Bear’s Den and Banfi – Live at the Apollo

Banfi

London-based Banfi approach the stage at the Apollo in a quietly confident manner, one that has perhaps been crafted over their stretched out tour with Bears Den and immediately captures the crowd’s attention with their subtle and yet rich pop rock sound that exceeds far beyond a traditional three-piece band.

Tracks such as Where We Part and Happy When You Go are certified crowd-pleasers with tranquil melodies that guarantee to hook audiences in and leave a lasting impression long after they’ve gone. Songs such as Future however, exhibit the bands ability to comfortably switch between radio-friendly ditties to emotional sucker punches that crescendo into beautiful harmonies that soar above and solidify their rightful place alongside Bear’s Den.

Ending the set with their latest offering Rosedale House, arguably their strongest and most refined track, proves that Banfi are one to look out for this year as they quietly make waves within the festival circuit and destined to do great things.

Bear’s Den

We’re so often reminded of the afflicting terrors surrounding us, which is why tonight, live at the Apollo, indie folk duo Bear’s Den ninety minute offering was a welcome calm amongst chaos embraced by its devoted audience. Crowds were encapsulated by the electric blue and red neon display that accompanied the bands ethereal openers The Red Earth and Pouring Rain and Emeralds, shimmering high across the stage and exhibiting the beautiful intricacies of the bands sophomore album.

Though the evening grew cold outside, familiar tracks such as Elysium, Stubborn Beast and Above The Clouds of Pompeii sparked a radiant fire within the Apollo that resonated far beyond the farthest corners of the room and new offerings such as Berlin plucked at heartstrings as eloquently as the instruments being performed. The band addressed their lack of acknowledgement as a sheer moment of awe and gratitude towards their audience, only to be reciprocated by an extensive round of applause.

As the band huddle round a single microphone, Andrew Davie quietly commands his listeners daring them to draw breath as the poignant sounds of Bad Blood stifle what was seconds ago an incandescent performance and bring it down to a single flicker that could extinguish at the sound of a single whisper. Quiet admiration however can only go so far and no sooner does the last note fall to the floor, the room catches ablaze with over a thousand cheers sparking embers that ignite to the awaited sounds of Agape, the grand and harmonious finale that rises beyond the flames and fills audiences with the warm glow of reassurance that all is not lost.

 

Words: Jack Lloyd

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