FAULT Magazine Meets The Creator: Wayne Noir

 

 

This week’s “Meet the creator” goes to Wayne Noir – Fashion photographer and editor-in-chief at RION magazine

 

Why did you decide to set up RION?

For me, I wanted to create a creative platform for emerging talent to help promote them and most importantly their work. We reach readers all over the world both in digital, print and online. So I wanted this to beacon the talent out there for them to shine. I know how hard it was when I first started as a fashion photographer trying to get portfolio out there. With the way social media is today, it’s much easier for creatives to showcase their work and reach a wider audience, and this is what RION helps do. We’re a platform for creatives to showcase their work to the world.

Where did the name RION originate?

RION is actually my surname backwards ‘NOIR’, I did want to call the publication NOIR magazine but the name was already taken, so I remembered seeing my Photographers business card in the reflection of my computer screen and that was it. RION was born.I like to pronounce it with a French accent, as ‘Ree,On’ an not RYAN ie RION.

What’s something RION does that no other magazine does?

With loads of other great independent magazines out there, getting published is made more available. What we like to do is work with our creatives to help them shine and really stand out. We’ve done PR for them, media partnerships and held fashion shows at London Fashion Week in aid to really publicise their work. We work with Creatives from all around the world and are becoming a global brand. We’ve just launched our latest issue in America which I’m totally thrilled about!

What inspired you to pursue publishing as a career path?

I originally started as a photographer back in my early 20’s then due to a at accident which left me with a dislocating shoulder made it harder for me to shoot all the time due to the weight of the equipment etc. I never wanted to leave Fashion so I took a job as a photo editor for a magazine. After a while, I had my vision to set up my own an have full creative control. Not just a magazine, but a creative platform for all to join and share their work. I love working in publishing and plan on extending the RION magazine brand in future years.

What’s the hardest thing about your job?

The hardest thing I find is working with CTS (Carpel Tunnel Syndrome) in both hands, something I’ve had for years, so at times, it’s difficult to type, write and shoot. But after the end result, seeing an issue put together, the final shoot or write editorial makes it all worth it. I don’t or won’t let it hold me back from what I believe in and dream. Even if it kills me, I’ll still create.

What’s the best thing about your job?

Watching our creative community grow, seeing their amazing work from around the world and having that close creative community is fantastic. In my time, I’ve seen photographers come from testing little shoots to growing a huge social profile and shooting exclusives for some very top named brands. This, I love to watch!

What is your FAULT?

Never shutting off, I over think everything, having full creative control with RION  only feeds my addiction to fashion, photography and art! I’m constantly hungry for success. 3pm is witching hour and often my time to reflect on the day ahead, and draw down ideas for shoots, editorials and words. I’m still very old school when it comes to writing, I like to draft in pen so that’s another fault of mine haha!

Spotify Who We Be paving the way for live music experiences

The music landscape has evolved at a rate of knots over the past few years, with giants such as Spotify and Apple playing a huge part. The boom of subscription services has meant the giants are looking for ways to grab people’s attention, and develop loyalty to their brand. And with that, Spotify have taken a big step in the right direction with their Who We Be live show, hosted at the famous Alexandra Palace in London.

The event at Ally Pally brought together some of the world’s biggest hip-hop, grime and R&B acts, with huge names including Tory Lanez, Craig David and French Montana as part of their Who We Be live show.

The show saw some of the UK’s top talents putting on a treat for their fans, including performances from Ghetts, Lethal Bizzle and Raye.

A personal highlight of the show for me was the appearance of FAULT Magazine #28 cover star Tory Lanez. He performed his biggest songs, with a real energy and verve. Before he was done, there was time for a spot of crowd surfing across the front rows.

Craig David showed why he’s well worth headlining, continuing his remarkable comeback to put on a great performance. He cycled through a few of his classics (7 Days, Fill Me In) alongside some of his new songs, as well as a cover of Robyn’s Show Me Love.

