MAALS Watches: guest post by co-founder Andy Sealey

In the beginning: the start of MAALS Watches

 

MAALS Watches - #MAALSWatches

Jump Over The Moon brushed steel by MAALS

 

Guest post by @AndyLSealey

My brother and I have always collected watches. None of them too expensive – some old, some new – but all a bit out of the norm in design. After years of talking but not doing, we bit the bullet and finally decided to start our own watch company and design watches that we’d be happy to have in our own collections.

This series of blogs will be about our journey from cool idea to reality. We’ve never written a blog or started a company before, so this is a whole new exciting – but a little scary – world for us. Welcome to MAALS Watches.

 

MAALS Watches - #MAALSWatches

Etched caseback art by The Art of Okse on the steel and black versions of Jump Over The Moon

 

MAALS Watches: the history

 

I, (Andy), started collecting watches when I moved to my own place at 18. New job, new city, new flat, so (of course) new clothes and a new watch or two had to be done. I started off with a Storm Camera which I stumbled across in a trendy charity shop in Worcester where I was living. That first one sparked an interest in Storm watches and their designs. After that I picked up a Storm Navigator and a lovely Storm Bubble, then a couple of Tokyo flash pieces.

The Storm Bubble was swapped for drinks on a special works night out by a friend of mine, whom I’d lent it to – we had some serious words about that one. The rest of my collection was unfortunately stolen – along with the TV, Stereo, photographs, (honestly, why?), and my housemates’ car – when the house I was living in was burgled. I stopped collecting after that for a long while. Partly because there wasn’t anything I really wanted, but mostly because I simply didn’t feel like collecting anymore.

MAALS Watches - #MAALSWatches

Jump Over The Moon black and steel – UK designed, unique moonphase timepieces

 

I started collecting again thanks to my other half who bought me an Armani as a birthday present. My small collection now consists of:

  • Armani
  • Two Skagens
  • Nooka Zub Blue
  • Nooka Zaz with its see-through dial
  • Storm Ovnik Blue
  • A gorgeous brushed rose gold Lasser jump hour, which is about as old as me I think.

My brother Bruno’s love of watches started much longer ago than mine. Old Mr Manny, who lived upstairs from us in the block of flats we lived in when we were both young, used to repair watches and taught him about movements and some basic repair bits for mechanical watches.

 

MAALS Watches - #MAALSWatches

Jump Over The Moon black steel by MAALS

 

MAALS Watches: the watch collectors

 

Time moved on and so did we. Bruno went to Uni in Liverpool in the 1990s where he brought his first watch: an Adidas sports watch, with money from being a lifeguard and working for the university. He had been given several by then but this one was with his own money. That was followed quickly by one of the first Puma watches, which he unfortunately lost. Several digital watches came and went while living and working in Japan, which would have been exceptionally cool if he still had them.

His collection today is very eclectic and goes like this:

  • Adidas sports watch
  • Next Prism
  • 1973 Damas 17 jewels automatic jump hour
  • Swatch London
  • Swatch California
  • Zirro Mercury
  • A Skagen
  • A Mondaine
  • Citizen Eco Drive Stealth
  • Lip Mach 2000 Chronograph
  • Xeric Xeriscope Square
  • A Garmin fitness tracker/sports watch

And

  • 3 Disney watches

I did say it was eclectic…

 

MAALS Watches - #MAALSWatches

Jump Over The Moon black steel with MAALS handmade leather watch pouch

 

MAALS Watches: The brand

 

Coming up with the idea for our watch has been far easier than creating the brand for it, to be honest. At first, we just wanted a cool name, which sounds easy but, frankly, every idea sounded rubbish. Eventually moving away from trying to be cool, we settled on simply making the brand personal. The idea being that the more it means to us, then the more we’ll put into it. It all sounds so obvious now that  I’m sitting here writing it…!

MAALS stands for Mark Anthony Andrew Lee Sealey – the initials from my brother and my name tailed with our family name. Simple and personal.

After that it was just a question of researching the watch market, creating a unique watch design, finding a reputable manufacturing partner, creating business and finance plans and lots more besides…

Still: at least the name is simple.

