Kojey Radical Speaks to FAULT about ‘In Gods Body’

At just 24 years-old, Kojey Radical is a trailblazer with a strong sense of artistic and personal vision. Nominated for two MOBO awards last year, the London-based poet, musician and mixed media visual artist is mostly known for his unique hybrid of spoken word and rap. But he’s so much more than his music; Kojey’s also the founder of creative collective PUSHCRAYONS and the art director of menswear brand Chelsea Bravo. More recently, he’s joined VOXI by Vodafone as a curator. VOXI is a new mobile service by Vodafone created for and by young people, enabling them to use their phone in the way they want and need. The VOXI SIM lets you use social & chat apps, as much as you like. And it doesn’t affect your data allowance. With as much calling and texting as you want, the freedom to roam in Europe as you do at home, and no contract, VOXI is accessible, flexible and completely transparent. 

We caught up with Kojey to talk about his latest project, ‘In Gods Body, being a curator for VOXI and reflecting one’s authentic self online.

You got into music through your love of painting and poetry, but it’s become your career focus. Do you ever wish you had pursued one of the others instead? Or do you intend to integrate your passions into a project at some point?

I feel like art has always been one entity for me. Everything that I’ve learned over the years has been a different medium to help me create. Me doing music was more from an art focus than a music career focus. It was a means to express myself. I’ve never necessarily switched off from the other mediums. I think eventually, as I have more successes with music, I definitely wanna to turn my hand to creating other experiences to help other generations.

You dropped your latest album, ‘In Gods Body’ two months ago. How has the reception been?

Crazier than I expected because I never intended it to be an album, I think people heard it and appreciated it so much that for them it’s an album. For me, it’s a living and growing project. I don’t think it’s really begun to take shape yet, I think people are still digesting the music. It’s been beautiful to see how much people have connected with it and how much they love it. I think at the moment I’m just in a period of being grateful. There’s definitely more to come.

Which is your favourite track from the album and what does it represent to you?

It changes every week but my favourite two at the moment are ‘Mood’ and ‘Icarus’. ‘Mood’ because it represents so much for me in terms of my creative team coming together to pull off things I never thought were possible. The space that I was in when I wrote it was genuine, so I think it’s one of my most honest pieces. ‘Icarus’ because of the stories I’ve heard in response to people listening to it. Things like that make all the difference when you’re a creator.

You were on tour for the best part of this year. Now that it’s over, do you miss life on the road?

I’m back on the road again soon. I’m going to Amsterdam, Berlin, Brazil, and South Africa. It’s been a wild experience this whole year, to be honest.

You’re currently working with VOXI by Vodafone as a curator. What does this role involve?

As a creator, I’m working with a team of young people, which is the most exciting part of this whole experience; being able to sit down and talk with new creators and find out what’s happening. Everyone’s under 25 which is completely rare for a big project like this. I think what Vodafone have created with VOXI is completely unique and I’m just there to help!

How do you hope to inspire other young people?

I just wanna be able to offer a perspective of reality. When I was growing up and trying to get into the creative field, you’re given so much overly optimistic advice, rather than actually being given key pieces of information that you can take away and learn from. I just wanna be honest with them, find out what they wanna do and help them find the best way to achieve it.

What advice would you give to your younger self?

I would say, if the milk looks off, don’t drink it. I would say, you don’t look good in turquoise, and I would also say, stay focused; remember that not every no means the door is closed but more that you have to find a new way in. I think if you have that approach to life, nothing can really defeat you.

You’re pretty active on social media and have amassed quite a loyal following. With social media being one of the main perception builders about the character of others, how do you ensure that your profile represents the artist you want to be?

The internet makes it very easy to fabricate who you are. We’re in a day and age where you can brand being yourself and monetise that. It’s a great tool to be able to kickstart your earliest ideas. Social media allowed me to do so when I first started writing poetry on the internet. I wasn’t sure how that would create links to other things but slowly and surely it did. It wasn’t about the views, it was about getting something out into the world so people could appreciate it. I think that’s one of the best things about social media and how we can use it. I don’t think you can try to be authentic, I think you wake up and you’re authentic.

What is your FAULT?

I don’t get excited by things, I’m constantly in a state of acceptance and sometimes that’s a good thing and sometimes that’s a bad thing. You wanna make sure you’re doing good for everyone when you’re on stage, you’re saying the right things and people are enjoying the music.

Words: Aimee Phillips

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