Ending the night was hip-hop heavyweight French Montana. Eagerly anticipated, he played some of his biggest hits such as Unforgettable and No Stylist, and was even able to call upon Stefflon Don and Krept & Konan to help close the show and make it a truly unforgettable night.

The youthful audience were delirious, seeing their favourite acts performing back-to-back-to-back and so on. No waiting around for 30 minutes between acts like you get at some music events. Each act coming up pretty swiftly after the other; as if you’ve streaming it through your earphones, with music being played continuously. It helped add to the live event aspect of what Spotify are trying to achieve, and showed they’re serious about giving people what they want. All their favourite acts delivering their favourite songs for them.

We’d love to see Spotify extend this format out to other playlists they have on their service. And if the Who We Be live shows are anything to go by, they’ll be making the right call.

FAULT Magazine Photoshoot and Interview with Miya Folick

Miya Folick X FAULT Magazine

Photographer: Tae Alvon
Creative Director & Stylist: Edith Walker Millwood
MUA: Charmanique Thompson 
Assistant: Leslie
Photographed in DUO London

Jumper – Norse Projects

Miya Folick’s debut album ‘Premonitions’ might have gone down a storm thanks to Miya’s incredible skills as a songwriter and powerhouse vocals. The artist wasted no time to celebrate, however, instead emarking on an extensive tour in support of Pale Waves and Sunflower Bean, with dates across the United States and Europe. As a natural hard-worker, touring isn’t a chore for Miya, instead it gives her a sense of purpose and brings structure to an otherwise manic and unpredictable working schedule.

We sat down with Miya Folick in London’s Duo for a photoshoot and interview to find out more about her process and plans for 2019.

 

‘Leave The Party’ is such a great feel good “dance like no one is watching” at home track, what was the inspiration behind it?

Miya Folick: I think it’s really exciting to move to a city like Los Angeles and become enamored with late nights and loud music and the excitement of meeting people and experiencing new things.  But, eventually, some of that wears off and you realize getting up early for your morning run is a lot more satisfying.

 

Can you tell us a bit about ‘Thingamajig’, the backstory of the song, the title and what headspace you were in while writing it?

Miya Folick: Thingamajig came from my subconscious.  In many ways, the day we wrote that song was a day just like any other.  I wasn’t feeling particularly sad or apologetic on the surface, but it must have been bubbling underneath.

Jumper – Norse Projects | Skirt – Topshop | Socks – Artist Own | Shoes – Artist Own

What’s the overriding emotion you felt in the lead up to the album’s release?

Miya Folick: I felt like I was ready to tour and make more music. I feel proud of myself and my team.

Top – Mango | Skirt – Topshop | Belt – Stylist Own | Sneakers – Mango

Your album is co-produced with Justin Raisen – how did you first start working together?

Miya Folick: We met on the recommendation of several different people and it just clicked. His wife jokes that their two-year-old was actually the one who convinced me to make the record with Justin.  James is very very cute, but it was actually because Justin is just a really exciting creative force.

Miya Folick FAULT Magazine

Suit – Topshop | Shirt – Scotch & Soda | Socks – Artist Own | Boots – Mango

You’ll be ending the year with a European tour- what’s your favourite part about hitting the road?

Miya Folick: Playing a show every night. Tour gives you a strong sense of purpose everyday. I have a more regular schedule on the road than at home. I run every morning before the rest of the band gets up, listen to podcasts in the van on the way to the next city, soundcheck, eat too much broccoli, show, dinner, hang with the guys.  It’s fantastic.

 

What do you have planned for 2019?

Miya Folick: Hopefully touring a lot for this record! Making a couple more music videos. Putting out a couple more singles.  I don’t know! Maybe i’ll be in a movie.  I want to get into acting again.

Puffer: Topshop

What is your FAULT?

Miya Folick: I am impatient.

