Taylor Swift’s Reputation Tour

TAYLOR SWIFT DELIVERS IMPECABLE PERFORMANCE OF POWERHOUSE CALIBER IN FRONT OF 90,000 PEOPLE AT WEMBLEY STADIUM.

 

Her Swifties are definitely not swiftly moving on. Welcome to the Reputation Tour.

 

Pop phenomenon Taylor Swift conquered Wembley Stadium tonight with a Cirque du Soleil like performance. Swift’s latest Reputation tour is the embodiment of pop impeccability.

Swift is a star that knows how to please everyone. The show comes together through a unique blend of dancers, lasers, fireworks, flame-throwers and a flying cage that whisks her away from stage to stage.

Her fans are in celebratory spirits. Going to a Taylor Swift show is an experience of belongingness for her fans as opposed to merely a high-octane spectacle. For an artist who has continuously published her personal journals, the stadium show feels strangely powerful and intimate at the same time. It’s a heart to heart in a high-octane show. Swift is a musician who doesn’t hide behind her lyrics. Stadiums can often strip the biggest stars of their presence, but Swift stands tall, undiminished by the flames, the fireworks, and the big-budget hydraulics.

With an all-inclusive playlist that features both songs from her previous albums and latest releases, Swift’s performance blends them all together into a cohesive version – reflective of her genuine self. The old songs are rendered in a new formula that makes them blend effortlessly into the high-octane setlist.

The show kicks off with criticism towards tabloid media who have torn the star to shreds previously and carry on doing so to present day. She’s taking in all in stride though. At the end of the day, it’s the fans that matter the most. Swift is a performer that never sought to make the same album twice. And her fans have stuck with her from her country days to her pop-infused 1989 up until present day with her EDM-reminiscent Reputation album. Ultimately, it’s their continuous support that sky-rocketed Taylor to household calibre and encouraged her to evolve and experiment.

The innocence of ‘You Belong With Me’ gave way to the vitriol of ‘Look What You Made Me Do’ as the imagery of snakes flooded the stage (a nod to the label Swift was given after a feud with Kanye West). Taylor Swift is an artist that appeals to both the little girl inside a woman and the woman inside a little girl.

And Wembley stadium is the perfect home for her latest album. Reputation is designed to be performed on a large scale. It’s perfectly curated for that particular high-caliber level of sound and light. It’s the definition of stadium-curated pop sensation. Throughout her set, Swift’s voice never falters, hitting all the high notes that are carefully timed in order to make a long-lasting impact. Her performance is inch-perfect and Swift sounds poised and potent.

The most impressive part of Taylor’s show lies within the stage design and overall outrageously perfect production, from her microphones to an arch designed in the shape of a cobra.

Infused with timeless pop references from George Michael’s 2006 stage – along with Coldplay’s concept of giving out wristbands that flicker to the beat, Swift quickly turns her fans into fireflies for the evening.

People might have strong opinions about Swift, but the singer-songwriter is clearly in her imperial phase. With 13 years in pop music, long may her reign continue. In a couple of decades, we will see this emblematic day at Wembley Stadium as the pinnacle moment of when Taylor Swift’s became a legacy name to rival Michael Jackson.

Rolling Stones: A never-ending love affair

The Rolling Stones taught us how to be young and now they’re teaching us how to be old. One day in the not-so-distant future, jaw-dropping evenings like these could be an experience only kept alive in our memories. The Rolling Stones are and will forever be a force to be reckoned with. Once again, they prove themselves in front of more than 60,000 people at London Stadium on a warm May evening.

Vanishing any doubts about their eternal youth and vigour in the late years, The Rolling Stones take the audience through highs, tender lows, laughter, and jubilation, at a show delivered with a flair that astounds and delights.

Mick Jagger is omnipresent, bursting on to the enormous stage in a silver, black and red jacket to the rumbling strains of “Street Fighting Man”, moving directly into “It’s Only Rock ’N’ Roll” then soothing us with “Tumbling Dice”, prompting roars with those opening notes of “Paint it Black”.
Mick, of course, is the consummate showman, remaining snake of hips and utterly fabulous with every curl of the lip and shake of the mane.




Guitar legend Keith Richards remains the rock pirate, Ronnie Wood dubbed the ‘Ryan Giggs’ of the band by Jagger for his youthful vigour, we presume, and Charlie Watts the driving pounding force on the drums.
For their second London Stadium show on the No Filter tour, The Rolling Stones were joined onstage by Florence Welch, for a special version of Wild Horses. Welch joined Jagger on stage for a staggering and passionate rendition of the Sticky Fingers classic, with the two singers trading verses, sharing choruses, locking eyes and holding hands as if entangled in musical conversation.


Earlier in the night, Florence and the Machine had served as one of the Rolling Stones’ all-star opening acts during this European stretch of No Filter Tour dates. Welch previously tweeted of the gig, “It is a huge honour to be playing with one of our biggest influences.”

Satisfaction closed out the style, with Jagger taking one last opportunity to prance remorsefully around the stage as only he can. Marriages, presidents, wars, and technology come and go, but The Rolling Stones remain, testing the limits of the rock ‘n’ roll dream. No longer the greatest, but still the greatest; a band that will forever stand the test of time.