 

For more information on MAALS watches, visit http://maals.co.uk

Follow MAALS watches on Facebook | Instagram |

Follow MAALS watches co-founder, Andy Sealey, on Twitter

Acufocal: Focus on camera bag brand founder Robert Baggs

Acufocal is a camera bag brand founded by London-based professional photographer and FStoppers.com editor Robert Baggs. Launched after years of exasperation at having to lug around ungainly, unsightly rucksacks, Acufocal released their first design, the Orwell, in Summer 2017. Fashioned from quality, heavy duty black canvas while sporting stylish leather straps and glistening chrome buckles, the Orwell is just as slick and sophisticated as it is rugged and utilitarian.

Modestly priced in the £150 bracket, the Orwell’s stand-out feature is its bipartite design. Splitting the bag into two compartments, separated by a simple zip, means easy access to important gear – imperative for photographers working in testing environments. The fact that it’s beautiful and practical in equal measures is more than just a bonus: it makes it a no-brainer for freelancers for whom image is so important.

 

FAULT: There are a few designers out there trying to offer what Acufocal does. What gives you the edge?

Robert Baggs (Acufocal): What makes us different is the motivation behind the brand: my needs as a professional photographer who enjoys fashion. I don’t need to research what photographers need in this area, I just need to look at what it is I can’t seem to find when buying a camera bag and create it.

 

You’re a photographer yourself, and your website goes into a lot of depth describing your frustrations with having to choose between “function or fashion” in camera bags. Do you think that’s a universal concern among photographers or just for those who work in particularly fashion-conscious environments?

Acufocal: I try to remain as transparent and honest as possible, and the answer to that is: no, it’s not a universal problem. There are, I’m sure, myriad photographers who don’t care how their bag looks and there’s nothing wrong with that. However, I also know there are lots of people like me who would love the functionality and the care for its contents that a good camera bag has, but with a design that looks more like a backpack from a fashion label. This has been confirmed by all the attention the Orwell has garnered and positivity, which has been gratifying. From the start my aim for Acufocal was and is to create products for photographers that don’t compromise fashion or functionality, despite how difficult it might be.

What were your top 3 concerns when developing the Orwell design?

Acufocal: That’s a tough one. Again, in the interest of honesty, the final design was far from the first sample we had made. My number one concern was always “where will I be expected to compromise functionality or style, and how will I get around it?” Second was creating enough space, padding, and pockets to house the plethora of gear us photographers carry, without infringing on the design; that was what changed the most from the first sample to the final product. Thirdly was achieving all my above goals, the highest quality materials I could get my hands on, weather proofing the materials (which takes a week), and heavy-duty zips and clasps, all without causing us to have to put a huge price tag on it.

 

What would you say the “hook” of the design is, functionality wise?

Acufocal: The bag being essentially comprised of two bags with the middle being unzippable to access the bottom section. Rucksacks make for great camera bags because equipment is heavy and it’s the best way to support the weight. However, trying to wade through everything at the top of the bag to get to the stuff at the bottom was so much hassle. To bypass that problem, the Orwell unzips in to halves.

 

Acufocal - FAULT Magazine interview Robert Baggs

 

You worked on the Orwell with the help of a fashion designer, and you’ve admitted that the prototype wasn’t perfect (to be fair, they rarely are!). It sounds like it was a bit of challenge to translate your understanding of how the bag should work into a final product. Did that come as a surprise to you?

Acufocal: Yes and no. I expected there to be problems before I’d received the first sample, but the areas that I wanted changed were not what I expected. The first prototype had a lower grade fabric, rougher cotton inside, cheaper leather, and so on. So, even after we made several changes to the design, I then had to just concede that I couldn’t accept a product that wasn’t the best we could possibly make, and so we upgraded every single element of the bag to the best quality we could get. The difference was utterly staggering and that really did surprise me. They say you get what you pay for and I’ve never seen that truer than in manufacturing.

 

Let’s talk price. For a boutique brand, your prices stack up remarkably well to your more mainstream competition (some of the nattier Nat Geo bags are priced in the region of £200). Is that sustainable for you, or will you be upping your prices for the Orwell or other products in future?

