FAULT Magazine Issue 25 Preview: Counterfeit. – Together We Are Stronger

 

 

Surely you remember the Counterfeit. boys fronted by our FAULT issue 22 Cover Jamie Campbell Bower. Long story short, they’re basically part of the FAULT family now. When we last caught up, the boys were only just releasing their debut EP. Well, fast-forward six months and they’ve got a brand new record out. We caught up again with the group and here’s a little teaser for what’s about to come out in our FAULT Issue 25. 

 


It’s been 6 months since we last caught up and back then you were only just releasing your EP. Look at us now, with you guys releasing your debut album! What’s the vibe in the Counterfeit. camp at the moment?

Jamie: It’s pretty good. We’ve made an album over the past six months since we saw you last. We’ve sort of been gearing up for the release ever since, while being locked away in a tiny room.

Now that you’ve got a full body of work that represents Counterfeit. if we were to listen to your EP back to back with your album, would we notice any differences?

Tristan: Yes definitely, it’s a step up from our EP. Mitch, the guy who we worked with on our album, is really talented. He’s worked with people like Rattlesnakes and the sound that he’s created for us is really raw.

Jamie: The album in comparison to the EP is a lot tighter and closer. Sonically, it’s a lot beefier and thicker than what we’ve done before. The sound that we wanted for the album compared to the EP comes from this love of a nice kick and a heavy snare rather than a roomy sound, so that’s definitely a step up in terms of how we went about it. But it’s still very much Counterfeit. It hasn’t changed. There’s room for mistakes in the record and those moments of ‘Oh what’s that?’ are really nice on an album. As opposed to, you know, something general and clean-cut from beginning to end.

 

I remember you were saying that most of your songs come from a very personal and honest place. Which one was the hardest for you to write and put out there and what’s the back-story?

Jamie: There are a few out there that are quite tough. The record opens with a song called ‘Washed Out’ and that’s a reflection of a period of my life from about 15 to 26 when my life was going in a direction and I didn’t really know which way it was going. I would actively do things that were negative that would have a negative impact on my life. Just the way that I acted or certain actions that I did, I wasn’t really ready to accept life on life’s terms. It was more about blowing everything up, because I didn’t really feel I had control. I was always trying to put a brave face on, like ‘No, I’m fine, I’m cool, I’m grand!’ But the past like two and a half years, I think all of us collectively just did some growing up. I also made some significant changes in my life, in regards to the way I behaved and the things that I did. ‘Washed Out’ was probably one of the first tracks that I wrote. It was a tough song to write. It’s hard to talk about being a mess and it’s not an easy thing to look back on.

 

What was the most difficult part of producing this record? You already had quite a solid body of work beforehand, but surely there must’ve been times when you felt stuck.

Sam: We all had moments when we went away from it for a little and when we came back we could discuss what troubles we had with the others with a clear head. We work quite well together when it comes to communicating ideas.

Jamie: There was one song – You Can’t Rely – that we’ve never played live, it was written at home and it was still very much in demo format. The chorus part needed to be changed and as soon as we got into the studio we realized that it needed some work. But it wasn’t like something that took a week to get over; we did it in like 4 hours. But the record was made quite quickly; it just took a while to find the time to do it, because we’ve all got our own things going on. But if you were to accumulate all the time that we spent together, it basically just took us 25 days to make a record. And I think that’s a really important factor in terms of what this record is. It’s frantic and struggling to survive and I think recording it over such a sort time-span contributed to those feelings.

 

Come March-April – you’re going back on the road again. Will we see anything different from Counterfeit on stage?

Jamie: I think the show this time is going to get like bigger and better. We’re getting our own technicians in to do our stuff for us. This band is very much home grown and passion grown, so it’s very important to us to have our own people with us on the road. We want to continue to take the show to bigger and better places. The way that we see it and the way that we see it in our minds is like a huge fucking rock show, and that’s what it needs to be and that’s what we have to provide for these people. We’ve done the tours already, it’s great, cool, and fun, call it whatever and we want to step it up. We want to give it the beans in terms of visuals as well. But yeah, Sam will definitely be put in danger again. I’m thinking less boat this time. I don’t know, maybe an inflatable whale.

Sam: Or just floating from above. Hang me from a cable. Sounds fun.

 

 Without getting political – but taking into account the current political climate, you come across as the kind of band who is not afraid to speak up. Now that people have something to rebel against, is this an area you’re willing to explore?

