SYLVIAN HYDE : NYFW INTERVIEW

 

Sylvian Hyde is the newly favorable and elevated neoclassical menswear brand to crave and desire. Birthed just last year of October 2017, Belize born Sylvian Hyde has introduced a new conversation to menswear titled with unswerving fearless confidence. A striking debut in summer’s heat, making everyone melt at every thread, much is to be expected from this evolving brand. An exuberant color palette seasoned with spark and spice and just to our explorative delights. We caught up for a little bit of chatter to learn some more about this engaging enterprise. 

FAULT: Who is Sylvian Hyde? As you are a very young brand, born just last year yes? How did it come about?

Sylvian Hyde: So yeah, I’m Sylvian Hyde, 25 years old, originally from Belize, migrated to the states in 2014. Yes, so I’ve lived there the majority of my life but I relocated here in December 2014 for political asylum. Um yea, so the brand started, like you said, last year in October. Really I just had a bunch of sketches and I always said one day I want to have my own line and then being friends with Jabari; I knew his interest in fashion, the administrative business side, and he had also interned for fashion week twice; so he shared stories with me. So one day we’re like let’s just stop talking about it – he has the business side, I have the design side, so we just started and once the ball started to roll and we saw our samples being made, and were like “Woah this really is a reality” and then every day it just got more serious and more serious till where we are today. 

How long have you been sketching? When did it start?

Sylvian Hyde: I’ve been drawing from when I was a kid. It’s like architecture, automotive design, it’s fashion. It wasn’t until I came to the states, that I really chose fashion. I really thought, growing up I would have done architecture, because where I was in Belize, a career in fashion or starting your own brand there, it’s like, “Ya you can do it but you’re not going to have the success rate to make a living off of it.” So it wasn’t until I got here I was like, “Wow, I’m living here in New York City, the fashion capital of the world. It’s possible.”

Where does your name come from? It’s so interesting and regal. Is there a backstory to it?

Sylvian Hyde: It’s the name my mom had. Interesting back story, so I changed my first name recently to Sylvian. My first name originally is Terrell which is the name my dad gave me from his best friend, and I changed it because I – it’s a whole long back story into my family background, but when I relocated here, starting over, a fresh start, I decided to take the name my mom wanted for me. I was the first child for both parents, so normally the guy gets to name his son. 

What would you say are your greatest influences for your designs and your day to day? Does Belize have an influence?

Sylvian Hyde: I feel the biggest influence coming from Belize is the depravation – the lack of opportunity. Now that I have the opportunity, it makes me want to work harder and appreciate the opportunity. In terms of influences for me my biggest is when I watch the red carpet events. When I see these distinguished men, looking like the help, I just wish men would make more fashion statements. That is my angle to make great fashion statements with men on the red carpet. Starting where I am at now, it’s to try to have guys evolve their style on a day to day basis. 

What sets Sylvian Hyde apart from other menswear designers?

Sylvian Hyde: I definitely say more use of untraditional menswear fabrics, and just doing things out of the box. For example, recently we just did some tailored suits out of athletic mesh. From the onset of designing I just really try to put my mind into the mind-frame to try to do something original. So I don’t pay attention to trends. I just do what I feel comes to me natural and is original. 

Does Sylvian Hyde function as a unisex brand?

Sylvian Hyde: When we started we didn’t think of ourselves or aspire to be a unisex brand, but however the women who have attended our shows and have seen our clothes have expressed interest and said, “Oh I would wear that.” So that definitely opened up our eyes to that possibility and it’s one that we are happy to entertain and foster. 

When and will you start thinking about venturing into a womenswear or swimwear brand?

Sylvian Hyde: I’d like to have my first womenswear collection by 2020. That’s kind of the goal. 

Aside from womenswear and considering how far and fast you have come, what other directions do you see the brand going? What else would you like to branch into with Sylvian Hyde?