FAULT Magazine Alumni Clean Bandit, Charli XCX and Bhad Bhabie release new song ‘Playboy Style’

 

It’s always great to see our faves working together so as you can expect, we’re all very excited to hear about the latest track to drop from Clean Bandit’s forthcoming second album, ‘What Is Love’ features both Charli XCX and Bhad Bhabie. All three artists on the song have graced the covers of FAULT respectively and have now joined forces to release this infection track which we’re sure will take over the charts worldwide.

Clean Bandit’s album titled ‘What Is Love?’ is set to release on Friday (November 30) and naturally, we’re all very excited to see what their new music they’ve been cooking up since their debut. If ‘Playboy Style’ is anything to go off, it’s sure to be a stormer!

Until then, check out their infecsious new release below and let us know what you think!

 

 

FAULT Magazine photoshoot and interview with Joel Baker

 

This week saw the release of Joel Baker’s ‘Winter Dreams’ EP, a brutally honest but wonderful example of the storytelling through music that we’ve come to expect from Joel over the course of his career. Also included on the EP is a cover of Phil Collins’ ‘You Can’t Hurry Love’, completely reimagined in Joel’s own style so wonderfully you could be forgiven in thinking it was a completely original track.

We met up with Joel to discuss his career thus far, and plans for the future in this FAULT Online photoshoot and interview.

 

You have a really unique voice, how did you develop your style?

It was a tone thing which over the years I’ve learnt to develop and use correctly. The singing bit it still the newest thing for me and that’s where I’m trying to grow and learn how to perfect.

 

Who are you listening to at the moment?

Ryan Adams, Leaf, I really like and a lot of Pheobe Bridges. There’s also a lot of HipHop, Chance The Rapper, Common and anything lyrical.

 

What’s your writing process like, are you structured with set times for working or are you an artist who’s always writing anywhere and everywhere?

I try and do a bit of both, I try and have that bit of structure. I like to do writing sessions, where you need to write a song in a day because that adds structure and it forces it out a little bit because I think sometimes just waiting for it to happen isn’t the best. But in saying that I like to have my songwriting antennas on at all time because it usually happens in conversation. I will be talking to somebody and say something weird or whatever and take a mental note of it and then use that so all those random thoughts and notes I wrote down and when it comes to actually produce the song I have a lot to work with.

Is it weird that people are coming to see you?

Today is strange, it’s a gig that has come from outside of my friendship group. it’ll be great to see the people who have come to see me who listen to my music every day and just want to experience me playing live.

 

Is it weird knowing that your song means something different?

that’s the best part. When you write something that someone else loves is so special. Especially when people say “we love it and keep it on repeat” it resonates so much because that’s exactly how I listen and experience music.

 

What’s your favourite on the road story?

I’ve got to be careful what I say Hah! One of my favourite characters I’ve met on the road was in Berlin I met someone called Yesper Monk. He turned up to meet us with this really heavy guitar and a typewriter, leather jack and pack of cigarettes. He looked like something out of the 40’s he’s by far the craziest guy I’ve ever met and I saw him last week and I’ve not seen him in ages and the first thing he tells me is “things are about to get crazy because I’ve just taken an ecstasy pill”. I love him, he’s an amazing artist and so inspirational for me.

What’s been your worse show?

When I first started I was just playing a dingy venue and I didn’t really want to do it. Also, no one was actually there so it was basically just the acts watching each other perform and it was the most horrendous show. It was a club venue atop the stage too so you’re playing a slow emotional song to party music above you.

 

Are you a studio body or do you prefer the stage?

It depends on the setting I’d say but for the most part, I enjoy the studio because I have control of the setup, my comforts etc. That being said, there are those shows where the stars align, the sounds amazing and the crowd is great and there have only been a few of those perfect shows but it’s just amazing to experience.

 

What is your FAULT?

I’m very guilty of comparing myself to people and it’s horrendous. The good things don’t seem as good and the bad things just sound a horrible way to live life.