Jamie: I don’t think we are the kind of band that is afraid to speak up. We are reactive to what we experience and what we’re shown around us. Would I be afraid to take it into a political direction? No. But would I consciously make an effort to be a beacon? I don’t think I would do that either because I’m sure as shit no pillar of morality myself. Of course there are some horrifically negative people in this world and the things that are happening around us right now tare very scary. I think that maybe if we feel the desire and burning passion to make a socio-political comment on that, then we should and it would be right to do so. But I would never force us to go into that direction. It wouldn’t be a conscious thought. If we were to do it and if we had to do it, it would have to be genuine.

Roland: Another interesting thing is the fact that the album is called ‘Together We Are Stronger’ and for us, it’s like a thank you to our fans. But at the same time it’s a message of unity and coming together. We seem to just live in a world where people just cut you off and simply don’t care. Our message is basically that whoever you are, it’s all good.

Jamie: The world does feel very fractious. I definitely get the sense of fracture and isolation and I think that’s terrifying. Because I don’t come from a place where I want to live on my own and lock all my door and shut all my windows. I’m not a small-minded individual. I truly believe in acceptance, love, understanding and peace.

And on that happy note, have you guys acquired any new FAULTs over the past few months?

Sam: I’m still losing things! I’m losing fewer things though cause I’m taking less things with me.

Jamie: He’s losing less things cause he lost most things already.

Roland: I used to be very good at bowling, but last time I went I lost, so that’s a fault.

Jamie: Over the last six months, I think I’ve been under a lot of pressure and haven’t actually managed to deal with stress in a positive way. I let it get to a point where I just blew up.

Tristan: My fault was disappearing for two days while doing the album.

Jimmy: I’m perfect.

You can order Together We Are Stronger here – available NOW

In anticipation for FAULT Issue 25 – check out an exclusive behind the scenes video with Counterfeit. More to come!

 

Words: Adina Ilie

Photography: Chris Moore

Photography Assistant: Matthew Lloyd
Grooming : Fabio Vivan using Bumble and bumble and grooming with Braun
SPECIAL THANKS TO TAPE LONDON – TAPE LODGE

 

NY MFW FW17 HIGHLIGHTS | N.HOOLYWOOD

Taking points from the homeless population and there means of survival, N.Hoolywood sent models down the runway with layers upon layers of garments and trash bags as accessories. As you peeled back the many layers, the individual garments of denim jackets, button down striped shirts with “survive” written down the front and hunter green leather pants were beautifully crafted. A strong message and excellent styling did not over shadow the design of the collection.

Words & Photographer: Mikah James

FAULT Focus: How Mariatu Turay Overcame Homelessness To Run The Successful Fashion Brand, Gitas Portal.

As we gear up for the launch of our ‘Made In America’ issue which chronicles all the popular artists who have managed to excel despite growing racist, homophobic and sexist sentiment in the land they call home, we’ve been keeping our ear to the ground for more artists to highlight who embody this role. Today that comes in the form of African-Caribbean Fashion Designer Mariatu Tura who is on a mission to help woman stand out with her bold designs and inspirational story

Mariatu Turay is London based fashion designer and owner of Gitas Portal, a brand which wants women to stand out, be bold and win in all areas of their lives. Born in London and raised in Freetown, Mariatu was forced to leave Sierra Leone at age 16 due to the Civil War, her father was a government official and her family was targeted.  She moved to the USA and started working as a hair braider at the age of 16 in a salon to make ends meet for her family. She then learnt secretarial and office skills as a way into corporate America. By the time Mariatu returned to the UK, her entrepreneurial spirit was fully fledged and she used her hairdressing skills to pay her way through university. After brief periods of homelessness in the US and the UK she found her way back on track: “My family life and dreams were interrupted overnight – I went from having a good life to having nothing. No one in their right mind wants to be homeless and face the uncertainty of having nothing. The trauma is on all levels but I never lost my way at the most challenging of times. Always knew with hard work and kindness I’d make it.”

After a successful career as a civil servant in the UK, Mariatu decided to tap into her passion for fashion and creativity. With her dual Sierra Leonean and Barbadian heritage, Mariatu has been able to merge different multicultural influences from fashion, art, culture and feminine attributes into her work giving her brand a broader appeal.

Established in 2011, Gitas Portal is an affordable, mid-market, luxury brand that is known for sophisticated, feminine cuts and a creative use of West African textiles in beautiful elegant styles. The Gitas Portal motto – Be Bold, WIN, Wear Colour – is for the woman who is unapologetic about her beauty and expresses her style with confidence.