Sylvian Hyde: 10 years plus I really see us becoming a real lifestyle brand. As I said I have interest in architecture, all different facets of design. I mean going way farther than interior design I mean actual architecture itself. Having a real designer home. With just details, details, details. If I could collaborate with an automator that way Victoria Beckham did with Landrover; she designed the interior for the Land Rover Range Rover Evoque. That type of stuff I would love to see the brand to do in the future. 

In another year, where are you looking to be, considering how fast you have moved in less than one year?

Sylvian Hyde: I think headed in the direction where I hope for it to go, which is guys just being a little more free and expressive with their style and not as limiting. For me I hope my influence is – I admire that the industry allows women to have clothing that flatters their body. I want guys to be able to have that same opportunity without it having any type of labels or stereotype. I’d like to see menswear make that jump. And society also to make that jump. 

If you could live in any other time, period and place, where would that be and why?

Sylvian Hyde: I would like to live in the future. Because hopefully in the future, I would be that much closer to realizing my vision and just enjoying the progression of society. 

What is your FAULT?

Sylvian Hyde: My fault is I could learn to be a little more patient. To just trust the process of things. But I also feel, let me try to clarify…I feel that with my impatience, I don’t like hearing no and I don’t like limitations and I see how that has helped us to achieve so much in such a short space of time. But I need to work on knowing and identifying, the little things that you  know, some things you are supposed to put some brakes on or just let it go. I guess choose battles better I guess. Choose projects better I guess and just let it get wrought out. 

Words + Interview: Chaunielle Brown | Images: Jennifer Laurantius 

COSMO’S MIDNIGHT FAULT MAGAZINE INTERVIEW

Let’s get this out into the open straightaway: Cosmo’s Midnight is a banger addict’s dream come true. With their full-length debut, What Comes Next, producer twins Cosmo and Patrick Liney are here to enable you.

Once scrappy upstarts in Australia’s beat-making scene, Cosmo’s Midnight has since become one of its finest electronic exports. The duo’s newly-released 12-track effort is dreamy, intoxicating, and complex—with the brotherly duo enlisting both local and international features to help bring their insatiable project to life, from L.A. rapper Buddy to Swedish wunderkind Tove Styrke, and Melbourne vocalist Woodes to Sydney’s six-piece Winston Surfshirt. Libidinal R&B (“Lowkey”), heartbreak disco (“Talk To Me”), cloud rap (“Where You Been”), near-instrumentals (“Polarised”), and sultry come-ons (“History”)—their tightly curated, summery, feel-good songs are all here for the taking.

The album dropped ahead of their Australia/New Zealand tour, which kicked off in July, and the fellas are now on the Asian leg of their tour before heading off to Europe next month. FAULT caught up with Cos and Pat at their show last week in Seoul, South Korea to discuss the music, the inspirations, and their journey to her.

Interview: Kee Chang

Photography: Jordan Kirk.

What Comes Next is incredibly addictive. Did it exceed your personal, creative expectations?

Patrick Liney: I think it definitely exceeded our expectations. At the very start of the process, we just couldn’t see the end and we were finding along the way what we really wanted to do with it. Looking back now, I’m really glad we ended up where we did. Three years ago, when we were writing the first demos for the album, I don’t think we—

Cosmo Liney: It was stabbing in the dark.

Patrick: With a lot of the album, it wasn’t like we went in like, “This is exactly what we’re gonna make.” We were figuring it out over three years and piecing together all these bits. So it wasn’t an album like, “This is the concept and we’re gonna smash it out in two months.” When we finished it and looked back, it sort of made sense that it was a combination of all these different things that influenced us growing up, up until the point that we became producers and musicians.

Cosmo: We feel really lucky to have had it work out, especially with a lot of the things that happened in the process. It was very fortunate because they may not have happened. For example, when we sampled N.E.R.D./Pharrell, that could’ve not happened.

Patrick: Yeah, they might not have cleared it.

Cosmo: A lot of the features were very difficult to get and hard to maintain contacts for.

Patrick: For example, we’d get a sick verse from a rapper and you just wouldn’t hear from them for like six months. You’re like, “This demo is so sick. Let’s finish it off,” and then they hit you back like, “Here’s a finished song.”

