Galvin Green from Function 18: must-have gear for golf fantatics

Galvin Green from Function 18

Golfers among us will recognise the name Galvin Green as one of the highest quality. Their garments, while understated, boast the technical design and consideration that is more typically seen in top of the range ski wear. The materials used are what strikes you first, with that stretchable fabric that ensures a tailored fit, while breathable enough that you don’t incubate. As with ski wear, golf clothing ought to be attractive, but needs to be comfortable and highly flexible; Galvin Green does exactly that. The tops are windproof and resilient to the elements and all the attributes lead to that prevalent word whenever this brand is mentioned: quality.

Galvin Green Dex Insula Golf Pullover

The Galvin Green Dex Insula Golf Pullover might — as its name implies — be marketed toward golfers, but in many ways that undersells it. The Dex Insula is premium sportswear no matter what metric you choose to employ to measure it by; fit, fabric, design… it’s superb. I haven’t yet tested its insulating properties to any extremes, but it has not fallen short so far in our tumultuous British Spring. Finally, and there’s no macho way to express this: it’s really soft. You can pretend that soft isn’t appealing all you like: no one’s buying it.

Another key component of golf clothing is, of course, sartorial sensibility. OK, the Galvin Green Dex Insula Golf Pullover isn’t exactly Ian Poulter grade gear but it is extremely stylish nonetheless. The lightweight yet durable polyester and elastane blend makes it flexible enough to adjust to your body movement while also having the added benefit of being neatly fitted for all those triumphal struts towards the green. That applies equally – if not more so – for the otherwise shame filled trudges into the rough as you prepare to try and swing your way through various bracken /parking lot mopeds /woodland creatures /other…

In summary: the Dex Insula has all the components required to be considered great sportswear: style, comfort, flexibility and durability. It’s true that there may be cheaper brands out there. But, as with most things in life, you get what you pay for and if you’re in the market for golf wear that ticks all the boxes and that will stand the test of time as it contorts to your swing, Galvin Green – available from Function 18 – should definitely be your first port of call.

Words: Robert Baggs

Images: courtesy of Galvin Green + Function 18

Galvin Green Dex Insula Golf Pullover

Daphne Guinness Launches Second Album at London’s BFI IMAX

Album cover on BFI IMAX screen

Last night saw the launch of British fashion muse and musician Daphne Guinness ’ second album as Daphne and The Golden Chords, It’s a Riotat the BFI IMAX. As what can only be described as an extravagant homage, the heiress to Guinness – yes, the Irish stout – was the main focus of the night from the start to finish, complete with glass sculptures of the singer at the entrance and projections of her mirage covering the walls as drinks were served. As an air of nepotism swept the room, the event was bustling with friends and confidants of Daphne. From old rockers in leather jackets to big names in the fashion industry, the crowd was an eclectic mix of all ages, some of which wouldn’t have looked out of place 50 years ago.

Once ushered into the cinema for the screening with bags of popcorn, glasses of prosecco and merchandise, FAULT was treated to a sensory eye bath. With the help of Tony Visconti, the American record producer who helped the likes of Bowie and T. Rex, Daphne’s music – set to visuals created by artist Nick Knight – made an instant impact, leaving the audience mesmerised.

Over a collection of arty clips and kaleidoscopic visuals of the singer herself, the music poured out poppy, Lauper-esque hooks with ethereal lyrics taking influence from Marc Bolan and Bowie – Visconti definitely left his mark on the album. The self-proclaimed autobiographical record visits her recent near-death experience and her life as it has progressed in last few years. Using her classical training, penchant for poetry and love of Wagner (thanks to hours chatting with Bowie in the studio), Daphne has created her own unique style of glam rock – think a lot of spoken word and catchy repetition.

The unashamedly self-assured Daphne was soon interviewed on stage by music journalist Will Hodgkinson, who’s written for the likes of The Guardian and Vogue. However, as the Q&A progressed, her coquettish facade transformed into a timid, more vulnerable persona, speaking about her fears and anxieties both in her personal life and musical career, before mentioning her new relationship with her bandmates who are, of course, also big names in the music industry, including keyboard player Terry Miles.

The singer’s 80s-inspired sound and alias is a perfect partnership and, in Daphne’s own words, completes her world. Tour? She doesn’t know. But, if she does, make sure you bring your glitter platforms and leave the Guinness Toucan Tees at home.