 

LISTEN TO/SHARE ‘WINTER DREAMS’ EP HERE

WATCH/SHARE NEW TRACK ‘RUPI KAUR’ HERE

KROST NEW YORK

(courtesy of KROST NEW YORK)

 

Words: Chaunielle Brown | Images: Jay Blum

A movement triggered from catastrophic echoes, a tragic repetition of a far too frequent headline, “School Shooting.” Parkland, Florida, February 14, 2018 tore at us all once again, and out of the broken, fallen and destructively destroyed rose a connected championed community, marching out of the madness, together, to march for our lives. In the desperately needed togetherness, a channeled understanding and respect for life came a stapled support, unwavering and bold. KROST NEW YORK found its place, tying in an ever burning determination to provide support for all; strangers pledged in a common belief, support for your friends, those past and present and those you have yet to meet. Together, as we march for lives, we march and vow to support. An inspired placement and nod to the transformational sixties and its engraved grit for fight, freedom and justice, support and love for all, we are bound together in a firmly rooted cornerstone. Rising to the surface we find a brand bonded in brotherhood with a gifted emboldened Pantone Autumn Glory Orange, unified, transitional no matter gender or preference. Founder Samuel Krost and Designer and Creative Director Scott Camaran lead us in a movement to be proudly worn. 

This First Semester, we found ourselves introduced and taken on an emergence of transcendent truth, #Support Your Friends. A camaraderie of banded souls, striving for principled authenticity, artistic and social change, KROST NEW YORK is lined with a school housed remembrance, outfitted by lockers, fresh fancied custom turfed golden green grass, varsity tracks and iridescent labels to remind us we are all the colors of the world, friends bound together in support.                                                                                                                                                         

(courtesy of KROST NEW YORK)

 

Following their well tailored motivational opening, we caught up with the two for some good loved chatter.

Tell me something about KROST that hasn’t been recorded or put down for all to read. 

SK: I think I got emotional yesterday for the first time on Instagram. For me personally, this entire concept started right after, unfortunately the mass shooting in Parkland, Florida. It kind of really hit a certain chord in me. I was determined to get involved with the youth. I think it was a week later, that March for Our Lives was put together and just watching the youth come together and supporting one other, whether they knew each other or not, they were supporting each other based on having the same beliefs. At that time I was determined to become involved in it, but at the same time, I wanted to pursue my passion and started to think about how I can combine the two. So this idea of Support Your Friends was created, and it has been a personal slogan for a long time. 

What Scott and I both will tell you, is that this brand wants to be known first for its message – for its story and for the community that we build around support your friends and and for us just being such fashion lovers, we are using apparel and accessories at the very beginning to try and tell that story. 

And that doesn’t go to take away from the attention to detail that we put into this clothing. We did not go to a warehouse and buy 500 t-shirts and write support your friends on them. We went through, 10 to 12 rounds of samples, really making sure that our fits and fabrics were of the utmost luxury and understanding where the fashion space is moving and were able to provide a luxury product, because we’re not wholesaling the brand right now. So we’re hitting good margins but were providing a luxury brand at one of the most accessible price points in the entire market right now. And that’s the exact feedback we’ve been getting about our price points, about our fits, about our fabrics, and of course the message finally is starting to come out. I think with trying to launch this company, there was so much that was happening that you know we were kinda just putting a fashion brand out there, but now the story is finally getting out there with the help of people like you and the press. With the backstory of how this actually happened.

And with March for Our Lives being the exact inspiration behind the brand, we wanted to take that and use it as the inspiration of how we were going to design this collection. And if we look when the last time something like this happened, we really just took it from the 1960s, which was the epitome of a decade when youth came together to forge a better today. Now whether it was about the sexual revolution, or whether it was anti-war, or anti-poverty, that was a decade that was filled with riots, protests, different movements, but what we take from there is it was the youth coming together to support one another. So that’s what we used as the inspiration behind the brand. And then we kind of took on the first collection and said hey let’s do this based on our modern take on the collegiate, university, varsity elements of the 1960s. That’s how we came to the aesthetic of our first collection. For us, this is called First Semester and Second Semester is really going to come down to what’s important in society, what’s currently happening and what needs more awareness, that needs more support, that needs a community to be built to bring people together to help actual create tangible change. Instead of just saying things, we want to show that through action. 