Cosmo: We’re very used to writing songs in the studio with the person and getting the songs made that way. A lot of this album was done over the Internet.

Patrick: Yeah, just emailing back and forth with ideas and stuff.

Cosmo: We’re just really glad it came together and that it’s something we can be proud of for our first album.

Patrick: Again, with a lot of the songs, we never met who wrote on them so a lot of it feels like we have this connection with the people we haven’t met yet. We wrote that song with Jay Prince and Buddy as well.

Those guys worked independently from each other as well, right?

Patrick:  Yeah, yeah. Then there’s Boogie, Winston Surfshirt, and Tove Styrke. Panama is from Sydney so and that was good for the process. I feel like we write our best music like that.

Cosmo: It’s easier to write like that.

Patrick: It’s definitely a challenge to work over emails. You can’t be like, “Change that take,” and stuff like that because it just takes too long, whereas in the studio you can change so much in a minute.

What was it like curating what ultimately ended up on the album? Are there a lot of unused demos?

Patrick: So, so, so much. The album has 12 tracks including the interlude, but I think we had somewhere around 50-ish demos.

Cosmo: And a lot of them were good. It was about finding—

Patrick: What works. There were songs that we really liked that we kind of put on hold. They just wouldn’t have worked for the album. We’re saving them for something later, further down the line. We sort of curated the album four months out of release like, “This is the final ones,” and then we went out and finished all the tracks after that. You always have the “What if?” in your head like, “What if we did this song instead? What if I tweaked this song forever?” which is why it’s good we didn’t mix it ourselves. This is the first project we’ve not mixed ourselves. I mixed all of our previous singles up until “Get to Know.” We brought in this incredible mixing engineer, George Nicholas, on board. He’s from this band called Seekae. Sometimes when you’ve been working on a song so closely for so long, you get tunnel vision. You need someone who’s objectively looking at it like, “I know what’s best for this song.” When I mix my own stuff, I don’t know what to change: “Am I making it worse or am I making it better?”

Cosmo: You just don’t know. You kind of lose track of the entire thing.

Patrick: We often come up with ideas really quickly and take a long time to finish it because all the details take a long time.

Is there any validity to artists who say that the songs that come together fast are usually the best cuts?

Cosmo: There’s no really right or wrong way to do it, but I think you can’t argue that when you write something that quickly and something that feels so right, you’ve kind of hit a nerve in some way.

Patrick: And you can only hit it every now and then. A lot of the times, you’re banging your head like, “Come on! Come out, song!” Then sometimes it happens without you even doing much and it sort of writes itself. It’s super weird. It feels really good when it’s effortless.

You guys came to play a show in South Korea just around this time last year, right?

Patrick: We did.

You were just in Singapore and headed to Thailand tomorrow. Are the vibes glaringly different?

Patrick: Oh, it’s so vast.

Cosmo: Even in Australia, it’s so different between cities. I don’t know what that comes down to at all.

Patrick: Cultural differences and like—

Cosmo: Just how much it’s different, though.

Patrick: Yeah, it’s insane. Playing in Singapore yesterday was kind of a shock. I couldn’t believe that people came to see us play in Singapore. It was really cool. Then you have the different crowd vibes. The crowd here in Seoul—at Soap anyways—they go crazy. [Laughs] At least at our last show, it was so much fun. We’ve played in China and other places where they’re more reserved.

Cosmos: They’ll politely enjoy the show and come up to you afterwards like, “That was amazing! I had so much fun!” and you’re like, “Really?” But they really did. They just didn’t show it.

What do you prefer?

Patrick: Obviously, the instant gratification of everyone sort of jumping around is really fun. But a lot of the times, we also go and talk to people after the show to see what they thought or just to say “Hi.” Hearing what they thought of the show is where you feel good. Some people just don’t like dancing and drinking or whatever—it’s not necessarily their vibe. There are different flavors. As long as they enjoyed it, that’s all that matters to me. At the end of the day, if they have a good time, then we have a good time. If someone’s not having a good time, me and Cosmo will not have a good time and it would just spiral. If everyone’s having a good time, it spirals in the reverse way.