Words: Flora Neighbour

Flora Neighbour with Daphne Guinness

Flora Neighbour with Daphne Guinness

 

Flora Neighbour with KC and Jordon Wi-Fi from Last Night in Paris

Flora Neighbour with KC and Jordon Wi-Fi from Last Night in Paris

 

Flora Neighbour with Daphne and The Golden Chord keyboard player Terry Miles

Flora Neighbour with Daphne and The Golden Chord keyboard player Terry Miles

 

Flora Neighbour with music journalist Will Hodgkinson

Flora Neighbour with music journalist Will Hodgkinson

Get to know Liza Anne with FAULT

The Beast from the East is in full swing when we meet with Liza Anne in East London, just days before she heads back to the States to embark on a Spring tour, including a stop in her hometown of Nashville: ‘I haven’t played there in like three years, so that will be fun’.

 

The buzz surrounding Liza Anne and her music is growing within the US and beyond, and it isn’t hard to see why; her deep and genuine lyrics, brought to life with haunting authenticity by her outstanding vocals, resonate with people on a level that is perhaps unexpected, given the vibrant pop energy of her latest album, Fine But Dying. Speaking with as much passion about her music as she does about dairy-free cheese, Liza is refreshingly open as we talk about everything from her family and future, to her own relationship with mental health, and a surprising admission to being something of a Hilary Duff fangirl…

 

So, you were performing at Kings Cross last night, how are you enjoying things in London?

I love it! I lived in Clapham Junction for six months one summer, and I’ve been here so many times it’s as if I was at home. All the clothes and record shops I like to go to are near here, so it’s a great place to be. And there’s so much good food too!

 

Last night was so fun, although I was worried because I woke up and couldn’t speak a word, so all day I just watched Princess Diaries and drank ginger tea! I did an interview with Radio X too, which was amazing – they played four songs from the new record, two of which are actually my favourites.

 

There were some great reactions on social media following that, about how your songs spoke to people’s own struggles with anxiety and mental health. Do you find people relate to your music in that way quite often?

I think that people are just waiting for someone to give them permission, in a way, which was the same for me for so long; I was just waiting for someone to give me a space to be fully myself or to feel whatever emotion I was feeling, so it’s interesting how people react when you create that space for them to exist in. More often than not people are just beyond kind and generous about how much the songs have helped them, which is really sweet to hear.

 

What’s been your journey through music, to get to where you are now?

 

When I try and think of what I wanted to be when I was a kid, I can’t remember anything except the moment that I wanted to start doing this. I started writing poetry when I was 8 years old, and started putting my poems to music when I was about 14. I think Taylor Swift was pretty big then, and I was like ‘Oh my gosh, I could totally do this!’

 

Interesting! So, was Taylor the sort of music you were into back then?

I definitely did not listen to a lot of Taylor Swift! I didn’t really listen to much country music, even though I grew up where that was very dominant. I listened to a lot of The Cranberries and Joni Mitchell, but I grew up in a really religious household, so I wasn’t allowed to listen to much ‘secular’ music.

 

My first concert was Hilary Duff – August 11th2004! I genuinely, to this day, am obsessed with her. She’s incredible! My aunt, who’s kind of my muse, gave me a mix tape when I was about 13, which had Joni Mitchell and The Cranberries on it, and I was like ‘Oh my God, I could sound like this!’

 

That’s really interesting about your aunt, what is it about her that makes her your muse?

 

She’s a visual artist, and she’s just one of the most raw, real and kind human beings I have ever met. I think she just looks at life in this very specific way, which gave me permission to look at life as I needed it to be and as I wanted it to be. As well as her giving me records when I was a kid, her husband was the one who loaned me a guitar for the summer when I went to camp, and I learned how to play it there.

 

Are there any artists that you’re into at the moment you think we should keep an ear out for?

 

So many! I mean St Vincent isn’t exactly up and coming but, my gosh, I cannot get over her! It is just the most refreshing thing to see a woman do something so unapologetically. There’s so much intent behind what she creates. As far as new things I’m loving, there’s this one girl, Caroline Rose, who is unbelievable. I came across her on Spotify last week and I have listened to her record maybe 10 times since then. She’s incredible – her lyrics, her voice, everything about her.

 

It’s not that I only listen to female artists, because there are a lot of male artists that I really do enjoy, but I think it’s so important, as a woman, to support other women who are carving out a space for themselves. I think I naturally gravitate towards those sorts of acts.

 

Your songs address some rather dark and melancholy emotions, but still manage to be very ‘pop’ in style – how do you go about balancing that sound with the subject matter?

