and release for free her song ‘Blindfold’: as a documentary-style video exploring the disability and the importance of music to those who suffer from it.

Photography: Constance Meath Baker

Photography: Constance Meath Baker

The song itself was written by Marie, who is 22, as a response to her grandmother’s experience with blindness and the implications it had had on her life and the lives around her. Having performed the song to senior BBC broadcast journalist Tony Shearman, who is also blind, Marie was invited to play and be interviewed on Insight Radio – the official radio station of the Royal National Institute of Blindness (RNIB).

Steve Plowman, a blind drummer living just outside of London, heard Marie on Insight Radio and impressed by the poignancy of the lyrics, as well as the tuneful song itself, he asked Marie whether there would be an opportunity for him to perform it with her.

With help from the RNIB, five more blind and partially sighted musicians expressed interest in the project, and so it was decided that a documentary/recording of the track would be made: to emphasise the importance of music in the lives of visually-impaired people and to show how, contrary to public opinion, a disability such as blindness does not automatically prevent a person from being able to perform music.

The 12 minute documentary, made by filmmaker Constance Meath Baker, consists of a series of interviews with the musicians followed by the track itself, recorded at a studio in High Wycombe with help from producer David Lane.

www.facebook.com/marienaffahmusic

www.twitter.com/marienaffah

FAULT Magazine Exclusive Editorial ‘Exploring Nature’ – Enrico Labriola’s FAULT

Pants: Porsch Design  Vest: MSGM Shoes: ACNE

Pants: Porsch Design
Vest: MSGM
Shoes: ACNE

Mask: Francesca Ricci Jacket: Moschino Button top: N.21  Bracelet: & other stories

Mask: Francesca Ricci
Jacket: Moschino
Button top: N.21
Bracelet: & other stories

Swather: Dries Van Noten Skirt: ASPESI Socks: stylist made Shoes: ACNE

Swather: Dries Van Noten Skirt: ASPESI
Socks: stylist made
Shoes: ACNE

Dress: Stella McCartney,  Mask: stylist made,  Hand piece: &other stories

Dress: Stella McCartney,
Mask: stylist made,
Hand piece: &other stories

fault 2

 

 

Photographer: Enrico Labriola
Stylist: Natalie Czyzyk
Make up and hair: Mara Tambu
Model: Axelle@ Major
Post Production: Alberto Salmaso

THE UNIT LONDON and THE SOMETHING ELSE COLLECTIVE present New Blood

Screen Shot 2015-03-23 at 13.42.51This March, The Unit London, Soho’s breakthrough artist-led gallery space, hosts for the first time The Something Else Collective. Curated by Sascha Bailey and Unit London directors Jonny Burt & Joe Kennedy, New Blood encapsulates the spirit of the young artistic movement emerging in London.

Highlights include a series of photographs by Fenton Bailey and Mairi-Luise. Also to be included is international artist Russell Young. Parisian

photographer Cecile Plaisance will showcase her acclaimed Lens series of interactive Barbie holograms, giving the exhibition a unique edge. Urban artist Ollie Sylvester, whose work captures what it’s truly like to be a graffiti in London today, will also showcase new piece.

In addition to the above, there will be exclusive works from Norwegian digital artist Magnus Gjoen, and British collage artist Joe Webb, whose surrealist work which explores themes of nostalgia and romance received critical acclaim at The Saatchi Gallery this year.

The exhibition will run from the 20th of March until the 2nd of April at The Unit London in Soho on 9 Earlham Street.

SAVAGE NATURE – New Fashion Editorial by Isabela Sabino

Trousers: Mara Mac Body chain: Paolla Falcão Shoes: Santa Lolla; Headpiece: stylist's own.

Trousers: Mara Mac
Body chain: Paolla Falcão Shoes: Santa Lolla; Headpiece: stylist’s own.

Fringe top: Wymann  Over dress: Mara Mac; Bracelets: Brechó Catherine Labouré Scarf wore on the head: Basso & Brooke archive.

Fringe top: Wymann
Over dress: Mara Mac; Bracelets: Brechó Catherine Labouré
Scarf wore on the head: Basso & Brooke archive.

Feathers skirt: archive Farm Black tulle skirt: stylist's own Necklace: Mawi  Body chain: Paolla Falcão Bracelets: stylist's own

Feathers skirt: archive Farm
Black tulle skirt: stylist’s own
Necklace: Mawi
Body chain: Paolla Falcão
Bracelets: Brechó Catherine Labouré.

Top and hotpants: Fernando Cozendey Earings: Paolla Falcão Shoes: Schutz.

Top and hotpants: Fernando Cozendey
Earings: Paolla Falcão
Shoes: Schutz.

 

Feathers skirt: archive Farm Black tulle skirt: stylist's own Necklace: Mawi Body chain: Paolla Falcão Bracelets: stylist's own

Feathers skirt: archive Farm
Black tulle skirt: stylist’s own
Necklace: Mawi
Body chain: Paolla Falcão Bracelets: stylist’s own

Bodysuit: Fernando Cozendey  Earings: Paolla Falcão Necklace: Virzi + De Luca at Vintage House Shoes: Schutz.