Cosmos: Upwards.

One of the things that seems to come up a lot when you’re asked about your early influences is your older brother Nik who really turned you onto music, as older siblings tend to do. Is he shocked by how much you took to music and how far you’ve come?

Patrick: I think so.

Cosmo: None of us were prepared for what would happen. None of us really knew that we’d be touring and playing around the world and stuff. To him, being our brother, I think it’s just more shocking because he knows us so well. To see it happening is really surprising for him.

Patrick: It’s weird. And he lives in London so he has this outsider’s perspective. Even though he’s our brother, he sees a lot of stuff through—

Cosmo: He won’t be at the shows, but he’ll see recaps or photos or something.

Patrick: We’re gonna go over to Europe next month so we’re gonna hang out and he’ll come to some of the shows. I don’t think he’s seen us play in a super long time—it’ll be cool to hang out. We’re really close, even though we don’t see each other that much. He’s only two years older than us so we’re pretty close in years as well.

What Comes Next is an interesting title for your debut album because it sounds prophetic. It seems to really set you up for what’s to come after this work.

Patrick: Yeah, it’s kind of cool because it’s acknowledging that it’s our debut effort—a launchpad for all the things that can come afterward. It’s prophetic in like a hopeful sense. It’s a prediction. At the same time, it acknowledges all the stuff that built up to this point as well. When we’re talking about our album and our process, we’re referring back to when we were kids. On the album cover, the artwork is based off a collage of all these photos of us from when we were little. We’ll be sitting in different rooms in our family house and my dad would be playing vinyls to us. They’re basically three things: Switch-On Bach, which is like a Minimoog version of all these Bach songs. Then he’d play us Jim Hall’s Undercurrent, which is this jazz-guitar album that I heard a million times. Also, a lot of disco as well. At the time, we were like, “Ugh—I hate this so much.” But then, you know, as you start getting into music, you come to appreciate it. My mom and dad would email us all this music like, “You listened to this when you were little! Don’t you remember it?” It’s like, “Holy shit. We’re really just a product of our parents.” They totally put us into this shit without us knowing. Then you’re like, “Cool.” [Laughs] I’m happy for it. That’s sort of what the album is about. It’s all these things that have coalesced and shaped us into musicians and just as people in general. We’re sort of filtering that through our experiences into a musical format. So a lot of the inspirations behind the album is super far and wide. There’s a lot of the disco stuff like Chic and Nile Rodgers. There’s some jazzy elements as well on a few tracks. Then there’s like 2000s R&B and Hip-Hop that we listen to a lot. Recently, we came back to Pharrell’s stuff and Timbaland and N.E.R.D. and The Neptunes and stuff. Then there are new inspirations—we listen to so much stuff. Lately, we’ve been listening to BadBadNotGood, The Internet, Blood Orange…

Cosmo: It’s obviously a big one. I just love Kaytranada for the fact that he can still sound like he’s got enough going on, even though he has such a specific sound.

Patrick: It’s just what’s really minimal about it that’s really full. We learned a lesson listening to all these artists we like where they do a lot with little. A lot of people will try to—us included—fill in the album’s gaps and stuff by adding more layers and details, but often, you just have to get rid of that and just make the initial sound bigger. You can write a really good, incredibly dense song with just 10 layers, whereas when we were starting out we’d do like 100+ tracks and it would just get super dense and get to be a nightmare to mix. This album was about paring back from that and going back to the fundamentals—just really focusing on the core things that make a song great to us. It’s about what we really like about the song and not over embellishing it and trying to keep it to “This is what works.” If it gets overdone, when we finally know that we’ve worked a song too hard, we can stop and pull back a bit and then send it off to George so he can just mix it. It’s good—we finally figured it out. The funnest part of writing a song is like the first day and the rest is hard, meticulous work where you’re concentrated but not necessarily creative. You’re just working at that point and it doesn’t feel fun.

