David LaChapelle solo exhibition in Holland

Good news for modern man: the future is bright. If you need any convincing to pop over to the pretty city of Groningen in Holland, the David LaChapelle solo exhibition should sway you in the right direction. Not the most obvious place to showcase the photographer’s raunchy images (after all, he has a history photographing Beyonce, Miley Cyrus and Lady Gaga), but this latest anthology returns to his artistic roots, and complement Groningen’s old town juxtaposed with modern buildings, which nestle on the canal in the north of the Netherlands.

David LaChapelle The Rape of Africa

Known for producing experimental fashion editorials, commercials and music videos for high profile clients, LaChapelle has worked with every big name in the industry, and is one of the most respected and in demand photographers around the world; So it is interesting to find that the Gronginger Museum, already owns one of his controversial, hyper stylised works, and is the place he chose for his first solo exhibition in the Netherlands.

To the broad minded Dutch nation- naked bodies, interracial relationships and liberal religious views are widely acceptable, and a show that comments on sexuality, birth, death and nature in an idyllic, utopian world would appear to be the perfect partnership. Taking over the modernistic Museum (which was redesigned by Philippe Starck and Alessandro Mendini) adds a unique, modern focus to the university town. Situated in a central location on the canal, and directly opposite the ancient architecture of the train station it offers a juxtaposition of eras, but this is something that works so well in Holland.

A bit of a rebel himself, LaChapelle ran away to New York aged 15, and worked as a busboy in Studio 54. Immersing himself in glamorous New York disco scene, he got to know the “It” crowd and partied with the movers and shakers of the eighties pop art scene including Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. It is also where he was introduced to Andy Warhol and his infamous “Factory”. Already photographing people, LaChapelle soon gained recognition for his uniquely raw images. Snapped up by Warhol, he became the photographer for ‘Interview’ magazine and exhibited alongside other 80s pioneers Doug Aitken and Karen Kilimnik.

His style emphasising lewd, larger than life subjects became him trademark, and he embraced the flamboyant characters of the nineties and noughties. Celebrities, high fashion magazines and advertising clients were queuing up to get immersed in La Chapelle’s irreverent gaze- where anti-perfection was approved and surrealism encouraged.  However, the celebrity bubble seems to have peaked for LaChapelle, as his more recent work is a much more personal representation of transfiguration, regaining paradise, and the notion of life after death.

David LaChapelle The Rape of Africa

Breaking boundaries, La Chapelle uses fine art as a basis for his work and is the first to admit he explores the darker side of reality. Often using props, he is the master of creating make believe worlds where anything is possible. The hyper-real landscapes blend urban and suburban environments to create a make believe setting which is also super real and accessible. This form of art is contrary to what other commercial photographers were presenting, and opened up a niche market for emotions.

In fact, after shooting every celebrity (and their dog) in 2006, he stepped away from commercial work, retreating to an isolated former nudist colony in Maui, Hawaii to focus on fine-art photography and farming. Whether this break was a rejection of the fast moving lifestyle where celebrity photography comes with its own celebrity or it was a time to reflect as he openly talks about his friends who died of AIDS, his consequential work has a more personal influence.

David-LaChapelle-The-House-at-the-End-of-the-World-2005

‘Good News for Modern Man’ is filled with sins and redemption is a deeply personal insight into LaChapelle’s life. With over 70 pieces, the narrative is as jerky as it is unanticipated, yet it seems to flow. Clearly inspired by fine artists Edward Hopper, William Blake and the Old Masters, LaChapelle has a knack of combining the two disciplines -fusing photography with art; Resulting in large scale representations of joy, lust, and paradise which are symbolic and timeless.

Mostly, these works reject the material world and are deeply spiritual or religious, with obvious reference to the greats. In particular, you can recognise Michelangelo’s ‘Renaissance’ in ‘The Deluge’ series. An immersive piece of art which engulfs the viewer in the ginormous seven metres wide span. On closer inspection you can see the sitters are big names from celebritydom, with Kanye West as Jesus, Lil’ Kim as the Virgin Mary and Naomi Campbell as Venus, which might be highly irreverent for some.

Part of LaChapelle’s work is tongue in cheek. Courting exploitation, he chooses religion to express popularity; Nothing is sacred or forbidden and his modern day representation of religious icons brings a new dimension to opinions of life after death and questions the metaphysical side of life.