Mariatu opened the first Gitas Portal boutique in London in 2016.  As a self-taught designer-maker, Mariatu’s goal is to set a benchmark for African inspired fashion pieces, promoting quality, beautiful and well-made designs that will challenge and balance the sometimes poor perception of ‘brand Africa’.  As a designer and a wearer of her own pieces, Mariatu celebrates fashion and sees it as a unique expression of individual flair and the emancipation of one’s inner beauty. Her journey is indicative of her tenacity and is a testimony that despite any of life’s turmoil’s anyone can make their dreams come true.

NY MFW FW17 HIGHLIGHTS | N-P ELLIOTT

Let N-P Elliott take you on a magical fantastical voyage ride. Perfection in sync with traditionally cultured tribal representation. 70s toned elegant sportswear with fur trims and velvet riches usher in a refreshment of championed extraterrestrial excellence. Mixed weighted volumes of play, complimentary separates and central earth tones fire off signals of growth, expansion, birth, renewal and revival.

Words: Chaunielle Brown | Photographer: Julie Warner

 

 

NY MFW FW17 HIGHLIGHTS | DYNE X SAMSUNG

Dyne merged technology and fashion with the sporty collection. Pullover hoodies, track pants with special details and oversized anorak jackets all equipped with a touchpoint tag when in contact with a Samsung devices shows where the garment can be purchased. As models demonstrated the tech capabilities of their stylish threads, onlookers marveled at the innovations.

Words: Mikah James | Photographer: Julie Warner

FAULT Magazine Exclusive Editorial – Felicity Sagoe’s FAULT

 

Photographer: Felicity Sagoe
 
Make-up by Sara Sorrenti @b_talent_managment using @chantecaille

Nails by Sara Sorrenti @b_talent_managment using @chanelofficial 

Hair Styling:  TAKANORI IMAMURA AT IMARI LONDON using Oway 
 
Model: Diana Nimylovych @ First Model Management
 
Photographic Assistant: Nick Probert
 
Special thanks to the twins, Dooks, Rin and Kieran

FAULT MAGAZINE REVIEWS Burberry AW17

This season was a departure on many levels for Chief Creative Director Christopher Bailey, with what looked like his most conceptual collection so far at Burberry.

Digging deeper into who Bailey is as a designer – his influences, points of view and creative expression – made for an intensely personal collection that was infused with his love for Yorkshire artist and sculptor Henry Moore. Speaking as a fellow Northerner, seeing Moore’s sculptures on the catwalk gave me a nostalgia for visiting the Yorkshire Sculpture Park as a child, the same memory that Bailey fondly recalls of while growing up.

As a whole, the colour palette was a deviation from Bailey’s love of colour with a muted palette of black, white, grey and faded blues (taking inspiration even from the artist’s own workwear wardrobe). Bailey used Moore’s un-proportional aesthetic to change the shape of the body with a lot of asymmetric and deconstructed pieces. There were curved shoulders on tweed jackets, round exaggerated sleeves and military jackets with prominent hard, angular shoulders.

Discovering and interjecting his own personality through the lens of Burberry’s 161-year history, Bailey sent a down the runway a series of sculptural capes in what was a stunning finale. Remaking Burberry’s most historic piece in plastic, crystals, lace, feather and pearls. An unforgettable and defining collection for Bailey in what marks his second See Now, Buy Now collection.

Words: Heather Ibberson

The Brits Awards 2016 – FAULTless Bits

 

 

This year’s Brit Awards were in no shortage of talent. From Skepta‘s unreal performance to The 1975 winning Best British Group and Katy Perry making a political statement with her performance, the upcoming year in music seems brighter than it ever has.

Wham! made a touching tribute to George Michael and Chris Martin performed a secret duet with the late musician, which resulted in the evening’s most memorable and emotional moment.

FAULT was there to witness it all and here’s some of our highlights from inside the music industry’s biggest event of the year.

FAULT Alumni Little Mix opened the show with a futuristic and groundbreaking performance, joined on stage by over 100 backup dancers.

 

Katy Perry made a stir with her controversial mock-up of Theresa May and Donald Trump while one of her backup houses accidentally – walked – off stage.

The Chainsmokers debuted a brand new single with Coldplay that no one knew about.

Chris Martin carried on to pay a touching tribute to George Michael after the former members of Wham! took the stage to pay their respects to the late musician.

 

Robbie Williams closed the evening with a round-up of his most successful tunes.

Not to say that his performance was FAULTless – but we nearly didn’t notice the glitch that forced him to cheer the crowd into singing along. We still loved it Robbie.

 

As awards season is slowly simmering down, we can’t wait to see what 2017 will bring. This year, the abundance of talent was exhuberating and it definitely set the bar higher for the year to come.

 

Coverage: Adina Ilie