What is your FAULT?

Patrick: Maybe I’m too meticulous—to a fault. I’m too overanalyzed and too self-critical and detailed.

Cosmo: My fault is that I’m the opposite of that. I don’t bring enough control to what I do. It’s too off-kilter to what we’re trying to do.

Patrick: So it kind of works out.

The yin and yang.

Cosmo: It’s totally feng shui.

Patrick: Cosmo brings the vibe and I bring the technicality to it.

For more information on COSMO’S MIDNIGHT, including tour dates, head over to www.cosmos-Midnight.com.

A special thanks to Astral People and SOAP Seoul.

Bebe Rexha Exclusive Covershoot and Interview with FAULT Magazine

Bebe Rexha X FAULT Magazine

Bebe Rexha for FAULT Magazine Issue 29

Photography: David Yeo | Fashion Editor – Rachel Holland | Make-Up: Brittany Lambert Paige | Hair: Rio Sreedharan | Nails: Diane Drummond | Fashion Assistant: Ana Carnu & Lupe Baeyens | Words: Aimee Phillips

 

FAULT Magazine speaks to Bebe Rexha about her debut album, Expectations, the importance of retaining creative control and still having those pinch-me moments in this exclusive FAULT Magazine issue 29 reverse cover shoot.

 

FAULT: Let’s talk about your single ‘Meant To Be’ ft. Florida Georgia Line. The country vibe is quite different from your usual style – what made you switch things up?

Bebe Rexha: It was quite unexpected but I kinda think all the best things in life are unexpected. That’s why I called my album Expectations, because you never know what’s gonna happen. It’s been an incredible journey and I’m so grateful for it. I’d never done country before so didn’t really know what to expect, and I think that was the beauty of it.

Bebe Rexha for FAULT Magazine Issue 29

FAULT Magazine Issue 29 is available to order for delivery worldwide

 

Where was your head at when you were creating the album? What were the circumstances and emotions that inspired it?

Bebe Rexha: I was thinking a lot about life and how I’ve always expected it to go a certain way but it took me on a different path. Life is better when you just go with the flow. For me, this album has been all about me trying to figure things out.

 

You’ve co-written or co-produced every song on the album – that’s quite rare. It must be extremely important to you to retain creative control?

Bebe Rexha: Yeah definitely. There were some songs that were sent to me and I was like, oh gosh, I need to have this record, it just speaks to me in such an incredible way. I would go in and make it my own, working with the producer to tweak it. Throughout the process, I’ve been involved in the production of various songs. I couldn’t see any other way. For me, writing music has been like therapy. I couldn’t imagine putting out an album or song without being

 Bebe Rexha for FAULT Magazine Issue 29

On writing “Monster” for Eminem

Bebe Rexha:  That really changed the game for me. It changed everyone’s perspective of who I was and really shone a spotlight on my songwriting, so when I transitioned into an artist, I never once had people tell me what to do. When you write the song yourself, people really connect with it on a different level.

 

You started off writing songs for other people. What journey did you have to go on in order to get where you are today?

Bebe Rexha:  I was signed to my first record deal when I was 18 or 19 but I was mainly writing pop songs for other people. Then I got into a band with Pete Wentz called Black Cards. We travelled the world for a few years and then got dropped, so that spurred me into really focusing on my songwriting and my craft. It was a blessing in disguise because it taught me a lot about the industry and perfecting what I can do. That’s when I wrote ‘The Monster’. No one really understood the song because they thought it was a little creepy or too weird, so when Eminem got it I was thrilled. That really changed the game for me. It changed everyone’s perspective of who I was and really shone a spotlight on my songwriting, so when I transitioned into an artist, I never once had people tell me what to do. When you write the song yourself, people really connect with it on a different level.

Bebe Rexha for FAULT Magazine Issue 29

Do you think you’ve gotten used to all then – the success and fame?