With a clear shift in focus from commercial commissions, this exhibition displays LaChapelle’s personal and intuitive concepts. Split into categories. ‘New World’ shares his personal search for Eden using thinly disguised biblical references which have the background of his sanctuary in Hawaii. However these pieces are seen more as art than photography as the two disciplines are fused to produce hyper-surreal images which burst into thousands of colours in front of you.

Lachapelle-blancanieves

The exhibition will no doubt question the viewer’s spiritual beliefs, and LaChapelle even questions himself on how long modern art actually lasts. It is a must-see for anyone with an inquisitive nature as the show is not just about the artworks, but is an important slice of history which makes a profound commentary on the contemporary world.

The exhibition LaChapelle: Good News For Modern Man can be seen from 21 April to 28 October 2018.

Head to Groningen for the exhibition and stay the weekend. This up and coming city is well worth a visit and only two hours from Amsterdam, you can have the perfect weekend away!

Jesus is my homeboy

FACTBOX

Gronginger Museum

*Hotel*

A pretty, listed 4star hotel,  dating back to the 15th century.

NH Groningen Hotel de Ville

Oude Boteringestraat 43-45, 9712 GD Groningen

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*Canal Trip*

The perfect way to see the city without walking across the cobbles.

Rondvaartbedrijf Kool

Stationsweg 1012, 9726 AZ Groningen

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*Restaurant*

Delicious, healthy modern cuisine. Open late, but must book.

Brasserie  Midi

Folkingestraat 42, Groningen

The Fashion Revolution: Why We Love Inspiration from the Past

People often say that fashion is revolutionary. With every passing decade we grow closer to repeating the successes (and failures – shell suits!?) of the past. Embracing what was great about the fashions of a past decade – what they represented culturally and socially – is key in showing how we have developed and can bring in previous motifs to the modern day. Let’s take a look at fashions from the 1960s right through to earlier in the 21st century to see which looks are enduring and why it’s important to keep links with the past.

Source: @rickbrownell via Twitter

Back to the Sixties

The 1960s were one of the first decades that made waves with fashion. While the standardized nature of the post-war years gave us some interesting touches such as the beehive hairdo and the dotted pencil skirt, it was the 1960s that allowed fashion to begin to speak for itself. Using fashion as a way to showcase culture was a huge part of the love revolution that took over the decade of the Beatles and Woodstock. The 1960s introduced mini skirts, leopard print, and knee-high boots. While the first two have remained popular since their inception, knee-high boots are making a true comeback. The 1960s also gave us the empire waist, a dress that used the defined waistline that sat higher on the frame to produce a unique and statuesque silhouette. The empire waist is suited for special occasions, so can often be seen as the feature on bridesmaids dresses and prom dresses. Though not everything from the 1960s could make a comeback – babydoll dresses, entire outfits made of the same color, and the color of the mods, lime green, have thankfully stayed in their decade.

Source: @70s_fashion via Twitter

Disco Fever

The 1970s gave us disco music and the entire culture and lifestyle that came with it – including metallics, sequins, and neon inspired clothing. One key trend from the 1970s that has made a recurrence is the flared trouser look. Harper’s Bazaar showcases many celebrities who embrace the look in 2018 and the loose fitting nature of the clothing could provide the perfect breezy relief for summer. In the 1970s people were taking more and more chances with what they wore – and in an age of freedom such as 2018, the same thing is happening with some 1970s motifs. Bohemian chic has made a comeback thanks to the hipsters and those appreciating the bohemian subculture. The outfits may be updated, but the understated, flowing, casual nature is retained. The punk rock styles of the ’70s have also remained timeless, with leather jackets staying in fashion thanks to their constant use by high fashion celebrities. The durable material allows the wearer to blend seamlessly into both casual and more formal settings and the style has only appreciated in value since its inception. Thankfully, the 1970s trend of safari attire and faux military khaki have left us with the last days of disco.

It’s Not Just Fashions – Hobbies Are Making a Comeback

But it’s not just fashions of the past that are making a comeback. Once a way in which to make do and mend, knitting has found a resurgence – with a high number of men taking up the therapeutic hobby. Bingo has seen a rise too. With the ability to play bingo online with no deposits, millennials are flocking to play the game of the baby boomers. Baking has seen a renaissance as well – with the success of the Great British Bake Off, more and more people are turning to traditional crafts that stood for values of reducing waste and centering the family around the dinner table. While our fashions are returning to the past through inspirational looks, our pastimes are as well, bringing modern touches – playing games online and reading receipts from iPads – to the classic nature of the hobby.