Acufocal: As you can guess from my above answers, money was a real consideration for both us and our customer base. We didn’t and don’t have any investors, it’s just me and my business partner trying to realise my vision for a brand. I have spent twice what our bag costs on an ugly (albeit functional) camera bag and I really wanted to avoid that price tag. The price is sustainable, yes, but it wasn’t set by the business side of my brain, that’s for sure. The price won’t be going up though. I want to see my bags being put to good use and enjoyed, not just something for the elite.

 

Are you planning on developing other products to expand the line?

Acufocal: That’s top of my list. I would like to add more products and more colours of the Orwell, but as I say, this is my passion project and I’m not the front man of a large corporation. As we continue to grow I will put my ideas to our designer and see where we go.

 

What are your plans to grow the business in general? Where does Acufocal go from here?

Acufocal: My end game is to comprehensively fill the void of fashion-conscious bags for photographers. I will continue to weather the headaches in order to never compromise on function or style and it would make me very happy if one day we’re the go-to for photographers who care what they look like when they’re out and about.

 

What has been your proudest moment working on Acufocal so far?

Acufocal: Without question it’s seeing top photographers enjoying the bag. After all the work, time and effort that has gone in to transitioning from a dream of mine, to having the bags on sale, to having a photographer tag me in a picture of his Orwell was so rewarding. One of our customers is a videographer working on the Olympics opening ceremony and for whatever reason, that was particularly pleasing!

~

For more information, please visit:

www.acufocal.com
www.facebook.com/Acufocal
www.instagram.com/acufocallondon

The Best Upcoming Rock Festivals of 2018

Source: Download Festival via Facebook 

The festival season is almost upon us, and the UK is one of the best places to enjoy music from all genres. There are more than twenty music celebrations taking place across the country this year, and among them are some awesome offerings for fans of rock music. Here we take a look at three rock festivals that are not to be missed in 2018.

Download Festival

Did you know that listening to rock music is actually good for your health? In this article by Lottoland, it notes how research discovered that heavy metal fans were happier and less regretful. So, if you want to avoid depression this summer, it might be wise to take a trip to Download Festival, the ultimate heavy metal event in England. It takes place at Donington Park in Leicester, and has been in existence since 2003. It quickly established itself as the most popular British rock festival and has featured world-renowned artists such as Black Sabbath, Iron Maiden, AC/DC, and Thin Lizzy.

This year the Main Stage headliners are Guns N’ Roses, Avenged Sevenfold, and Ozzy Osbourne. Popular acts such as Marilyn Manson, Black Stone Cherry, and Bullet for my Valentine are supporting as well. Famous for its use of facial recognition technology to ensure that criminals from a European database are banned from entry, Download is also one of the safest festivals to go to.   

Isle of Wight Festival

The Isle of Wight festival began as a counterculture event which ran for three years between 1968 and 1970. Acts like Jefferson Airplane, Bob Dylan, and Jimi Hendrix played in those days, helping the festival to go down in history. It returned in 2002 and has occurred every year since then. The major musical event has been a magnet for some of the world’s biggest artists over the years including the Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Amy Winehouse, and Kings of Leon.

This year, the event will run for four days, and there are some seriously impressive names on the bill. These include the Killers, Van Morrison, the Wombats, Kasabian, Liam Gallagher, and Depeche Mode. This award-winning festival is an event that all rock fans should attend at some point in their lives.

TRNSMT Festival

TRNSMT Festival is the youngest event in this list and took place for the first time in 2017. Last year there were appearances from Radiohead, Kasabian, Biffy Clyro, and The View, helping the young festival to get off to a barnstorming start and achieve instant fame. It was named Best New Festival at the UK Festival Awards in London.

The event in Glasgow this year doesn’t include overnight camping, but it does run for five days. Once again, there are some hugely popular artists playing. These include Stereophonics, Liam Gallagher, Arctic Monkeys, and the Killers.

Rock fans in the UK are going to be treated to some exceptional music this summer from a number of world-renowned musicians. Being spoilt for choice, why not choose one you’ve never been to before?

FAULT Issue 28 – the Structural Issue – is now available to order

We are pleased to announce that FAULT Issue 28 – The Structural Issue – is available to order NOW.

FAULT Magazine Issue 28 - Janelle Monáe and Macklemore

FAULT Issue 28 cover star Janelle Monáe was shot by David Yeo and styled by Rachel Holland. Macklemore was shot by Miles Holder and styled by Rachel Gold. Click here to pre-order your copy of this issue!