Bebe Rexha: Not at all, I still feel like I don’t belong. It was never handed to me on a silver platter, like, here you go, you’re a star! I was always the underdog. I was a little quirky, a little different, I would write my own songs. But I’m so supportive of other females and other artists

 

What is your FAULT?

Bebe Rexha: It’s hard for me to enjoy being in the moment, I’m always thinking about the next thing.

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 29 – THE MOVEMENT ISSUE –  IS AVAILABLE TO PRE-ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

SWONNE : MFW SS19 HIGHLIGHTS

Katie Golinczak is the new menswear talent to watch. After having solid exposure working for Ralph Lauren, John Varvatos, Levi’s, to name a few, Katie launched her debut collection for Swonne at NYFW Men S/S 2019. Her first collection is inspired by Mod Rockers of the 60s, and consisted of a seasonless denim collection, t-shirts, biker jackets, parkas with tailoring details. Her SW1 parka, which is one of her (and our) favorite piece, is designed, constructed and hand painted in Brooklyn, NY. Swonne’s debut collection definitely lived up to our expectations and we look forward to see what it has to offer next season!

Katie Golinczak, Designer of SWONNE

Words + Images: Jennifer Laurantius Art Design/Layout: Chaunielle Brown

 

ALESSANDRO TRINCONE | MFW SS19 | HIGHLIGHTS

A modern day set whimsical romance orchestrated for pleasures play. Menswear reimagined for a possible futuristic walking strut of design, fantasy and exploration. A carefree confidence floating on air with ruffles, waves, tiers of tulle and femme delights. With imagination and disco discovery we’re presented with stapled stamped pieces of a light plush blush palette and marshmallow. Recollections of Viktor & Rolf echoed with ease; alas a fearless collection with no boundaries or limits. Ingenious strolling works of art and visionary obsessions. Tinsel streams of silver, metallics, glitters, gloves and knee highs, leaving mouths ajar for the elements of surprise. Alessandro Trincone has us kept in an excess of life’s secret garden.

Words by: Chaunielle Brown | Photographer: Jay Blum

FAULT Magazine to attend POP Kultur Festival 2018

As summer slowly draws to a close (not that you would know with the summer we’re currently experiencing), as does festival season, but that does mean an end to all the festivities as we’ve still got one last festival to review this summer and all signs point to it being a great one.

From the 15th-18th of August we’re heading on down to Berlin to experience their Pop kultur festival, which has seemingly brought together an all encompassing line up to ensure that there’s something for everyone this year. YGG and Ms Banks, Neneh Cherry sharing a lineup with Boy Sharsher, Myrkur, Die Nerven isn’t something you see at every festival but the hope is (in our eyes at least) that this bringing together of such a diverse line up of music will also introduce many music fans to a genre they has not yet been introduced to.

It should also be mentioned that the calibre of the musicians is very high this year, we have a keen eye out for Anna von Hau, Drangsaal, Agar Agar, Myrkur and while they’ve only just been put on our radar, the Gaddafi Girls also have us very excited.

For more information and to pick up your tickets, head over to http://www.pop-kultur.berlin/

BST Hyde Park FESTIVAL SPECIAL – THE WELL-KNOWN, THE NEW, THE LEGENDARY

Photography: Jack Alexander

 

Words: Adina Ilie

This weekend, British Summer Time showcased an array of exceptional talent ranging from the well-established to the ones-to-watch. As ever, BST Hyde Park is a celebration of music in all of its splendour, where genres intertwine, and people gather to immerse themselves in pure talent. This year, Bruno Mars, this year’s most acclaimed headline act completely sold out the festival on Saturday. He gathered support from acts such as Charlie Wilson, Naomi Scott, Liv Dawson along with the likes of DNCE, Khalid, Yungen and many others. As an impromptu moment, Joe Jonas of DNCE also announced that both of his siblings were supporting the band side-stage, making the crowd go wild in ecstasy and nostalgia altogether.

 

British Summer Time is now left behind with a heavy heart as the sight of a deserted Hyde Park is imminent, but there is no doubt that 2019 will bring even greater things for the most emblematic event in London’s festival history. For the time being, we look fondly at the acts that graced the stage in splendour this weekend.