Straight Out of the Eighties

The 1980s took the fashion steps made in the 1960s and 1970s and ran with them. Dozens of fashions from the 1980s have remained popular – from t-shirts with bands on them to logo t-shirts to leggings with them. Shoulder pads and crimped hair are yet to make a reoccurrence, as are batwing sleeves. The 1980s personified the trend of dressing to exercise, and while we don’t wear sweatbands are our wrists and foreheads, wearing tracksuits and jogging bottoms with vests is an enduring fashion.

Source: @90s via Twitter

Not So Long Ago

We assume when people are talking about past fashions that they’re talking about the distant past and since the 1980s we have gained a collective fashion conscience to move forwards. But the 1990s, looking back – and being almost thirty years ago – had their share of outlandish fashions. Let’s start with curtained fringes, which have make a comeback, especially with models. Faded jeans and oversized t-shirts have also seen a rise in fashion stores such as ASOS, and colored jumpers and sweatshirts have circulated back into fashion. Looking back at bands from the 1990s, such as the Spice Girls, and blockbusters such as Clueless show us what fashion was back then. We didn’t notice the garish and striking nature of it at the time, but have since developed more of an eye for what looks good.

Basically Yesterday

Fashions from the 2000s are also coming back – and ones we didn’t even realize had left circulation until we saw photographic documentation of what we used to look like fifteen years ago. The age of social media means that we are more conscious of how we look and what we wear, so creating unique fashions seems more contrived that the way they naturally trickled through society. Wearing trends such as Beyonce’s Blue Ivy ranges and men wearing white jeans are some trends that cropped up and instantly faded in recent years. Topknots were also the rage just a few years ago, yet are seldom sported now, receiving raised eyebrows instead. Looking forward, it could be that in five to ten years’ time, topknots will be the rage again, sported by celebrities and civilians alike, with no memory of the way they boomed and faded only yesterday. Fashion is revolutionary and just as we repeat and take influence from the past, we are creating fashions that will feed into fashion revolutions of the future.

So, as we can see, the fashions of the past 50 years can be called upon in modern times to help accent certain features or infuse a look with the culture and attitudes that helped its invention. Bringing back fashions from the past not only helps introduce them to a new audience but reminds us of how far we have come and how we should constantly be looking back in order to cultivate a better future.

Galvin Green from Function 18: must-have gear for golf fantatics

Galvin Green from Function 18

Golfers among us will recognise the name Galvin Green as one of the highest quality. Their garments, while understated, boast the technical design and consideration that is more typically seen in top of the range ski wear. The materials used are what strikes you first, with that stretchable fabric that ensures a tailored fit, while breathable enough that you don’t incubate. As with ski wear, golf clothing ought to be attractive, but needs to be comfortable and highly flexible; Galvin Green does exactly that. The tops are windproof and resilient to the elements and all the attributes lead to that prevalent word whenever this brand is mentioned: quality.

Galvin Green Dex Insula Golf Pullover

The Galvin Green Dex Insula Golf Pullover might — as its name implies — be marketed toward golfers, but in many ways that undersells it. The Dex Insula is premium sportswear no matter what metric you choose to employ to measure it by; fit, fabric, design… it’s superb. I haven’t yet tested its insulating properties to any extremes, but it has not fallen short so far in our tumultuous British Spring. Finally, and there’s no macho way to express this: it’s really soft. You can pretend that soft isn’t appealing all you like: no one’s buying it.

Another key component of golf clothing is, of course, sartorial sensibility. OK, the Galvin Green Dex Insula Golf Pullover isn’t exactly Ian Poulter grade gear but it is extremely stylish nonetheless. The lightweight yet durable polyester and elastane blend makes it flexible enough to adjust to your body movement while also having the added benefit of being neatly fitted for all those triumphal struts towards the green. That applies equally – if not more so – for the otherwise shame filled trudges into the rough as you prepare to try and swing your way through various bracken /parking lot mopeds /woodland creatures /other…

In summary: the Dex Insula has all the components required to be considered great sportswear: style, comfort, flexibility and durability. It’s true that there may be cheaper brands out there. But, as with most things in life, you get what you pay for and if you’re in the market for golf wear that ticks all the boxes and that will stand the test of time as it contorts to your swing, Galvin Green – available from Function 18 – should definitely be your first port of call.

