Lottie Moss Style section cover for FAULT Issue 28

Lottie Moss x FAULT Magazine

Lottie Moss FAULT Magazine Issue 28 Style cover

Photography Stephanie Yt
Fashion: Ozzy Shah @carol Hayes Management
Hair: Diego Miranda @bts Talent Using Oribe
Makeup: Emily Dhanjal @bts Talent Using Charlotte Tilbury
Nails: Naima Coleman Using Chanel Ballerina
Fashion Assistant: Keeley Dawson
Words: Adina Ilie
Special Thanks: W Hotel, London

In the era of the social media supermodel, Lottie Moss is carving her own niche. With the mammoth ‘MOSS’ legacy name behind her, Lottie appears utterly unfazed by the pressure that comes with it. Rather than picking up her older sister’s mantle by strutting the catwalks, Lottie revels in the freedom of being a campaign model. To have such a significant social media following at such a young age is nothing new. Indeed, given her background, it’s little wonder that other young and aspiring models see her as source of advice. By contrast, the sense of responsibility she clearly feels for curating her digital platform is refreshing for someone at her stage in life. In striving to speak out for the portrayal of healthy body image online and in the media, not to mention her unflinching honesty and directness in interviews, Lottie epitomises the new breed of young, socially conscious online influencers.

We spoke to Lottie after our Style section cover shoot at Soho’s W Hotel to discuss her plans for taking over the fashion world – one campaign at a time.

FAULT: You decided to pursue modeling in favour of going to university. What led you towards that decision when many of your peers went into a different direction?
Lottie Moss: I never felt like school was for me. Modeling also kind of landed in my lap a little bit, and I’m so happy it happened. It’s not something that happens to everyone, it’s a very rare thing ever. I’m lucky to have the opportunity.

What has been the biggest challenge that you’ve encountered after diving head first into a cut-throat industry?
Lottie Moss: It’s been hard with the media knowing what you do all the time.

Lottie Moss FAULT Magazine Issue 28 Style cover feature

 

What is the main thing that you choose to promote with the help of your platform?
Lottie Moss: I usually use my platform in a body-positive way. I post pictures where you can see lumps and bumps, just to show that nobody’s perfect and that it’s okay if there are parts of yourself that you don’t like. I strongly believe in body-confidence. I do it to show that you can do whatever you want – I’m a model and I’m not even remotely tall enough to be one. You can do whatever you want if you just try hard enough.

There are many young girls who look up to you at this point. How do you take that responsibility and react towards it?
Lottie Moss: I always try to post positive things and I’m very careful with what I post on my social channels, especially when I go on nights out. You have to remember that these girls are young and that they’re watching.

Lottie Moss FAULT Magazine Issue 28 Style cover feature

 

Have you ever tried to educate them in a certain direction?
Lottie Moss: Not intentionally, but I do try my best to give out advice when people ask. Girls always DM me and ask me how to become a model and I reply to them in that sense. I would love to get involved in something bigger though.

Do you have any insecurities from when you were young that you’d like to share with your fans for them to learn and grow from?
Lottie Moss: It has to be my height and weight. When you’re younger, you don’t really put on any weight when you eat, and then I obviously started to gain weight when I got older. Growing up with social media, I used to get quite sad over the girls I saw on Instagram. But I realized that I’m special in my own way and that’s what matters.

Many young models have gone through phases of body dysmorphia and anxiety caused by the industry’s unrealistic standards. Is this something that you’ve experienced at any point? And if so – how did you counteract it?
Lottie Moss: I haven’t actually experienced any anxiety as a model, as I’m usually portraying myself so I wouldn’t know what advice to give in that direction. Everyone gets stressed, but I’m lucky as I rarely do.

Lottie Moss FAULT Magazine Issue 28 Style cover feature

What individual aspects do you want to bring to your work to set yourself apart?
Lottie Moss: There are so many directions that I want to take. I’m currently working on my own label. It’s going to be amazing – very LA vibes.

You’re very good friends with a lot of models in the industry who come from a similar family background rooted in entertainment. Do you ever feel competitive against each other?
Lottie Moss: I’ve never felt like I’ve ever competed with anyone, but I’ve also never felt like I was a proper model. I’ve never done runway shows or anything like that. The girls who do catwalks probably do feel a little bit of competitiveness, but I’ve never had.

Do you think this is a good way to differentiate yourself as a model?
Lottie Moss: I feel like I’m more of an influencer rather than a model. And I try to be a good role model and stay relevant through the content that I create on my platform.

What’s your FAULT?
Lottie Moss: I have literally no self-control. And I’m really messy too, so untidy!

Lottie Moss FAULT Magazine Issue 28 Style cover feature

 

FAULT MAGAZINE ISSUE 28 – THE STRUCTURAL ISSUE –  IS AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW

 *FAULT MAGAZINE IS AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY WORLDWIDE*

…Or get your copy digitally via Zinio! 1 year’s subscription = just £14.40

 

Facebook Comments

Speak Your Mind

*