 

I think you have to sometimes trick people in a way; like, people might avoid [the music] if it felt heavy, but if you lure people in with a poppier sound, they accidentally end up finding more of themselves.

 

I think I realised early on that what I wanted to do was appeal to the person who, perhaps, wouldn’t necessarily enjoy or choose a sad song, but they’re the ones who are usually suppressing those emotions the most. I wanted to give even the most unlikely person a door to more of their emotions. That’s not to say that I haven’t written a slew of sad songs too!

 

How do you think your sound has progressed over the years?

 

I think from playing live shows, I started to want to feel louder, to have more of a full, cinematic sort of show; I was just by myself with an electric guitar, so there was only a certain level I could really reach. I started listening to St Vincent when I was already quite far into writing this album, as well as Lady Lamb, Broadcast and The Cranberries – and all of those things that I was naturally pulling from before felt like they finally had a place in the art I was creating. So more than just being something I enjoyed, I realised I could channel those things in my own music.

 

Your new album, Fine But Dying, is out this month, which is pretty exciting! How have you found writing this latest record?

 

It’s crazy, I wrote the first song on this record three and a half years ago! It’s always therapeutic. I think that writing, or art in general, has the ability to save whoever is experiencing it, as much as they let it. I went into this record wanting to be on different terms with my panic disorder than I had been before; I wanted to have a healthy relationship with it, and I wanted to have a healthier relationship with myself and with my partner. I think the intention behind making the record was for it to be a cathartic experience.

 

And what sort vibe do you want people to get from it, is there something in particular you’re wanting to communicate?

 

Like with any of my music, I just want people to have this space to completely be themselves, to feel their emotions and feel free and validated. I want to create a portal for people to explore themselves, just like I want the shows to feel like this wave of emotion – with high energy moments and real introspective moments. I just want it to feel natural and alive.

 

What’s next for you? Is there anything on your bucket list you want to tick off soon?

I don’t know, play Jools Holland probably! I just want to keep outdoing every last thing I did. I don’t like setting crazy goals, I feel like it removes you from the present moment in a way. It’s like, thinking ahead to the biggest thing that I might do when I’m in my thirties sort of takes away from the fact that I’m 24 now, and I get to record and tour this record that I wrote, you know? I think I just want to try to be as present as I can over this whole journey.

 

And lastly, Liza, what is your FAULT?

 

Oh no, so many things! I guess with the job that I have, you can get a little bit self-reliant and self-centred in a way. I mean, I don’t feel like I’m an egotistical person but sometimes I’m just like, damn, Liza, you should really consider people outside of yourself. Absolutely that.

 

Fine But Dying is available to buy now. For more information visit www.lizaannemusic.com

Words: Jennifer Parkes

Isaac Gracie live @ The Deaf Institute Manchester

Isaac Gracie live @ The Deaf Institute, Manchester, 31/01/18

Isaac Grace shot by Aurelie Lagoutte

Photography: Aurelie Lagoutte

 

In the cosy, papered walls of Manchester’s Deaf Institute, a mixed crowd has gathered to see up-and-coming Londoner Isaac Gracie live. Couples and groups of friends of all ages have trudged through the rainy evening to see the early twenty-something who has found himself all over the airwaves. If you think you haven’t heard of him, think again. Listen to one of his hauntingly beautiful songs ‘The Death of You and I’ or ‘Terrified’ and you will probably know the words.

The intimate venue was a perfect setting for the cool and understated artist. In a tight floral shirt with more buttons undone than fastened, a wooden crucifix necklace on the bare skin that is revealed, black skinny jeans and shoulder length locks, Gracie cuts a celestial silhouette. Poking fun at his own outfit, voice and general demeanour throughout the night, Gracie’s bashfulness and self depreciation falls away as soon as he begins to sing. Chatting idly between songs, he disarms the audience with his chilled attitude before building momentum with each tune and leaving them agape.

Isaac Gracie shot by Aurelie Lagoutte

One for fans of James Bay and Hozier, Isaac Gracie pulls off a dramatic performance with all the confidence of a seasoned artist. Impressive, as he is yet to release his debut album. Not keeping the hits until his encore, Gracie performs the roaring ‘Death of You and I’ early in the set and nails the juxtaposing raucous chorus and mellow verses. Standout songs are the chilling ‘Reverie’ and sad sing-a-long ‘Terrified.’ If this show is anything to go by, Gracie’s upcoming album (set to be released in spring) and UK tour aren’t to be missed.