 

Were there roadblocks to this journey? 

SC: I don’t think Sam and I are quitters. We know how to divide and conquer.

SK: I think we both wear, I don’t want to use the word multiple, because it’s more than multiple, but we wear A LOT of different hats right now. I didn’t want to tiptoe our way into this. We wanted to come out and let people know we’re here. And I wanted to do it the right way. With that being said, like I said before, this wasn’t “Let’s go into a warehouse and buy 500 t-shirts.” We put a serious investment into this company in creating from scratch our patterns. And every time our pattern was wrong we had to go and pay to redo it and redo it and redo it. And we had to start from scratch and every dollar put in, before we raised money, I don’t want to say, went into the garbage, but technically it did. It was an educational experience and technically as a startup there’s going to be mistakes along the way. But we do know that we don’t allow mistakes to happen twice. There were so many roadblocks, so many days that were harder than others. To be honest, I had to make sure our product got to this pop-up for the opening. When I say everything came down to the last minute…EVERYTHING came down to the last minute.

We know our systems now, we have our patterns. We’ve developed them. So we’re hoping and praying that based on an incredible seven, eight month educational experience, that we know how to do this the right way moving forward. And we have an incredibly huge team. A digital marketing team. We’re a digitally focused brand that wants to continuously have physical retail concept stores. The vision for the future is bring other brands into our retail to make those experiential retail spaces and falling into this idea of “Support Your Friends;” bring other brands in that follow our message, that help us broaden that message. Anyone or anything, any vehicle that we could create, whether that’s through video, photography, art, other apparel, whatever it may be, that’s the future for the brand. Getting into those spaces to help us push this message. 

How did you two meet?

SC: Sam and I knew each other for about a year before we started the company. Back when I was working at ACNE STUDIOS, he was my client. I think it was last December when I met his mom, they were shopping for the holidays. I was helping him shop for his Aspen trip. His mom had mentioned to me, “Sammy, you’ve always wanted to have a clothing line.” And I said, “You know, I’m a designer. and then I showed them my designs on my phone and pretty much after a bit, we finally got together to talk about it, talk about some ideas and concepts and next thing you know, eight months later, we’re launching our concept retail space in Soho. 

 

Why Autumn Glory Orange?

SC: It’s the color of friendship. The thing about orange in general is it’s a mixture between yellow and red. When you google the meanings behind colors, friendship is one of the names that pops up as the definition for it. But also Autumn Glory, I think, what it was, was kind of random. Sam in his apartment had a coffee table book that was orange, similar orange to the one we chose for the collection and THEN (laughter) we googled it and then it all ended up working out. 

Will there be other colors introduced?

SC: We want to develop these accent colors. For next season we have a couple Pantones in mind. If you look at our tags and our stickers, they’re iridescent so the iridescent we kind of want to touch upon every color, every person, it’s supposed to show that lack of conformity to one thing. I think what’s so cool about iridescent is that it changes color depending on what angle you look at it. So I think that’s how I perceived the design aspect to each collection. It’s really the same message at a different angle. So I think we represent a new color Pantone every time there’s a new season, but still maintain that same thread, that same message cohesively throughout the brand. 

(left, Samuel Krost)

What is next for KROST, any special collections, community relations?