Official release: 23/04/17

FAULT Magazine – the Structural Issue – proudly presents exclusive shoots and interviews with:

Janelle Monáe (front cover)

Macklemore (reversible cover)

Daniel Bruhl

Tory Lanez

Dylan Sprouse

Tom Walker

Lottie Moss

Rhye

Until the Ribbon Breaks

Isaac Gracie

Ady Sulieman

Plus our usual FAULTless selection of the finest Film, Fashion, Music & Photography, inspired by the aesthetics of structure and the tenets of structuralism as we expand our horizons in 2018

This is your FAULT

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 28 – THE STRUCTURAL ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

Our Lady Underground editorial – Caroline Lawless

Johanna Ortiz (@johannaoritzofficial) silk organza dress with slip (@matchesfashion)
Sole Society (@solesociety) patent leather and lucite heel (@nordstromrack)

 

Johanna Ortiz (@johannaoritzofficial) silk organza dress with slip (@matchesfashion),
Sole Society (@solesociety) patent leather and lucite heel (@nordstromrack)

 

Rejina Pyo ruffled organza blouse (@netaporter)
DKNY (@dkny) pleated vegan leather skirt (stylist’s own)
Rodarte (@rodarte) gold-plated mismatched heart earrings (@matchesfashion)
Forever 21 (@forever21) black sheer socks

 

Sequin Hearts mermaid gown (@nordstrom)
Prada (@prada) metallic brocade crop top (@netaporter)
Jennifer Behr (@jenniferbehr) gold-plated earrings (@netaporter)
Forever 21 (@forever21) black sheer socks
Sam Edelman (@sam_edelman) gold glitter heel (@nordstromrack)

 

Sequin Hearts mermaid gown (@nordstrom)
Prada (@prada) metallic brocade crop top (@netaporter)
Jennifer Behr (@jenniferbehr) gold-plated earrings (@netaporter)
Forever 21 (@forever21) black sheer socks
Sam Edelman (@sam_edelman) gold glitter heel (@nordstromrack)

 

Topshop (@topshop) satin midi dress (@nordstrom)
Elle Macpherson bralette (stylist’s own)
Forever 21 (@forever21) pink tulle skirt
Vintage crinoline (stylist’s own)
Topshop (@topshop) metallic trench coat (@nordstrom)
Forever 21 (@forever21) black sheer socks
Jessica Simpson patent leather and lucite booties (@nordstromrack)

 

Rejina Pyo ruffled organza blouse (@netaporter)
DKNY (@dkny) pleated vegan leather skirt (stylist’s own)
Rodarte (@rodarte) gold-plated mismatched heart earrings (@matchesfashion)
Forever 21 (@forever21) black sheer socks

 

Photographer & MUA: Caroline Lawless www.carolinelawless.com
Model: Rachael Pope with ANTImanagement
Hairstylist: Alli Carter
Stylist: Melissa de Leon

Lottie Moss Style section cover for FAULT Issue 28

Lottie Moss x FAULT Magazine

Lottie Moss FAULT Magazine Issue 28 Style cover

Photography Stephanie Yt
Fashion: Ozzy Shah @carol Hayes Management
Hair: Diego Miranda @bts Talent Using Oribe
Makeup: Emily Dhanjal @bts Talent Using Charlotte Tilbury
Nails: Naima Coleman Using Chanel Ballerina
Fashion Assistant: Keeley Dawson
Words: Adina Ilie
Special Thanks: W Hotel, London

In the era of the social media supermodel, Lottie Moss is carving her own niche. With the mammoth ‘MOSS’ legacy name behind her, Lottie appears utterly unfazed by the pressure that comes with it. Rather than picking up her older sister’s mantle by strutting the catwalks, Lottie revels in the freedom of being a campaign model. To have such a significant social media following at such a young age is nothing new. Indeed, given her background, it’s little wonder that other young and aspiring models see her as source of advice. By contrast, the sense of responsibility she clearly feels for curating her digital platform is refreshing for someone at her stage in life. In striving to speak out for the portrayal of healthy body image online and in the media, not to mention her unflinching honesty and directness in interviews, Lottie epitomises the new breed of young, socially conscious online influencers.