Words: Robert Baggs

Images: courtesy of Galvin Green + Function 18

Galvin Green Dex Insula Golf Pullover

Daphne Guinness Launches Second Album at London’s BFI IMAX

Album cover on BFI IMAX screen

Last night saw the launch of British fashion muse and musician Daphne Guinness ’ second album as Daphne and The Golden Chords, It’s a Riotat the BFI IMAX. As what can only be described as an extravagant homage, the heiress to Guinness – yes, the Irish stout – was the main focus of the night from the start to finish, complete with glass sculptures of the singer at the entrance and projections of her mirage covering the walls as drinks were served. As an air of nepotism swept the room, the event was bustling with friends and confidants of Daphne. From old rockers in leather jackets to big names in the fashion industry, the crowd was an eclectic mix of all ages, some of which wouldn’t have looked out of place 50 years ago.

Once ushered into the cinema for the screening with bags of popcorn, glasses of prosecco and merchandise, FAULT was treated to a sensory eye bath. With the help of Tony Visconti, the American record producer who helped the likes of Bowie and T. Rex, Daphne’s music – set to visuals created by artist Nick Knight – made an instant impact, leaving the audience mesmerised.

Over a collection of arty clips and kaleidoscopic visuals of the singer herself, the music poured out poppy, Lauper-esque hooks with ethereal lyrics taking influence from Marc Bolan and Bowie – Visconti definitely left his mark on the album. The self-proclaimed autobiographical record visits her recent near-death experience and her life as it has progressed in last few years. Using her classical training, penchant for poetry and love of Wagner (thanks to hours chatting with Bowie in the studio), Daphne has created her own unique style of glam rock – think a lot of spoken word and catchy repetition.

The unashamedly self-assured Daphne was soon interviewed on stage by music journalist Will Hodgkinson, who’s written for the likes of The Guardian and Vogue. However, as the Q&A progressed, her coquettish facade transformed into a timid, more vulnerable persona, speaking about her fears and anxieties both in her personal life and musical career, before mentioning her new relationship with her bandmates who are, of course, also big names in the music industry, including keyboard player Terry Miles.

The singer’s 80s-inspired sound and alias is a perfect partnership and, in Daphne’s own words, completes her world. Tour? She doesn’t know. But, if she does, make sure you bring your glitter platforms and leave the Guinness Toucan Tees at home.

Words: Flora Neighbour

Flora Neighbour with Daphne Guinness

Flora Neighbour with Daphne Guinness

 

Flora Neighbour with KC and Jordon Wi-Fi from Last Night in Paris

Flora Neighbour with KC and Jordon Wi-Fi from Last Night in Paris

 

Flora Neighbour with Daphne and The Golden Chord keyboard player Terry Miles

Flora Neighbour with Daphne and The Golden Chord keyboard player Terry Miles

 

Flora Neighbour with music journalist Will Hodgkinson

Flora Neighbour with music journalist Will Hodgkinson

Get to know Liza Anne with FAULT

The Beast from the East is in full swing when we meet with Liza Anne in East London, just days before she heads back to the States to embark on a Spring tour, including a stop in her hometown of Nashville: ‘I haven’t played there in like three years, so that will be fun’.

 

The buzz surrounding Liza Anne and her music is growing within the US and beyond, and it isn’t hard to see why; her deep and genuine lyrics, brought to life with haunting authenticity by her outstanding vocals, resonate with people on a level that is perhaps unexpected, given the vibrant pop energy of her latest album, Fine But Dying. Speaking with as much passion about her music as she does about dairy-free cheese, Liza is refreshingly open as we talk about everything from her family and future, to her own relationship with mental health, and a surprising admission to being something of a Hilary Duff fangirl…

 

So, you were performing at Kings Cross last night, how are you enjoying things in London?

I love it! I lived in Clapham Junction for six months one summer, and I’ve been here so many times it’s as if I was at home. All the clothes and record shops I like to go to are near here, so it’s a great place to be. And there’s so much good food too!

 

Last night was so fun, although I was worried because I woke up and couldn’t speak a word, so all day I just watched Princess Diaries and drank ginger tea! I did an interview with Radio X too, which was amazing – they played four songs from the new record, two of which are actually my favourites.

 

There were some great reactions on social media following that, about how your songs spoke to people’s own struggles with anxiety and mental health. Do you find people relate to your music in that way quite often?

I think that people are just waiting for someone to give them permission, in a way, which was the same for me for so long; I was just waiting for someone to give me a space to be fully myself or to feel whatever emotion I was feeling, so it’s interesting how people react when you create that space for them to exist in. More often than not people are just beyond kind and generous about how much the songs have helped them, which is really sweet to hear.