SK: We’re working on a capsule collection special for March for Our Lives, where proceeds will be donated directly back to March for Our Lives. I think one thing that’s super interesting is we’re continuously trying to find unique angles to make this brand different and to stand out. And with that I’ve been working with a developer integrating a platform onto our website. Our vision is to white label it and pass it through the entire non-profit sector. Unfortunately in the non-profit space, it’s also one of the most corrupt spaces. As a brand you say “I’m donating this.” You don’t believe it anymore, it doesn’t really sound credible anymore. I’m trying to think, how am I going to not just be another brand that says, “Hey we partner with March for Our Lives and we’re giving them money” so we’re creating a block chain software, where basically if you buy a hoodie for $100 Chaunielle and I donate 10% of that, that $10 that you bought that hoodie on November 16 goes into an escrow account, when March for Our Lives wants to take that $10, what happens is we basically own this digital ledger that keeps track of all the donations and when March For Our Lives goes into that escrow account and takes your $10, Chaunielle is going to get a message, an email, a notification, that says, “Hey it’s Jan 1, March for Our Lives just took the $10 that you donated, based on the sweatshirt you bought on November 16 for $100, that we got $10 from, oh and also, we’re using this $10 to buy Tommy a box of cereal.

(courtesy of KROST NEW YORK)

So basically were bringing credibility back into the non-profit space, that money is not being released until the organization actually needs it and for the brand, we’re reengaging with our consumers and giving you the ability to feel good about what you just did. We’re bringing transparency and we’re bringing credibility. And most importantly we are making our customers feel good about that they did. And again it’s about putting this product on, that you were able to buy because it’s an accessible price point and now you’re wearing a brand thats bigger than the clothing, our goal is to make you feel like you’re part of the community when you were something from the brand. 

Also for Second Semester, we’re going to be tackling other issues that stem from the same concepts, of community and unity but also this idea of loving yourself. Because in the past year, we all know how much suicide has affected the world. Young people, successful people, people who have the facade of living a happy life and non-problematic lifestyles and are still suffering and still don’t know how to love themselves. So i think that’s one message, when designing I have in mind for next season. We’re all about designing with purpose. Because I really think it’s important to do that.

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR FAVORITE PART?

SK: For example if you look at our campaign video, there’s a side by side in the campaign where we have a few of our models, one on the shoulders of another, you know, peaceful protest celebrating and then there’s a side by side of the EXACT, identical replica video that was shot in 1960s in black and white and it’s just like, this is exactly what we envisioned and like Scott said, to see it, to just come to life, I still haven’t been able to sit down and like, give ourselves a pat on the back and I don’t think I ever will, because I’m difficult to be satisfied. I think we can always do better. And I think that’s what’s going to keep us alive. Scott and I both have that same drive. Definitely just seeing this come to live when we met in a Le Pain on Grand Street and literally sketched out on a napkin, and now we’re sitting in our first concept retail store with our product hanging, with our team around us and it’s just a blessing. It’s been our dream. All my friends and family know I’ve always dreamt about having a brand. Scott’s the most talented person, across the board. From design to photography to film, whatever needs to be done, Scott can get that done. I think we’re an incredible team that we divide and conquer. And we are getting to live our dream. That’s something we’ll never take for granted and always look at as a blessing. And if we’re able to create some real change and put a positive message out there, that’s the just going to be the absolute cherry on top. 

(courtesy of KROST NEW YORK)

WHAT IS YOUR FAULT?

SK: Patience, becoming good leaders. Making sure we’re doing everything by the books. Having patience with people. Having patience with each other. Scott and I have screamed at each other along the way, but just knowing that it’s in good faith and it’s all love. 

SC: Ya, Sam is my brother. Our moms were literally hanging out at the opening. I think patience and I hate the word, “expectations and being realistic.” But along those lines just understanding who we are and where we are and what we’re doing. I know I have HUGE expectations. When I say, I want what I want, I mean it. Sam and I are both stubborn which is why I think we were able to get to where we are. We’re so set in our ways and know what we want that we actually have to get it. But I think it’s just working with other people to understand. We’re also working with people who are professionals and have done this before and we have to come from their perspective and understand what it takes for them to do their job. I think gaining that sort of perception will help and that’s just a startup fault: expectations. 

(courtesy of KROST NEW YORK)

KROST NEW YORK concept retail pop-up store in Soho at 357 CANAL STREET will tentatively be open till November 26th 2018 and “hopefully if everything goes well, we’ll have it till the end of the year.”

Blac Chyna launches whitening cream called ‘whitenicious’ and we are NOT writing about that shit.