 

LIV DAWSON

What’s your most exciting festival moment to date?

The best part has to be meeting people that I admire. Also, last year I played Wildlife festival on the main stage, which was absolutely amazing. I also remember meeting Lucy Rose, who is an incredible singer and I was absolutely freaked out.

 

What are you most looking forward to at BST?

I am so excited to play my set and also be surrounded by so many amazing talents. I’m looking forward to seeing Tom Walker, Bruno Mars, Khalid. It’s going to be a good day.

 

What is your festival FAULT?

I played The Great Escape quite recently and I had some technical difficulties on stage. I started one of my songs wrong and I had to start it all over again. It always happens, but that just makes the set funnier.

YUNGEN

 

What’s your favourite part about playing music festivals?

They bring an entirely different vibe. I was doing a lot of club gigs and there’s only a certain set that you can do in a club. At festivals you can get really creative.

 

How will your set today differ from the sets you usually play?

At club gigs, I like to quickly go through the songs to keep the energy up. I feel like at festivals, they come to see – you – so there’s more space to be creative.

 

What’s your festival FAULT?

I was at a festival and some kids climbed up on the fence and started shouting ‘Hey Yungen!’ And I was like ‘hey man, are you alright?’ and they thought that was an indication to jump over the fence. Security was looking at me like ‘what have you done?!’ because they had to chase those kids all around the festival!

 

DNCE

 

You’ve recently released a new EP People to People which has an entirely different sound to your previous material. What made you change direction?

Joe: For any person, you look at yourself a year back and realise how much you’ve grown ever since. For us, as musicians, we definitely have grown together, separately, emotionally and even physically *laughs*. We finally tapped into something new and it’s exciting to share the journey this very moment, instead of waiting a few more months for putting an entire album together. We just wanted to release this EP and get it out there.

 

You’ve got a more serious note on the EP. How did you tap into that particular part of song writing?

Cole: What we did is that we took away a few layers and stripped it down to what instruments we’re playing and where we are emotionally. It might be a little more sophisticated, but it’s also a bit more indie rock. We wanted to focus on that. Because we couldn’t do a 180 – we’re DNCE – funk meets rock’n’roll meets pop. So, we twisted the knobs a little bit and we have a good idea what’s next. We hope to release more music soon.

 

How are festivals different to you as opposed to your own personal shows?

Joe: Festivals are always more fun. You get to meet a lot of new artists and hang out in really elaborate tents. But it’s not just festivals – this is Hyde Park. Playing Hyde Park is the dream. It’s definitely a bucket list one for us.

 

Do you have any festival anecdotes that you’d like to share?

Joe: We’ve had moments when we’ve lost each other and then found each other in the most bizarre situations. We’ll disperse and then hours and hours later I’d be waiting in line for the urinal and Cole pops right out.

Cole: We were at a festival and we were watching Average White Band play and we were literally having the time of our lives. Dancing, singing, it was great. But somehow, all the pictures that our fans took of us then – we literally looked mortally depressed.

 

What’s your festival FAULT?

All: Fried food, that’s for sure.

NAOMI SCOTT

 

You’ve got a stellar Hollywood career and now you’ve gone into music too. What spurred your love for music?

I grew up in church, so I grew up listening to gospel music. I remember going through my dad’s iTunes and stumbling upon Kate Bush. She’s fantastic, weird and whacky and I loved it! I also love Enya (probably because I’m a big Lord of the Rings fan) – but clearly my influences are very mixed!

 

Who would you most like to collaborate with – out of all of the artists that you’ve pointed out just now?

Honestly – I really love Chance The Rapper. I’d love to do something with him. Collaboratively, he would be ideal in terms of what he actually brings to the table. I also love J. Cole – and what I love about him is his storytelling. There’s always a message with his music.

 

We all know of your Hollywood highlight moments – but what are your musical highlights?