 

What’s been your journey through music, to get to where you are now?

 

When I try and think of what I wanted to be when I was a kid, I can’t remember anything except the moment that I wanted to start doing this. I started writing poetry when I was 8 years old, and started putting my poems to music when I was about 14. I think Taylor Swift was pretty big then, and I was like ‘Oh my gosh, I could totally do this!’

 

Interesting! So, was Taylor the sort of music you were into back then?

I definitely did not listen to a lot of Taylor Swift! I didn’t really listen to much country music, even though I grew up where that was very dominant. I listened to a lot of The Cranberries and Joni Mitchell, but I grew up in a really religious household, so I wasn’t allowed to listen to much ‘secular’ music.

 

My first concert was Hilary Duff – August 11th2004! I genuinely, to this day, am obsessed with her. She’s incredible! My aunt, who’s kind of my muse, gave me a mix tape when I was about 13, which had Joni Mitchell and The Cranberries on it, and I was like ‘Oh my God, I could sound like this!’

 

That’s really interesting about your aunt, what is it about her that makes her your muse?

 

She’s a visual artist, and she’s just one of the most raw, real and kind human beings I have ever met. I think she just looks at life in this very specific way, which gave me permission to look at life as I needed it to be and as I wanted it to be. As well as her giving me records when I was a kid, her husband was the one who loaned me a guitar for the summer when I went to camp, and I learned how to play it there.

 

Are there any artists that you’re into at the moment you think we should keep an ear out for?

 

So many! I mean St Vincent isn’t exactly up and coming but, my gosh, I cannot get over her! It is just the most refreshing thing to see a woman do something so unapologetically. There’s so much intent behind what she creates. As far as new things I’m loving, there’s this one girl, Caroline Rose, who is unbelievable. I came across her on Spotify last week and I have listened to her record maybe 10 times since then. She’s incredible – her lyrics, her voice, everything about her.

 

It’s not that I only listen to female artists, because there are a lot of male artists that I really do enjoy, but I think it’s so important, as a woman, to support other women who are carving out a space for themselves. I think I naturally gravitate towards those sorts of acts.

 

Your songs address some rather dark and melancholy emotions, but still manage to be very ‘pop’ in style – how do you go about balancing that sound with the subject matter?

 

I think you have to sometimes trick people in a way; like, people might avoid [the music] if it felt heavy, but if you lure people in with a poppier sound, they accidentally end up finding more of themselves.

 

I think I realised early on that what I wanted to do was appeal to the person who, perhaps, wouldn’t necessarily enjoy or choose a sad song, but they’re the ones who are usually suppressing those emotions the most. I wanted to give even the most unlikely person a door to more of their emotions. That’s not to say that I haven’t written a slew of sad songs too!

 

How do you think your sound has progressed over the years?

 

I think from playing live shows, I started to want to feel louder, to have more of a full, cinematic sort of show; I was just by myself with an electric guitar, so there was only a certain level I could really reach. I started listening to St Vincent when I was already quite far into writing this album, as well as Lady Lamb, Broadcast and The Cranberries – and all of those things that I was naturally pulling from before felt like they finally had a place in the art I was creating. So more than just being something I enjoyed, I realised I could channel those things in my own music.

 

Your new album, Fine But Dying, is out this month, which is pretty exciting! How have you found writing this latest record?

 

It’s crazy, I wrote the first song on this record three and a half years ago! It’s always therapeutic. I think that writing, or art in general, has the ability to save whoever is experiencing it, as much as they let it. I went into this record wanting to be on different terms with my panic disorder than I had been before; I wanted to have a healthy relationship with it, and I wanted to have a healthier relationship with myself and with my partner. I think the intention behind making the record was for it to be a cathartic experience.

 

And what sort vibe do you want people to get from it, is there something in particular you’re wanting to communicate?

 

Like with any of my music, I just want people to have this space to completely be themselves, to feel their emotions and feel free and validated. I want to create a portal for people to explore themselves, just like I want the shows to feel like this wave of emotion – with high energy moments and real introspective moments. I just want it to feel natural and alive.

 

What’s next for you? Is there anything on your bucket list you want to tick off soon?

I don’t know, play Jools Holland probably! I just want to keep outdoing every last thing I did. I don’t like setting crazy goals, I feel like it removes you from the present moment in a way. It’s like, thinking ahead to the biggest thing that I might do when I’m in my thirties sort of takes away from the fact that I’m 24 now, and I get to record and tour this record that I wrote, you know? I think I just want to try to be as present as I can over this whole journey.