 

Words: Miles Holder

Jack Rowan Exclusive Photoshoot and Interview for FAULT Magazine

 

PHOTOGRAPHY ELLIOTT MORGAN

STYLING KRISHAN PARMAR

GROOMING LAUREN GRIFFIN @LONDON STYLE AGENCY

 

JACK ROWAN is a young actor with an already-enviable track record. Fresh from a BAFTA nomination for his first lead role, the ‘Peaky Blinders’ favourite has moved quickly and seamlessly onto the silver screen in Simon Amstell’s Benjamin. Currently filming the TV adaptation of Malorie Blackman’s ‘Noughts + Crosses’ in South Africa, we caught up with the young star to discuss his career thus far.

 

You received a BAFTA nomination for your first lead role (in ‘Born to Kill’) – an incredible achievement. Do you feel any additional pressure now to continue go for those sorts of awards or does it just inspire you to try and win them in future?

I went in to ‘Born To Kill’ with no expectations, which made the award nominations even more special to me. If I can go into every job with that same outlook then I won’t feel pressure as such, just a drive to do the best performance I possibly can. That way, if it leads to awards or not, I’ll never be disappointed.

I read that you filmed last Summer for Simon Amstell’s debut feature film, Benjamin, which is scheduled for release later this year. Was it tough to transition from some pretty dark, drama-driven roles to a comedic one?

It definitely was a challenge but it was one I was incredibly eager to take on. I want to look back in the future at a diverse body of work and say that I gave all genres a go and tried as many roles/characters as possible – as long as I see something in each one. It’s scary being on set and having to trust your natural instincts to try and evoke laughter, yet, I enjoyed every second of the experience.

There’s a widely-held perception that the film’s pretty heavily autobiographical. Was it tough to work on something with a director so personally invested in a project?

I’m sure that could be the case with some projects but Simon Amstell’s definitely an exception to that. He created an environment on set which was so positive and as an actor I felt completely free to do whatever came natural to me. That being said, Simon kept control of his message and was always there to give articulate and clear direction whenever he felt it was necessary.

 

You’ve got a lot of well-publicised interests outside of acting. Do you appreciate the fact that you can control – to some extent! – what fans and the general public know about you (through social media, interviews etc)? Or do you worry about public intrusion into your private life becoming too invasive?

I wouldn’t say it’s a worry at this current stage because I’m relatively early on in my career. Although, I do value privacy in my personal life and going forward it’s something I aim to keep. The less people know about me, the easier it is for someone to believe in the characters I play.

 

Tyson Fury vs Anthony Joshua – who’d win?

I’m going to have to stay on the fence with this one, because as a fan of the sport, they’re two boxers I’d like to meet. I don’t want to be in either ones bad books! So how’s about we go with a draw?!

 

Who’s had the greatest impact on your career so far?

Without a doubt its the whole ‘Born To Kill’ team. That project will forever have a place in my heart. Not only did it make me believe in my own ability, but it led to an agent in the states, multiple award nominations and posters all over the underground. All these things combined have opened so many more doors and I can’t wait for what the future holds.

Do you have a dream role? If so: what is it and why?

I wouldn’t say there’s a specific role that I see as being ‘The One.’ But as I said earlier, I’d love to take on characters in all genres of film, tv and theatre. For me, dream roles are apparent when they arrive. For example, ‘Born to Kill’ was one, and hopefully there’ll be many more.

‘Peaky Blinders’ season 5 is scheduled for 2019. If plot wasn’t an issue (ie: if your character were to stay alive and integral to the plot indefinitely), how long could you see yourself working on any one series?

If the journey of the character was right and it made sense in the bigger picture of my career, I can’t see why I wouldn’t stay in any one series.

What else are you working on later this year/next – acting-related or otherwise?

I have a few things lined up including a project later this year, but as it stands I’m unable to share any specific details. However, I can say I’m excited to embark on another controversial piece playing a complex character at its core.