Words: Alex Bee

‘Artificial Light’ by Frederick Wilkinson – Exclusive Fashion editorial for FAULT Online

Top- Minan Wong
Pants- Layana Aguilar
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- H&M

Blue pants- Chikimiki
Print blouse- Chikimiki
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- H&M

 

Blouse- behno
Earring- H&M

Long sleeve blouse- Behno
Dress- Layana Aguilar
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- H&M

Long sleeve knit top- Chikimiki
Sleeveless knit top- Chikimiki
Skirt- chikimiki
Shoes- ALDO
Earring- H&M

Coat- Layana Aguilar
Earring- H&M

Top- Chikimiki
Long sleeve blouse (worn around neck)- Vintage
Pants- Chikimiki
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- H&M

Top- Chikimiki
Bralette- KORAL
Pants- Chikimiki
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- MANGO

Dress- Layana Aguilar
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- H&M

Photographer: Frederick Wilkinson @fw_photo

Model: Asia, MSA Models NY @asiaprus @msamodels

Stylist: Lauren Walsh @laaurenwalsh

MUA: Elena Thomopoulos @elvendoe

Wig Stylist: Bamby @bambyofsuburbia

Photographer’s Assistant: Yanutzi Diaz @yanutzi

FAULT Favourites: Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

“Yes, I was thinking: we live without a future. That’s what’s queer …” Virginia Woolf

Marius Janusauskas SS18

The Marius Janusauskas SS18 collection marries “a wish-landscape”, mythopoetic categories and queer temporality. The refusal of a certain natural order opens up new possibilities for hope and diversity in the present moment. This celebration of the moment signifies utopian potentiality and an escape from the constraints of reality.

The collection is inspired by uniforms, Andy Warhol’s early hand-drawings and camouflage, which is this context is viewed as an artistic approximation of nature. The process of deconstruction of regular military, white collar and workers uniforms with soft silks and transgender body has progressed into creation of original garments. The suggestion of which is like an unregistered story or a poem.

 

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Photographer: Paulius Zaborskis

Full Collection by Marius Janusauskas SS18

Grooming: Kristina Pasaka Busilaite

Model: Nikita at imagegroup

See more at www.mariusjanusauskas.com

Snow White On The Edge – exclusive fashion editorial for FAULT Online

Kimono: Fendi
Denim: Dior
Accessories: By Highinheels
Shoes: Alaia

Kimono: Fendi
Denim: Dior
Accessories: By Highinheels
Shoes: Alaia

Motor Jacket: Kanye West
Dress: Cos
Necklace: Dior
Shoes: Alaia
Skirt: Vintage Chloe

Motor Jacket: Kanye West
Dress: Cos
Necklace: Dior
Shoes: Alaia
Skirt: Vintage Chloe

Outerwear: Fausto Puglisi
Dress: Versace Vintage
Necklace: Dior
Glasses: Ferre
Shoes: Alaia

Kimono: Fendi
Denim: Dior
Accessories: By Highinheels
Shoes: Alaia

Outerwear: Fausto Puglisi
Dress: Versace Vintage
Necklace: Dior
Glasses: Ferre
Shoes: Alaia

Photographer: Theresa Kaindl – @TheresaKaindl
Stylist: Dominique Reina – @Domi.NYC
Hair + Make Up: Joshua Nyitray – @JoshuaNyitrayhair
Model: Anastasia Salenko – @Miralenko
Agency: Montrueil Group – @MontreuilGroup

70s to 90s Harlem at its best – exclusive fashion editorial for FAULT Online

DFYD Top: Olivia Mains, The George Trousers: Olivia Mains, Trainers/Sneakers: Puma

Leather Coat: Vintage CR MATES, Trousers: Zara, Shoes: Clarks, Shirt: Vintage Versace

Shirt: Chiffon, Trousers: Olivia Mains, Sandals: BU Collection

 

Blazer: Hart Schaffner Marx, Shirt: Gillingan & O’Malley, Trousers: Gillingan & O’Malley, Shoes: Mossimo, Leather Holster: Flux Production, Sunglasses: Gucci

 

Tied Up Croptop: Olivia Mains, The Peakaboo Pants: Olivia Mains, Trainers: Puma, Gold Oversized Chain: Thrift store

Eye C U Top & Leggings & Plastic Pullover: Olivia Mains, Sunglasses: Thrift Store, Sandals: Steve Madden

Photographed by Noa Grayevsky

Styling: Zarah Elizabeth

Hair & Make Up: Admin Rivero

Model: Xiara Waller (Fusion Models)

Produced by Carolin Ramsauer