For me, the highlight has just been able to grow and stay independent. But the biggest moment was a month ago when I ended my UK tour in London. I’ve been putting out music sporadically for a long time and people knew the whole back catalogue. Stuff that I’ve released years and years ago.

 

What stood out the most?

I was in Cardiff, in Wales and there was a girl right at the front who literally knew all of the words to every single song. For me – that was the best moment.

 

What do you want your fans to take from your music?

I honestly just want people to have a good time. I want them to have fun, I’m completely myself on stage and I want people to feel escapism when they come to my shows. Kind of like movies – in a way. And I want it to be a memorable experience.

 

What’s your festival FAULT?

Well, this is my first festival, so I’ll just say that it’s very hot outside and I’m very disorganised!

 

CHARLIE WILSON

 

What’s your most fond memory of BST Hyde Park?

I was here a couple of years ago on one of the smaller stages when Stevie Wonder and Pharrell were playing. I said that one day I’ll play the main stage and here I am today.

 

Do you have a memorable moment from playing live that you would like to share?

I played a show with The Rolling Stones when I was in my 20s. We opened the show in Kansas City. Back in that day, we had no hits. We were making up songs to sound like rock songs basically. So, I went into a song – except that I didn’t know it was already a Rolling Stones song! And I started singing Jumpin’ Jack Flash and everyone kept signalling me to stop doing it. And afterwards I went to my manager and asked him how many shows we had left with The Stones and he said that he was pretty sure that that was our last one.

 

What’s your festival FAULT?

I don’t have one now, but back in the day it used to be drugs and alcohol. I’m sober now, been sober for a long time, but I wish I hadn’t wasted all the time.

 

Wireless Festival 2018 – London’s Hottest Music Festival

 


Wireless 2018 on paper promised to be the king of the day festivals in London this year, with heavyweights from the hip hop and R&B scene converging on a weekend in the Finsbury Park sunshine. We arrived on Friday excited for what was in store, and were not disappointed. 

 


Friday:
We were welcomed by the “The Godfather of Grime” (to give his full title), who launched straight into his summer anthem Wearing My Rolex. Reports he was indeed wearing his Rolex are unconfirmed at this point, but it got the crowd hyped. After some more bangers from the grime legend, we waited the arrival of one of hip-hop’s most respected artists in Big Sean.

Taking us through his major hits, Big Sean showed why his career continues to go from strength to strength. The high point was Bounce Back, and truly went beast mode on the Wireless faithful.  

Post Malone might be the hottest property right now in the music scene, and he showed it here. Taking the crowd through the songs that put him on the map (White Iverson, Congratulations, I Fall Apart), through to a collection from his new album (Paranoid, Candy Paint, Psycho), the crowd was hyped and ready for the headline act to draw the curtain down on the first night.

Enter J Cole. Bounding about the stage with energy and passion, the North Carolina rapper who showed just why he was chosen to return to the headline slot at Wireless. His incredible lyricism was on show, and energised the crowd desperate to hear J Cole deliver his latest album.



Sunday:

67 have been making noise on the UK scene with their energetic brand of drill music popularised in Chicago. And they made some noise here in Finsbury Park. Despite some controversy around the scene here in the UK, 67 showed why there’s a place for them on the UK music scene.

Onto Giggs, the veteran of the grime scene, who took us through a plethora of bangers. From what made him famous in Talkin The Hardest and Look What The Cat Dragged In through to his latest hit, London Town. He closed with KMT, a song he is the feature on with none other than…

Drake – reports earlier in the day confirmed DJ Khaled would not be arriving for his headline set. Understandably, there was worry at what the festival organisers could do at such short notice. But they came through with the biggest hip hop star in the world. Not bad at all. He blasted through songs from his new album, including God’s Plan and Nice For What, whipping the crowd into a frenzy and bringing to a close a quite stunning weekend of music.

With a billion streams in A WEEK, there is no denying that Drake sits on top of the music scene right now.

And that was it for Wireless. Again delivering as the hottest day festival right now in London. Until next year.