Gabriel Kane Day Lewis Photoshoot and Interview with FAULT Magazine Preview

 

 

 

 

Art Direction & Photography: Leonardo De Angelis & Eric Francis Silverberg 

Stylist: Marc Anthony George 

Groomer: Roberto Morelli

Stylist Assistant: Evan Grotevant

Location SplashLight Studios NYC

 

 

Words: Carolyn Okomo

 

While music appears to be the emerging pop crooner’s chosen love, the Day Lewis hasn’t cast off the idea of trading a microphone for a script, though he admits he still has much to learn about the artform.

 

“I have, and I do want to act. It just has to be right. The right director, the right cast, the right screenplay.  I want to be in something noteworthy” he says. “But before I just throw myself into acting I want to take classes and learn. I feel it’s important for all artists to go through a certain learning process, regardless of talent.”

 

Day Lewis recently spoke with FAULT about his influences, regret, bullies, and forging his own unique brand of celebrity.

 

How did you discover your passion for music?

 

I wouldn’t say that I discovered music. It was a gradual thing, and it’s definitely been ingrained in me for as far back as I can remember. I’ve just always loved everything about music, and as I got older I started showing a pretty natural interest in the hands on aspect of music, and picked up the piano and guitar.

 

The first song I wrote was for my babysitter Kelly. I was five,  I think. The song was called “Pretty”, and it was basically me singing the word “pretty” over and over again to the tune of “Twinkle twinkle little star”. Wrote my first “original” song when I was eleven or twelve. I’ve been writing songs since.

 

 

Who are some artist you’d like to work with?

 

It’s hard to pinpoint, the youth is crushing pop at the moment. So many new faces, and insane amounts of talent. Everyone’s doing their thing and it’s really cool. I’d like to work with James Bay, his vibe is really what I’m about at the moment. Ed Sheeran would obviously be a dream collaboration. He just writes the most incredible songs.

 

You’ve written off your hip hop-influenced video, ‘Green Aura,’ as a misrepresentation of you as an artist. Do you feel the same way about it? How do you think you’ve grown, and what do you feel you’ve learned, since making that video — good and bad?

 

Green Auras. I used to always avoid questions about the viral music video I made when I was eighteen because it was still somewhat of a fresh wound, if you will. But now that I’ve been able to distance myself and completely come to terms with all the shade the internet threw at me back then, and look on it with some perspective from life experiences I’ve had since then.

 

I don’t really have anything I regret. If anything it was a valuable lesson and I learned it early on. The internet us a playground for bullies. In the track for that video, I made my biggest mistake by opening up about some real personal issues I hadn’t addressed back then, and people were just flat out mean about it. I was young and didn’t think the video would ever get the attention it did. I don’t care anymore, it blew over and it’s in the past now.

 

 

How did growing up in NYC influence you as an artist?

 

NYC has been just as good for my creativity, as its been stifling. What I love about the city is it’s constant flow of energy, the diversity. There’s always something to do and people to meet.  It feels so familiar to me. There’s something about the city that makes me feel on top of the world. That feeling of being unstoppable with infinite possibilities. It becomes energy that can be processed creatively. But I had to take a break from New York, it was wearing me out. I’ll be back soon.

 

What is your FAULT?

 

Hopeless romance.

 

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