Bodysuit: Fernando Cozendey
Earings: Paolla Falcão Necklace: Virzi + De Luca at Vintage House
Shoes: Schutz.

Skirt: Adriana Barra Top: Vintage House  Necklace: Mawi Boots: stylist's own.

Skirt: Adriana Barra
Top: Vintage House
Necklace: Mawi
Boots: stylist’s own.

Top: Mara Mac Feathers Necklace: Onyx & Shell Earings and rings: Jommi Lim

Top: Mara Mac
Feathers Necklace: Onyx & Shell
Earings and rings: Jommi Lim

White bodysuit over peach bodysuit both: Wymann Horn: stylist's own; Necklace: Mawi Boots: Schutz.

White bodysuit over peach bodysuit both: Wymann
Horn: stylist’s own; Necklace: Mawi
Boots: Schutz.

Blouse and shorts: Adriana Barra Neacklace: Mawi  Headpiece: Stylist's own Shoes: Melissa

Blouse and shorts: Adriana Barra
Neacklace: Mawi
Headpiece: Stylist’s own
Shoes: Melissa Gareth Pugh

 

Cardigan: Maison Martin Margiela for H&M at Vintage House Pink agate: necklace over chains  Necklace: Paolla Falcão; Shoes: Santa Lolla.

Cardigan: Maison Martin Margiela for H&M at Vintage House
Pink agate: necklace over chains
Necklace: Paolla Falcão; Shoes: Santa Lolla

 

Photography & Art Direction: Isabela Sabino
Styling: Jana Mello
Beauty: Amanda Schön (Blissme)
Stylist Assistant: Livia Amorim
Beauty Assistant: Fox Goulart
Photo Assistant: Guto Ramos
Model: Karen Marinovich @ Ford Models

‘Divergent – Insurgent’ Actor Keiynan Lonsdale speaks to FAULT Online on his upcoming US blockbuster

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Photo: Isaac Sterling

 

Former face of MTV Australia, Keiynan Lonsdale is currently making his US debut starring as Uriah in the highly anticipated follow-up to Divergent, Insurgent. FAULT caught up with the 23 year old Aussie star who spilled the beans on his love for Michael Jackson, how it feels to break America and more.

 

FAULT: Insurgent is just about to hit the big screen and things seem to escalade quite quickly for you as an actor right now. Could you tell us a bit about your character in the film?

Keiynan: I play Uriah Pedrad, from the Dauntless faction. Uriah’s also a Divergent, so he doesn’t always conform to the rules. There is a lot more depth to him and his way of thinking, than he often lets on.

 

How did you get involved in the Divergent series?

I sent in my audition for Insurgent via video, because I was living in Australia at the time. A month after my initial tape, I did my final call back on video chat with the director, Robert Schwentke, and was lucky enough to be cast a few days after that.

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Photo: Isaac Sterling

 

Had you read the books beforehand? Did you have an interest in the series before getting the part? 

I watched the film (and loved it) the night before I found out that there was an audition for the sequel, so the story and the world still felt fresh in my mind, which was helpful. I read all three books quickly after I found out I had been cast.

 

You’re originally from Australia and were shooting a number of projects over there before Insurgent. How does the production differ in the US than from Australia?

Production wise, everything was a whole lot bigger, but the environment still felt pretty familiar. As daunting as it was to step into such a big film set, everything was pretty relaxed, so I felt comfortable.

 

Whether you have seen the first film, Divergent or you haven’t, what do you think is a good reason to see Insurgent?

It has such a stellar cast of all ages and experience; I’m personally of a fan of every actor in the film. It’s also a great story, and it makes you question how you would survive and who you would become if you had to live in a society like the one in Divergent. I can’t wait for people to watch it.

 

Let’s talk a bit about you as a performer, musician and television presenter. What was your transition like from the face of MTV Australia to landing your own dance show on ABC Australia to then receiving a role on US blockbuster Insurgent?

I feel like at times the transition felt smooth & other times it has felt pretty sharp – and that’s probably because I wasn’t expecting my first job in the US to be such a huge and amazing film franchise. MTV was always supportive of the acting side of my career, so I never felt like presenting got in the way or hindered my chances of crossing over to film.

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Photo: Isaac Sterling

 

When did you discover your passion for performing, whether it was acting or dancing?

I was obsessed with Michael Jackson from the age of two, so I danced all day every from that point on. When I was about 15 I really started to get passionate about acting and music. I don’t ever remember not wanting to be a performer, it’s just what I’ve always done.

 

You’re a singer as well and you released a single last year. How is your music career coming along?

I think a few days after I released “One and Only” independently, I found out that I got Insurgent and would need to fly out to Atlanta for filming. My whole mind set had to change if I really wanted to give acting my best shot. I’m not going to rush anything with my music just for the sake of it, when it’s my focus again and when I know I’m creating the music I want to, then I’ll push it out there.

 

What other projects do you have planned? What else would you like to get yourself involved in?

I wrapped filming on “The Finest Hours” in December, which was extremely challenging but such an incredible learning experience, that film comes out in October. I just really want to continue working with creative people, and continue to push myself further outside my comfort zone which each role I do.

 

Lastly, what’s your FAULT?

I let my own doubt control my confidence.

 

Words: Adina Ilie