We spoke to Lottie after our Style section cover shoot at Soho’s W Hotel to discuss her plans for taking over the fashion world – one campaign at a time.

FAULT: You decided to pursue modeling in favour of going to university. What led you towards that decision when many of your peers went into a different direction?
Lottie Moss: I never felt like school was for me. Modeling also kind of landed in my lap a little bit, and I’m so happy it happened. It’s not something that happens to everyone, it’s a very rare thing ever. I’m lucky to have the opportunity.

What has been the biggest challenge that you’ve encountered after diving head first into a cut-throat industry?
Lottie Moss: It’s been hard with the media knowing what you do all the time.

Lottie Moss FAULT Magazine Issue 28 Style cover feature

 

What is the main thing that you choose to promote with the help of your platform?
Lottie Moss: I usually use my platform in a body-positive way. I post pictures where you can see lumps and bumps, just to show that nobody’s perfect and that it’s okay if there are parts of yourself that you don’t like. I strongly believe in body-confidence. I do it to show that you can do whatever you want – I’m a model and I’m not even remotely tall enough to be one. You can do whatever you want if you just try hard enough.

There are many young girls who look up to you at this point. How do you take that responsibility and react towards it?
Lottie Moss: I always try to post positive things and I’m very careful with what I post on my social channels, especially when I go on nights out. You have to remember that these girls are young and that they’re watching.

Lottie Moss FAULT Magazine Issue 28 Style cover feature

 

Have you ever tried to educate them in a certain direction?
Lottie Moss: Not intentionally, but I do try my best to give out advice when people ask. Girls always DM me and ask me how to become a model and I reply to them in that sense. I would love to get involved in something bigger though.

Do you have any insecurities from when you were young that you’d like to share with your fans for them to learn and grow from?
Lottie Moss: It has to be my height and weight. When you’re younger, you don’t really put on any weight when you eat, and then I obviously started to gain weight when I got older. Growing up with social media, I used to get quite sad over the girls I saw on Instagram. But I realized that I’m special in my own way and that’s what matters.

Many young models have gone through phases of body dysmorphia and anxiety caused by the industry’s unrealistic standards. Is this something that you’ve experienced at any point? And if so – how did you counteract it?
Lottie Moss: I haven’t actually experienced any anxiety as a model, as I’m usually portraying myself so I wouldn’t know what advice to give in that direction. Everyone gets stressed, but I’m lucky as I rarely do.

Lottie Moss FAULT Magazine Issue 28 Style cover feature

What individual aspects do you want to bring to your work to set yourself apart?
Lottie Moss: There are so many directions that I want to take. I’m currently working on my own label. It’s going to be amazing – very LA vibes.

You’re very good friends with a lot of models in the industry who come from a similar family background rooted in entertainment. Do you ever feel competitive against each other?
Lottie Moss: I’ve never felt like I’ve ever competed with anyone, but I’ve also never felt like I was a proper model. I’ve never done runway shows or anything like that. The girls who do catwalks probably do feel a little bit of competitiveness, but I’ve never had.

Do you think this is a good way to differentiate yourself as a model?
Lottie Moss: I feel like I’m more of an influencer rather than a model. And I try to be a good role model and stay relevant through the content that I create on my platform.

What’s your FAULT?
Lottie Moss: I have literally no self-control. And I’m really messy too, so untidy!

Lottie Moss FAULT Magazine Issue 28 Style cover feature

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 28 – THE STRUCTURAL ISSUE –  IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

 

Isaac Gracie for FAULT Issue 28

Isaac Gracie X FAULT Magazine

Isaac Gracie for FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Photography: Joseph Sinclair
Styling: Gary Salter
Grooming: Charlotte Kraftman
Words: Jack Lloyd

For Isaac Gracie, the last two years have been nothing more than a journey of self-discovery and introspection. It just so happens that along the way, Isaac has caught of the ears of millions of listeners and radio stations worldwide. After selling out many of the UK’s most prestigious venues, Isaac is about to embark on an even bigger journey after the release of his eponymous debut album on 13th April.

Whilst formulating a series of songs with poetic precision and articulated with such devastating beauty, Isaac has pieced together a record that he claims is a physical representation of a heavy and formative time in his life and as a result unveiled to the public the unravelling of a bold new voice.