 

And lastly, Liza, what is your FAULT?

 

Oh no, so many things! I guess with the job that I have, you can get a little bit self-reliant and self-centred in a way. I mean, I don’t feel like I’m an egotistical person but sometimes I’m just like, damn, Liza, you should really consider people outside of yourself. Absolutely that.

 

Fine But Dying is available to buy now. For more information visit www.lizaannemusic.com

Words: Jennifer Parkes

Isaac Gracie live @ The Deaf Institute Manchester

Isaac Gracie live @ The Deaf Institute, Manchester, 31/01/18

Isaac Grace shot by Aurelie Lagoutte

Photography: Aurelie Lagoutte

 

In the cosy, papered walls of Manchester’s Deaf Institute, a mixed crowd has gathered to see up-and-coming Londoner Isaac Gracie live. Couples and groups of friends of all ages have trudged through the rainy evening to see the early twenty-something who has found himself all over the airwaves. If you think you haven’t heard of him, think again. Listen to one of his hauntingly beautiful songs ‘The Death of You and I’ or ‘Terrified’ and you will probably know the words.

The intimate venue was a perfect setting for the cool and understated artist. In a tight floral shirt with more buttons undone than fastened, a wooden crucifix necklace on the bare skin that is revealed, black skinny jeans and shoulder length locks, Gracie cuts a celestial silhouette. Poking fun at his own outfit, voice and general demeanour throughout the night, Gracie’s bashfulness and self depreciation falls away as soon as he begins to sing. Chatting idly between songs, he disarms the audience with his chilled attitude before building momentum with each tune and leaving them agape.

Isaac Gracie shot by Aurelie Lagoutte

One for fans of James Bay and Hozier, Isaac Gracie pulls off a dramatic performance with all the confidence of a seasoned artist. Impressive, as he is yet to release his debut album. Not keeping the hits until his encore, Gracie performs the roaring ‘Death of You and I’ early in the set and nails the juxtaposing raucous chorus and mellow verses. Standout songs are the chilling ‘Reverie’ and sad sing-a-long ‘Terrified.’ If this show is anything to go by, Gracie’s upcoming album (set to be released in spring) and UK tour aren’t to be missed.

Words: Alex Bee

‘Artificial Light’ by Frederick Wilkinson – Exclusive Fashion editorial for FAULT Online

Top- Minan Wong
Pants- Layana Aguilar
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- H&M

Blue pants- Chikimiki
Print blouse- Chikimiki
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- H&M

 

Blouse- behno
Earring- H&M

Long sleeve blouse- Behno
Dress- Layana Aguilar
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- H&M

Long sleeve knit top- Chikimiki
Sleeveless knit top- Chikimiki
Skirt- chikimiki
Shoes- ALDO
Earring- H&M

Coat- Layana Aguilar
Earring- H&M

Top- Chikimiki
Long sleeve blouse (worn around neck)- Vintage
Pants- Chikimiki
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- H&M

Top- Chikimiki
Bralette- KORAL
Pants- Chikimiki
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- MANGO

Dress- Layana Aguilar
Shoes- Marc Fisher
Earring- H&M

Photographer: Frederick Wilkinson @fw_photo

Model: Asia, MSA Models NY @asiaprus @msamodels

Stylist: Lauren Walsh @laaurenwalsh

MUA: Elena Thomopoulos @elvendoe

Wig Stylist: Bamby @bambyofsuburbia

Photographer’s Assistant: Yanutzi Diaz @yanutzi

FAULT Favourites: Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

“Yes, I was thinking: we live without a future. That’s what’s queer …” Virginia Woolf

Marius Janusauskas SS18

The Marius Janusauskas SS18 collection marries “a wish-landscape”, mythopoetic categories and queer temporality. The refusal of a certain natural order opens up new possibilities for hope and diversity in the present moment. This celebration of the moment signifies utopian potentiality and an escape from the constraints of reality.

The collection is inspired by uniforms, Andy Warhol’s early hand-drawings and camouflage, which is this context is viewed as an artistic approximation of nature. The process of deconstruction of regular military, white collar and workers uniforms with soft silks and transgender body has progressed into creation of original garments. The suggestion of which is like an unregistered story or a poem.

 

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Marius Janusauskas SS18

Photographer: Paulius Zaborskis

Full Collection by Marius Janusauskas SS18

Grooming: Kristina Pasaka Busilaite

Model: Nikita at imagegroup

See more at www.mariusjanusauskas.com