SYLVIAN HYDE : NYFW INTERVIEW

 

Sylvian Hyde is the newly favorable and elevated neoclassical menswear brand to crave and desire. Birthed just last year of October 2017, Belize born Sylvian Hyde has introduced a new conversation to menswear titled with unswerving fearless confidence. A striking debut in summer’s heat, making everyone melt at every thread, much is to be expected from this evolving brand. An exuberant color palette seasoned with spark and spice and just to our explorative delights. We caught up for a little bit of chatter to learn some more about this engaging enterprise. 

FAULT: Who is Sylvian Hyde? As you are a very young brand, born just last year yes? How did it come about?

Sylvian Hyde: So yeah, I’m Sylvian Hyde, 25 years old, originally from Belize, migrated to the states in 2014. Yes, so I’ve lived there the majority of my life but I relocated here in December 2014 for political asylum. Um yea, so the brand started, like you said, last year in October. Really I just had a bunch of sketches and I always said one day I want to have my own line and then being friends with Jabari; I knew his interest in fashion, the administrative business side, and he had also interned for fashion week twice; so he shared stories with me. So one day we’re like let’s just stop talking about it – he has the business side, I have the design side, so we just started and once the ball started to roll and we saw our samples being made, and were like “Woah this really is a reality” and then every day it just got more serious and more serious till where we are today. 

How long have you been sketching? When did it start?

Sylvian Hyde: I’ve been drawing from when I was a kid. It’s like architecture, automotive design, it’s fashion. It wasn’t until I came to the states, that I really chose fashion. I really thought, growing up I would have done architecture, because where I was in Belize, a career in fashion or starting your own brand there, it’s like, “Ya you can do it but you’re not going to have the success rate to make a living off of it.” So it wasn’t until I got here I was like, “Wow, I’m living here in New York City, the fashion capital of the world. It’s possible.”

Where does your name come from? It’s so interesting and regal. Is there a backstory to it?

Sylvian Hyde: It’s the name my mom had. Interesting back story, so I changed my first name recently to Sylvian. My first name originally is Terrell which is the name my dad gave me from his best friend, and I changed it because I – it’s a whole long back story into my family background, but when I relocated here, starting over, a fresh start, I decided to take the name my mom wanted for me. I was the first child for both parents, so normally the guy gets to name his son. 

What would you say are your greatest influences for your designs and your day to day? Does Belize have an influence?

Sylvian Hyde: I feel the biggest influence coming from Belize is the depravation – the lack of opportunity. Now that I have the opportunity, it makes me want to work harder and appreciate the opportunity. In terms of influences for me my biggest is when I watch the red carpet events. When I see these distinguished men, looking like the help, I just wish men would make more fashion statements. That is my angle to make great fashion statements with men on the red carpet. Starting where I am at now, it’s to try to have guys evolve their style on a day to day basis. 

What sets Sylvian Hyde apart from other menswear designers?

Sylvian Hyde: I definitely say more use of untraditional menswear fabrics, and just doing things out of the box. For example, recently we just did some tailored suits out of athletic mesh. From the onset of designing I just really try to put my mind into the mind-frame to try to do something original. So I don’t pay attention to trends. I just do what I feel comes to me natural and is original. 

Does Sylvian Hyde function as a unisex brand?

Sylvian Hyde: When we started we didn’t think of ourselves or aspire to be a unisex brand, but however the women who have attended our shows and have seen our clothes have expressed interest and said, “Oh I would wear that.” So that definitely opened up our eyes to that possibility and it’s one that we are happy to entertain and foster. 

When and will you start thinking about venturing into a womenswear or swimwear brand?

Sylvian Hyde: I’d like to have my first womenswear collection by 2020. That’s kind of the goal. 

Aside from womenswear and considering how far and fast you have come, what other directions do you see the brand going? What else would you like to branch into with Sylvian Hyde?

Sylvian Hyde: 10 years plus I really see us becoming a real lifestyle brand. As I said I have interest in architecture, all different facets of design. I mean going way farther than interior design I mean actual architecture itself. Having a real designer home. With just details, details, details. If I could collaborate with an automator that way Victoria Beckham did with Landrover; she designed the interior for the Land Rover Range Rover Evoque. That type of stuff I would love to see the brand to do in the future. 

In another year, where are you looking to be, considering how fast you have moved in less than one year?

Sylvian Hyde: I think headed in the direction where I hope for it to go, which is guys just being a little more free and expressive with their style and not as limiting. For me I hope my influence is – I admire that the industry allows women to have clothing that flatters their body. I want guys to be able to have that same opportunity without it having any type of labels or stereotype. I’d like to see menswear make that jump. And society also to make that jump. 

If you could live in any other time, period and place, where would that be and why?

Sylvian Hyde: I would like to live in the future. Because hopefully in the future, I would be that much closer to realizing my vision and just enjoying the progression of society. 

What is your FAULT?

Sylvian Hyde: My fault is I could learn to be a little more patient. To just trust the process of things. But I also feel, let me try to clarify…I feel that with my impatience, I don’t like hearing no and I don’t like limitations and I see how that has helped us to achieve so much in such a short space of time. But I need to work on knowing and identifying, the little things that you  know, some things you are supposed to put some brakes on or just let it go. I guess choose battles better I guess. Choose projects better I guess and just let it get wrought out. 

Words + Interview: Chaunielle Brown | Images: Jennifer Laurantius 

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