We sit down with one of Britain’s most sought-after artists.

FAULT: First of all, how are you and how has your year been so far?

Isaac Gracie: It’s been good – I’ve been good. I just came back from Europe where I finished off the record which is coming out next month. It’s all kind of coming together nicely.

Talk to me about that moment you submitted your demo track ‘Last Words’ and how it got picked up by BBC. Where were you when it all started?

Isaac Gracie: I was on my summer holiday between first and second year of university and I was spending most of my time at home or working in a coffee shop. It was there that I started getting a strange amount of interest whilst I was washing dishes and cleaning tables. I was getting emails from record labels which I had never even thought about and all the while trying to fumble together a decent wage at a coffee shop, it was definitely surreal.

I was also in like a strange headspace then as well. It was summer and I was in the middle of university so I was in a lot of places at one time, so the music felt definitely like an abnormal thing to blow up.

Isaac Gracie for FAULT Magazine Issue 28 srcset=

Was music not a priority at that time?

Isaac Gracie: I was just getting on with making a little bit of money so I could have some spending cash at uni, focusing on studying as well and finding a place to live. I had all of these things going on that were completely not related to music – the music was just a personal hobby and a passion – I really had no intention beyond that. It was definitely part of my life – but large notions of success were completely out of the picture.

Is your family musical at all?

Isaac Gracie: No one played necessarily, it wasn’t a run in the family type thing. I was raised on music only in the way that my mum loved music. Bob Dylan was always number one with my mum and when I was growing up, my dad used to play The Bends in the car when we were driving. I can remember going along listening to The Bends when I was like four years old and really digging it.

Where did you record the album?

Isaac Gracie: It was recorded in a few places, we did a big bulk of it at RAK Studios and then we did some at Westpoint Studios in Shepereds Bush and Crouch End. It was recorded over a long period of time in a lot of different set ups so it really does represent the journey of that time. It isn’t just one singular block of experience or creativity but more of an evolution and a reflexion of the changes that happened over that period of time.

Do you find it easier to write a particular song more than others or did you ever struggle at all when writing the album?

Isaac Gracie: I struggle with it all the time. The nature of the songs is kind of like you’re wandering along a beach trying to find a treasure trove and you can walk for hours and not find anything. Obviously, sometimes things are buried closely to the surface and very easy to uncover and other times you really have to dig for them. That’s just kind of how I relate to it, there is no one way or one experience that I have in relation to songwriting.

Are there any songs on the album or on your previous EP’s that have really pushed you out of your comfort zone?

Isaac Gracie: My relationship to songwriting is pretty much on its own terms. I have a diverse and wide appreciation for music and by no means want to restrict myself but it’s purely for the time being based on the situation that I find myself in and in the songs that I still feel I have yet to write. I think right now it’s all based within that frame.

Isaac Gracie for FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Talk to me about being on tour. Do you have any highlights?

Isaac Gracie: I just love being on the road, it’s pretty awesome to turn up in a different city every day and have like a new crowd of generally speaking, really lovely interesting people there to hear you play your songs. I love the opportunity to travel and see new places but also just driving and looking out the window and being with other people.

It’s also in many respects a bit of a vacuum because you don’t necessarily feel responsible for anything other than the tour so you can kind of switch off a little bit.

What would be your dream if you weren’t a musician?

Isaac Gracie: I’d love to be in film. I’m fascinated by movies and how they’re acted, how they’re directed, how they’re written, everything about them. Obviously, right now music is without doubt the focus but If I get to a place where there was any relative level of comfort or sustainability, then anything in that world would be a dream.

Who would you most like to go and have a beer with?

Isaac Gracie: I saw Bon Iver the other day, I actually saw him twice in one week and he’s always been such a mastery of melody. Also, someone like Jonny Greenwood and be able to discuss the stuff that he’s doing at the moment with his film scores.

What’s 2018 looking like for you?

Isaac Gracie: Well I’m going on tour next month and touring the UK and Europe then I’ve got the album coming out next month as well, April 13th. Following that I’ll be playing festivals throughout the summer and then going on another tour in the winter. Being on the road and making the most of every opportunity to introduce my music to people and play to crowds who enjoy it. It’s a cool experience and the build-up to this record has been a long time coming so I just want to make the most of it when it comes out.

Isaac Gracie for FAULT Magazine Issue 28

The eponymous ‘Isaac Gracie’ album was released on the 13th April.

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 28 – THE STRUCTURAL ISSUE – IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

Vance Joy for FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Vance Joy x FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Vance Joy FAULT Magazine Issue 28

Words and Photography: Miles Holder
Fashion: Rachel Gold

Vance Joy first caught our eye back in 2013 with the release of his debut album EP God Loves You When You’re Dancing which featured his runaway hit ‘Riptide’. In February 2018 Vance Joy returned with his second album record Nation of Two which featured hits ‘Saturday Sun’ and ‘I’m With You’. About to embark on his worldwide tour, we caught up with Vance to find out more!

FAULT: You’re about to embark on your Nation Of Two world tour, excited?

Vance Joy: We did a short European tour last month, and it was so much fun to see the fans and reconnect with them in person. It’d been three and a half years since we’d last played in Europe, so it’ll be great to relaunch with the big shows and play some new material. IT should be a lot of fun, and everyone is really excited.

Do you find that your songs suddenly take on new meaning when you get to play them live to your fans?

Vance Joy: I’m always surprised to find that so many people know the lyrics to a bunch of songs and it’s such a warm and enthusiastic vibe when I’m playing, and it’s super encouraging. You don’t know what songs people will know and recently on tour we played some of the deep album tracks, and it was great to see people enjoying them. As we tour, I’m getting more comfortable with the songs and finding new ways to sing them and wear them in a bit. ‘We’re Going Home’, and ‘Saturday Sun’ are tracks in particular which are starting to feel good to perform on stage.

Vance Joy FAULT Magazine Issue 28

 

Is there a date in particular or festival in particular that you’re especially excited for?

Vance Joy: I’m looking forward to going to LA for a rehearsal for a few days, so I’m looking forward to the band and me having a relaxing time out there. We’ll do a couple of shows and then head to Coachella which is a big one that everyone will know. There are also dates in huge venues which will also be a new challenge and experience for us, but it’s exciting to play to bigger rooms and larger audiences. I’m looking forward to seeing how it all goes!

Nation Of Two released a couple of months ago now; do you ever find yourself wanting to make changes or fixes to it or do you feel like the project was exactly what it needed to be at the time and it should remain that way?

Vance Joy: I’m quite relaxed when it comes to that stuff; I think you need a deadline and know when to say goodbye. I feel like when you have a song that you feel strongly about but there’s pushback, and people say, “I don’t think you quite nailed it on this song”, then I listen. I listen to all of those perspectives and then eventually you’ve got to release it and say “that’s it”. I sometimes think instead of looking too closely and getting too stuck on the minutia you can get distracted. Certainly, after two months you might hear it on the radio and say “oh, I’m seeing it differently now” but I think you can get distracted and go off course with perfection and I don’t think there’s such a thing.

Vance Joy FAULT Magazine Issue 28

What is your favourite tour story?

Vance Joy: I was fortunate and got to play the AFL Grand Final, and I was playing with another band called Living Head, and the main headliner was Sting. After we played, we were chilling out in the green room, and I felt someone hug me from behind, and I turned around, and it was Sting! It was surreal, I just shook his hand and said: “lovely to meet you!”

What is your writing discipline, do you sit down at a writing station and try to get through it or do you just let them come to you naturally?

Vance Joy: I think there’s a bit of both and always a push and pull. If you haven’t written a song in a while, you can get frustrated. Sometimes you just have to pick up your guitar, and a song comes, and other days it feels like you’re trying to force it out. I think ultimately the excellent stuff songs happen mysteriously and catch you off guard. Some days you can write and take the chance that magic will happen again but sometimes you have to approach it with a bit more discipline. The best stuff happens when you’re not trying to force it too much.

What is your FAULT?

Vance Joy: I can be impatient, and when I’m in a bad mood, the atmosphere can be quiet and cold. I might not say anything, but people can tell! I’m learning to try and remove myself at times when I’m annoyed (or hungry) but it doesn’t happen too often, but I’m trying to notice when it does.

Vance Joy FAULT Magazine Issue 28

 

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